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Episode 225 – The Green Way Outdoors in Jackson Hole with Kyle Green
Episode 25519th January 2023 • The Jackson Hole Connection • Stephan C. Abrams
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Kyle Green is the Host and Executive Producer of The Green Way Outdoors a TV show, podcast, outdoor education series. The Green Way Outdoors is dedicated to inspiring a passion for fishing, hunting, and outdoor recreation among millennials and Gen-Z through engaging and informative content.

In this episode, Kyle and Stephan discuss why The Green Way Outdoors team is heading out to Jackson Hole to film an episode of their new show on the History Channel. From fishing and hunting, to the difficulties of shipping meat, car ride games, podcasting, living in Michigan, lost luggage, and the importance of fishing and hunting licenses for conservation, Kyle and Stephan will cover an eclectic range of topics. They'll also talk about how good the fishing is in Jackson Hole and the many dangerous ways you could meet your maker in the area.

To watch The Green Way Outdoors TV show and listen to their podcast visit TheGreenWayOutdoors.com

This week's episode is supported in part by Teton County Solid Waste and Recycling announcing this year’s Christmas tree drop-off. Live Christmas trees can be dropped-off at the Teton County Fairgrounds, for residents only, or at the Trash Transfer Station at no cost until January 31 st . All trees must be delivered undecorated and absolutely no tinsel please, as they will be composted. Thank you for keeping these materials out of the landfill. For more information visit tetoncountywy.gov/recycle.

Support also comes from The Jackson Hole Marketplace. The Deli at Jackson Hole Marketplace offers ready-made soups, sandwiches, breakfast burritos, and hot lunch specials. More at JHMarketplace.com 

Want to be a guest on The Jackson Hole Connection? Email us at connect@thejacksonholeconnection.com. Marketing and editing support by Michael Moeri (michaelmoeri.com)

Transcripts

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You are tuned into the Jackson hole, connection, sharing, fascinating stories

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of people connected to Jackson Hole.

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I am truly grateful for each of you for tuning in today and support

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for this podcast comes from:

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When I read and listen to books or whatever I'm listening to, I like to pick

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up ideas, and today I have a little quote for you that came from a recent idea.

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Hold the door open for a stranger today and say hello.

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An act of kindness will be paid forward in ways you won't see,

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but certainly you will feel good.

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that comes from me.

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So hope you enjoy it.

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Do something nice for another person.

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Random acts of kindness.

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And you are listening to episode number 225, and my guest today is

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Kyle Green, the host and executive producer of the Greenway Outdoors.

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Kyle and his buddies have a deep passion.

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To educate people about the great outdoors and to encourage more people to

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build an interest to be in the outdoors.

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Kyle and his team connected with me because they're working on a little

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project out here in this area with the Game and Fish department and trust

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me, this is really interesting what he and his crew are getting ready to do.

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Or when you listen to this, maybe they've already done it.

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Kyle and his team have been on many adventures together in the outdoors.

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I've watched several of his YouTube videos and It's very entertaining

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to see him and I feel that it's easy to connect with Kyle.

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Kyle and his team have been on many adventures together in the outdoors

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with the mission to bring their experiences to people around the globe

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finding that spark, helping fire it.

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Of people's interests to begin building their own outdoor experiences.

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Kyle and I speak on a few topics today, little go all over the

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place, and I know you too.

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After this conversation will have an appreciation for a DeLorean time machine

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Kyle, thank you for joining me here today at the Jackson Hole Connection.

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It's a delight and honor to have somebody of your fame and, internet

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prowess join me here at, at the Jackson Hole Connection today.

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Thank

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you.

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Well, that, thank you for the introduction and I'm ex I'm excited to be here.

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You guys are a good fit for exactly what we got going on, so I was pumped to do it.

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Well, you're very welcome, Kyle.

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You're, you're not really connected to Jackson Hole yet, but you

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will be very, very soon because you're coming out this way.

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And let's start off with you telling the listeners where were you raised

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and and now where are you living

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as well?

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Yeah, so I grew up, in Michigan.

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I grew up in a town called Madison Heights, Michigan.

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And I went to Laur High School.

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It's a small town you've probably heard of Eight Mile,

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because of, because of m and m.

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So I grew up on 12 Mile, so not that far.

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You know, there's only a four mile, stretch between the, between the two.

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I grew up in that area, in the city, but I had incredible parents, super

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amazing foundation church every Sunday, good Christian people that, you know,

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taught me the values of hard work.

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and I live a little bit farther north now in a town called Fenton, Michigan,

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which I am determined to think just like Jackson Hole seems to be the center of

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the universe, because everywhere we go, everybody knows, or at least has heard

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of or has a relative that lives in.

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And, uh, our studio here.

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It's kind of a cool building.

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We're right on the, the main street here.

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And, it was a house at one point, like a six bedroom house, and then

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it was converted into businesses, but it was built in the 1930s.

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and then, it was converted into commercial space.

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And then we kind of like all the guys, we each have like our own bedroom,

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if you will, and then, uh mm-hmm.

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. Um, Um, and then we kind of turn those into our offices.

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And then we've got, one of 'em here is obviously our podcast studio,

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which is where I'm at today.

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but the community here is really cool.

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In Fenton, it's, you have like the downtown, like historic, like

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classic downtown stuff with like small shops and boutiques and

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restaurants and things like that.

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And then surrounding.

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Is nothing but freshwater lakes, tons of 'em.

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I mean, we've got something like 30 within 20 miles or something like that.

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So, I love the water and obviously fishing's a big part

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of what we do, so it's kind of a good fit for us in this town.

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that's a lot of lakes and Oh, we're nothing but lake.

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You're not even in, Minnesota.

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The lake.

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Yeah.

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And that the land of . Right.

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Of, of lakes.

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but Michigan's known for its outdoor activities for sure.

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So as you mentioned, you're in your podcast studio, you're a podcaster.

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What.

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Is your podcast that

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you have.

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So it's called The Greenway Outdoors, and that goes hand in hand with our TV show.

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Everything kind of falls under that brand.

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I got the logo on my hat here.

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But so we have the main TV show, we've got the podcast, and then we have an

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online series called the Hunt Series.

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And then in addition to that we have a How to encyclopedia called

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our Outdoor Education series.

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So we've kind of got those four different platforms.

