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UNCUT: Elite Australian business coach Kerwin Rae – part 2
Episode 24Bonus Episode19th August 2021 • Nerds of Business • Webbuzz Media
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BONUS: special 'uncut' episode.

Kerwin Rae is an entrepreneur, leading business coach & motivational speaker. With 2 million social media followers and a hit podcast 'Unstoppable' he's a powerhouse of inspiration. In the the second of a two-part interview, he shares his incredible story with Nerds of Business host, Darren Moffatt.

Guest Bios:

Kerwin Rae (https://www.linkedin.com/in/kerwinrae/)– founder & CEO of Business Mastery International (https://www.kerwinrae.com) 

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Transcripts

Darren Moffatt:

Hi listeners, and welcome to the nerds of business podcast. My name is Darren Moffatt. I'm a director of Webbuzz, the growth marketing agency. And I'm your host. It's great to have you with us for another one of our special uncut episodes. Today's uncut session is part two of my interview with Kerwin Rae. Now, Kerwin is a legend of the business coaching industry, and he's an absolute powerhouse. He's helped thousands of businesses across 154 industries, and he's got 2 million social media followers. He's also the host of unstoppable, which is consistently one of the top Australian business shows on apple podcasts. So when it comes to high performance and what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur, Kerwin is all over this stuff. In today's episode, Kerwin share's some incredible mindset techniques. He explained how he built his massive social media following, and he's got some great insights into non-verbal communication or body language.

Darren Moffatt:

He also reveals the one superpower that he thinks is most responsible for the success he's enjoyed so far. If you're an entrepreneur or business leader, you really won't want to miss this. On another note, just a quick update on how we're going with the new forthcoming series of nerds of business mindset of the disruptive entrepreneur is in the can. We've interviewed all of our entrepreneurs and subject matter experts, and we're in the final stages of post-production. So we should be back soon with the first episode of season three, thanks for your patience and keep an eye out for that coming soon. In the meantime, I hope you enjoy this special edition of nerds of business uncut. I love data.

Background Audio:

You need to have systems, you need to have structure. You're going to get chopped to pieces. Enthusiasm Is unstoppable. We kind of hit a point where we were like, we need another lever. Surround yourself with people who are smarter than you and richer than you.

Background Audio:

This is nerd of business. And Look,

Darren Moffatt:

this is again, it's nice Segway's here. You know, the, the next question I've got for you kind of jumps off that point. You know, I loved, um, one of the things I saw in your social media, um, in research for the, for this chat, uh, there's a video piece there where you're talking about, you know, change your story, change your change, the game, you know, and everyone has their own internal narrative. Everyone has their, their story that they tell themselves, which then of course, uh, dictates how they life plays out to a large extent. And so your proposition was change your story and change the game. What's one killer tip you could give to business owners

Kerwin Rae:

To change their own story, realize the

Kerwin Rae:

incredibly powerful suggestive nature of the brain. Um, and how, like I do this exercise in a room of about 800 people where I suggest that every single person is going to behave in a very specific way. I suggested to the entire room 34 times the very next day, about 60 to 80% of the room, execute on the behavior at the exact time that I suggested they would. And all I did was say to them that they were going to do it 34 times. And so when we start to understand the suggestible nature of our brain and the programmatic nature of our brain, we start to realize that I can input program suggestions. I can input, you know, suggestions that I'm stupid. If I tell myself I'm stupid, you know, everyday, 34 times, or what do you think I'm going to respond to? What do you think I am going to, you know, my brain is going to respond in kind to the suggestion.

Kerwin Rae:

And so for me, I think I know this is a bigger answer. It's not just a here push this button, but if there was one button, I'd encourage people to form as a surgical application of suggestion to themselves, Napoleon Hill referred to this as auto suggestion, one of the, you know, the 13 critical traits of the identified the 500 wealthiest people at that time. And these are people that are very conscious of the suggestions that they're making themselves elite, professional athletes, elite military, uh, elite, you know, people in a, in any situation they're very conscious of the narrative who's driving the narrative, you know, am I reacting to the narrative and I'm, and is it a, you know, is the narrative noisy, or am I f**king in control of the narrative? I'm relaying the script. I am laying the tracks, I'm creating the code. And that to me is something that I think is an incredibly important aspect that a lot of people become irresponsible for, or they go, I'm just thinking like my mum, no, you're modeling what your mum thought. Okay. It's still your, you may or may not be your fault, but it is your responsibility to wake up and do things differently. So you don't pass this on to the next generation.

