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Catch Burnout Before the Fire with Bryan Smith
Episode 6623rd June 2022 • Revenue Real Hotline • Amy Hrehovcik
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On this installment of RRH, we’ve got the co-founder and CEO of Leon Bryan Smith. Together we dig into the impact of managing human beings and measuring burnout. 

Topics Discussed


  • What’s the impact of measuring team burnout? (3:09)
  • How do opportunities drop? 
  • How does call volume decrease or increase? 
  • What happens when you have a bad manager and what happens to sort of sales rep performance? 


Resources Mentioned: 


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Transcripts

Amy:

What's up human.

Amy:

Welcome to the revenue real hotline.

Amy:

I'm Amy UFF check more importantly.

Amy:

I'm excited.

Amy:

You decided to join us today.

Amy:

I know you've got a ton of options and I appreciate you.

Amy:

This is a show about all the hard and uncomfortable conversations

Amy:

that arise while generating revenue and how to think, or rethink what

Amy:

you're doing, why you're doing it.

Amy:

And then of course, how to execute differently.

Amy:

And like I said, I'm happy you decided to come along for the.

Amy:

Don't forget to follow the show wherever you listen.

Amy:

So you can be notified each time a new episode drops and do me a favor friend.

Amy:

Don't tell anybody about the show.

Amy:

Let's keep it our little secret.

Amy:

I'm Amy UFF check.

Amy:

This is the revenue real hotline.

Amy:

Enjoy

Amy:

Brian Smith.

Amy:

Welcome to the revenue real hotline

Bryan:

friend.

Bryan:

What's up Amy?

Bryan:

How are.

Bryan:

Ah,

Amy:

I am pretty fantastic.

Amy:

We got a light breeze coming from the east, so the air is

Amy:

cool here on the Jersey shore.

Amy:

And I can hear the, the waves and the birds.

Amy:

And so I got no complaints, but unlike your day, you just, you did

Amy:

doctor's office for a new baby, right?

Bryan:

Yeah.

Bryan:

Three month checkups.

Bryan:

It's a little three month old.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

So it's just like, you know, it's like, it's at this point right now where you're

Bryan:

at the doctors pretty much every, I think.

Bryan:

At this point for other shots or checkups or whatnot.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

But yeah, he's all good.

Bryan:

So no complaints there, you're an

Amy:

old pro it may have been a couple of years, Brian, but it's like riding a bike.

Amy:

So I'm told

Bryan:

it's like, we, it's not at all, like riding a bike.

Bryan:

Like I completely forgot.

Bryan:

I, so for the listeners, I have a, I have a 13 year old, a 10

Bryan:

year old and a three month old.

Bryan:

Um, this shit is not like grinding.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

I completely forgot how to do all of.

Bryan:

And you like, I totally forgot.

Bryan:

Like, and also I'm older now.

Bryan:

Yeah.

Bryan:

So I'm like, sleeping is more important.

Bryan:

Now my wife is breastfeeding, so it's, I sort of, I'm lucky

Bryan:

that way, but God, I'm tired.

Bryan:

I'm really tired.

Bryan:

Oh man.

Amy:

Well, thoughts and prayers, Brian, thoughts and prayers.

Amy:

I like and prayer.

Amy:

So, so why, why don't we, why don't you tell our listeners a little

Amy:

bit about who you are and what you do every day and then we'll dive

Bryan:

right in.

Bryan:

Sure.

Bryan:

Um, Brian Smith.

Bryan:

So I'm one of the co-founders at Leon.

Bryan:

We are a sales focused mental health platform.

Bryan:

Um, and yeah, my, my background is, uh, I, I grew up in the world of sports science.

Bryan:

So I, uh, worked for USA track and field and IX, which is a football club, B

Bryan:

Holland, Philadelphia Eagles, um, bunch of different organizations, essentially

Bryan:

just doing really cool stuff with data.

Bryan:

To sort of predict performance or predict injuries with, uh, professional athletes.

Bryan:

And somehow I ended up in the world of tech sort of doing it's something.