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Our podcast is probably my favorite thing to.

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because it's just me, the core team, the producer, the director of the

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main TV show, and then my best friend who's the other host on the show.

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It's the four of us, talking about everything that's

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going on in the outdoors.

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But you know, we also talk about things like the movie Back to

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the Future and everything else.

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You can pretty much imagine that we got going on.

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That four guys that travel the world together, the stories we

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have are often, pretty interesting.

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So,

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ooh, well I like interesting stories.

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And your, your podcast.

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How can people find your podcast?

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And.

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Maybe give, a topic of what one of your recent episodes is, or if you

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wanna talk about back to the future.

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I'm happy to talk about that as

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well.

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I can talk about back in the future all day.

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, we have a, we have a game actually.

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the director and I, when we're, when we're traveling, we go, we obviously have

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a lot of long car rides and we have to take boats, places and things like that.

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We, luckily we get to fly to Jackson Hole, which is nice, but we have this

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game we play that our producer hates, where AJ and I will listen to Movie

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one, two, or three of back the future.

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And whoever can say a line before it happens gets like points.

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And the less significant the line, the more points you get.

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Because if you say like, You know that's your name, isn't it?

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Kelvin Klein.

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It's written all over your underwear.

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That's not worth much because everyone knows that line.

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But if you can say something that's super off the wall, like he's

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gonna be like, oh, grab that cup.

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You're gonna get major laughs and points out of it.

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Unfortunately for Ryan, he's heard the movie 50 times, so he's

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ready to kill us all with it.

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But back to the future's a big one on the podcast itself.

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Like I said, it's the four of us.

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The, the core.

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And, one of the topics that we talked about recently was, one of our most

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popular episodes is called Ship This.

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And it was, uh, this insane story about how we went paddle fishing in Oklahoma

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and we were trying to ship meat back.

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and this lady, I, the, the entire story's on that, so I won't, I won't

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bore you with all the details, but basically this lady at, the post

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office put us through the ringer, but we're in the middle of nowhere, so she

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was the only one that could help us.

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She sent us to like this library and this tin building where we had to try

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and print out these, these forms that we had to sign for her in order to put it as

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hazardous material because we use dry ice.

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And then we brought it back and she said we couldn't use dry.

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So then we had to take that off and then she sent us to Walmart to get

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these packages and then we had to try and freeze the stuff with the dry ice.

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So we went to Sonic and got food in the meantime cuz it was the only restaurant

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around within like a hundred miles.

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Anyhow, she put us through this ringer and the story itself is really funny.

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But then with that, we teach our viewers what we learned about the best way to

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ship meat back when you're traveling.

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And it's not through the post.

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It is a no, you know, so.

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Mm-hmm.

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, we actually have this system in place where we buy, we go to

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the store and we buy coolers.

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The cheapest, you can find like $20 coolers with the wheels, you know, you

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can get those Coleman ones for 20 bucks.

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Mm-hmm.

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and uh, we'll stuff the meat in there and then put the ice packs

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in there, and then duct tape.

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The everliving crap out of it.

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And then we check it like luggage.

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You just gotta make sure it's like 40 pounds or 50 pounds

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depending on the flight.

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And we'll check it like luggage, and sometimes they'll cut into it, but it's

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their responsibility If they cut in your luggage that they have to retape it so you

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like hand it off and you're good to go.

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Now you're only paying like $25 for the bag.

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as opposed to the 300, it would be to send it back to Michigan from wherever we are.

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So that is a little tip As far as where they can find the podcast, it's

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mostly, watched actually our podcast, the video form does, it represents

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89% of our viewership that can be found on YouTube and also carbon tv,

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uh, which is carbon TV, is where a majority of our viewership comes.

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And then the audio version, if we're too ugly to look at, you can basically

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find that anywhere podcasts are found.

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Oh super.

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I think it's hilarious how you mentioned about shipping back meat.

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Cause I've talked to plenty of people who have gone fishing in Alaska, but

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out here it's a big hunting community.

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And in the fall you have the hunters coming out and.

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, of course, they want to take home their game.

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And I got a buddy, he owns this company called Jackson

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Hole, Buffalo Meat Companies.

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It's got Chris o Lynes and because he ships so much meat through the

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carriers, he, um, he gets these special rates and he's got it dialed.

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Yeah.

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For, he's got a system.

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Mm-hmm.

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. So a lot of.

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Outfitters go to him to ship back the meat that their clients kill.

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But I've, I've run into the same thing that you're talking about as

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before, cuz I grew up in Louisiana.

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I went to Louisiana once and I wanted to bring back, you know,

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Anne Dewey, sausage and alligator and crawfish and bring back shrimp.

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And what you said about the cooler, that was money man.

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. And another pro tip is if you get yourself on a frequent flyer, program mm-hmm.

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with one of those companies, one of those airlines, you don't have to pay the $25

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Yeah.

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I, uh, um, we're all with Delta here, so we get the first bag for

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free and then I think the second one is something like 25 after that.

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But we're all with Delta cuz that's, we fly so much.

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That's been our best experience so far, but mm-hmm.

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. Yeah, we've, we have plenty of lost baggage stories, I'll tell you that.

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Oh, I'm, I'm actually a little scared with Jackson Hole because we fly to

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Indiana, and we're there for a day.

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Then we fly to, we have two stops, I think one.

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Minnesota and then one in Utah and then up to you guys or something like that.

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That was like the best way to do Delta.

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And I'm like, man, with all those connections, if our camera equipment

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doesn't arrive, that's not good.

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You know?

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So that, that had me a little worried.

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They're pretty good.

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My guess is you're going to Indiana to Minneapolis.

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Minneapolis over to Salt Lake City.

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That is it, which is the main hub, and then Salt Lake

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City up to here.

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Yeah.

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And I like going to Jackson Hole.

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You guys don't even have, like, you get off the plane on stairs

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and then you're just outside.

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That's right.

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Yeah.

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I'd never seen that.

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Well, do you know what's unique about our airport here?

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What's that?

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It is the only, f a a, from my understanding, it is the only f a, a

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approved airport inside of a national.

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Commercial airport inside of the

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National Park.

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Oh, that sounds very yellow.

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Stoney.

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You know, like the show, Yellowstone

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, like the, like the show, the Yeah.

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That type

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of yellow stoney.