Darren Moffatt:

And so that's, that's actually a very interesting philosophical point here about personal responsibility, because there is a school there opposing schools of thought here. Yeah. That, uh, you know, some people are not responsible for their, um, path in life because of their, where they were born or the yes, the upbringing they had the, um, and so on. Are you saying you, you reject that?

Kerwin Rae:

I absolutely and utterly reject that. You know, you may not be at fault, but you are always at responsible, always responsible for the response, you know, cause, I've, I've had a number of conversations with people I say, because my philosophy, everything is my fault. But then sometimes you sit down with people who share some stories with you and you go, whoa, that's big, that's heavy. And you go, you know what, that may not have been your fault, but now it's your responsibility to do something with it. That's going to be positive. Okay. And you may not be at fault with the event, but you are at fault for the perspective, you're at fault for the response, you know, and it's now your responsibility to do something about it. And I think the greatest misrepresentations ever been made to humanity is the blame game. You know, and the most powerful institutions in the world love the fact that we blame each other because we surrender our power for creation. We surrender our power for outcome. And we start cause when we're irresponsible, when we blame people, we are powerless. We are disempowered, you know, and the easiest, the easiest people to manipulate the easiest people to coerce are those people. And so our goal really should be, um, to, to yeah, to, to play the opposite game of that. Well, look,

Darren Moffatt:

You know, Kerwin, you're a man of many talents and interests. It's clear that you're very widely, you've got, you have extremely high energy. Uh, you know, you wear a lot of badges, you're an investor or a business owner, an entrepreneur, a mentor, a boss, um, an extreme sports person. And of course, an ambassador for ADHD. Which Kerwin does the world need the most right now. And why? That's a big question there. Oh,

Kerwin Rae:

You know, it's interesting. Cause um, you look at my social media following and you know, as you kindly pointed out, we've got a, you know, almost a couple of million followers on social media, but what's really interesting is my audience, you know, I'm the business guy, I'm the business performance guy. My specialty, my expertise is, um, you know, growing businesses very quickly. And I've been very good at it for 20 years, but 80, well, let's call it 70% of my audience on social media. They're not in business. Yeah. You know, because when you look at my content, it's on relationships, it's on parenting, it's on addiction, It's on mental health, it's on business as well, but it's a full spectrum of life, you know? And that's where I took to those 360 degrees as an entrepreneur. I share all of the degrees. You know, I don't, I don't hold anything back.

Kerwin Rae:

I think the world needs, um, uh, the version of Kerwin that's going to help more people. And the version of Kerwin that's going to help more people, um, is, is the version of Kerwin that's bringing back a program called power to create. We created a program, Well, I created a program five years ago. Well actually, you know, 10 years ago, I shelved it five years ago because I wanted to focus on the business side. We've blown the business side up significantly now to the point where we can bring power to create back. Power to create is a mainstream program, performance, personal development, spiritual, you know, psychology, quantum mechanics, particle physics. It really is a complete integration of performance from, you know, from a range of different, uh, angles. And right now with everything that I see going on, you know, I see more people needing that information and I get to share that information by virtue of the little clips, you know, that we put out there. But that, that is basically three days of user's manual. And that's what the world needs right now is a, is a better user's manual. Cause the one that we've got right now, um, I think everyone's starting to realize it's out of date.

Darren Moffatt:

Very Good point. And you touched on it a minute ago. I mean, when I went through your social accounts, uh, I, that really struck me that you there's a lot of content, particularly on the Facebook feed around codependency PTSD, imposter syndrome, and so on. You know, I, I was really struck by the consistent focus on common, psychological challenges and conditions. And, and so guessing that because of your holistic view.

