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Solar Energy Movement Disrupts Global Energy Industry. Bill Nussey
Episode 18726th September 2022 • Your Positive Imprint • Catherine Praiswater
00:00:00 00:27:31

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The world is embarking on one of the most important projects in its history—the transition away from fossil fuels toward renewable energy such as local-Scale solar and batteries. Bill Nussey founded the Freeing Energy Project. It is a mobilization plan to move us towards a cleaner, cheaper, and more resilient local energy future. The electricity industry is being reinvented. Join the search for energy freedom in disrupting the global energy industry and moving towards more affordable energy. Part 2 with Bill Nussey.


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Catherine:

Your positive, positive, positive imprint, imprint, imprint stories are everywhere people and their positive action inspire positive achievements.

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Get ready for your positive imprint.

Catherine:

Hello, this is Catherine host of your positive imprint.

Catherine:

The variety show featuring people all over the world whose positive actions are inspiring positive achievements, exceptional people rise to the challenge.

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As always a huge thank you to Chris, for permission to use some of his music on this podcast, including

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elevated intentions in which he composed for your positive imprint.

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Catherine:

Thank you.

Catherine:

Your positive imprint.

Catherine:

What's your PI?

Catherine:

My guest today says that the transition to clean energy is moving far too slowly.

Catherine:

And, you know, I absolutely absolutely agree.

Catherine:

Bill Nussey founded the Freeing Energy Project, which is a mobilization plan to move the talents and energies of entrepreneurs worldwide, as well as global policy makers

Catherine:

But what is awesome about his positive imprint is that his project is 'power by the people for the people.' That means it's up to you and me collectively.

Catherine:

And that's key.

Catherine:

Collectively.

Catherine:

The electricity industry is being reinvented

Catherine:

My favorite line from his book is 'in search of energy, freedom.' Well, it is clear that bill authored a book, but it's not just about clean energy or how to invest in it.

Catherine:

Here is the man himself, Bill Nussey, welcome to your positive imprint.

Bill Nussey:

Thank you very much, Catherine.

Bill Nussey:

That's an incredibly flattering, uh, introduction.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, and I'm just thrilled that some of the parts of the book spoke to you that makes, makes my day.

Bill Nussey:

Thank you.

Catherine:

part two with Bill Nussey, using local scale solar and batteries to disrupt the global energy industry from the outside in so exciting, great information.

Bill Nussey:

I was born at the right time.

Bill Nussey:

Exactly the right time at the beginning of the computer revolution.

Bill Nussey:

Born out of my weaknesses, stumbling into my strengths, I fell in love with technology and, uh, I love it.

Bill Nussey:

I love what technology can do to business and to society.

Bill Nussey:

I also lament the problems it can create too.

Bill Nussey:

I think what'll be the largest technology revolution in the history of technology is the transition to clean energy.

Bill Nussey:

So all that kind of played together is a single theme that, uh, was born out of, um, searching to do something that really I could truly be passionate about.

Bill Nussey:

And I feel very lucky that I've been doing that for a couple decades now.

Catherine:

Why the title freeing energy.

, Bill Nussey:

what I'm trying to say is that energy is locked into, uh, monopoly and public utility commissioner and legislation.

, Bill Nussey:

It's, it's this incredibly innovative opportunity.

, Bill Nussey:

That's just stuck.

, Bill Nussey:

It's stuck in a system.

, Bill Nussey:

Uh, that's dominated by incumbents, like the utilities that don't want it to change and the book is entirely about how do we free that energy, the

, Bill Nussey:

So wouldn't it be great if you and I were getting the profits from solar, rather than your utility, getting the profits by building a giant solar plant, someone's gonna get the profits.

, Bill Nussey:

Uh, it'd be better if it was you and me and, and, and particularly families that, uh, that are struggling to meet their bills.

, Bill Nussey:

Wouldn't it be great if they got the profits from cheaper solar rather than their utility.

, Bill Nussey:

And so freeing energy touches all that, uh, by freeing it from a system that's outta date, uh, overdue for big changes.