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Yeah, that type of Yellowstone.

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Cause that's the whole thing.

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They're trying to build an airport on the, on his land or something.

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And he's trying to stop 'em.

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Yes.

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Just gave me Yellowstone vibes.

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. Mm-hmm.

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. Well, this was done a long time ago, , and you can thank, Rockefeller

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for having the park created.

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Okay.

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Okay.

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Yeah, he, he's the one that bought up a lot of the land and donated it.

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For sure.

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That's awesome.

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so Kyle, tell us.

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What's gonna bring you and your crew out here to Jackson?

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I mean, are you coming to go ice fishing or are you looking to look

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at the stars unencumbered skies?

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What, what's happening?

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Well, right now we're currently in production.

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We have, some exciting news that our show is actually going to be coming

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to the outdoor block on the history channel, in the second half of 2023.

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So we're currently in production filming for that.

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And one of the things is we came out to Jackson, to actually,

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you guys kind of have like that tri-state area thing going on right?

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Where you're at and, uh, we actually work with Idaho Fishing Game in the past, and

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we're coming out to Jackson Hole because we're going to be working with the DNRs

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there to do obviously some ice fishing.

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But what's happening is, especially in Idaho, what they're doing is

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the DNR does surveys to find out what the community wants as far

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as the funds, how they want it.

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You know, you know in nature.

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So you buy a hunting or fishing license and then they do a survey

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and say, okay, how do you want us to spend that money you gave us?

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And one of the things was, throughout the tri-state area, I know you're not supposed

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to probably call it tri-state area, but in that area that you guys are in the hub of.

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they wanted these remote lake stocks because you guys have the Snake River.

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You have all these different rivers that people fly all over the world

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to to fish, and the tourists come.

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Well, the locals there wanted these remote lakes stocked in the mountains

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that don't normally have fish.

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The reason they don't have fish already is because birds carry eggs to

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different bodies of water, and that's how fish populations get established.

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Well, up in the mountains, 30, 40 miles, there's not a lot of birds

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taking eggs from one spot to the other.

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So because of that, there's no fish in there.

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So they take Henry's Lake, which is in Idaho.

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They take fish out of there and then stock it in these remote lakes.

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So what we're coming to do for the show, for the outdoor block on the

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History channel is to, go there, take a survey of Henry's lake, look at what

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fish are there, see how healthy they are, and then go to these remote lakes.

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Take snowmobiles 30, 40 miles in the mountains and find out,

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hey, did these remote lake.

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Did the stocking work in these lakes and kind of do that survey that way when

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the summer comes or the spring comes and it's time for the locals to run

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away from the river spots that all the tourists are coming to, we'll be able

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to tell them, Hey, there is fish there.

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We went there in the winter and this is what we found.

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This is what you can expect to catch.

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This is the situation you're gonna be looking at.

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So all tying back to, as most of our episodes do of the main TV show, is to

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talk about a conservation message and how conservation's being used appropriately.

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That is so cool.

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And we're gonna break some of that down, Kyle, but first, because I

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need a little bit of clarity here.

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What's a d n r?

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well, I guess in Michigan we call him d n R.

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You guys call him what you'd say?

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Phish and game.

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So that's the, oh, okay.

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Yeah.

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That's your branch of government that manages the, the wildlife.

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Okay.

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you gonna be working with, Rob Howell over.

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No, the, do you know who

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you're working with?

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The gentleman I'm working with, his name is Brett High, so he's a, he's

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a brilliant biologist, so, yeah.

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Okay.

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He'll, he'll be the one taking me around.

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And, like I said, we worked, we actually worked with Brett, when we

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did the Cutthroat Trout episode, we were talking about how in the, snake

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River, the South Fork, what, what's happening is the native cutthroat.

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are losing the competition against the mm-hmm.

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introduced, rainbow trs, very fascinating.

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Rainbow Trout were actually brought into the Snake River, the South Fork

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specifically, to help with food.

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So when people were coming back from World War ii, they wanted to fish for food.

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Well, they were catching cutthroat trout and they were catching 'em.

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Buy the lot and they were eating everything they caught.

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They weren't catching release fishing, hadn't even been invented yet, you know?

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and they were catching, eating everything.

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Well, we saw the cutthroat trout numbers going down so significantly that we

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said, okay, we gotta put a stop to it.

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Well, at the time they had like this huge supply of rainbow trout

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fry, so they, decided to release 'em into the, the South Fork.

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And it really worked.

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You know, the rainbow trout did really well.

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Rainbow trout are super aggressive.

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And not only that they could interbreed with, the native cutthroat.

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So what we saw was, I should say we, cuz I wasn't even thought of, I don't even

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know if my dad was thought of it this time, , but the native cutthroat trout.

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were getting outcompeted by the rainbow trout, but it didn't matter because

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all the anglers were letting the, cutthroat trout go and the rainbow

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trout they were keeping and eating.

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So it was working out.

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The rainbow trout actually saved the cutthroat.

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Well, now fast forward, to, you know, 20 20, 20 21, 20 22, and now 2023.

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Can you believe it?

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Then 2020 sound like it would've been a year ago, and now it's three.

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Uh, but, Fast forward to now.

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You have a lot of people catch and release fishing.

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You have a lot of people.

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You have a lot less people interested in fishing.

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And so what's happening is the rainbow trout numbers aren't being

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knocked down and because they're not being knocked down, they're

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interbreeding with the cutthroat.

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They're out-competing them for food.

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They're beating them in every way.

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They're more aggressive with breeding.

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So now the rainbow trout numbers are skyrocketing.

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And now we have a real fear of losing the cutthroat trout because why?

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they're inner breeding, so half of them are going, you

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know, they're half seas now.

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You know, they're a mix.

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So purebred cutthroats are becoming increasingly rare.

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So what we did was we went in and we shocked the waters, collected all the

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rainbow trout, and transported them to a different river where those trout

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could still give fisherman opportunity.

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, but wouldn't impact the native cutthroat trout to try and save

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the native cutthroat trout.

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And the number you're looking for is 30%.

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If you can knock down about 30% of the Pop, the Rainbow trout population.

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Then it's kind of like a snowball going down a hill where it'll continue

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to grow and grow and grow and grow where the, the, the numbers, if you

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will, of the rainbow truck will start to go down and the cutthroat can,

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you know, claim their waters again.

