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End Plastic Pollution. Sea Monkey Project, Sydney Steenland
Episode 18917th October 2022 • Your Positive Imprint • Catherine Praiswater
00:00:00 00:30:31

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The Sea Monkey Project educates the world on how to clean ocean plastic pollution. But what do you do with plastics then? Spokesperson Sydney Steenland shares ocean plastic solutions. End plastic pollution and the overproduction of single-use plastics.


Transcripts

Sydney Steenland:

We wish fair winds and plastic free seas to you all.

Catherine:

Hello, I'm Catherine, your host of this variety show podcast.

Catherine:

Your positive imprint is transforming how we live today for a more sustainable tomorrow through education and information.

Catherine:

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Catherine:

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Catherine:

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Catherine:

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Catherine:

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Catherine:

Music by the legendary and, talented Chris Nole.

Catherine:

Chris is known for being John Denver's pianist in the 1990s.

Catherine:

Chris today composes his own music, including elevated intentions.

Catherine:

Heard here only on your positive imprint.

Catherine:

Check out Chris and his awesome music at ChrisNole.com.

Catherine:

C H R I S N O L E Thank you again for listening and for your support of this podcast, your positive imprint.

Catherine:

What's your PI?

Catherine:

My guests on the show today is a family of four from Australia.

Catherine:

Sea life is under the threat of death.

Catherine:

Fortunately, the sea monkeys are informing the world about ways to clean ocean plastic pollution.

Catherine:

They're finding ocean plastic solutions.

Catherine:

. And you know, there are still communities who are not informed.

Catherine:

They don't know that throwing plastic bags into the ocean is a death sentence for turtles and other sea life.

Catherine:

And not to mention that in hundreds of years that plastic will still exist as microplastic.

Catherine:

Micro might mean small, but it is still huge.

Catherine:

Well, there are ocean plastic solutions.

Catherine:

Meet members of the Sea Monkey Project, a family of four who sail and live aboard their 41 foot yacht.

Catherine:

Sydney, not quite 18 is the spokesperson for the sea monkey project.

Catherine:

Sydney is joined by her mom, Sarah dad, Carlos and younger brother Indie.

Sydney:

We moved on the boat when I was six years old,

Sydney:

This is the second boat we've lived on.

Sydney:

The first one was actually built by my grandfather and it was just 36 feet long and it only had really two rooms.

Sydney:

One was the bathroom and the other was just the whole living room,

Sydney:

kitchen and bedroom and yeah, dining table . Yeah.

Sydney:

But I guess I didn't really know what was going on at the time, but I thought it was really cool because, I mean, it was really fun sort of living on a boat

Sydney:

And, it's kind of like camping, I guess.

Catherine:

I've been reading all about Sydney and Indie doing all of this work with regard to saving the oceans and, and keeping plastic out

Sarah Steenland:

Our tagline is, is ocean plastic solutions and education.

Sarah Steenland:

Plastic is a very, useful item for transporting things and medical and, it's a miracle product, but, as far as it goes for human progress.

Sarah Steenland:

The main thing that we are focusing on is single use plastics like straws and, plastic bags, takeaway containers like poly styrene, yeah, that's the

Sarah Steenland:

Turtles, ingest and whales . If you're gonna focus on something, that's probably the one that, that we like, because it's just too enormous to tackle it as a whole.

Sarah Steenland:

So yeah, just the overall excessive consumption of, , the society now with, having everything overpackaged.

Sarah Steenland:

Some grapes that came from,

Sarah Steenland:

Korea I counted , five different packed wrappings on it.

Sarah Steenland:

It had, plastic container bubble wrap.

Sarah Steenland:

It was sitting on bubble wrap and then it had, some other like, bubble wrap type foam substance.

Sarah Steenland:

And then it was again wrapped in plastic, a plastic bag.

Sarah Steenland:

That's totally unnecessary

Sarah Steenland:

. Catherine: Excessive consumption and overpackaging, that is the society we are living in.

Sydney:

What made me wanna do all this, as this is what I say all the time, it's like as we sailed, And mostly through Asia, we found plastic everywhere.

Sydney:

There's nowhere we've been that hasn't had plastic.

Sydney:

But as we traveled, that's how we saw how bad the plastic pollution problem really was.

Sydney:

And it was just, it was so much of it.