Bryan:

I was sellers I'm that did the exact thing for sales teams.

Bryan:

It's still pretty cool.

Bryan:

I still get to work with, with high performers.

Bryan:

So I like

Amy:

that.

Amy:

That's awesome.

Amy:

That's those are my favorite people to work with as well.

Amy:

All right, Brian, I.

Amy:

I gotta say, I mean, we have to start with this.

Amy:

You just made the decision to, um, make Leon a platform that currently has over.

Amy:

I think it was 240 sales teams and 2.4 million data points about burnout.

Amy:

Right.

Amy:

And specifically with the goal to prevent burnout, right.

Amy:

Predictive, um, at the manager level.

Amy:

But I love the phrase catch burnout before the fire, as someone that went through the

Amy:

fire and came out on the other side, like I'm speaking from experience listeners,

Amy:

you don't wanna go through the fire.

Amy:

This is something you wanna get in front of.

Amy:

But anyway, Brian, I, you gotta, you gotta tell me how you came to

Amy:

this decision that you're going to, you know, give the platform away

Amy:

for free shift business models.

Amy:

You'd put a ranger post out about how, you know, you cared more about your

Amy:

sellers than, than the, like the VCs and they may fire you for it, which listeners

Amy:

that'll be linked in the show notes too.

Amy:

But Brian, tell us, tell, tell us about.

Bryan:

Yeah.

Bryan:

So it's important to understand what Leon does, right.

Bryan:

And what we do is we collect data points from a bunch of different sort of things.

Bryan:

If it's surveys and sort of like diagnostic surveys and Salesforce

Bryan:

integrations and whatnot.

Bryan:

And then we take that data and then we help frontline managers

Bryan:

understand the teams that are at risk of burning out the teams that

Bryan:

are at risk of mental health issues.

Bryan:

The teams that you know, are not very aligned to the organization

Bryan:

or the team or whatever, have.

Bryan:

But on the opposite end of that, we actually tell them how to

Bryan:

challenge or push your teams harder.

Bryan:

Right?

Bryan:

We take data in that.

Bryan:

We tell frontline managers, this is what you can do and can't do.

Bryan:

And here are some recommendations and services and some consultants

Bryan:

that you can engage in to be able to better support your team.

Bryan:

Now, why we, how we did that for free.

Bryan:

In the world of tech it's, the sales manager is like sort of this

Bryan:

like really interesting thing.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

And the re, and the reason I say that is unlike every other manager in the

Bryan:

world, sales teams managed by Salesforce.

Bryan:

That's what they do, right?

Bryan:

It's a dashboard.

Bryan:

It's like, are you hitting your goals or you, are you not?

Bryan:

And that's how AEs who get promoted or SDRs who get promoted.

Bryan:

That's the path they usually take.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

And that's what they learn from.

Bryan:

But what they don't learn is how to manage human beings.

Bryan:

How to manage sort of like the intricacies of understanding stress and understanding

Bryan:

recovery and understanding mental health.

Bryan:

And you probably agree to this, Amy is that that's probably 90% of

Bryan:

what we do as sales leaders, right?

Bryan:

It's driving performance by better coaching up our people.

Bryan:

and quite honestly, to me, it just felt like Leon's too valuable to

Bryan:

protect in protecting people to not give it to free for people.

Bryan:

If that makes sense.

Bryan:

Um, I didn't want a barrier of money to be the restriction that, you know, prevents

Bryan:

people from getting burned out or prevents people from quitting art, prevents

Bryan:

people from, you know, getting promoted.

Bryan:

Does that make sense?

Bryan:

It

Amy:

does actually, it does very much so.

Amy:

And what's most impressive about the pivot as someone that's, you know, a friend and

Amy:

a cheerleader and an advocate and just super excited about the whole thing is is

Amy:

you, a lot of people get stuck in their.

Amy:

Way of thinking their train of thought, right?

Amy:

It it's in the same way that people, their experiences with these, these

Amy:

sales bosses, as you say, like sometimes the most the thing that's

Amy:

kind of pulling against you, the hardest is your own experience, right.