Kerwin Rae:

Yeah. And it's the difference that makes a difference. It's the difference. That makes a difference. You know, when I work with a business owner, I don't just build their business, I help them heal. And I know that sounds really f**king woo woo right. But here's what I know. Like what prevents people from success is often they're carrying too much weight, they're carrying too much baggage. And so for me, you know, and I'm so blessed because I've had the baggage of ADHD. I've had the baggage of dyslexia. I've had the baggage of near death experiences I've had the baggage of addiction. I've had the baggage of a stepfather was murdered when I was eight years of age. I've had the baggage of, you know, physical, mental, all sorts of trauma, you know, and by virtue of that, I've had to go through the journey of going, okay, I've got this condition, my toll is bad.

Kerwin Rae:

Maybe there's something good in it. Maybe I can make it better. Maybe I can use this to my advantage. And then I do. And I'm like, I reckon there's other people out there that would really benefit from this, you know, from a different perspective on ADHD, a different perspective on PTSD, a different perspective on dyslexia. And so the reason that I talk about so many different threads is because I've just had so much of my own baggage. I've had so much of my own s**t, but I'm just the kind of guy that has no issue in the world, unpacking my bags publicly. Uh, and if anything, I talk about everything. So they've got nothing to hide from. Uh, and by virtue of me doing that, it serves a lot of people because there's a lot of people out there. Here's what I've learned too. And you've probably identified this Darren, entrepreneurs, they're a f**king great crack bunch, but a lot of them are, uh, um, and I hope this doesn't come across as a negative, um, implicational stereotype, but entrepreneurs for the most part can be a little bit of a broken bunch.

Kerwin Rae:

You know, in most cases, most entrepreneurs that I have connected with have a story, a story of something, a trauma, a something, you know, and by virtue of business, they see business a challenge, but unconsciously, the reason I think so many people are attracted to business who have baggage is because they know that that challenge is going to require personal work. And by virtue of that personal work, it's going to provide healing. I don't think this is a conscious association, but here's what we know. Our business is very stressful. It's enormous levels of personal development. It confronts you with the stuff that you don't want to look at. And in most cases it can be used as a vehicle of healing. And the reason I think there's so many entrepreneurs have psychological issues is because that's why they became entrepreneurs because those psychological issues I can relate, drove them. I can relate to that. I'll put my hand up there. Oh mate, I'll put both hands and both feet up. And I drove them to that, to that point. Cause I know for me personally, you know, that's what drove me, you know, PTSD had such an impact on my life. And so I, it drove me, you know, ADHD, dyslexic, trauma, it's just, it's all the stuff that drives me that I shared that I've discovered really does help unlock the hearts and minds and the souls of others that we can connect with in a meaningful

Kerwin Rae:

way. But from a performance perspective,

Kerwin Rae:

There's nothing faster than an athlete, that's been carrying a twenty kilo bag. And then all of a sudden they put it down. Now that athlete's now fast.

Darren Moffatt:

That's a very, another very nice analogy. I get the feeling you've done this before Kerwin, you're really good at this speaking stuff. Uh, thanks, mate.

Darren Moffatt:

Um, and look, you know, again, what you just said sort of leads naturally into one of the other questions that I've got here for you. Um, and it's, you know, regarding your very significant social media following almost up at 2 million followers. And I know that you're a big fan of Gary Vaynerchuk now he's probably let's face it in sort of business coaching entrepreneurs sort of circles, he's probably the absolute gold standard internationally. Um, and, uh, I see that he's even presented at some of your events, uh, which is amazing. What are the three most important things that you've learned about building your amazing personal brand, um, that you could share with our listeners? Yeah,

Kerwin Rae:

Good question. Well, first of all, I do, I am very grateful to Gary because Gary, I hired Gary to speak at one of my events in 2015. And he took, he came to the back of the room. Uh, it was in Las Vegas and he took about eight minutes to connect with me. And I think of those eight minutes, he spent seven minutes telling me how badly my social media sucked. Um, and I got my a** kicked in a really beautiful way. But as by virtue, this is what happened. Um, you know, and as one of the things that I've learned when it comes to social media and look, there's a few things, but the first one is, you know, there's two ways that you can create content. You can either create content or you can document content and ideally your ability, to create content or document content will fundamentally determine your ability to complete the second most important thing, which is consistency.

