The PCOS Revolution Podcast - Farrar Duro EPISODE 8
What Your Cycle Says About Your Health With Lisa Hendrickson-Jack
00:00:00 00:30:10

What Your Cycle Says About Your Health With Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

Welcome to Episode 8 of Season 7 of The PCOS Revolution Podcast:

What Your Cycle Says About Your Health With Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

Your cycle isn’t just about having babies, it’s so much more than that. It can be a key indicator of your overall health.

This week on PCOS Revolution Podcast, I am having a conversation with Lisa Hendrickson-Jack. She is a Certified Fertility Awareness Educator and Holistic Reproductive Health Practitioner. She teaches women to monitor their periods for natural birth control, conception and overall help. Lisa is also an author and podcast host.

Most women find fertility awareness for a specific purpose. Although, many start to realize how the cycle relates to overall health. The first day of your menstrual cycle is the first day of your period, but isn’t just your period.

Not only does your menstrual cycle help detect pregnancy, it is also a sign of health. There are ways to improve your health without drugs. We will talk more about this in this episode. We’ll also talk about how to look at your period like a vital sign and pay attention to cycle fluctuations and irregularities.

Learn more about Lisa, how she helps various women, a great deal of information about your cycle and overall health as well as so much more on this episode of the PCOS Revolution Podcast.

READ the entire transcript here:

Read Full Transcript

Farrar Duro

Hello everyone. Welcome back to the PCOS Revolution podcast. I’m honored today to have Lisa Hendrickson-Jack here, who’s a certified fertility awareness educator, and holistic reproductive health practitioner, for those of you who don’t know her, and she teaches women to chart their menstrual cycles for natural birth control, conception and monitoring overall health. In her new book The fifth vital sign, Lisa debunks the myth that regular ovulation is only important when you want children by recognizing the menstrual cycle is a vital sign. Drawing heavily from the current scientific literature, Lisa presents an evidence based approach to fertility awareness, and menstrual cycle optimization. And she hosts one of my favorite podcasts, The fertility Friday podcast, it’s a weekly radio show devoted to helping women connect to their fifth vital sign by uncovering the connection between the menstrual cycle, fertility, and overall health. So welcome, Lisa, it’s so great to have you on.

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

Thank you so much for having me, I’m excited to be here.

Farrar Duro

And I think today is going to be a little different, because a lot of times we talk about how, you know, to conceive and those sort of things. But we get a lot of questions in our clinic on how to prevent pregnancy if you’re not wanting to be on birth control. And you’re wanting to kind of do more natural methods. So, we’re going to get into a little bit of the details about that and how kind of tuning into your body is going to be very helpful in understanding the right times, even if you have an irregular cycle, or if it’s kind of all over the map, how to look at your period as a vital sign and also some assistance with doing natural family planning and that sort of thing. So I’m excited to get into this. So tell us a little bit about what made you really want to focus so much on the cycle and women’s health?

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

Well, in my case, I discovered fertility awareness, pretty young. So I was about 18, or 19, right out of high school, and I was on the pill for heavy painful periods throughout high school. So I wasn’t using it for birth control. And it helped in you know, by masking the symptoms. So my periods were like I was able to manage my air quote, periods. But every time I would go off of it just to see if it actually had done anything, my real periods would always be the same or worse than they were before. So when I actually needed birth control, I was already skeptical of the pill because in general, because I knew it wasn’t actually helping whatever was wrong with me, it was just making it seem better while I was on it. And also because I wasn’t using it for birth control, I wasn’t taking it at the right time and I wasn’t, I just didn’t want to be scared all the time. Because I thought, okay, my goodness, if I like take it an hour late or something, I’m always going to be really stressed because that’s just my personality. And so it’s right around that time that I discovered fertility awareness. And it was one of those things where, like many women who discover it, I was sitting there in a talk and woman was describing how you can tell when you’re fertile by your cervical mucus observations and the cervical position changes. And it was only at that point that I realized, wow, we’re not fertile every single day of the cycle, there’s only a short window of fertility, you can figure out what you know when that is and then you can use that to determine like, you know, choose how you’re going to address it. So if you’re trying to avoid pregnancy, you can just avoid pregnancy during that short window manage your fertility in other ways, and then the rest of the cycle you can’t get pregnant. So for me, the reason that I focused on this field is because I mean, that was life changing for me. And I was even to this day, I’m just, most women have no idea how their fertility works, most women are still under the impression that you can get pregnant any day of the cycle and that assumption leads us to make choices if you believe that you’re fertile every single day of the year, all the time, 24 hours a day, that it may said a lot easier to choose a birth control method that is giving you protection 24 hours a day, seven days a week. And then the other thing was that early on in my journey, I discovered that your cycle isn’t just about having babies. Because when I was first charting, my cycles were actually quite long. On average, they were like 38-40 something days, and my temperatures were really low. And so because of what was showing up on my charts, my charting instructor kind of she kind of looked at me and was like, Lisa, your temperatures are too low, your cycles are too long, I think you should get tested for thyroid. And so in my very early 20s, I was actually diagnosed with like a really subclinical thyroid issue like so before it had caused any problems, it was detected just because of these subtle things that were showing up on my chart. So early on for me, it was more than just birth control, I really learned that there’s a connection between your cycle and your overall health in a personal way, before I started working with clients.