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Because when the dn, the dnr, fish and game, I should call 'em there,

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did their surveys, the number one most important thing over

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everything to the community there in Jackson Hole and Idaho all around.

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was, we want our native cutthroat trout, the Yellowstone cutthroat trout,

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to be around for future generations cuz they're supposed to be here.

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They were not introduced, they were here.

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You know?

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For hundreds, thousands of years.

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So we want to keep 'em.

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Mm.

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So that's what we did was help, help that process and kind of

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highlight what's going on there.

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And, they're making a dent.

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They're working, they're, they're doing well.

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there's some pushback from some of the community.

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The other side is people think, like, they're like, leave all the fish.

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We want to catch 'em all.

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Don't move 'em to other waters.

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And this sort of thing.

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But I think the, the counterpoint to what the fishing game is doing,

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is a little silly, but we actually had people put stickers on our car.

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Picket and stuff like that when we were there filming it because

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they were majorly against us.

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They just didn't understand that we were taking the cut the rainbow trout

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and moving them to other waters that would still give everyone there the

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opportunity to fish for those fish.

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the mortality rate was only, I think five out of 900 fish we moved.

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So it, it's not like we harmed any, we just moved him to a different water

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where they wouldn't out-compete with the cutthroat and now there's more cut.

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because they can mm-hmm.

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, they can breed better.

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So there's actually more fish overall by transporting some, and

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it's just trying to get people to understand the science behind that.

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But that was the episode.

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Very interesting.

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That, that is fascinating.

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and you, you hear about it in, in the paper quite a bit in this area.

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and in Yellowstone they have, I, I don't know a lot about fish.

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You're so, you'll know more about this.

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I think they have the brown trout.

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up in Yellowstone Lake and they're so aggressive.

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They're taking over, the native lake trout that are up there,

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which could be the cutthroat.

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I know there is a fish up there that if you

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catch it, it probably is the cutthroat that you're worried about.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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Y you, if you up in Y Lake Yellowstone, if you catch that

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fish, you keep all you want.

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Oh,

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they, yeah.

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So that the rainbow trout there actually the nago shock there.

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There was talk.

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making it illegal to throw back rainbow trout.

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And I don't think it ever stuck, but I could be.

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But I know that there was talk of it.

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But then you get into like weird waters, right?

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Where you're like telling people what they can and can't

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do when they, when they fish.

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And anytime that happens, things get a little, a little funky too.

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Mm-hmm.

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. And you don't want people keeping fish that aren't gonna eat 'em.

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Cause at the end of the day, a life is a life.

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. That's right.

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Now I, I like what you said for the people to go up into the mountains in the summer

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and then you said the spring to go fish.

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And I'm just curious, Have you been out here to go fishing in

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the spring or, or the summer

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before?

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Just when we filmed that episode, it was in the spring.

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Uhhuh.

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. That's when they were doing all the shocking and stuff

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and talk about gorgeous.

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Okay.

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I mean, talk about gorgeous, the water's there.

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You guys don't know what you have.

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You do not know what you have.

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You go when in Michigan, if you're, it's kind of funny, I took my girlfriend

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out trout fishing and we were catching brook trout and stuff like this

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big and getting jacked up about it.

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And I don't even have the heart to tell her.

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She'll probably see this, but I don't have the heart to tell her.

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Like, if we go out to Jackson Hole and we hit up the rivers out there,

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you're gonna be catching rainbow trout the size of footballs all day long.

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and it's just the best meat, I mean, fatty, rich protein.

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So good for you.

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I'm just obsessed with the fish out there, you guys, and it's so funny

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when we're with people, I'm like, you don't understand what you have.

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Like every fish I was catching, I'm like, hooting and hollering and so pumped up

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and excited and they're like, it's a fish.

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I'm like, you don't get it.

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You don't get it.

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You don't know what you have here and how special it is.

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Now I, I'm, I'm very curious, do you know the elevation that you're going to?

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Because I know there's a, a lake that I hike to, and I've been

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up there in July, like July 4th before, and the lake's still frozen.

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Wow.

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Yeah.

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yeah, so it is, I don't know the exact elevation because Uhhuh right

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now there's about six or seven different lakes that are being,

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Decided on by Fish and Game by Brett.

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He's kind of making the choice of like which ones we're gonna go to

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and which ones would be best for the show and that sort of thing.

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And he's been out like scouting and taking the snowmobiles out ahead of time.

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And, so I don't know the exact ones, but I know the elevation is big enough.

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We actually, and this is a bit of a shameless plug though, but,

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we have a sponsor, it's called Wilderness Athlete, and they make

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something called Altitude Advantage.

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And we're all taking it right now because we do believe that we'll be

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over 10,000 feet for at least some of it because, you know, if you're not

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used to it, you can get you can get sick, just, you know, altitude sickness.

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And this actually supplement is supposed to prevent it.

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So I'm a little bit relieved because I've gotten altitude sick.

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and someone on else on the team has.

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So I'm a little relieved that I kind of have a system in place now

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that I don't think that'll happen.

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. Well, I please let me know

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Mm-hmm.

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because, We hear about it quite a bit out here of people getting altitude

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sickness, and I have a good, good buddy, my best friend, and he gets altitude

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sickness, and I know he would love to know of a non-prescription type of

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Yeah, you can solution, you can buy it right on their website.

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It's, it's called the Wilderness Athlete is the name of the company.

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Mm-hmm.

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and they make all kinds of incredible supplements.

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What's incredible about them is their science base and,

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the scientists that they.

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that actually construct this stuff.

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And it, like, once you know how they make supplements, I'm scared to death

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to take anything else because then you learn what most companies do.

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And, this supplement specifically is called Altitude Advantage,

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and it's, it's pretty awesome.

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That's cool.

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Yeah.

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Hey Kyle, we're gonna take a quick break to get a word from one of our

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sponsors, and then when we come back I want to hear more about how your shows

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got picked up by the History channel.

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Perfect.

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Kyle, welcome back.

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I tell you, I'm learning a lot from you and I so respect your knowledge of the

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outdoors and with this area, and I'm very grateful that you take an interest

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in our native biology out here as well.

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Regards to the cut native cutthroat and how you can help with maintaining that

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fish population in these waters out here.