Kerwin Rae:

Okay. And that's where if you're not consistently posting content, you're going to find it very hard to build an audience very hard to connect with an audience, very hard to be even liked by the engines themselves or the networks themselves. And so by virtue of being consistent, you have to have content. And if you're not producing content consistently, you're not going to have anything to post consistently. And so for me, you know, you've got to have a really good content strategy and that's where I'm very pro documentation. Um, I'm on now my third documentary, like we've created the first documentary was the social experiment, which was, I think 40 episodes. The second documentary was K day, which I think was 119 episodes. And we're about to launch another documentary now, which is called bracing for impact. It's all around our response to COVID.

Kerwin Rae:

Um, and so there features, I guess, you'd call there aspects of pillar content, but I document everything I do. Like even this conversation right now has probably already, I've already identified at least probably 12 videos that this will be cut up into, you know, just from this conversation. And so by virtue, my, I prefer to do intelligent content strategies and intelligent content strategies to me is how can I spend less time creating content and more time documenting meaningful content. That's probably going to have a genuine impact. And so if I sit down, I have this conversation with a camera it's not going to land anywhere near as well as if I film me having a conversation with Darren, you know, talking about these things because it's a lot more authentic. It's a lot more natural. It's social, it looks like a social connection.

Kerwin Rae:

Okay. And so by virtue of the mechanism of being a documentarian by documenting content, you create more contents, relative content. Like the content is more social because it's more real, it's not staged, it's not produced. Okay. Cause that's, that's more traditional style. And so step one, you've got to have a good content strategy in terms of the documentation or the creation side, your strategy might be, well, I don't do anything. That's entertaining enough to document, well great. Then you have to sit down at least a couple of times a week and you have to look at the camera and you need to go, Hey guys, today, I'm going to talk about the four things you need to know when it comes to losing weight effectively and keeping it off. Okay, you're going to have to create content. It's gonna have a different temperature, different kind of, um, I could guess a different level of, uh, sentiment.

Kerwin Rae:

Um, but you know, all the same, you need number one, a good content strategy to producing documenting number two, you need to be posting consistently. And number three, you need to understand, you know, where the attention is. And then the attention is in the audience. You know, the attention is not in the social networks, in the audience. And if you don't show respect to the audience, um, then they're not going to listen to what you have to say. And so how do we show respect to the audience? well we listen. You know, we understand it's a social network. You know, it's not a broadcast network. A broadcast network is a one-way communication. Okay. A social network is about dialogue. It's about, you know, 89% of businesses. Don't respond to messages and posts on social media, 89%.

Kerwin Rae:

Yeah, that's ridiculous. It blows my f**king

Kerwin Rae:

mind, Darren. And when you consider a conversation is the synthesis of the sale. Like once upon a time marketers of the world, we spent all of our time and money, okay, to do promotions, to generate leads, whereby we could call people and start a conversation that we hope would lead into a f**king sale. Now we have people coming into our shop, AKA social media and starting to talk to us, but 89% of business owners turn around and ignore them. That's a conversation. And that's the problem because conversation's the new lead and people don't see that one in five Instagram, organic stories from a business will result in a direct message from a follower. That's the Genesis of a conversation. What do you do with that? Well, you could just reply all start a conversation that builds trust, that builds intimacy, that builds connection. And as a natural consequence, who knows where it's going to go, chances are transactionally. Uh, and in most cases authentically, and here's the best part organically without having to be a sales and marketing.