Farrar Duro

Very cool, it’s something that we don’t think about a lot. But I really think that the looking at the thyroid, you can, you know, you can tell a lot by your body temperatures. And maybe you know, that was the first time that that kind of even came up, like no one had ever really checked your blood work or anything like that. But you saw it in your temperatures. That’s very cool. So, as far as you know, your background working with other women with their cycles, what Tell me how you do that?

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

Well, so over the years, I’ve taught women how to chart their cycles. And so when I’m working with clients, there’s always a piece of it where it’s very practical. So we’re learning about the hormone cycle, the menstrual cycle, the three main fertile signs: your cervical fluid, your basal body temperature, and your cervical position. And so some women are wanting to use this as their primary birth control method. So then we really dive in, learn all the rules, and all the specific things that you need to know if you want to use it, fertility awareness as a birth control method. And then obviously, some women are trying to conceive. So it really helps us to time it so that we understand exactly when is the best time of the cycle to have sex. But there’s this other component. So it’s kind of like the iceberg analogy, where a lot of women find fertility awareness for a purpose, that’s very practical, we’re going to use it for this purpose. But then you start to realize the connection between your cycles and your overall health. And so when you start charting, you can quickly see the difference between what a healthy cycle should look like and where your cycle falls. And for many women, this is an opportunity for them to do things to improve their hormonal balance, to improve their hormonal health, to regulate their cycles, in a natural way, without hormones and things like that. So it, you typically start for one reason, and then it becomes much more, and it also. So that’s a big part of what I do, it’s to support women to optimize their fertility to really improve their cycles because there’s a lot that you can do naturally, to help your hormones get to that optimal level.

Farrar Duro

And I think with PCOS, there’s just so many myths about, you know, well, I have to ovulate on day 14, and it’s just not true. And I think, you know, with my kids, it was day 25 I think when I emulated I don’t know, they were they turned out, okay, so, you know, it’s like, I don’t think that we have to have this, you know, thing in our head where we have to have perfect 28 day cycles, and rarely do people. I mean, we do see that. But you know, it’s not it’s not the rule. So, can you talk a little bit about why it’s important to get to know your body more and get to know your cycle rhythm and that sort of thing, beyond just, you know, trying to get pregnant?

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

Well, I mean, absolutely, I kind of feel like this would also be a good opportunity to smash some of the myths. One of the most common myths, as you mentioned about the menstrual cycle is that in order for it to be normal, it does have to be 28 days, or that all women have 28 day cycles with ovulation on day 14. And when you look at women with healthy cycles, so typical average woman whose cycles are fairly healthy, the the normal length can range. So 20, even when you look at studies that have measured, you know, hundreds or thousands of women’s menstrual cycles, 28 or 29 days represents the average. And healthy cycle can range anywhere from about 24 days, to about 35 days. So one of the most common symptoms and signs of PCOS are the way that PCOS shows up on the menstrual cycle chart is long, irregular cycles. So cycles that are kind of regularly 35 days or more. Or you know, in a year, you’re having fewer than eight or nine periods, those types of things are really characteristic of PCOS. And in a cycle like that, it’s really helpful to understand just generally how the cycle works. So, when we talk about the menstrual cycle, a lot of women that comes you know, talk about the period, but the first day of your menstrual cycle is the first day of your period. And so in a, you know, the way that the cycle works is you have your period, a healthy period would be anywhere from about three to seven days. And then once your period is done, you have a few days before you typically start to see cervical fluid. So, for any woman who’s listening, who’s ever seen her cervical fluid, it can look like creamy white hand lotion, it can look like clear, stretchy kind of raw egg whites.