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And it's, it's wonderful that as an outdoors person, that you don't just

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talk about it, but you're actually taking action and action can make

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such a difference in, in our world.

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And you also said earlier that your show was just picked.

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to be on the History Channel.

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Mm-hmm.

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give us the title of the show.

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you might have already said it, you probably already said it already,

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but, what does this mean for you and what should people expect to see?

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Can you give a little

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tickler?

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Yeah, I, I, I'll, I'll say exactly what I'm allowed to say, and then I'll

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branch, I'll branch out from there.

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I know what's kind of funny is, um, now there's like, and

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this is like new for us, right?

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When now there's like specific things I can and can't say,

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and it's never been that way.

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but just get a flex capacitor and you'll be good.

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There you go.

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I love it.

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. I love the back.

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That's awesome.

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when this thing goes 88 miles per hour?

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No.

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Um,, so we're currently in production and obviously we're super excited about it

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and we're creating, a 10 episode series.

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It is gonna just still be called The Green Outdoors, so it is our show.

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It's the same one we've.

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For the last seven years, it is still the same name and it's still the same

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show that, you know, our audience knows.

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And it's gonna be in the outdoor block on the History Channel, which as of

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right now, if you were to turn on the History Channel is on Saturdays.

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so, it's gonna be in the second half of the year.

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I know when it is, but things change all the time and, with television.

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So I have to be really careful about specific dates and stuff.

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But it'll be in the second half.

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And this episode that we're.

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Assuming I don't get hit by a Mack truck or something while we're there,

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although maybe even then, we'll be one of the episodes in that series.

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That is super.

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Well, let's get real getting hit by a Mack truck.

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Pretty limited.

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Yeah.

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But you are coming out to the wilderness, so let's talk about what could happen.

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you could.

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, you could disturb a bear in hibernation.

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Mm-hmm.

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getting eaten by a bear.

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if you're really, really lucky, there are wolverine out this way.

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That's super.

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Don't know.

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Super cool.

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I don't know if they're known to have them in Idaho, but Wolverine travel

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like mad and they're so elusive.

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And we're from Michigan and I've never seen one.

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We got the Michigan Wolverines and I've never seen one in person.

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There's very few people that have seen.

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A Wolverine.

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Mm-hmm.

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. It's almost like that.

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The snow leopard.

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Yeah.

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They're, they're so rare to see.

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And, what else could happen?

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Could fall into a lake.

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You could fall through the ice.

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Yeah.

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. Yeah.

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Just, just natural.

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So I, I don't foresee you getting hit by Mack truck.

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Yeah, there's, there's plenty of bad things that could happen that I

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don't even gotta make up that one.

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Yeah, I think the snow, no, I, I think we're supposed to be going

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something like, 35 miles on snow machines into the mountains.

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So I can probably think of about 20 things that can happen on the way up there.

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That'll be interesting.

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I, I believe the ice should be so thick that I think we'll be safe on that bet.

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but out there it's more or less you don't wanna get stranded.

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That's the biggest thing is you don't wanna get stranded out there.

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And, we carry like, pack out bars and uh, obviously supplements and food

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and things like that, but you gotta be kind of prepared for anything.

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And then when you have the camera crew out there, especially.

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You know, I feel like I have a whole other group of people that I have

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to look out for, not just myself.

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So we're, it's quite the tribe going out there too, so it should be interesting.

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We'll have about six people out there, so it'll be really fun.

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Well, well, I'm glad that you said preparation because your show,

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your site where you go onsite or on location is in the outdoors.

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Mm-hmm.

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, everything about the outdoors is.

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Unpredictable because it's nature.

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And you said preparation.

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What are some of the steps, the stages to prepare not just you and

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your team, but as you said, you have this whole camera crew, right?

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And do you have to find a camera crew that is used to being in the outdoors,

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especially winter temperatures.

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I'm not the only only owner of the company, and matter of fact, my

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entire team is made up of owners.

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Everybody on my team owns a piece, and I have the most

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ruthless, hardworking, dedicated.

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I mean, I was at the office last night until one 30 in the morning,

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and I was here at seven 50 this morning and my team was with me.

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So I have the most dedicated team on the face of the earth.

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No one works harder than them.

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They are used to being exposed to the worst situations.

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We'll go days without sleep.

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They're used to living, you know, in tents.

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They're used to being dropped off at cliffs in Hawaii.

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We're used to being, you know, spearfishing underwater in Mexico

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with sharks surrounding us.

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Like these are the things that my team is used to.

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it's made up of all my best.

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We call ourselves a traveling fraternity.

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so it's just me and all of my best friends creating the content together and

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following our dreams of eventually, you know, making it to a, a, a big network.

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So they are always ready.

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aj our director, he's in charge of making sure all the camera equipment

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stuff is the way it has to be.

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He kind of took that job on himself, cuz he's like very

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anal about how everything is.

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but the preparation with the cameras is like, we have to have so many batteries.

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that are charged.

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Mm-hmm.

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and ways to charge it.

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Like, we take generators almost everywhere we go.

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We got a little generator that, you know, runs a, a couple camera chargers

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and stuff like that cuz you're in the wilderness, you know what I mean?

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There's no way to mm-hmm.

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unless you turn it, you know, so cameras are big.

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And also in the cold, the camera batteries die really fast.

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and that, that's, that's something that we have to prepare for.

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I'm the one that always thinks about the food, so, Packing

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food and stuff like that.

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Normally in my pack is always like tons and tons of food.

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I will.

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that one of the things that we discovered in our, our travels is like you ever,

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you know how like astronauts and stuff always complain about the food and people

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are always talking about like how bad, rehydrated meals are and stuff like that.

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the last couple years, they have gotten really good, like

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the peak ones are really good.

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The, the, I think blue something, I forgot what it's called, have

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gotten like incredibly good.

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The best ones are like the egg scramble one.

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. And then, and then I also really like the, like chicken and rice ones, like

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the, the kind of more like Chinese food, like teriyaki type ones.

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Mm-hmm.

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. But they've actually gotten really good to the point where

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we kind of look forward to 'em.

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So we pack a lot of those.

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Hmm.

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So we, uh, we always have waterproof matches with us.

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because that's always really important.

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Every one of us has at least one knife on us, and obviously

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to protection of a firearm.

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We always have a, a, a savage on us in some way, shape or form with,

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nosler ammunition in it to keep safe.