, Bill Nussey:

The thing I love so much about this business and this journey I'm on is that you can do well by doing good.

, Bill Nussey:

Uh, I didn't get into this because I wanted to make money.

, Bill Nussey:

I got into this because it needed to be done.

, Bill Nussey:

And people with solid business backgrounds were shying away from it.

, Bill Nussey:

And I wanted to create a perspective for policy makers, for individual families, for entrepreneurs, for scientists to say this isn't just about, , saving the environment.

, Bill Nussey:

This isn't something we have to sacrifice to make happen.

, Bill Nussey:

This is something that if we embrace it, Simple economics mean that everybody wins and we actually save money, whether we're in Africa, uh, growing crops who couldn't grow before, or

, Bill Nussey:

I mean, the opportunities to embrace this next generation is truly global.

, Bill Nussey:

I hope it does make, , a positive imprint.

, Bill Nussey:

, certainly that's been my goal when I, , started off on this.

, Bill Nussey:

The subtitle how innovators are using local scale solar and batteries to disrupt the global energy industry from the outside in.

Catherine:

We have our solar panels and my husband just bought some for the ground.

Catherine:

Yeah.

Catherine:

We have some on the roof and he bought some on the ground., , he's connecting it so we can actually, yeah.

Bill Nussey:

And you're gonna want batteries.

Bill Nussey:

They're more expensive today.

Bill Nussey:

If you wait a few years they're gonna be so much cheaper, uh, but uh, batteries give you the resiliency, particularly in New Mexico, where it's created outages because of the heat and the fires.

Bill Nussey:

And that's gonna become increasingly widespread.

Bill Nussey:

Texas is very conflicted over what they think about clean energy, but most Texans agree that it's the grid.

Bill Nussey:

Outages are a very real issue.

Bill Nussey:

And as communities and families, those that have the means are putting batteries in as fast as they can.

Bill Nussey:

And I'm very fortunate . So if I have a grid outage in my neighborhood, which generally doesn't happen, Georgia power generally does a good job.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, then, uh, my house will remain operational and I can still watch my TV and charge my phone and do, , podcast interviews like this, uh, because I am essentially off grid when I need to be.

Bill Nussey:

But the reason this is, this is such a big deal because the power, the electricity industry, the power industry for a century has been entirely predicated on fuels.

Bill Nussey:

So it was coal in the early days, natural gas, after that, then nuclear came along and that was supposed to be the big change.

Bill Nussey:

And it didn't turn out to be, but all these cases you need fuels.

Bill Nussey:

And so there, the largest portion of the costs goes into fuels.

Bill Nussey:

So as we see natural gas prices rising around the world, largely because of the war in Ukraine, the, uh, price of electricity is going to slowly start rising.

Bill Nussey:

It takes a little while for all the contracts to change, but we're gonna see electricity prices go up because of the rise of natural gas prices and natural gas is the largest source of electricity in the United States.

Bill Nussey:

But the thing that is, uh, so challenging and flabbergasting to the electric industry is

Bill Nussey:

that solar and batteries are technologies.

Bill Nussey:

They're not fuels.

Bill Nussey:

And so for a century, the utilities have been focused on how do you manage fuel costs?

Bill Nussey:

How do you hedge it?

Bill Nussey:

How do you acquire supply chains?

Bill Nussey:

Now they're dealing with this absolutely disruptive thing called a technology, solar and batteries, and the price of solar over the last 45 years has dropped 400 times.

Bill Nussey:

The very first solar cells were on, on satellites that allowed satellites to stay operational in orbit people remember Sputnik.

Bill Nussey:

The Russian Sputnik only lasted for a few weeks, cuz the battery ran out and NASA changed the satellite race by putting solar on satellites and they could run for years.

Bill Nussey:

This was the beginning of it.

Bill Nussey:

And back then solar costs about $70 a WATT and today solar costs about 20 cents a WATT.