Sydney:

There's plastic underneath people's homes in the waters of where they actually get their food, it really got into my mind.

Sydney:

And then when we got to Malaysia, that's when we created the Sea Monkey Project and.

Sydney:

. That's how I started to learn a lot more.

Sydney:

And the people we meet and the things that we do has made me learn so much more and be much more, I guess, passionate about it.

Sydney:

And

Carlos Steenland:

We are trying to provide the kids, or give the kids an alternative way of thinking, and that this is a normal way of life that we need to start thinking not first and

Carlos Steenland:

It's something that she feels personally that she needs to try and do something about to help these animals or to help the earth and try and help the things that don't have a choice.

Carlos Steenland:

They're just stuck with it.

Sarah Steenland:

For Sydney, she's passionate about the ocean.

Sarah Steenland:

She wants to do something with animals and, and the sea.

Sarah Steenland:

So the natural thing was to make a project.

Sarah Steenland:

I always think if you're gonna do something, then it can't be, in theory, you actually have to go out and actually.

Sarah Steenland:

Do it instead of just writing in a textbook and then forgetting about it.

Sarah Steenland:

It's the best way to learn is to actually start a business or start some sort of mission that, that you can keep growing and progressing.

Sarah Steenland:

And along the way she's met some very amazing and influential people, which you know, that only is going to help her in the future because she's making lots of contacts and meeting very interesting people.

Sarah Steenland:

We are so lucky that we discovered the cruising community, but also the people who are interested in stopping the flow of plastic into the ocean.

Sarah Steenland:

We collaborate together and share ideas and solutions.

Sarah Steenland:

It's just been a really great way of a schooling method because of all these, yeah, all these opportunities that keep coming at, at us and particularly Sydney

Catherine:

You're innovative and you're moving the thought process along into the future.

Catherine:

That university of life is truly what you're providing the kids, both of them,

Catherine:

As with any experience, there are apprehensions and sometimes fears.

Catherine:

Will Sydney shares how she deals with those ocean storms.

Sydney:

We were in like a really pretty bad storm in Sumatra and I do get really scared at times, but I guess I'm not real good at showing it really.

Sydney:

I basically sit outside and I kind of freak out in my mind, but if I'm told to do something that will help what, I'm told to do something in the storm, I have to do it.

Sydney:

I won't just say, No, I can't do that.

Sydney:

More than 1 million sea birds and animals die of, ingesting plastics every year.

Sydney:

Plastics are overproduced and consumers continue purchasing certain plastics when there are solutions such as well, cotton bags and other solutions.

Sydney:

The Steenland family embarked on an innovative journey to find ways to remove plastic from the oceans

Sydney:

and keeping it out of the oceans.

Sydney:

Hence they're upcycling projects.

Sydney:

We started when, when we got to Malaysia, my dad in particular, he wanted to actually do something like we went through a few ideas before we got to this machine.

Sydney:

The man who designed the machines, he he invented them.

Sydney:

He's in Holland, and then he invented them in 2013.

Sydney:

The blueprints we got from the precious plastics was actually not right.

Sydney:

So my dad did actually kind of have to work it out on, on his own and, a little bit from scratch, I guess, but.

Sydney:

, Not exactly, but so I, I helped him build that machine and I actually did most of the electrical wiring on it so that, that was actually really, Yeah, that was a really

Sydney:

Yeah.

Sydney:

So that's a good, good skill to learn.

Sydney:

So we built the first machine and we had one person interested in it, they weren't really committed to it.

Sydney:

They just wanted to have it as like a home project, but that is definitely not what we wanted.

Sydney:

We ended up partnering with Fuze Ecoteer.

Sydney:

They're like an eco tourism company.

Sydney:

And so they, they kind of helped us, because we're partnering with them.

Sydney:

That helped us.

Sydney:

a bit bigger.

Sydney:

And that's when we started doing fancy things like oiling the wooden bench and powder coating all of the me the metal.

Sydney:

And so that we then we got really snazzy and machines.

Sydney:

So then we started selling them to, well, we got our first buyer.

Sydney:

It was

Sarah Steenland:

Plastic free jersey.

Sarah Steenland:

Yeah.

Sarah Steenland:

Jersey Island.

Sarah Steenland:

In the UK

Sydney:

Now we've got machine on Perhentian Island in Malaysia, that's just north of Tioman and we've got a, a machine on Tioman Island.