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So we always have guns, ammunition, knives, and and plenty of food.

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Mm-hmm.

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to, to get us out of there.

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And then so far that's kept us alive.

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. Well, I'm thrilled to hear that you,

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Also, yeah.

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Being out here in the winter, it is the worst enemy for batteries.

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Mm-hmm.

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recently since Covid.

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And you see so many people moving out here that now have electric cars and , they're,

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I didn't even think about it.

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Charging.

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It's very funny.

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Yeah.

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E even charging your car indoor.

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As soon as you drive it outside and it's negative 10 outside your

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battery life has just lost 20, 30%.

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No

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kidding.

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Just pull outta the garage.

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I never thought about that variable.

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Never thought about that variable.

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what,

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what about communication for when you all are out there?

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What type of devices are you taking?

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Because when you're out.

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The wilderness outdoors, the chances of you having cell phone reception

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is limited because I know I've been out there and I know I carry now

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carry a device after I was, as my friend said, you didn't get lost.

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You got disoriented,

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. . You know what we take?

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and we're not even sponsored by this company.

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We have Garmin inReach.

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I got one of those.

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Yeah.

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And.

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You know, it's a little funny.

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the first time we took it out, we, you realize that there's like, you can't

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make your texts very long and they, you know, it can be an hour until

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the other person received your text.

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So don't mm-hmm.

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. And then, and then sometimes they come outta order, but, With all of that

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said, it's really nice that you can, you can actually reach people, back

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home and just say, Hey, I'm not dead.

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and that mm-hmm.

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, it only works with techs and there is an sos so you can buy

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the insurance through there.

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So if you press the SOS people are coming.

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So you can buy the, you can buy like an insurance policy.

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It's not very expensive.

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I wanna say it's under $20 or something like that a month that you have it.

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You can't, you can only turn it on the month you need it and that sort of thing.

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So it's not that big a deal.

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and we, you have the insurance policy.

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He needed to be helicoptered out of there or something.

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You could.

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So for the budget, that's really good.

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As far as like actually getting around, we use OnX.

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so if you're familiar with OnX Hunt, basically it's a mobile application that

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has all of the boundaries and all of the maps and all of the things that you could

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possibly need to know on your phone.

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It also will keep you from trespassing, cuz like it, let's say

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you're, you're, you're on, public land, but you're near private land.

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You'll know exactly where the lines.

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if you should shoot a deer and it goes onto the private land, it can

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show you how to get in contact.

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It shows you the address of the person so that you can get in contact with them,

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so you can get permission to go on there.

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and the other thing is it can work offline.

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So if you don't have service, it'll still work.

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You just download the maps to your phone ahead of time and

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you can get really detailed.

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That thing saves us more often than that.

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That, that, that's a, that's a big.

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That's awesome because there are talking about fishing.

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I was talking to an old timer out here and he loves going fishing.

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I mean, this is a guy that came out here.

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Back in the late sixties to start rock climbing.

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And he was rock climbing with Yvonne Shinard back then.

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Okay.

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but now he just loves to go fishing.

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And he said the thing that he finds a lot of times is because there's

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so much ranch land out here, that it's figuring out who owns the.

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To be able to get access so he can get to the B l M land or the Forest

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Service land, cuz people's private land, borders that area and you need access.

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Sure.

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You, you gotta ask, ask for that.

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Be to be able to go fish.

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And that's kind of his thing is he travels around in his van and fishes.

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I like it.

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. I like, that's not mm-hmm.

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That's my backup plan.

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I'll tell you that right now.

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. Well, I bet you will find it out how

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Yeah.

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And, you know, talking about communication, the thing that I

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found out was, even though you don't have cell phone reception, your

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phone will pick up GPS on occasion.

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Mm.

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and, and that's how I was able to communicate was it picked up

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g p s and I also learned from the search and rescue out here.

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Another thing to do is take an extra, a backup battery and

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make sure you have a cable.

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Hook your phone up to it, so if your phone starts dying, because it takes

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so long to communicate through that.

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the inReach, you can charge your phone.

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Yeah.

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That is smart.

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Yeah.

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One of those wireless, or wired, they're just like those little boxes

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that you can charge 'em ahead of time and then plug your phone into that.

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That's right.

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Yep.

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Yeah, those are nice to have.

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Absolutely.

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And so Kyle, how.

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Did you come up?

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What is your why of you and your fraternity friends here that this,

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this group of business owners, what was your why to come up with this

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platform of what you guys are doing?

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Because I can certainly see your passion for it and people don't work like you're

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working and your crew, your team are working, your partners are working.

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unless you're really passionate about something.

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Yeah.

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I thank you for asking me that.

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our why is this 60% of hunting and fishing licenses are sold to

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white males over the age of 55.

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Now, I gave you the example of the cutthroat trout and how that works

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and how, how important the sale of fishing licenses is to make sure that

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we have cutthroat trout in the future.

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Matter of fact, if we didn't have those licenses, you guys wouldn't

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have cutthroat t trout anymore.

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I can almost guarantee that once those Rainbow T Trout went in,

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it would've never looked back.

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Not only that, our species sustainability efforts, which is like the cutthroat,

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our forests, our national parks, our clean water, ba, our fish stocking

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efforts, all of those things, there's more whitetail deer in North America

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than ever in recorded history.

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Right now, as you and I sit here today than ever in recorded history, because of

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the sale of hunting and fishing licenses fund the conservation of the species.

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So in 1960 in Michigan, the Wild Turkey was just about.

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Now there's a huntable.

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You're kidding?

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Yeah.

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Now there's a Huntable population and either, I think it's like 48

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states or something like that.

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There's a huntable population, and because.

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People put in money towards conservation and bought Turkey licenses and

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organizations like the National Wild Turkey Federation came about to help

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save the Turkey, reintroduce 'em.

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So now when I go Turkey hunting and I buy my Turkey license, I am

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affecting, basically getting 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 new turkeys into

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the wild, and I'm only taking one.

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So buy hunting for Turkey.

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I am causing there to be more turkeys through conservation,

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the sale of that license.

Speaker:

Not to mention we we're not that far from Flint, Michigan, and I probably,

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you've probably heard about their water that's being cleaned up right now by

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the sale of Duck hunting licenses.

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Nobody knows this stuff.

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No kidding.