Bill Nussey:

And if you look at anybody's predictions the, the even fossil fuel companies like, uh, uh, BP, uh, are looking at the price of solar in the future.

Bill Nussey:

And it's gonna go down to about 10, 5, 10, 15 cents a wat and batteries are falling the same curve, especially now that we're ramping up battery manufacturing around the world, to make electric cars as fast as we can get

Bill Nussey:

'em.

Bill Nussey:

Electric cars are hitting the tipping point today.

Bill Nussey:

So we're making batteries as a planet at a rate that is unprecedented.

Bill Nussey:

, for folks that listen in that, that don't have a background in business, uh, mass production of anything lowers its cost.

Bill Nussey:

And it's a standard rule.

Bill Nussey:

They teach you in business school.

Bill Nussey:

The first year of business school, the more factories you make, the cheaper something gets.

Bill Nussey:

That's why we we've come to expect it.

Bill Nussey:

Every new generation of our iPhone, it'll be faster.

Bill Nussey:

It'll have more memory.

Bill Nussey:

It'll have a better camera.

Bill Nussey:

We just expect that.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, but that's miraculous.

Bill Nussey:

No time in history has such feature capability grown so quickly.

Bill Nussey:

Well that same kind of mass production of electronics is exactly what's driving this disruption in energy.

Bill Nussey:

That's why solar and batteries not wind, not geothermal.

Bill Nussey:

Those are all great, but they're not technologies.

Bill Nussey:

You can't make them by the billions in factories.

Bill Nussey:

Like we do iPhones like we do, uh, flat screen televisions.

Bill Nussey:

Like we do solar panels and electric cars.

Bill Nussey:

So this is why these prices are gonna continue to decline.

Bill Nussey:

So today you and your husband and your neighbors might say, well, I'm gonna save 10 or 20%, maybe 30% if I put up the solar panels and then I'll have them paid off in seven to 10 years.

Bill Nussey:

And all my electricity from the panels is free after that.

Bill Nussey:

And, and, and maybe you're motivated cuz you want to, uh, make sure that as much of your electricity as possible is generated without fossil fuel combustion would go, you know, go for that.

Bill Nussey:

That's awesome.

Bill Nussey:

But in, in 10 years, even skeptics are gonna say, well, if I put solar today, it's gonna cut my bills by half, not by a 10 or 20%, but by half and in 30 or 40 years, it's gonna cut their bills by three quarters.

Bill Nussey:

And as I tell people, I do a lot of interviews over with people in Europe.

Bill Nussey:

And I said, one thing you can say about Americans, there's a lot of things you say about Americans, but you can, whether we're red or, or blue.

Bill Nussey:

To something you, you will never be able to go to Americans and say, uh, we would like to charge you quadruple what you should have to pay, because we wanna make

Bill Nussey:

No American is gonna put up with that.

Bill Nussey:

None.

Bill Nussey:

And that's what the utilities are facing.

Bill Nussey:

And that's why it's gonna be a disruption.

Catherine:

Oh, I love that word disruption and, and it has been happening.

Catherine:

Going back.

Catherine:

, when I was lobbying, I, I lobbied.

Catherine:

Uh,

Bill Nussey:

Wow.

Catherine:

uh when it had to do with the Arctic drilling.

Catherine:

I know when it had to do with the Arctic drilling.

Catherine:

Yep.

Catherine:

So I had to do a lot of research on energy that we don't need the fossil fuels that's up in the Arctic.

Catherine:

Right.

Catherine:

Uh, because we need to start moving and if we don't move, we're gonna be in an urgent situation, which I feel I'm sorry.

Catherine:

I feel that we're already in an yeah.

Catherine:

And

Bill Nussey:

2022 is the year that even the skeptics can't ignore that the earth is warming.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, well, there's a lot of money thrown around and I've got a lot of those numbers in freeing energy and also on my site, But the, the solar tax credit, which is, uh,

Bill Nussey:

But yeah, this is the one thing that's really interesting about these small scale system is they don't get as politicized as the very large scale systems.

