Artwork for podcast Remarkable Branding
Ep 5
Episode 53rd June 2022 • Remarkable Branding • Amin Ahmed & Heather Murphy
00:00:00 00:06:13

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Today we're going to be talking about how brands can build trust. This one's really exciting because we are going to be using one of our own clients as an example.

Transcripts

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Hey, welcome to the show today.

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We're going to be talking about how brands can build trust.

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This one's really exciting Amin because we are going to be using one

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of our own clients as an example.

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So I'm going to teach you some of the techniques that I do visually

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to build trust with my brands and, Amin is going to be sharing some

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of the technical things that he's done to impact people's experience.

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Yeah, that's awesome.

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Let's hear about the, visual and psychological part of it.

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So, the, three parts that we're going to be looking at is the look,

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the voice and the experience like we talked about in the last episode.

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And so for the look, one of the things that I like to do is create an anchor.

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So, whether that's using colors from other famous brands in that area or

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other famous brands that they want to be identified with, or typefaces from

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those brands, you want to create a visual anchor that subconsciously tells

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your consumer that you are trustworthy because they associate you with

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these other brands or look and feel.

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So for one of our clients, called art match.

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We wanted to bring in some of that anchoring technique.

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So their logo looks a lot like a Mondrian painting.

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And if you don't know Mondrian, he's a famous artist that used

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a lot of geometrical shapes.

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So we included that kind of feel in the logo.

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And then we also added some splashes to make it fun and vibrant.

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So we made it a little bit more casual than a Mondrian, but subconsciously

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there's that trigger to say.

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Hey this is a professional art company.

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So yeah, that's how we did that with the look we'll, put a link

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in the show notes here as well.

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So you can take a look at the website and you can see what you think about the way

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that we incorporated that into the logo.

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Yeah.

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Then the other thing was the voice.

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And so we, we were able to achieve this by creating consistency.

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So when you have something that's jarring in your brand, like using

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the wrong font or using the wrong colors or using the wrong tone of

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voice, people lose trust for you.

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And that can happen without them even realizing it's a very

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subconscious and quick process that happens inside the brain.

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So we want to make sure that there's consistency in our brands.

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So for art match on their website, they've got a very consistent flow on each page.

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Very similar headers, a very similar type phase.

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We made sure that everything was sized properly, but also the tone of voices

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consistently light, but professional.

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So it's just like the logo.

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It's got a little bit of a casual edge to it, but it's still very polished.

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Would you say that's, is that how you describe their voice?

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Definitely.

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And even the way in which this site functions is also part of that as well.

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So the buttons all look the same on all the pages.

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The backgrounds are consistent, but unique on the pages.

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So it definitely the consistency is there even though it's, not

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the same thing over and over.

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Yeah.

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Does that make any sense?

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Yeah, absolutely.

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So that consistency keeps everything flowing.

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And then the third thing, Amin, I'm going to let you speak to this,

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but it's about customer experience.

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And so, we can make everything as pretty as we want and sound as nice as we want,

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but if it doesn't function, you're going to have some of that jarring experience.

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And so can you speak to that Amin?

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Absolutely.

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When it comes to websites, there's two big areas.

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There's UI and UX UI is what we just talked about.

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The, the user interface, the buttons, the way that it flows, how it works

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on mobile, they user experience UX is similar, but it's a little bit different.

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The UX, for example, I can give you a few examples is that

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if you're browsing through.

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Page.

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And there's a link that says click here to get our contact information.

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Well, if I click it and it opens a PDF on my computer, it's going to ask me

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to download it on my phone, depending on what device you're on is going to

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do endless number of different things.

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That's a terrible user experience.

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You could take the same information.

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Build a webpage and link to that page itself.

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Another example is also checkouts.

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Now this is something that I'm often looking at and critiquing just as a,

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developer, myself as a web developer.

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I know what good user experiences on checkout and what isn't.

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So I'll start with what isn't often you'll go to a website and

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you want to perhaps download a.

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E-book or you want to purchase something and it forces you to go through a

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checkout process, which is designed for material goods, physical shipped goods.

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So it asks you for your phone number, it asked for a shipping

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address and your billing address, which is completely unnecessary.

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And sometimes I do it just because I want that item, that electronic or virtual

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item badly, but it's unnecessary to ask.

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Fill all that out.

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Now on the flip side is if you do strip out all of the addresses on

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a checkout, but then you ask for a phone number and make it mandatory.

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There's no need for my phone number.

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And I don't want to get more texts.

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I don't want to get more spam phone calls or spam texts.

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And so this is another area of user experience that can be easily fixed.

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Make it optional.

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You don't have to provide it so often I'll just put a fake phone

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number in there and go on with it.

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But it, it erodes my trust in the company because I question it and then

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wonder why do you want my phone number?

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Right.

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I'm only downloading, you know, an MP3 or something like that.

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Yeah.

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If I really want something, but I don't really want to hear from the

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company I've used the email address.

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No, at no.com.

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Yeah, that's funny.

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And there's also some services that are called like one time email or

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something like that, or disposable email, and you get a disposable email,

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you use it, you can check the inbox of that thing, but as soon as you close

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your browser, that emails is gone.

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So clunky.

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How clunky of an experience.

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Yeah.

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Terrible user experience, anchoring user interface and user experience

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are three really important ways to build trust for your brand.

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Thank you for listening with us today.

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It's been nice to go over some of these of my favorite principles

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