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Nobody knows this stuff.

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So the sale of hunting and fishing licenses and the work of our conservation

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organization such as Ducks Unlimited, national Wild Turkey Federation,

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those organizations and those types of organizations, that money and

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the sale of those licenses is what funds us having natural resource.

Speaker:

The reason why the North American model works so well is because

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this is, the North American model.

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This is why we don't have an issue like Africa does with their wild game,

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is because we manage it this way.

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The problem is this, if 60% of those licenses and those conservation

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organization groups are made up of members that are 55 and older, what's gonna happen

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in 10 years when, cuz some of that doesn't mean they're 55, some of 'em are 70,

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some of 'em are 80, some of 'em are 90.

Speaker:

we're going have that giant drop off.

Speaker:

And not to mention the fact that the outdoor industry represents roughly 3%

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of our nation's G D P, that's insane because that is oil that's equal or

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greater than oil is how important the outdoor industry is to our economy.

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Is it really?

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Yeah.

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Imagine if we lost 3% of our G D P, what would happen?

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So if 60%.

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Our old white guys . Then what happens when they stop doing it?

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So the entire reason we started this show was to reintroduce

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millennials in Generation Z into the outdoors, and you do some research.

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How do you reach millennials in Generation Z right now?

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Well, you would do that through media content.

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Well, at the time, what are the top two rated content?

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Topics or, um, genres that were doing well with that age group.

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And it was reality TV and cooking, actually not in that order.

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Cooking was the number one, which surprised me.

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So we built the show around the greenway gear checklist, which is everything

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you need for a hunting or fishing trip.

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The, we show you the hunting or fishing trip in a reality show style format.

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We decriminalize the hunt by teaching you about the conservation of it.

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, we give you a moral lesson that includes a Bible verse every episode.

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And then we have a studio kitchen here in Auburn Hills, Michigan, a state-of-the-art

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where we show you a recipe kind of taking you from that field to table

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thing that is so popular right now.

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So cuz people wanna know where their food comes from, especially after

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Covid, people wanted, Val food has a whole new value and a lot of people

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got into the outdoors because of it.

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So we built.

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outline of the show in order to inspire, entertain, and get the next generation

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interested into hunting and fishing.

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To be honest with you, I don't give a lick about people that already

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hunt and fish watching our show.

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. What inspires me is the kids that are gonna watch it, what's inspire me as

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a dad that's gonna watch that had no interest in hunting or fishing, but now

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is gonna take his kid fishing and that hunting license and that fishing license

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that's gonna get sold and those seeds that are gonna plant so that the, that

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next generation comes in and replaces the demographic that we're about to lose.

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That funds 60% of what we're doing right now.

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The problem is if we don't.

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, it'll be the ultimate terrible, I told you so.

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And, um, lucky for us, and I will say this, everyone should

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know this and be grateful for it.

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Another individual that makes all this possible is Johnny

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Morris, a Bass Pro shop.

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The millions and millions and millions and millions and millions

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of dollars that he donates to conservation every year is so necess.

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To, to protect us.

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So he's the, he's the other hold of this.

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So I, you'll see me, I'll wear Bass Pro shop every single day of my life.

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So people know, because it is, it is so important to know the

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money that's going in to actually preserve our natural resources.

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So that was our why.

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So when we wake up every single morning and we're building this show,

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it isn't to, I mean, we wanted to get on a major network because then we

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could reach the most amount of people.

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But I don't care about the, the, the fame aspect of that.

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I don't care about what people think about it.

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I don't, I don't care about anything.

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. I care about hunting and fishing licenses being sold.

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I care about conservation.

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I care about the future of our natural resources because I want my great

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grandkids one day to be able to deer hunt.

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I want my great, great ca grandkids to know where their food comes from

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and to have that same relationship with the food that I have.

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And I, I, I do believe that the old ways and, and, and following those and.

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Being a, a good steward of the land, I is what we're meant to do.

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and I, I also think that God created us all in his image.

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He was a creator.

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so creating something is the only way that we can really, truly find happiness,

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and this is what makes me happy.

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So we wake up every single day.

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I have my best friends who are ruthless with their work ethic.

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I mean, like I said, we did a 17 hour day yesterday.

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We'll do a 17 hour day today.

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Mine will probably be more like 18 and we'll be on a flight

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tomorrow, and it's back to work.

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I mean, that's, that's what we.

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, Kyle, you, you gave the Y, which

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have you ever heard of a bhag?

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I have not.

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Big hairy, audacious goal.

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Yeah.

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This is that

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. Well put a number to it and, and you don't

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and send me a note with what is your bhag.

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So do you want to build up 1 million Millennial and Gen Zers into.

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Being involved in the great outdoors and conservation, what is it?

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So I want you to think about it.

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Google it for your big, big, hairy, audacious goal.

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You and your team can think about it.

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It doesn't come quickly.

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It probably goes to many iterations.

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Yeah.

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But it puts a number to it and, and I'd love to hear what that is

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cuz I bet it'll be a great one.

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Whatever you come up with.

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I

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like that.

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I think, I think what I gotta do is do some research on what that 60% number

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is, you know, that we're replace.

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because I think that's what we wanna do.

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I think that's what we wanna do.

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But I probably do 65% because, you know, you gotta, you gotta be better

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than you were when you started.

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But, but yeah, I, I like to figure out those numbers.

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I like that.

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I like that.

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It makes me be specific.

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I like that.

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Mm-hmm.

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. Now have you been able to

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Your why, if you and how you're, you are making an impact, are you

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able to see it?

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You know what, that's an interesting question.

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I believe that the impact, obviously on the History channel is going

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to, Multiply that by, you know, 10 times, whatever it might be.

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Now, I had a, I just actually got out of a, an interview with

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a, a woman named Tony Cooper.

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And, she's an incredible motivational speaker.

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And I, I was talking to her and she said, four years ago you told me about

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the sale of hunting and fishing licenses and how it helps this and helps that.

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She goes, I gotta tell you, I tell probably two or three people a week

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about that cuz it's so fascinating.

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Nobody knows it.

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And I was like, man, imagine if one or two other people do what

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she's doing as far as they're.

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And it's like that butterfly flack, that giant web that you impact X amount

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of people and it goes from there.

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I do know that, uh, in the last season of our show, we averaged something like

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700,000 people have seen each episode.