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

And it can also for some women, they don’t see a lot of the clear stretchy egg white, but they’ll feel a sensation of lubrication, so they’ll be wiping themselves. And it’ll feel really slippery. So either of those three options for cervical fluid, but you’ll have a few days after your period, typically before you start to see it and then at some point, you’ll start to see your cervical fluid in a healthy cycle, you would expect to have anywhere from two to seven days of that, and then you would be late. And then after ovulation your period would come in about 12 to 14 days. So any woman who is cycling normally with PCOS will recognize that that may not be how it looks. So in a PCOS cycle, there’s a few things that you might see. So one of them would be multiple patches of cervical fluid or lots and lots of days of cervical fluid. Because when you have a long cycle, what’s happening is that ovulation is delayed. So the first half of the cycle, like the pre ovulatory phase, is the most variable phase of the cycle, it’s the most susceptible to stress. And to some of the issues that arise in women with PCOS. So many women who struggle with PCOS, some of the characteristics are inflammation in the body for different, you know, various reasons, as well as insulin resistance, glucose intolerance.

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

And so there’s a variety of things specific to women with PCOS, that are basically causing, you know, lack of a better word, a state of stress in the body, and that negatively impacts ovulation. So when you kind of understand that, then it kind of makes the PCOS cycle make a little bit more sense, like it’s still super annoying and frustrating, especially when you’re waiting for ovulation to happen. But to understand that, it means when you have a longer cycle, when you’re going longer time between periods, it’s a delayed ovulation that you’re experiencing. So then it’s really common to see multiple patches of cervical fluid. So, for women who are actually tracking, for women who are trying to get pregnant, they might be looking for their cervical fluid, and they might see it, and then think, okay, I’m going to ovulate, but then they might, you know, it stops and then they see it again. So sometimes it can take a couple tries, essentially for ovulation to actually happen. And so that’s just a little bit of background, because we have this idea that the cycle has to be 28 days to be normal. There is a range of what’s normal. When the cycle does go regularly, beyond 35 days, that is a sign of issue, which we’ll talk about more. But hopefully that’s helpful, at least to paint a picture of what is going on in the cycle when you have PCOS.

Farrar Duro

Yeah, definitely. Yeah. And it can be frustrating, like you mentioned, and for those are listeners who are not familiar with how to chart a cycle, when we talk about, you know, starting on day, one of the first day of full flow and that sort of thing. Do you recommend that paper charts so or apps that are out there, or any any particular apps that you recommend?

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

I mean, I think that every woman has a preference. So for me, I mean, I started charging, like 20 years ago, there were no apps, there were none, there was none of this cool technology. So the majority of my clients use charting apps and so there’s a lot now. I would say what to look for in an app, from my perspective. And I would say, especially if you have PCOS and your cycles have not been regular, is you want to look for an app, if you’re using apps that allows you to turn off the predictive settings. So a lot of the apps on the market are programmed with algorithms or calculators. And so what it’ll do is like you chart a couple of cycles, and it’ll calculate the average. And then it’s going to tell you about when your you know, going to ovulate, and all that kind of stuff. But the challenge as anyone who has kind of irregular cycles knows is that ovulation can vary from cycle to cycle and it does. Even in a woman without PCOS, has, you know, quite regular cycles, her ovulation is not going to fall on the same day, every single cycle. You can have a 28 day cycle and ovulate on day 14 or you can ovulate on the 16th. Yeah, because it changes and no guarantees that even if you typically do ovulate around a certain day that the following cycle, you will. So that would be you know, my recommendation, like, try to get an app that doesn’t fill that stuff in for you so that you can start to appreciate that for yourself. And then for the for those women who do like paper charting, because when I started all these years working with clients, I kind of thought, Okay, well apps are here, so no one’s gonna want to try them paper anymore. But there’s always a percentage of my clients who like paper. So I just came out with a paper charting book as well, which is kind of fun.

Farrar Duro

I like the paper. I’m old school.

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

It’s nice to have a record. But again, kind of I don’t recommend any particular it’s kind of whichever one is best for you.