Amy:

Where you've had success in the past.

Amy:

And it's it almost.

Amy:

It closes the mind around other paths to success, right?

Amy:

Or the changing nature of pretty much all things, or just at least, especially

Amy:

since COVID what you exhibited to me is the opposite of that because you

Amy:

not only saw the value of, of the good that you can do right now in the present

Amy:

moment, but you also found an adjacent path to deliver value for the company.

Amy:

right.

Amy:

Mm-hmm as well as, you know, ran the calculation around the

Amy:

gathering more data faster, which is an important step, especially if

Amy:

we're gonna plan the game of right.

Amy:

How sales is currently managed right now.

Amy:

And it's through dashboards and aggressive use of dashboards.

Amy:

And.

Amy:

A lack of an understanding about where true performance comes from.

Amy:

But Brian, it's interesting though, because while you were speaking,

Amy:

it made, I had a thought, right?

Amy:

I think that even when you do kind of push through as a, as an, I see

Amy:

as an individual contributor, right.

Amy:

And you get to a certain point.

Amy:

I don't know, like most of my friends that are my age or other advocates on

Amy:

the mental health front, like we learned the hard way, I guess you could say.

Amy:

And that generally, I don't know if it's like a mid 30 thing or

Amy:

just like, I, I don't know, but it's just a trend I'm noticing.

Amy:

And so I guess what I'm trying to say is that I don't know of many human

Amy:

beings that are this evolved on the understanding and communicating around

Amy:

the internal struggle that it is.

Amy:

Operate as a salesperson without having gone through the learning curve of getting

Amy:

their, their own head game in order.

Amy:

Yeah.

Bryan:

You know, what's, uh, it's funny.

Bryan:

I was just talking to my, my co-founder about this.

Bryan:

People now mean employees now are demonstrably more productive than they've

Bryan:

ever been throughout history, right?

Bryan:

Like you take, you know, going to work in the nineties, hiring a sales rep in

Bryan:

the nineties versus hiring a sales rep.

Bryan:

Now they're infinitely more productive.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

But with that productivity does come up sort of a level of protection,

Bryan:

but also a level of demand that those sales reps or that employees can now

Bryan:

demand that sort of take account to.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

So when we talk about mental health and we talk about all of these things,

Bryan:

I almost look to medicine, right?

Bryan:

Like medicine has used this concept of evidence-based practice to dictate a

Bryan:

lot of the decisions that we make on a daily basis within a hospital system.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

The idea is that we wanna make sure we use evidence to be about

Bryan:

in data to support its decisions that we make within our people.

Bryan:

And that's why we decided to make it free, right.

Bryan:

Is because we wanna understand what does your Salesforce instances look

Bryan:

like when we're seeing on our system, that a team is starting to burn out.

Bryan:

How do opportunities drop?

Bryan:

How does call volume decrease or increase?

Bryan:

What happens when you have a bad manager and what happens to

Bryan:

sort of sales rep performance?

Bryan:

Like we can say this generally, like, oh, most likely they'll sell less or

Bryan:

they'll turn over whenever have you, but we haven't been able to quantify that.

Bryan:

All right.

Bryan:

I wanna be able to say let's take data in and I wanna be

Bryan:

able to serve let's predict.

Bryan:

When burnout's gonna happen using Salesforce and surveys and whatever else.

Bryan:

So we can mitigate those costs before performance drops by 20%, you

Bryan:

burn out your entire team and you lose your job as the sales manager,

Bryan:

that's what I wanna be able to do.

Bryan:

And that's why we're giving away for free.

Bryan:

Cuz we're moving to that point where we can start using that

Bryan:

data to make real recommendations.

Bryan:

On like how to better manage your

Amy:

team.

Amy:

Brian, I sold data, right?

Amy:

Embroiders wore data.

Amy:

This was my fucking house.

Amy:

And one of the things, one of the soapbox that I would climb up

Amy:

on is that there's a tremendous amount of data around us right now.