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and I anticipate that going up a lot.

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and I, I look forward to that.

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But then you get into the How to Video series and the Hunt Cast series and to,

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to have a, to have a no on the impact.

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I, I couldn't say, but the, the greatest part about what I

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do is the letters that we do.

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the emails and stuff where people are like super grateful and got into hunting or,

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Hey, thank you for this, how to video on how to properly handle a firearm safely.

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So nothing happens because I just got a gun and I didn't know what I was doing,

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and now you inspired me to wanna go hunt.

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And like, those types of letters are just so meaningful.

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But to put a put a number to it would be tough.

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But to, and to track it, you know, you can track it through socials, you

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can track it through Nielsen ratings, you can track it through those things.

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But man, I, I, I think I find the most inspiration in the fact of,

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like, that word of mouth thing has just, has so much value.

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Mm-hmm.

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, you know, and there's no way to know.

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There's no way to know.

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A and the

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fact that people are reaching out to you and showing you gratitude and

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appreciation, that's an impact and Right.

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And kudos to you and, and to your

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team.

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Well, thank you.

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That's my team.

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That's my team.

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Yeah.

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Now,

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Kyle.

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If people want to reach out to you or your team, what is a great

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way for them to connect with

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you guys?

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Sure.

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we're on all the socials, you know, as far as Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, TikTok.

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But in that case, you're gonna get Kellen, in, in, in order to

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reach out to us, if you go to the greenway outdoors.com, there, you

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can find links to the main TV show.

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you'll find links to our online series, the Hunt Cast, the How-tos.

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, the recipes, the, all that stuff, our merchandise, all those things can be

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found at just the greenway outdoors.com.

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And there is a Contact us page there, that takes you to our email.

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It actually does get red, so, every single day.

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So if you, if you email there, Callen, Callen will get back with you quick.

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And then, you know, I, but I love seeing that stuff.

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I love seeing it.

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But yeah, the green outdoors.com is the best way.

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Beautiful.

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Well, Kyle, I so appreciate you taking your time today.

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To sit down and talk with me and share your why and some fascinating information

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that I didn't know, and I'm gonna take a big guess that a lot of people

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who are listening didn't know either.

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So, I've learned so much from you, and I'm, I'm grateful to learn

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today and to get to know you.

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And I, I wish you and your team all the best for your travels, that everything

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arrives when it's supposed to.

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And not, but, and that's my goal for this year, is to change using

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the word but, and to use the word.

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And so, and you have a safe and productive time in the great outdoors out here.

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During the wintertime.

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Well, thank you so much for having me.

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This was awesome.

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And, I, I look forward to sharing this on the socials and having everyone

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else see it too, because I think they'll be able to pull a lot from the

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interview and also check out your other episodes for my audience, is there

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any, is there any specific episodes where you're like, Hey, go listen

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to this number because this would be the, this is a, this is a good one.

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Is there another one that you think my audience would get excited?

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They might really enjoy listening to Boots Nelson.

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Okay.

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And on, on the website, you can search by name.

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I haven't figured out how to search by name on the podcasts,

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like podcast platforms.

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But on the website, boots Nelson, he's a fishing guide out here.

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Okay, another.

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Gentlemen that I mentioned, his name is Bill Johnson.

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He's the guy, he was one of the early episodes that I had, and he was one

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of those guys that came out here early on to, to just climb, be a climber in

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the early days of, of Jackson Hole.

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And, I, I think you're, there's always something out there for people to learn.

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It's, it might not be outdoors, but it's definitely some life stories that are,

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that are on those episodes out there.

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So, I mean, there's like 200 and, you know, 20 episode.

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I've been doing it for four and a half years.

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That's awesome.

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So thank you for asking.

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Yeah.

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That's very kind of

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you.

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No, no.

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Yeah, I, I, I always find too is when you asked me about a good episode and we were

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talking about the ship, this episode,

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You know, you always wanna put your best foot forward.

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And I think, I think you're right.

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I think those do sound interesting.

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And I'm about to have a bunch of traveling myself, so I'll be,

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I'll be checking 'em out too.

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Thank you.

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Oh, and you might like Chris o BNI when I interviewed him and he has that

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Jackson Hole, Buffalo meat company.

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Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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He's definitely about conservation and in the, in Hal.

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Buffalo is important to feeding, feeding people as well.

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Yeah.

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We actually, one of our episodes that's, gonna be in this series on history is, we

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did a buffalo hunt, and it was, with, the Native Americans, the Comanche tribe, the

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great-great grandson of the last chief of the Comanches, which are also interesting

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because they are the only Indian nation I believe that never surrendered.

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and Huh yeah.

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And, uh, I.

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I think it was Teddy Roosevelt actually became an honorary member,

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but we did a Buffalo episode and it was just super interesting to learn

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about the relationship with Buffalo and how they were feeding people

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and what actually happened, and then where the Buffalo stands nowadays.

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man, we'll have to connect with him.

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I bet he'd be a great podcast guest too, to have on just before that episode

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airs, because I think it's possibly our best episode we've ever done.

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So I'm pretty, I'm, I'm excited for that one specifically.

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And boy, is that meat good?

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I'll tell you what, , that's as good as it gets.

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It is, it's phenomenal.

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Phenomenal meat for sure.

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Chris would love it.

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He'd, he'd be over the moon for sure.

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Awesome.

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Well,

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thank you so very much.

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Kyle, you're so welcome and right back at you.

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My gratitude back to you and your team for finding us and have a safe travels.

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Thank you.

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Um, all that.

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You're gonna be working.

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Enjoy a sunrise, enjoy a sunset, and enjoy those stars that are unencumbered.

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We

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will.

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Thank

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you so much.

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Okay, take care, Cal.

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Bye Bye.

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To learn more about Kyle Green, and his passion for the great outdoor.

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Visit the Jackson hole connection.com, episode number 225.

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Folks, get out there and share this podcast.

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I had a blast creating it and talking to Kyle.

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I know your friends, families, neighbors, would love to learn

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more about what Kyle's doing.

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Thank you everybody who helps keep this podcast on the air.

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Of course, Michael Moeri, who does all the editing and marketing, my lovely

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wife Laura, my boys, William and Lewis.

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I look forward to seeing you right back here for the next episode of

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the Jackson Hole Connection, and thank you for your time today.

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