Farrar Duro

And I have a funny story about the paper charting it was many years ago, and I, you know, I had actually have a book that I give our patients about charting, that I wrote, just to kind of as a collection of notes and questions that I’ve gotten throughout the years and all that. And so you know, I have the story in the book that I have. But it basically, there was a patient that you know, was coming in for PCOS to try to get pregnant and I had given her the paper chart. And I said we’re going to just you know, each chart went to 40 days. So it was, you know, an extended chart. And so she had two charts. And she came into the office and she was furious. And she said, I thought this treatment was supposed to help, these acupuncture treatments, suppose to help my cycles become shorter, and they’re becoming much longer. And I said let me just see, because she had been out of town for a while I hadn’t seen her. And I said okay, that little dip means you ovulated. Let’s count how many days you know that it spiked after that dip. That means you’re in your luteal phase. So we started counting and counting. And I said, okay, it’s been 25 days. Have you taken a pregnancy test? And so she took a pregnancy test in the office, she was pregnant, you know? And she goes, Oh, I’m sorry. And it was so funny. I said everybody in the waiting room was looking at me like, what did you do to this lady, you know, but but had she you know, had she actually not been charting, she just would have thought she was used to having 60 to 70 day cycles. So, and after that she concieved four more kids naturally. So using charting, and I think charting is just a way to really making very clear that yes, you ovulated. And if you did not ovulate, there’s a great, you know, a great opportunity to kind of, you know, say okay, let’s, you know, seek treatment now, to help with this, instead of just continuing to chart and getting that flatline day after day. And that can be frustrating, too. So I wonder how many months do you recommend someone do charting? If it is sort of stressful for them? Or they’re they’re getting a little frustrated?

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

Well, I mean, that’s a great question. Charting in and of itself, is just monitoring what’s happening, right. So, for instance, if you are working with a woman who is struggling with long irregular cycles, charting by itself, just watching, it doesn’t address any of those challenges, right? So, but charting does give you a really unique opportunity to, so there’s a few very practical things. So one, it’s kind of what you touched on. So when you’re charting, then for many women, this is the first time that they actually understand how their cycle works. So you know, most women, I can assume who are listening, we’re taught kind of or not taught in school, that you can get pregnant every day of your cycle. So we spend a lot of time in early 20s, like trying to avoid pregnancy, and completely terrified that we’re going to get pregnant all the time. And then when you start trying to get pregnant, then all of a sudden, you realize, whoa, there’s only a small window. And I like you have all the sex sometimes and then you don’t get pregnant. And so it’s really alarming, especially after years of knowing this. So, a lot of women who are struggling to conceive will go to their doctors, and the doctors will say, okay, have sex on day 14 or start on day 12 and have sex every other day forever. But neither of those strategies are really relevant to a specific woman, especially a woman with PCOS, because as you mentioned when you conceived, was it your daughter?

Farrar Duro

Yeah, well, both Yes, Uh, huh.

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

you ovulated around day 25. And you only knew that likely because you were tracking your cycle. So one of the very practical things with charting is that it allows you to zero in on that. So, it’s still frustrating for women who are having these long cycles, because you may have three patches, the deepest and each time. So your cervical mucus is what tells you when you’re fertile. Your cervical mucus is what keeps the sperm alive. And it happens as you approach ovulation. So that is the most reliable way. But, you know, when you’re having these long cycles, you may have it multiple times. So it’s still frustrating, but it at least does give you a way to pinpoint it. And then also, you know, when you have ovulated, as you mentioned, with the temperature shift, and then your mucus eventually goes away, so you can know when to stop.

Farrar Duro

Right.

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

But in terms of So, you know, understanding that the menstrual cycle is a sign of health, when your menstrual cycles are outside of that normal range. In the case of PCOS, I mentioned inflammation, and you know, insulin resistance, there’s several factors that as women, you can start addressing through diet, lifestyle practices. And if you’re working with a practitioner through supplementation, the great thing about charting is that as you actually start to address the underlying issues that are causing your cycle to be irregular, then you would start to see improvements in your cycle. So one of the most obvious things is that if you address that glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, inflammation, and kind of situation over time, you would expect to see population happening sooner. You know, one of the big ways to know if what you’re doing is working is if you’re actually shortening that follicular phase. And that’s something you can see from cycle to cycle as you’re charting. So, charting itself doesn’t fix everything, but it does allow you to track your progress as you work towards improving your cycles.