Amy:

And.

Amy:

One of the first things.

Amy:

If you want to plan a game of using evidence based data to make smart

Amy:

decisions, smart business decisions as an organization, let's start by figuring out

Amy:

how to use the data we've got right now.

Amy:

And I'm thinking about the I, what is it?

Amy:

The Google project oxygen study that I believe was done first, it's

Amy:

been done more than once now, but it was the first time was 2000 and.

Amy:

And they came up with a pretty exquisite framework using evidence based data

Amy:

across Google, which at that point was moderately large to identify

Amy:

the eight characteristics that went into exceptional results, right.

Amy:

The performance that the team was having.

Amy:

And then they went back and expanded on it and I.

Amy:

This is all like pretty known information it's out there.

Amy:

We live in the information agent.

Amy:

So to this idea of solving for the root cause why do you think that our landscape.

Amy:

Has not used or incorporated the data that is, has been out there

Amy:

just to use that one example for 12

Bryan:

years.

Bryan:

Yeah.

Bryan:

I mean, uh, to your point with Google, right?

Bryan:

I mean, so when, when Google puts out a report like that, what they're

Bryan:

trying to establish is best practices.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

Which, which makes sense.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

But that's also Google.

Bryan:

All right.

Bryan:

That's also a very specific type of person that's being hired at Google

Bryan:

and a pedigree of managers, a pedigree of culture and all those other things

Bryan:

that are sort of influencing that.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

Mm-hmm so what we're trying to

Amy:

understand is also known as a control group, listener this, and he set me up

Amy:

here and I'm like, where's going, Brian,

Bryan:

please.

Bryan:

There's a gentleman by the name of Dave Snowden who talks.

Bryan:

Is that in the world of complexity.

Bryan:

All right.

Bryan:

Which is managing people.

Bryan:

There is no such thing as best practice.

Bryan:

There's only emergent practice.

Bryan:

All right.

Bryan:

And what you have to be able to do is run safe to fail experiments,

Bryan:

to wait for signals, to emerge, to understand what works for your team.

Bryan:

You can run safe to fail experiments in Google and have a good understanding or a

Bryan:

good control, uh, to what's gonna happen.

Bryan:

But it doesn't mean that your sales team in Kentucky, right.

Bryan:

That is selling, you know, a widget is going to be able to, you're gonna be

Bryan:

able to implement Google's best practices than it's gonna work for your team.

Bryan:

So what we would rather do is we give you a signal.

Bryan:

We give you recommendations.

Bryan:

We have you run the recommendation, we collect the data to understand

Bryan:

the impact of that recommendation.

Bryan:

And then we tell you if it works for you or not.

Bryan:

Does that make sense?

Bryan:

Of course it

Amy:

does.

Amy:

Okay.

Amy:

So I wanna bring this more to the practical that was well said and, and

Amy:

point conceited and made to you, sir.

Amy:

Okay.

Amy:

When you were talking about mental health and burnout is so subjective, right?

Amy:

It means wellness means different things to different people, right?

Amy:

And, and how to go about getting there is also very individual.

Amy:

And this is why the, the coaching skills, um, at the manager level are

Amy:

massive wellness, intelligence index.

Amy:

I love that frame.

Amy:

I think what I wanna talk about is how we organize and structure a

Amy:

period of performance for sales teams.

Amy:

And I loved this three week on and then recovery week, um, because

Amy:

one, I had never heard it before.

Amy:

And two, I was just having conversation last night with a

Amy:

new manager, a new sales manager.

Amy:

She's a friend of mine and the new directive came down

Amy:

and it's like the same.

Amy:

It's like do more.

Amy:

Zero extra inputs go and do more like that in turn turns or feels like at

Amy:

the rep level, just do twice as more.

Amy:

What you've done is not good enough, like all those things.

Amy:

And I don't know.

Amy:

Let's talk more about how, what is organizing and structuring the team.

Amy:

Performance periods look like to

Bryan:

you.

Bryan:

So, um, so to your point about, uh, wellness being subjective, right?