Sydney:

We have a machine in Bangkok, one in the Maripur Rainforest that's like in the center of Malaysia and in the UK so it's going really well.

Sydney:

So the original machine that was built by Dave Hankins.

Sydney:

So there's three parts of the machine.

Sydney:

You have the shredder, the extrusion, and the injection machine.

Sydney:

And, but they were originally all on sort separate table.

Sydney:

But what we did is put them all onto one table.

Sydney:

It's much more portable that way.

Sydney:

The shredder, that's the, basically the first step of the process of recycling.

Sydney:

So you have to get the clean, sorted plastic by types cuz there's seven different types of plastic and there's no, they've all got their own personalities, I guess . And

Sydney:

And put them through the shredder and it makes it up into tiny little granules flakes.

Sydney:

Yeah.

Sydney:

Flakes.

Sydney:

. And then you get the flakes and you, you take them and you can either put them into the extrusion machine or the injection machine and the extrusion, it goes into the hopper and it goes into like

Sydney:

And that's what we get the end of the noodle and we start wrapping it around in a circle.

Sydney:

And then that's how we make bowls and plant pots.

Sydney:

Yeah.

Sydney:

And or then you have the injection machine and you put the flakes into the hopper.

Sydney:

It goes as a tube and a melt.

Sydney:

And then instead of it coming out as at the very end, you actually have to put a mold onto the bottom.

Sydney:

And we have a mold for earrings, it's just like a disc, but the mold for it is just flat.

Sydney:

And we just use a hole puncher and punch out the earrings.

Sydney:

And we have a mold for these turtles that we mostly make.

Carlos Steenland:

The idea behind how we've done the machines is that essentially what I wanted to do was we wanted to , be able to create essentially a little business in a box.

Carlos Steenland:

So in these communities where they're poor and they need some extra funds, we can put a machine set there, and then one or two people, they can walk around the machine and keep working and then they're producing.

Carlos Steenland:

So they're getting paid to clean up the area and getting paid to manufacture.

Carlos Steenland:

We try and keep them close together and working with each

Catherine:

other.

Sydney:

One of our main goals is to, instead of having like volunteers from like local turtle rehabilitation project working on it , we want to get the locals doing it and like on Perhentian Island, they make turtles.

Catherine:

You're able to make a change.

Catherine:

You will never know the absolute wonderful imprint that you have made for that person

Catherine:

You're also witness to this project and the creation of your heart and your compassion

Sarah Steenland:

The Juara turtle project juaraturtleproject.com who owned the machine, it was they had thought of the idea of turning their ocean plastic because

Sarah Steenland:

Barnacles stuff.

Sarah Steenland:

Algae.

Sarah Steenland:

Yeah.

Sarah Steenland:

You just can't clean it enough that recyclers won't recycle it.

Sarah Steenland:

So there's a, it's all well and good to, to pull it out the ocean.

Sarah Steenland:

I mean, ideally our goal is to make sure it doesn't go in, in the first place, but once it is taken outta the ocean, there's not a lot you can actually do with it.

Sarah Steenland:

So, Tom, who's the leader of the, the recycling project on the island, He experimented in the, the ratio of plastic flakes.

Sarah Steenland:

So the shredder, we just basically threw all the ocean plastic in the shredder and it was a, and a bit of an experiment because it smelled terrible, Yeah, there was lots of

Sarah Steenland:

But it all went in the shredder.

Sarah Steenland:

Carlos was very anxious to see how the shredder would hold up because we had never done it before

Sarah Steenland:

But it went fantastic.

Sarah Steenland:

It, it, it handled it all the plastic really well.

Sarah Steenland:

And then Tom had figured out the ratio between sand and this, the cement and, and some rocks.

Sarah Steenland:

There's gotta be a bit more testing with durability later on, but so far so good.

Sarah Steenland:

Yeah, they're, they're holding up really well.

Sarah Steenland:

So, yeah, it was another discovery and and another application for what to do with the plastic waste that no one can recycle.

Sydney:

There's seven types, seven different types.

Sydney:

And at the moment, You really only experimented with type two and type five and from top and from type four, Yeah.

Sydney:

Young indie shares his knowledge regarding the different types of plastics

Sarah Steenland:

We, we've got the expert here, who knows.

Sarah Steenland:

We'll bring him in.