Darren Moffatt:

Well, uh, as a marketing, I won't take personal offense to that. You know, I run a digital marketing agency. But it's okay. I've got a thick, thick skin. I can, I can, I can look past that now. No Look, I think there's a lot of value in what you're saying. And of course, you know, if you can get, um, a lead or inquiry, you can build those relationships, uh,

Kerwin Rae:

Its not hard to respond to a comment. It's not hard to respond to a direct message. It's not hard to understand that anytime someone tries to talk to you, that is the Genesis of a sale. That's where sales start. They start at the beginning of a conversation and if people are trying to talk to us and we're ignoring them. We're not respecting the audience, you know, and that's where we can learn a lot from our audience in terms of that third thing, which is listen to the audience, talk to the audience, you know, because that's where most of your content ideas will come from your product ideas. You know, cause I don't just listen to my audience. I listen to my clients, you know, I have, I have, uh, boards of advisors for my, for different businesses and the board of advisors that I've got for the BMI, which is a 30 plus million dollar organization. They go, there's eight people on the board. Six of those people are my clients.

Darren Moffatt:

Wow. Okay. That's unusual.

Kerwin Rae:

That's very, very unusual, very unusual. But I listen to my audience and I don't just listen to my audience. I listen to my clients because where do my greatest innovations come from my audience and my clients, because why they're seeing things that I don't, you know, and oftentimes they're seeing it in a meaningful way as an observer that can give me some really incredible insights if I create the space for that to transpire

Darren Moffatt:

Well Kerwin, you're obviously a very thoughtful person and I've only got two more questions for you. And one of them maybe kind of relates to what you just said there. Um, this is a special recurring segment on Nerds of Business, called, It's not that one. Let's keep this in. This is a special recurring segment, called.

Background Audio:

Nerd Super Power. There we go, that was real, Wasn't it? I love it.

Darren Moffatt:

Uh, so this is nerd super power Kerwin and you're, you know, look, you've, obviously you've done a lot in your life. You've got a lot of talents and a lot of passions and enthusiasms, but if you had to sort of distil all of that down to one thing, what is, what is your super power? Oh gosh,

Kerwin Rae:

That's a tough question. That's a really tough question. Um, look, I'm going to try and be as original as I can here and I'd have to say my one of my greatest superpowers and I've spent an in disproportionate amount of time developing this is probably my level of awareness. And I, I don't say that in an arrogant way because when I, when I refer to this in the most part, because I've spent to give you a context, I spent about nine years studying with Paul Ekman and David 11 years with David Matsumoto, uh, Phil Houston of the CIA. So I've spent a disproportionate amount of time studying, uh, nonverbal communication from, um, from a security perspective, from an interrogation perspective, from a, you know, um, from the perspective of being able to see information that no one else can see like Paul Ekman, uh, you know, he's responsible for training some of the, you know, some of the greatest, um, I guess you could say, uh, counter terrorist organizations as has for Houston when it comes to being able to read facial expressions, micro facial expressions that happen within less than 0.2, five of a second, to be able to identify emotions that are being suppressed, to be able to identify in most cases, to seek deception or emission, Phil Houston, you know, with his, um, L squared methods.

Kerwin Rae:

And so I've spent a lot of time, like 15 years I spent studying deception, just deception. And again, that was born as a result of being lied to one too times and never wanting to be caught again.

Darren Moffatt:

And your kids, your kids are in for a world of pain when they, when they get to teenagers. Like my God, they've got no chance.

Kerwin Rae:

Well, here's, what's really interesting. Paul Ekman was a, um, a mentor of mine for a very long time. They even created a TV series on him called lie to me. And Paul actually wrote, and his expertise was facial acquisition, or I was called, um, micro expression techniques. So he developed, uh, the technology better identify different marker expressions. And what's interesting is he ended up writing a book with the Dalai Lama because what Paul didn't realize he was doing is he was actually teaching consciousness to police officers consciousness, to counter-terrorism because what he was teaching them to do was to learn how to slow things down to the point where they could see tiny little micro behaviors in a split of a second. And that takes an enormous level of awareness to do. It takes an enormous level of awareness to be able to see something that no one else can see, because it's not only a micro expression, meaning it's a tiny fractional expression, but it only appears in some cases in point 0.1, 0.25 of a second, which is fleeting, and to be able to develop sensory acuity to the point where you can catch every single one of those, you know, leakages, as they're referred to, that takes an enormous level of awareness to be able to completely neutrally observe every single expression in a non-biased way to try and put the sentence together.