Bill Nussey:

And, and even though I think most of the criticism of the large scale systems is political in nature and, and undeserved..

Bill Nussey:

But, uh, everybody loves the small scale systems.

Bill Nussey:

You know, the great story was out of Florida where all the Republican legislators voted for a bill to essentially make local solar unaffordable.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, and, uh, the investigative journalists, if I recall the story correctly, unearthed the email thread through a freedom of information act that showed that the word for

Bill Nussey:

And of course, everybody expected the governor of Florida, Ron DeSantis to rubber stamp it as well.

Bill Nussey:

But he was inundated because people like you and me, Catherine really care about this.

Bill Nussey:

They showed up in his doorstep and study after study, including, uh, done by Republican groups showed that 85% of Floridians wanted rooftop solar.

Bill Nussey:

So he, he was the shot heard around the world when Ron DeSantis vetoed the Bill and made, uh, solar continue to be affordable in the state of Florida.

Bill Nussey:

And, uh, so there's some real hope that the activism works.

Bill Nussey:

The work you did up in, uh, with fossil fuels in Alaska, but the amount of money that's spent on lobbying and maintaining the incumbency is extraordinary.

Bill Nussey:

But in the end, if enough people care and they say it only takes five or 6% of the population to start a movement.

Bill Nussey:

So if anybody in this, um, listens in on this wants to be part of the movement, you know, there's a lot of things you can do, including read the book and get some of your own ideas, find the

Bill Nussey:

if you wanna make solar available for everybody, uh, that you can get involved with in your community.

Bill Nussey:

This, we call it the local energy revolution.

Bill Nussey:

I have mugs that say 'local energy revolution.' I'll send you one, if you want Catherine.

Bill Nussey:

This is a, a very large movement that, uh, people are realizing it's not just about saving the earth.

Bill Nussey:

In fact, you don't have to care about the earth.

Bill Nussey:

You could be a complete climate denier and say, I think this is just cycles and moon or whatever it is that you're you, you read about.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, but guess what, you're gonna save money and guess what, uh, as the grid, whatever you, as a climate skeptic, think the grid issues are getting larger.

Bill Nussey:

Whatever the reason might be, um, guess what they are happening.

Bill Nussey:

It's a fact.

Bill Nussey:

And with solar and battery, uh, even the biggest climate skeptic can have comfort that he or she and their family will be safe during outages because of this local energy movement.

Bill Nussey:

So this is not political at all.

Bill Nussey:

This is a universal movement or across the planet, uh, to create resiliency and to save money.

Bill Nussey:

I oh, by the way, if you are as concerned about climate, as it sounds like you are an, I am, you might just save the planet too.

Catherine:

Yeah.

Catherine:

well, I've been working on that with other people for so long and it just, it gets frustrating after a while, and as an educator, we were at the mayor's office.

Catherine:

We had,

Bill Nussey:

I love it.

Catherine:

we had so many activities, but that was, in the nineties and in the mid two thousands.

Catherine:

Well, the mid

Bill Nussey:

And you know, back then the, what you, everything you were promoting was gonna cost money.

Bill Nussey:

Everything.

Bill Nussey:

It ha required tax, not just tax investments, but actual tax spending that had to go against things like schools and lowering taxes, so that what's changed in the last two or three years.

Bill Nussey:

And that's why I decided now was the time for me to get into this industry was for the first time solar battery wind.

Bill Nussey:

These are actually cheaper.

Bill Nussey:

So no longer is this an environmental movement.

Bill Nussey:

This is a business movement.

Bill Nussey:

And for all the folks like you, my deepest respects my deepest admiration for the work when you did, when you were trying to get people to pay a higher

Bill Nussey:

You don't have to make that trade off anymore.

Bill Nussey:

That's, what's so exciting.

Bill Nussey:

There's a great cartoon that's famous in the climate world.

Bill Nussey:

You may have seen it.

Bill Nussey:

And it's, , two people at a conference, uh, skeptics conference, climate skeptics conference, , and one says to the other, , what if this whole climate thing is a complete hoax?