Indie:

I'm classified as the expert because we did this I guess plastic education for this school in Kuala Lumpur, but we did it in Tioman where we are now.

Indie:

And I had to tell all of the kids about the different types of plastic.

Indie:

So type one, which is polyethylene terephthalate is plastic bottles mostly it yeah, water bottles.

Indie:

And it's, I haven't seen it in a lot of other types of packaging.

Indie:

Yeah.

Indie:

Type two, which is high density polyethylene is mostly like conditioner bottles, like well, shampoo and bottle caps.

Indie:

Yeah.

Indie:

The HD stands for high density, meaning it's really thick.

Indie:

So usually if you get a very durable plastic it'll be type two, I guess.

Indie:

So, and then type three, which is pvc, polyvinyl chloride.

Indie:

That's what it was.

Indie:

Polyvinyl.

Indie:

polyvinyl chloride.

Indie:

I don't know a lot about.

Indie:

That's why I said to all of our kids.

Indie:

Yeah, the, well like you just said, water pipes.

Indie:

You don't see it a lot in everyday plastic, I

Sarah Steenland:

guess

Indie:

So then type type four is low density polyethylene.

Indie:

That is usually bags, plastic bags.

Sydney:

The LD stands for low density, so it's really thin and we, we don't recycle.

Sydney:

We haven't been able to recycle plastic bags yet because they're so flexible.

Sydney:

It, we can't really shred it.

Indie:

Type five, which is polypropylene, is the probably the most popular single use plastics.

Indie:

It straws, it's bottle, its packaging like tupperware containers.

Indie:

Yeah.

Indie:

Yeah.

Indie:

It's usually like, well, we went to a supermarket and I looked at these containers.

Indie:

It was little candy containers, like TicTacs, tick taxis, type five theft packaging.

Indie:

And then type six is styrofoam poly styre.

Indie:

Poly styrene.

Indie:

Yeah.

Sydney:

Please always avoid that . It's very bad.

Sydney:

Yes.

Sydney:

I don't think anyone can ever really recycle it because it's mostly air.

Sydney:

Oh yeah, we forgot Type seven.

Sydney:

Type seven is just literally labeled other and that's like compact discs.

Sydney:

And nylon fabrics and yeah.

Sydney:

. , Catherine: I never thought about nylon fabrics being considered a plastic.

Sydney:

Yeah, well, was it like 95% of, I think it was 97% of all plastic in the Great Pacific garbage patch is microplastics.

Sydney:

And that can mean, little tiny pieces of plastic or fibers.

Sydney:

When you do your laundry, like if you have lots of plastic based clothing, about 10,000 fibers will go into the drains and into the oceans

Sydney:

The Cora Ball.

Sydney:

Inspired by Coral because how they filter through micro, micro algae or something living in the ocean.

Sydney:

And, they made this ball that you can just check into your laundry and it will, I don't know how it works really.

Sydney:

It's like, it's not very that fine, but it still manages to collect so many bits of fiber.

Sydney:

It actually comes out as like a fluff and then you can pick it up.

Sydney:

You can take it out and put it in the rubbish bin.

Carlos Steenland:

Probably, it's probably creating like a static electric charge and, and it pulls it in cuz you can see static electricity when you rub against a lot of nylon shirts, you can feel it.

Carlos Steenland:

So that's probably what's happening.

Carlos Steenland:

It's probably like a static electric charge or something like that.

Carlos Steenland:

And it's attracting all those little micro fibers, so like your, your polar fleeces and it.

Carlos Steenland:

And your moisture wicking shirts and all that sort of stuff.

Carlos Steenland:

of it is letting a

Catherine:

plastic

Sarah Steenland:

coat.

Sydney:

Education.

Sarah Steenland:

Yeah.

Sarah Steenland:

It's , we've kind of gone into the rabbit hole of finding out all these things and, and being horrified as well.

Sarah Steenland:

Yep.

Catherine:

Everybody makes their own conscious decisions,

Carlos Steenland:

It is really, really, really hard for people to make an informed and educated decision because they don't have the full story and It is seriously hard to find the full story.

Carlos Steenland:

It, it takes a long time.

Carlos Steenland:

So only once you get the full story the whole way around, can you sit there and actually say, Okay, consciously I'm gonna do this or I'm gonna do that it, You can't really.

Carlos Steenland:

Poke blame or, or put people at fault because they don't know.