Farrar Duro

Yeah, and it’s a great tool to also give you insight into how like you said, how your treatment is working, if you’re doing acupuncture, herbal medicine or anything like that, I think, in general, you can even use it if you’re doing you know, Clomid, or that sort of thing to at least to to kind of get a little more insight. Even though I guess Clomid might I’m not sure if it shifts your temps or anything like that actually, maybe found that if women are taking any fertility medications, that it changes the temperatures at all, or?

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

I mean Clomid, what it essentially does is it makes your body your cells resistant to estrogen. So what would typically you know, happen is like you’re producing estrogen and your that would kind of have an effect on your cells as you approach ovulation. But when your cells are resistant to it, then you end up having to produce a lot more. And so that’s one of the ways that it triggers population. It doesn’t trigger ovulation in 100% of women. So, when you look at the research, there’s about at least 25% of women who, even if they’re taking it, it doesn’t trigger ovulation. The way that Clomid changes the cycle is one of the kind of after effects of making yourselves insensitive to estrogen is that after multiple rounds of Clomid, it can have a negative effect on the cervical fluid. So, some women will find that after a couple rounds of Clomid, they’re producing less cervical fluid during their fertile window. And then it can also have an effect on the uterine lining. So it’s kind of like, it doesn’t affect the temperature, but it can affect some of the other factors, especially after multiple uses.

Farrar Duro

Definitely. And there’s a big debate about whether that is helpful in certain age ranges, also of women with PCOS, and the rate of miscarriage and all that, too. So the research is always changing. So definitely, I can encourage everybody to do their research on that. And so if let’s say, for instance, we are not trying to get pregnant, and we want to have an alternative to hormonal birth control, do you work with women that are using charting for that purpose, with PCOS, you know, even though the cycle is irregular? or What advice would you give?

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

Yeah, absolutely. I would say that one of the biggest myths about fertility awareness is that it only works if your cycles are regular. And I believe that the reason that that myth exists is because oftentimes, we just assume the fertility awareness method is the same thing as the rhythm method. And a lot of women who track their cycles and kind of start using fertility awareness, still feel that way, subconsciously, I call it rhythm method thinking. And so what I mean by that, the rhythm method is designed, it’s a calculation, it’s a mathematical calculation. So the idea behind the rhythm method is that your cycles are always going to be regular. So it’s based on this assumption that your cycle are going to be 28 days and ovulation, that’s going to be on day 14. So, if you just track a few, let’s say three to six cycles, and you get kind of the average of how when you usually ovulate and all of that, the rhythm method basically would say that, then if you kind of track a few cycles, and we can just expect that your cycles will always kind of be like that. And so we can predict when you’re going to have your population and all that, and then actually act on it. The fertility awareness method is not the same thing at all, it’s very different. Because the fertility awareness method, we’re actually checking each day, your bodily signs to determine when you are in your fertile window when you’re not when ovulation is happening. And so the one thing that all women do have in common across the board, when you look at their cycles, is cycle fluctuations, and cycle irregularities.

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

So some women obviously have a much greater degree of cycle fluctuation and irregularities than others. But everything single woman who tracks her cycle for any length of time, will experience a cycle where she ovulates sooner than normal, and later than normal. And I mentioned already that the the pre ovulatory phase is the most susceptible to stress to illness to all those types of things. So any woman who’s been tracking her cycle for a while will recognize, Wow, I went on a vacation and it delayed my ovulation, or, oh, my goodness, I had this, my sister got married. And we were really busy during that time, and it actually affected my cycles. So with fertility awareness, it’s a different thing, because it acknowledges that your cycles can fluctuate. So for instance, for a woman who has a regular cycles, and she wants to use fertility awareness, to avoid pregnancy, she would follow the same path strategies as a woman with regular cycles. So basically, what you do, especially the method that I teach, so I teach a version of this simple thermal method, meaning that you’re tracking your cervical fluid, and you’re tracking basal body temperature, and then you can choose to track your cervical position, that’s an optional sign. And you’re putting that information together. And so at the beginning of your cycle, you start checking for cervical fluid, so you start checking for it and checking for it. And as soon as you start to see cervical fluid in your cycle, then you know that you’re fertile. And you’ve moved into your fertile window. And so then you consider yourself fertile until after ovulation. I would say the biggest challenge for women with a long irregular cycles is that what can happen, so for my clients who have, you know, PCOS, and are using this method for birth control, is that often because of their delayed ovulation because of that PCOS, they end up with a longer period that they have to consider fertile.