Bill Nussey:

, we, we saved all this money and removed all this pollution and created all these jobs for nothing.

Bill Nussey:

It's like the, the joke is that we're doing so much good regardless of the climate,

Bill Nussey:

One of the things I love to point out to people is that if you build small scale solar, like on, on a mall or a school or a church or a mosque or your house, uh, versus you put a giant

Bill Nussey:

So if you're concerned about jobs, which every politician's concerned about, uh, every decision maker, every community cares about jobs, um, it, it's an amazing story.

Bill Nussey:

And the last story I would love if you're not familiar with it, um, and I should have, uh, should have brought this out from the very beginning.

Bill Nussey:

My favorite story about local energy, uh, is New Mexican story.

Bill Nussey:

This is actually the number one story I was gonna tell in my book, but for a variety of reasons, it, it didn't fit in the final versions.

Bill Nussey:

And I'll just give it to you very briefly.

Bill Nussey:

But for all of your listeners, especially if there's a lot in, in where you live, they should be inspired by this story.

Bill Nussey:

So, uh, Kit Carson is a small utility.

Bill Nussey:

I think I'll say 30 to 60,000 customers.

Bill Nussey:

A lot of utilities are very small

Bill Nussey:

So the story is amazing.

Bill Nussey:

So they decided that they wanted you, the kit Carson was served probably where you are served by a very large utility called Tristate, which is historically, uh, one of

Bill Nussey:

Some of them decided wouldn't it be great if we could have clean energy, solar and wind.

Bill Nussey:

So they went to tri-state and said, could we please buy clean energy instead?

Bill Nussey:

And I get the numbers wrong, but roughly they were paying about 14 cents a kilowatt hour, which is a little above average, but not crazy.

Bill Nussey:

tri-state came back as I understand it and said, pound sand.

Bill Nussey:

And they're like, no, no, we will pay more.

Bill Nussey:

We really wanna have it as an offering.

Bill Nussey:

And tri-state said, Nope, not interested.

Bill Nussey:

So Kit Carson did something that no small utility in the history the United States ever did.

Bill Nussey:

, they went to their giant feeder utility and said, well, we're gonna break off and get electricity ourselves.

Bill Nussey:

And tri-state said, sure, sure.

Bill Nussey:

They patted him on the head and sent 'em out.

Bill Nussey:

Kit Carson said, no, really we want do it.

Bill Nussey:

And so, uh, what, what would it cost to break our contract?

Bill Nussey:

And there's, there's a hundred, there's a three, I think there's a thousand of these in the United States where these, uh, they're called EMCs they're cooperatives run by

Bill Nussey:

And Tri-state's the big one where you live.

Bill Nussey:

And, uh, Tri-state came back and said, it's gonna be, uh, a hundred million dollars.

Bill Nussey:

And I, I don't remember Kit Carson's revenues, but they're, you know, nine, 10, 15 million.

Bill Nussey:

And, and so they thought that was the end of it.

Bill Nussey:

So this is what's really cool.

Bill Nussey:

The leaders of, of Taos got together, they talked to their citizens, they put out an RFP, they said we want someone to, to, to help us with this.

Bill Nussey:

And they had everyone in the country came to them, but they ended up picking a company out of Florida called Guzman, uh, which is a brilliant small, , expert in this area.

Bill Nussey:

And they put together a deal and they negotiated it down.

Bill Nussey:

And so they bought out, uh, the Tri-state contract, , for like $35 million.

Bill Nussey:

And this is where it gets really cool.

Bill Nussey:

So that's a lot of money and it kind of puts 'em underwater, but because there's wholesale markets for electricity, not these sort of long term contracts, which Tri-state loved monopoly, utility loved.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, they just went out and bought electricity on the market.

Bill Nussey:

And overnight, the next day, the electricity they were buying in the market was so much cheaper than the contract they'd been locked in to for 40 years, that they were able to lower the electricity rates.