Carlos Steenland:

So that's, that's a big part of what we are trying to do, is we are trying to provide that education and that bit of knowledge so that people can then make an informed decision.

Carlos Steenland:

And they might not, they might not go to the extreme or the length of what we are doing, but they're still got the information that they can go to, the level that they are comfortable with, that they're happy to do.

Carlos Steenland:

And that's all that we can ask

Sydney:

We came to shore once and when we docked our dingy and we were walking along with jetty, you could see the the fishermen were getting blocks of ice and checking

Sydney:

Frozen water inside plastic bags with rubber and rubber bands.

Sydney:

So they were cutting, they were cutting the plastic bags off and chucking them into the water just off the side of the jetty because they didn't know.

Sydney:

And they don't know how it affect every day.

Sydney:

There was so many bags but they just, they didn't really know because this was quite a poor community and it was fairly isolated.

Sydney:

But you can see there was trash everywhere.

Sydney:

And, but what we did was we, we stopped and we helped them cut the plastic bags off, but we kept the bags and put them into another bag.

Sydney:

And then we took the bag and we showed them what we were doing and we went and chucked it into the nearest dumpster.

Sydney:

And then we just kept going and we.

Sydney:

Yeah.

Sydney:

Goodbye and stuff.

Sydney:

But then when we came back the next day, they were collecting the bags themselves and putting it into the dumpster.

Catherine:

Your modeling and your education work,

Catherine:

It may be just a little small piece in the world and just a few people, but word spreads and they'll continue to do this

Sydney Steenland:

We also began doing things like harvesting fishing net and rope that has been entangled in mangroves and in, in the ocean floating around the ocean and, tangled amongst rocks on islands.

Sydney Steenland:

So we saw that this was quite a valuable material that's still quite durable.

Sydney Steenland:

But it's actually very, very bad for the environment.

Sydney Steenland:

So it makes up a very wide percentage of plastic pollution in the ocean.

Sydney Steenland:

I may be wrong, but , from what I last remember, it was like 40% of plastic pollution is actually from fishing industry.

Sydney Steenland:

So we went and we collected these materials and we began upcycling them in our headquarters and we began upcycling them into things like key chain loops and um, uh, draw string bags, uh, with a net.

Sydney Steenland:

But that was sort of the birth of our newest line of products that we are extremely proud of.

Sydney Steenland:

So these products are, 100% upcycled material, , backpacks, toe bags, and fanny packs.

Sydney Steenland:

So these, we, we saw all of these materials that have been discarded, , in the water sport industry, the fishing industry.

Sydney Steenland:

When I say water sport industry, I mean sailing, I mean, uh, surfing.

Sydney Steenland:

, wind surfing, kite surfing, all stuff like that.

Sydney Steenland:

Uh, materials like the sails, wetsuits or fishing nets or , rope bits and pieces like that.

Sydney Steenland:

And we've been putting these all together into these unique water resistant durable bags, and . , even the stitching is a hundred percent recycled, , plastic.

Sydney Steenland:

These are all upcycled backpacks and we are very proud of them.

Sydney Steenland:

So during recent times, during Corona 19, uh, since it affected our project quite largely, we decided to take on a new approach to our project.

Sydney Steenland:

So we realized that recycling will never be the answer.

Sydney Steenland:

And we have sort of stepped a little bit back from recycling and more into up- cycling, which means giving an item a much higher value than what it was valued before, but we're also working more on education..

Sydney Steenland:

Covid 19 happened and now we are here with our own, , Plastic education comic book that was illustrated by my mother, compiled by her and a boat friend.

Sydney Steenland:

It teaches kids as young as, I'm gonna say, seven or eight, all sorts of things like, uh, where plastic came from, why it's bad, how you can avoid it, and how you can be an ocean hero.

Sarah Steenland:

A big component to what we do is creating education material and and mainly for kids because we find they're, they're are just more open to learning about things.

Sarah Steenland:

And there's not actually a lot of information for, for the youth about global issues.

Sarah Steenland:

But, I think, I think that kids have got a lot of power and like if they, if they get the knowledge, they'd likely to tell their parents, like, Oh, let's

Sarah Steenland:

Or why, cuz kids are very curious and once they find out different things, they will tell their parents about it.

Sarah Steenland:

So that's a key factor in what we do is get the kids informed and then they hopefully will will spread the word to their communities.