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

Can’t predict ahead of time when you’re going to ovulate so you know, in a healthy cycle, you would have your periods, and then you’d have a couple days before you start to see cervical fluid. Once you see the cervical fluid, you know, then you stop having unprotected sex until you confirm ovulation. And so in a healthy cycle, you would have two to seven days. So you would have like a week or a little bit more than a week, maybe 10 days where you have to find another way to manage your fertility. So either using condoms, some women don’t have sex at all, some women will have alternative sex meaning no penis and vagina intercourse, some women will use a cervical cap or a diaphragm. So there’s all these different, you know, barrier methods basically, that your using to prevent the sperm from coming into contact with your cervical fluid during that time. But for when you have a healthy cycle, that’s like a shorter period of time. For a woman with PCOS, who’s ovulating, maybe on day 30, or something like that, she might have multiple patches of cervical fluid and end up with a longer period of time where she has to find other ways to manage her fertility.

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

Some women are going to be okay with that. And they’re fine to use condoms, or they’re fine to some you know, I’ll say withdrawal. I know that it’s controversial to talk about it. But I do work with actual human beings, real couples, and a lot of people use withdrawal. They just don’t talk about it. And they they often say it with a lot of shame, like I’m not recommending it or not, I’m just actually just stating that there’s different ways that couples used to manage their fertility. And so for some women, they’re okay with that. But for other women, it becomes more of an issue, like, all these days that they have to use condoms, when previously they were on a hormonal method, and they didn’t have to use any type of barrier. And so that’s where it really, you know, I would never sit here and say, okay, fertility awareness is for every woman, every single woman should use it for their whole entire lives. But for a woman who doesn’t want to use a hormonal method, and understands how the method works, and is willing to use a barrier during her fertile time, or figure out how she’s going to manage that fertile time, she can be just as successful as anyone else. It is more challenging with PCOS, but that’s often a really good motivator, to then start doing the things that you need to do to shorten that follicular phase and make your cycles healthier overall.

Farrar Duro

Definitely, and this is so helpful, I think that people will know everybody listening will kind of be curious if you have never charted your cycle to kind of get to know your body a little more. And, you know, also you’ll have a record, you know, to compare it with, let’s say, six months down the road, or, or even a year, and you can really see how you’ve been improving. So, I encourage everyone to give it a try. And go to Lisa’s website, because you’ve got so much good information. And also check out your book for sure. The fifth vital sign, right? So and also, if you have any words of wisdom that you’d like to give our audience any parting guidance, please, please share?

Lisa Hendrickson-Jack

Well, I suppose as a parting word, I would say that, you know, your menstrual cycle is a sign of health. And it is possible to improve your menstrual cycle without drugs. So if you’ve been told that the only way to quote unquote, regulate your cycle, is by using hormonal birth control, just know that hormonal birth control doesn’t regulate it, it creates a hormonal state where instead of ovulating, you just stop ovulating , and then you get a bleed, because you take away the hormones for a couple days. So it’s not the same thing as actually addressing the root cause. So when you have cycle irregularities and things like that, it is a sign that something deeper is going on. And I have seen it happen. I’ve worked with many women with irregular cycles. And we address the root cause, the insulin resistance, the inflammation, you know, the various factors that are actually at the root of what PCOS is. And we actually regulate that cycle naturally without drugs. So it is possible. So if anything, I just want to leave you with that. Because I think for a lot women, they just no one’s ever told them that it’s possible to improve these things naturally, without using medications or different things. Sometimes medications are necessary. So I’m not saying that there’s not a place for that. I’m just saying that there’s a lot that we can do on our own as well.

Farrar Duro

Definitely. Well, thank you so much for being here. And I really look forward to checking out your book and we’ll definitely link to that in our show notes and also link to your website as well. So thank you everybody for listening. And thanks again, Lisa for being here. Have a great week, everyone.

Episode Spotlights:

  • Why Lisa wanted to focus on the cycle and fertility health ([1:47])
  • Fertility awareness ([3:05])
  • Connection between your cycle and overall health ([4:45])
  • How Sarah works with women and their cycles ([5:32])
  • Why it’s important to know your cycle rhythm and get to know your body ([7:48])
  • What’s different in a PCOS menstrual cycle ([10:15])
  • What to look for in apps ([13:08])
  • Charting and how long you should do it ([16:33])
  • Using charting for birth control with PCOS ([22:30])
  • Challenges for women with long irregular cycles ([25:30])

Resources Mentioned In This Episode:

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