Bill Nussey:

And again, I'll get the numbers wrong, but like from 14 cents to 12 cents immediately, but, and it's, they were buying it all, almost all the clean, they were buying

Bill Nussey:

The best part of the story was they, the people of Taos said, listen, we really want to, um, lower our price even more and want to be even cleaner.

Bill Nussey:

So then Guzman and kit Carson got together and they built, I think it was, uh, last count was seven.

Bill Nussey:

They went to each of the small communities in Taos and , they trained people in the community to be solar installers.

Bill Nussey:

They hired them to install like one megawatt size plants in the communities.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, and then they turned those things on.

Bill Nussey:

And I just saw something the other day that those small systems on sunny days are generating a hundred percent of the power and they own these systems.

Bill Nussey:

This is like farm to table uh, dream come true.

Bill Nussey:

And so they're generating and some days a hundred percent of their own electricity built by people who live in the community managed by people who live in the community.

Bill Nussey:

They own the system.

Bill Nussey:

So once they finish paying off the, the loan to build it in typically 3, 5, 7 years, the electricity will be free.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, and they're buying less and less electricity on the open market.

Bill Nussey:

And they can just continue to use all these savings to invest in more resiliency, more robust systems to create more jobs.

Bill Nussey:

This is the future of electricity and it, and I can't believe, I didn't think of this when you told me you lived in New Mexico, but the folks in Taos, the Kit Carson leaderships,

Bill Nussey:

And the whole world knows about them by the way.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, The entire world looks at and pays attention and has deep respects for the folks in Taos, New Mexico, the Northern part of the state that have done something that now dozens of other communities are trying to copy.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, Europe has passed laws.

Bill Nussey:

Imagine that they actually pass laws to make this doable and easy in Europe.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, the United States will eventually be shamed into copying those laws, but they'll fight it because, um, the Tri-states of the world really, really, really don't want this

Bill Nussey:

This is the better product a better price.

Bill Nussey:

And you cannot stop this.

Bill Nussey:

This is a, uh, uh, juggernaut.

Bill Nussey:

It may take a few years, but it's going to happen.

Bill Nussey:

Uh it's and we, I think a lot of people will say it started in New Mexico.

Catherine:

That is awesome.

Catherine:

Bill Nussey.

Catherine:

I hope your words of it will happen will hold true, because I'm, I'm really hoping.

Bill Nussey:

The person, that's the face of this is Louis Reyes, uh, uh, Louis Reyes.

Bill Nussey:

Who's the head of Kit Carson and he's travels around the world now talking to governments and to DC explaining this amazing story.

Bill Nussey:

And he was actually, he was, I have my own podcast, which people who loved this local energy would love for them to listen in.

Bill Nussey:

It's available everywhere.

Bill Nussey:

It's called freeing energy, easy to remember.

Bill Nussey:

And, uh, my first two interviews were the CEO of Guzman and the second one was Louis Reyes of Kit Carson.

Bill Nussey:

So freeing energy started in New Mexico.

Bill Nussey:

all freeing energy started in New Mexico.

Catherine:

all right.

Catherine:

Well, with, with that, do you have anything else you wanted to share about fossil fuels or anything else that we've missed?

Bill Nussey:

There's so much to cover.

Bill Nussey:

And that's why my book's a little long.

Bill Nussey:

I apologize for that.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, but it's, uh, if you're interested in this stuff, I think there's a lot of great resources, including freeing energy, but, I think that this is coming and

Bill Nussey:

This is, this is truly the local energy revolution.

Bill Nussey:

And it's starting now.

Bill Nussey:

And people will look back on this podcast and all the things you're talking about to realize that, um, they'll just wonder how do we ever live without it?

Bill Nussey:

How do we, how do we even imagine a world of just giant monopolies and giant power plants?

Bill Nussey:

Why did we even stay doing that so long?

Bill Nussey:

Um, it is gonna happen.

Bill Nussey:

I am absolutely positive and I really appreciate you sharing my, uh, my story and my enthusiasm for this, with your listeners.