Sydney:

We have the green turtle and the leather back turtle, and those were actually made to raise awareness for turtles in Malaysia because the green turtle is the most common one that comes to Malaysia to nest.

Sydney:

But the leather back is actually extinct in Malaysia,

Sarah Steenland:

There's a lot of kids that are actually making a stand.

Sarah Steenland:

Sidney Sarah and Carlos share their last inspiring words.

Sydney:

So really the wildlife that's been on our planet has been here for so much longer than humans ever have been.

Sydney:

And they've all worked together to make a giant just a symbiotic ecosystem where they all work together and they manage to make it so perfect

Sydney:

I guess.

Sydney:

It took so long to evolve that, but then when humans come along and they start being selfish , they're not considerate of the things that have been here so much longer than us.

Sydney:

Do you know how, like, children are taught to be nice to elderly people because they're much wiser and they've been here so much longer.

Sydney:

We're not doing the same thing to the planet, and I mean, just for this planet to evolve so perfectly, I guess just to be destroyed by humans is in not that much of, in not that long of time.

Sydney:

We've got so many solutions to things that work, but it's just a lack of, in lack of caring that none of these things have gone forth yet.

Sydney:

, it just hasn't happened yet and , you just need to care really.

Sarah Steenland:

I think that's the thing is is the making conversation is really important.

Sarah Steenland:

And then , the blindfold comes off with a lot of these things that, that we didn't know before.

Sarah Steenland:

And then you can just get better and better.

Sarah Steenland:

There's always room for improvement.

Sarah Steenland:

No one's perfect, but we just have to start somewhere and then Yeah, and then you never know where it, where it leads.

Sydney:

Really greedy businessmen they don't understand that not even they can survive without the planet.

Carlos Steenland:

Simplification.

Carlos Steenland:

It's just, . It's very re very liberating.

Carlos Steenland:

Very liberating, that's for sure.

Carlos Steenland:

Yeah.

Carlos Steenland:

Yeah.

Catherine:

you have quality time with each other and you have that time for conversation.

Carlos Steenland:

Just pick something to do something that is a start and start to try and make a difference.

Carlos Steenland:

Doesn't have to be big.

Carlos Steenland:

Just, Yeah.

Carlos Steenland:

Just start,

Sydney:

You'll find nature so much more enjoyable.

Sydney:

If you would like to buy a turtle and support our project where the funds go directly into funding our project to build machines, fund beach cleanups

Sydney:

You can go to our website, theseamonkeyprojects.com, and you can also learn about plastic waste and what we do and how we do it.

Sydney:

And see all Mom's awesome cartoons.

Catherine:

To learn more about the sea monkey project or to support their efforts of pulling plastic from the sea.

Catherine:

Go to SeaMonkeyProjects.com, S E a M O N K E Y.

Catherine:

P R O J E C T s.com.

Catherine:

I'm having a drawing for your positive imprint cotton shopping bag.

Catherine:

Here's how to enter the drawing.

Catherine:

Share how you have reduced or eliminated single use plastics or other types of plastics or nylon by emailing me.

Catherine:

And the boating industry.

Catherine:

I invite you to share your positive imprints as well in the reduction of plastics aboard your vessel.

Catherine:

Please share your positive imprints and email them to me, Catherine@YourPositiveImprint.com.

Catherine:

That's C a T H E R I N E.

Catherine:

And you will be entered in a contest to win your positive imprint, cotton shopping bag.

Catherine:

The drawing will be held on November 14th.

Catherine:

I am giving away two bags.

Catherine:

You could win one of them, please enter.

Catherine:

And remember right now, guests are twice a month.

Catherine:

Coming in November.

Catherine:

What's in a name what's in your name.

Catherine:

Hm, join me as guests, Juliana from the UK shares.

Catherine:

What's in a name?

Catherine:

Followed by a climate change update by Nathan Ben doff himself.

Catherine:

Thanks for sending your emails with suggestions of positive imprints you'd like me to share.

Catherine:

Again, the next guest will be November 7th.

Catherine:

In the meantime, check out my catalog of variety guest episodes.

Catherine:

There's almost 200

Catherine:

and don't forget to enter the contest with your positive imprints on ways to end plastic pollution.

Sydney Steenland:

We wish fair winds and plastic free seas to you all.