Bryan:

Our level of resiliency is dictated by so many different things, right.

Bryan:

And how resilient a team is to a point of things that you can't even control.

Bryan:

I, for example, Epigenetics, like there's an interesting study done,

Bryan:

um, with Holocaust survivors, right?

Bryan:

So they took Holocaust survivors.

Bryan:

And what they did is they measure hormonal stress responses to

Bryan:

other great grandchildren.

Bryan:

And what they found is that their great grandchildren lacked certain

Bryan:

ability to adapt, to stress due to epigenetic factors from their great

Bryan:

grandparents who were so stressed out and the Holocaust that it impacted

Bryan:

generations of families down the line.

Bryan:

So that made that subset of population less resilient.

Bryan:

And I bring that up because when we're talking about.

Bryan:

Stress and performance, whatnot.

Bryan:

It's all subjective.

Bryan:

So it can be

Amy:

subjective around the time of day.

Amy:

Like exactly Dan Pink's, um, scientific benefits of perfect

Amy:

timing talks about what is it?

Amy:

Chronobiology blue.

Amy:

My mind started with a case study or a story about, I figured it's the

Amy:

Lucita and how the captain made his.

Amy:

Stupid decision at like three o'clock right.

Amy:

When that dip comes in, I CA I tell stories all the time about how I, when

Amy:

I've taken the Myers Briggs test, I, I actually straddle between introverted and

Amy:

extroverted and realizing that something so fundamental, like how I physically

Amy:

char recharge, excuse me, changed.

Amy:

There is so much subjectivity.

Amy:

There is.

Amy:

So it's internal factors.

Amy:

It's external factors.

Amy:

It's the time of day.

Amy:

It's our genetics, what our, our grandparents experience.

Amy:

And yet everyone's still looking for a, I don't know, a magic

Amy:

wand or some kind of, yeah.

Amy:

You know, here, let me read somebody else's routine.

Amy:

Let me.

Amy:

Implement this turnkey thing, but still that said, we do need to

Amy:

design sales floors with a high degree of predictability and control.

Amy:

But tell me more about, so what

Bryan:

I was getting at is with that understanding is.

Bryan:

High performance isn't necessarily like tape a phone to your hand, like old

Bryan:

school sort of like boiler room, right.

Bryan:

And like bang out 25 red bulls all, although that can be part

Bryan:

of, sort of the creating a high performance environment, right.

Bryan:

At least within a certain subset of population.

Bryan:

But when we develop these sort of three weeks on one week off model, the idea

Bryan:

is, is that we're turning up sort of a stress response during that three weeks.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

So we're increasing goals.

Bryan:

Maybe you're having a little bit harder conversations.

Bryan:

Maybe that's when you're using that radical candor sort of concept where

Bryan:

like, everything is just a little bit more poignant and targeted on performance.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

So we do that for maybe three weeks.

Bryan:

Maybe we sort of step up the sort of volume.

Bryan:

So like week one, it's uh, like I talked about this in the podcast

Bryan:

with Brian ancestor tother, you wanna almost run like an MVP.

Bryan:

With sales professionals.

Bryan:

We're so fucking busy, right?

Bryan:

We have from LinkedIn to like whatever, writing blogs, whatever it

Bryan:

is, like there's a million different things we're doing with that week.

Bryan:

One, let's make that an MVP week.

Bryan:

Let's get rid of all the unnecessary stuff that you don't need to be

Bryan:

doing from a sales standpoint.

Bryan:

Just focus on the task at hand, right?

Bryan:

Align on goals, align on calls, align on whatever it is, right.

Bryan:

Align, align on sort of performance.

Bryan:

And then you slowly sort of ramp that up over, over a period of time, right

Bryan:

over week one week two in week three.

Bryan:

But while you're doing that as a manager, you're.

Bryan:

Implementing sort of like micro strategies or micro, whatever to sort

Bryan:

of help your team recover a little bit.