Bill Nussey:

It's been a real real honor to be here today, and I hope that, uh, we can get a few more people to join the local energy revolution.

Catherine:

Oh, well, thank you for that bill Nesti.

Catherine:

And I wanna say that your book, you were talking about how, um, Investigative journalism is kind of going along the wayside.

Catherine:

Well, books are still there and your book definitely is investigative journalism.

Catherine:

So it, it definite yes, it's very good.

Catherine:

And it presents, different, perspectives and the different points and statistics and so on and so

Bill Nussey:

Well, one thing I tried to do that probably added a year to the process was that if you read most books about this space, including books, like

Bill Nussey:

So if you are interested or you're, you're skeptical, uh, or you are interested in doing more research, uh, you're kind of stuck.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, and what I, I have over 400 citations in this book, which is a big part of it.

Bill Nussey:

And many of those citations take you to my website, where I have spreadsheets lives, interactive spreadsheets, and you can see my source data and you can put in your

Bill Nussey:

I have tremendous respect for environmental groups, , and they are saving the world.

Bill Nussey:

Many people who are skeptical of this think they have an agenda.

Bill Nussey:

So what, like 99% of the data in the book is rock solid undisputed, government scientific sourced data.

Bill Nussey:

I don't cite environmentalists.

Bill Nussey:

Uh, I wanted to, but I wanted to make sure that someone was skeptical reading this.

Bill Nussey:

And they're gonna say, baloney, he's just cherry picking data.

Bill Nussey:

I wanted to have the most conservative objective, reliable sources of data throughout it.

Bill Nussey:

That's probably tripled the time to come up with the citations, but that's another part of the book that people that really wanted do their own research to kind of a dangerous term these days.

Bill Nussey:

But if you wanna really dive in and look at the sources and, and provide full skepticism, I hope that they, uh, are satisfied that I've produced a lot of supporting data and graphs that are very verifiable sources.

Catherine:

Well, I thank you for your hard work.

Catherine:

So I end with your last inspiring words, which of course you are inspiring.

Catherine:

The book is great, but what are your last inspiring words for the listeners?

Bill Nussey:

I'm going to read my favorite quote from the book.

Catherine:

Okay.

Bill Nussey:

When I think about the challenges and more the opportunities that we're facing, I think it comes together in a single quote by Robert F.

Bill Nussey:

Kennedy.

Bill Nussey:

And he said, "few will have the greatness to bend itself, but each of us can work to change a small portion of events.

Bill Nussey:

And in the total of all those acts will be written the history of this generation."

Catherine:

Bill Nussey,.

Catherine:

You're doing a great job with getting that word out and revolutionizing freeing energy.

Catherine:

I thank you so much for being here on the show.

Bill Nussey:

Thank you, Catherine.

Bill Nussey:

It's been an honor and a lot of fun.

Catherine:

Thank you.

Catherine:

Learn more about Bill and of course his book, Freeing Energy, go to freeingenergy.com.

Catherine:

You can also learn more about him and his work by searching Bill Nussey, B I L L N U S S E Y.

Catherine:

And of course, part one episode, 186 with Bill, is available here at your positive imprint or your favorite podcast platform?

Catherine:

This is a free podcast, but if you would like to buy me a salad or contribute to the financial production of this podcast I would certainly appreciate your support in any amount.

Catherine:

At this time, I can accept donations using PayPal.

Catherine:

My support link is paypal.com/PayPalme/your positive imprint.

Catherine:

And you can find this link on my website.

Catherine:

Thank you.

Catherine:

Well, I need to make changes to the launch schedule to twice a month.

Catherine:

October will be guest, Sayaka and reclaiming creations along with more information in October on plastics and our seas coming up October 10th.

Catherine:

To hear more about what people are doing around the world.

Catherine:

Go to yourpositiveimprint.com or of course follow or subscribe from your favorite podcast platform.

Catherine:

Thanks for listening.

Catherine:

Your positive imprint.