Kerwin Rae:

Cause this is what a lot of people don't realize, right? Non-verbal communication, isn't in isolation. So most people go, if someone does this, you know, they're closing off, well, no, they could be cold, okay, but what is this? Okay. In the sentence of what's going on, this is one word and a body communicates in sentences. Our face communicates in sentences, energy communicates in sentences. And so one of the things that we have to do when we are reading non-verbal behaviors in very high levels of acuity, sensory acuity, and awareness, that we need to be able to have a level of non bias and what's called truth bias, ignore the truth and focus on everything else to see what is really actually there. And it's look, it's an incredible skill as a superpower, my poor kids, I feel that anyone that tries to come into my life and play games or game me, because honestly it's just, yeah, it's just, it's just something that I have developed as at 15 years of studying deception developed an incredible skill that I now use in a whole range of other areas as well.

Darren Moffatt:

Wow. That is one potent super power. Um, and that might just be the best, uh, best answer to that question. I've asked all my guests that question and I've never had that particular superpower, so yeah. That's amazing.,

Kerwin Rae:

I'm a walking, talking, lie detector. It annoys the s**t out of everybody.

Darren Moffatt:

I Bet it does. I'm sure it's incredibly powerful, but it must be annoying too, Sometimes a close family & friends.

Kerwin Rae:

Here's, what's really interesting when I first learnt it because over the first five years I experienced some up and emotionally because I was like, hang on a second. And this is going to be the kicker. Everybody lies, everybody lies. But what I had to discover was not everybody's motive was the same and not everybody's intent was the same, you know, some people just, you know, lie because it's just how they've been brought up, you know? Oh, I know I'm just not very good at that. Well, what do you, you're a professional at what you do, but you're thinking that's a lie. You know, there are so many ways that, you know, that, that, um, deception has been used. And the more we understand about it, you know, that the more we start to realize that it's very common, but everybody has their different reasons for doing it. And some people are telling a lie because they're trying to protect themselves. And sometimes, you know, they're protecting others and sometimes it's protecting ego and other times it's great. But here's one thing that I find really interesting from a deception in the study of human behaviors, people whose main driver in business or in work is that is money. They're eight times more likely if their purpose is to make money. Number one, driver make money eight times more likely to engage in deceit, deception. I omissive and fraudulent related behaviours.

Darren Moffatt:

That's no surprise to me. I mean, yeah, that's no surprise to me. And I, you know, uh, like you I've been in business for quite a while now. And I, I never actually got into it really for, for the money. Uh, it was always about achievement and, you know, wanting to, um, you know, reach certain objectives.

Kerwin Rae:

I did. I got into it because I didn't have any money I got in business because it was missing. And then I made lots of money

Kerwin Rae:

And I was still f**king miserable. And I was like Hang on.

Kerwin Rae:

That's not was on the brochure. They said, if I made lots of money, I'd be f**king happy. Cause that's what Disneyland showed me. And I just,

Darren Moffatt:

It doesn't quite work out that way. Yeah. Well, um, Kerwin, it's been a delight talking with you. I've got one last question and, um, this might be, my favorite of all. Um, you know, I find that most top entrepreneurs, are deep thinkers with a restless mind, and that would absolutely apply to you. Um, now whether it's meditation or a nice bottle of red or jumping out of a plane, which I know you do. Um, but do you have a really favorite mental habit or process that you use to channel your creativity.

Kerwin Rae:

Oh meditation. It's honestly, it's another superpower I've probably meditated. I don't know. It's gotta be over 10,000, maybe 20,000 hours, you know, in the last 26 odd years. And it's just the impact that it has. I just, it, again, if you, and if you study different forms of meditation, transcendental is probably the, one of my scientifically validated forms of meditation. When you start to understand what it does, like what the neurology, the biology it's,

Kerwin Rae:

There's nothing that can really beat it. So for me, that's probably my number one. The second thing I really love to do is I love to spend time with my family. Like there's no greater way, the fastest way to turn my mind off is, and it sounds really weird is to get my partner to come and hold me. The moment she hugs me, I just I'm gone.

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