Bryan:

Maybe that's when you turn on head space for that week, maybe that's when you do

Bryan:

that team building event, maybe that's when you realign on personal goals.

Bryan:

Right?

Bryan:

So you're increasing ramp of performance while you're

Bryan:

supporting them during that time.

Bryan:

All right.

Bryan:

And once you hit that three week ramp, that's when you drop down and you

Bryan:

recover and that's when you recover.

Bryan:

But to your point, it follows this sort of super compensation

Bryan:

cycle, which is you're sort of maintaining a level of homeostasis.

Bryan:

You increase stress, increase, stress, increase stress, right back off, or

Bryan:

recover a little bit, allow your body to sort of super compensate and get back to

Bryan:

that sort of new level of homeostasis.

Bryan:

And now performance improves.

Bryan:

When you take a focused approach, what happens is it's cyclical, right?

Bryan:

It's stress recover, increased performance, stress, recover, increased

Bryan:

performance, or increased resilience or whatever it is too often in sales, we

Bryan:

go baseline, say you onboard as an SDR and you just go, go, go, go, go, go.

Bryan:

And you're trying to get promoted.

Bryan:

So you don't take a vacation and you're trying to get promoted.

Bryan:

So you don't talk to your manager about taking time off and you.

Bryan:

Go.

Bryan:

All right.

Bryan:

But as managers, we can build this stuff in.

Bryan:

It's just understanding sort of the signals and the data that you have

Bryan:

to figure out if like, all right, this team is struggling right now.

Bryan:

Let me just run some micro strategies or micro interactions,

Bryan:

or just like me talk to them about their personal love being goals.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

That down regulates that stress response.

Bryan:

So then it gives you more of an opportunity or bandwidth to stretch

Bryan:

that performance out a little bit more.

Bryan:

Does that make sense?

Bryan:

Of course it does.

Amy:

I loved your hand.

Amy:

Gestures, listeners missed out, like you missed out.

Amy:

It was, there were some serious graphs and bar lines and like, um, standard

Amy:

deviation of pretty sure calculated.

Amy:

Yeah.

Amy:

Shouldn't have pretty sure it's calculated.

Amy:

Yeah.

Amy:

All of we are sitting here, so just so you know, like don't take

Amy:

off Brian without a calculator.

Amy:

Consider yourself worth.

Amy:

Okay, Brian, that was awesome.

Amy:

I.

Amy:

Love it.

Amy:

And I love this idea very much about like three, even three weeks

Amy:

on three weeks or a week of rest, like the first week of the month and

Amy:

introducing new stretching exercises.

Amy:

But I stand by what, what I said.

Amy:

I think that all managers should.

Amy:

Be working with a cognitive behavioral therapist or frankly, I

Amy:

feel like the organization should have one staff, um, like billions

Amy:

on, on Showtime, like in 10 years.

Amy:

Yeah.

Amy:

I think, I think that's where it's gonna be.

Amy:

Like, it just, it seems silly.

Amy:

Like how hard do you think bill Belichick had to be convinced to get a sports?

Amy:

I put colleges hired for like the, well,

Bryan:

what's crazy about it though.

Bryan:

Educate this approach in the beginning, you're increasing the overall

Bryan:

capacity of performance in the long.

Bryan:

Yeah.

Bryan:

Cause

Amy:

your muscles, even, even, even if it's just one cycle,

Amy:

like every time your muscles come back and grow together strong.

Amy:

Um, they are just that.

Bryan:

Yeah.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

It's called the establishment of a functional system.

Bryan:

Like your body is creating systems.

Bryan:

Alright.

Bryan:

And I mean, body as like holistically mind, you know, whatever else

Bryan:

is creating systems to learn how to adapt to that new stressor.

Bryan:

So now for the first like six weeks, you did three weeks on when we call

Bryan:

for whatever strategy you're using.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

But after six weeks, Now you can maybe stretch it out to four weeks

Bryan:

on one week off five weeks on one week off, six weeks on one week off.

Bryan:

So you're developing a more resilient workforce if you're using strategy to

Bryan:

be able to do it, versus how we do it now, versus just like hit your goals

Bryan:

or get on a pit plan and die, you know?

Amy:

Yeah.

Amy:

Um, yeah, one of the most interesting things that I've

Amy:

read recently on this topic.

Amy:

I think it was looking at Navy seals and there were two control or two groups, and

Amy:

it was like, which one performed better.

Amy:

Right.

Amy:

And they ended up identifying the way these, um, two groups assessed a problem

Amy:

and went after solving it group a comes up with the whole plan, thinks it

Amy:

through blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, and then executes.

Amy:

But far more prepared group B take on a task rest.

Amy:

Take on a task and rest task rest.

Amy:

And I, I mean, I feel like it's kind of obvious here, but given the context

Amy:

of the conversation, but care to take a guess, which group performed

Amy:

way better than the other one.

Amy:

I would say

Bryan:

that the, the rest one, the task

Amy:

and the rest.

Amy:

Right.

Amy:

And it struck me because I'm a planner.

Amy:

I can see a project like in, you know, year, a month or months down the road.

Amy:

And I like to have it all planned out now don't get me wrong.

Amy:

I was raised by a sales VP.

Amy:

We were asked every night at dinner.

Amy:

Like how many, how many times did you feel butterflies in your stomach today?

Amy:

Or tell me a story of when, so we were raised to seek out the discomfort, which

Amy:

I think is a key part of wellness, but that said, I'm still a planner and I read

Amy:

this and it was just like, oh my gosh.

Amy:

And so I started making this change.

Amy:

right.

Amy:

And not only did it allow me to be more intentional with going to

Amy:

take a walk in between a task or maybe not feel so overwhelmed at the

Amy:

start of the day with all the stuff that I'm gonna try to do, you know?

Amy:

And it just, it it's been awesome.

Amy:

But on that, I'll give you, I'll give you a final

Bryan:

word and then, then we'll.

Bryan:

Yeah.

Bryan:

I mean, uh, well that, that, I think that same thing applies to leader.

Bryan:

Right.

Bryan:

Is that it's not just task specific.

Bryan:

It's also how you're managing people.

Bryan:

Cuz I think as sales leaders, we get too caught up and like we said before

Bryan:

about managing the dashboard that you never just pause and reflect and be like,

Bryan:

how can I support my people right now?

Bryan:

Right?

Bryan:

Like what is something I can do to downregulate stress for them a

Bryan:

little bit, have them realign on the mission hand and then push forward.

Bryan:

Wow.

Bryan:

So great point.

Bryan:

Awesome.

Amy:

That wraps another installment of the revenue real hotline.

Amy:

I'd like to thank my guest for being so damn real and for sharing their insights

Amy:

and for, of course, being so much fun.

Amy:

And I'd like to thank you, two listeners.

Amy:

It means the world.

Amy:

And I appreciate you.

Amy:

If you have any thoughts or comments or experiences, you feel inclined to share

Amy:

head straight over to revenue, rail.com.

Amy:

There's a new join.

Amy:

The conversation feature on the right side of the page.

Amy:

I am old damn ears.

Amy:

Final thought.

Amy:

We are introducing a coaching aspect to the show.

Amy:

So anyone who's brave enough to dig into an account strategy

Amy:

or outbound strategy session.

Amy:

That's where we kick things.

Amy:

Please do follow the show wherever you listen to your podcasts.

Amy:

So you'll always have the latest episode downloaded.

Amy:

If you want to contact me, I'm at Amy at revenue, rail.com.

Amy:

If you wanna follow me on social Twitter is Amy underscore Raub check.

Amy:

And LinkedIn is linkedin.com/amy UFF.

Amy:

Check.

Amy:

This episode was produced by the fabulous Neen Feedler rock, man.

Amy:

And I appreciate you too friend.

Amy:

And of course, whatever you do, don't tell anybody about the show.

Amy:

Let's keep it our little secret.

Amy:

Until next time, all I'm Amy hub check.

Amy:

This is the revenue real hotline, happy selling.

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