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Scuba Diver Marine Biologist Electrocuted Underwater. Terry Lilley
Episode 16114th February 2022 • Your Positive Imprint • Catherine Praiswater
00:00:00 00:26:02

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While conducting underwater studies of electromagnetic discharge into the coral reef from a nearby ship, marine biologist Terry Lilley almost lost his life. There should be no electromagnetic energy naturally underwater on a coral reef. Terry describes his experience and how his accident just might have saved the very same coral reef he was studying. After the accident Terry continued with his path in life as a marine biologist and educator.


Transcripts

Terry Lilley:

Yeah, I had to learn the hard way, but once again, I look back at it now and I see why it happened.

Terry Lilley:

Well, hello, thank you so much for listening to all of these amazing and exceptional, positive imprints.

Terry Lilley:

Well, I'm Catherine, your host for the podcast, your positive imprint, the variety show, featuring people all over the world whose positive actions are inspiring positive achievements.

Terry Lilley:

Exceptional people rise to the challenge.

Terry Lilley:

Music by the talented Chris Nole.,

Terry Lilley:

chris's music may be found at ChrisNole.com.

Terry Lilley:

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram.

Terry Lilley:

Your positive imprint.

Terry Lilley:

Connect with me on LinkedIn,

Terry Lilley:

my website is yourpositiveimprint.com

Terry Lilley:

you can listen to the show from my website, yourpositiveimprint.com or of course listen from any podcast platform, apple podcasts, Google podcasts, Spotify, or simply your favorite podcast platform.

Terry Lilley:

Your positive imprint.

Terry Lilley:

What's your PI.

Terry Lilley:

Last week Marine biologist, endangered species manager, cinematographer, diver, environmental and wildlife activist and advocate, Terry Lilley shared his ocean studies of coral reefs

Terry Lilley:

Why are some reefs living while others are struggling, even dying.

Terry Lilley:

While conducting underwater studies of electromagnetic discharge into the coral reef from a nearby ship, Terry Lilley almost lost his life.

Terry Lilley:

Part two right now with Terry Lilley.

Catherine:

Terry.

Catherine:

Welcome to the show.

Catherine:

It's so good to see you again.

Catherine:

Aloha.

Terry Lilley:

Thanks for having me.

Terry Lilley:

It's a broadcasting right now from the beautiful island of Kaua'i.

Catherine:

Well, your work out in the ocean is so imperative as scientists like yourself, biologists are bringing information to the world and to other biologists, so that comparisons can be made

Catherine:

I know that there was an accident that you had because of what was happening up above.

Catherine:

And you were down in the water, scuba diving.

Terry Lilley:

Yeah, I had to learn the hard way, but once again, I look back at it now and I see why it happened.

Terry Lilley:

So just in a brief story in 2012, through 2015, along the north shore Kaua'i, I was scuba diving almost every day, documenting the reefs dying.

Terry Lilley:

And I did underwater electrical studies also to pick up a electromagnetic discharge into the coral reef, which shouldn't be there.

Terry Lilley:

There should be no electromagnetic energy naturally underwater on a coral reef.

Terry Lilley:

So I was putting two and two together that the military activities were damaging the coral reefs, but I didn't really have the proof at that point in time.

Terry Lilley:

What I didn't realize is that at the time of these underwater activities, the Navy seals got a notice from the Navy.

Terry Lilley:

And it said, and I quote for no Navy seal or Navy diver to get within 3,500 feet underwater of the Navy drones, submarines or warships when they're operating their electromagnetic energy.

Terry Lilley:

Because if you do, you will have an immediate heart seizure.

Terry Lilley:

Oh my gosh.

Terry Lilley:

. I have that document.

Catherine:

Wait, wait, wait.

Catherine:

So this was, this was sent out to

Terry Lilley:

just the Navy seal divers, the Navy seal divers.

Terry Lilley:

One of them actually gave me the document after I got electrocuted underwater.

Terry Lilley:

So I did not know at the time how plasma energy weapons work; how microwave weapons work, how electromagnet energy weapons work.

Terry Lilley:

They're utilizing all of these underwater, uh, in the Hawaiian islands the main testing zone and the Pacific Northwest in Oregon, uh, Northern California, all the way up to Washington.

Terry Lilley:

So anyway, I went out scuba diving in 2015.

Terry Lilley:

There was a war ship right off shore.

Terry Lilley:

I could hear the underwater, the submarines sonar going.

Terry Lilley:

And so I went out basically to prove that these warships were killing our coral reefs.

Terry Lilley:

Only a few days earlier and these movies are up on my YouTube channel.

Terry Lilley:

I actually shot video of sea turtles where their flippers being blown off.

Terry Lilley:

Oh my gosh.

Terry Lilley:

Yeah.

Terry Lilley:

Dead whales, dead dolphins on the beach.

Terry Lilley:

And this was all happening when you could visually see the warships off.

Terry Lilley:

So I went out to prove that these warships were discharging electricity into the coral reef and was causing a massive coral disease killing our coral reefs here.

Terry Lilley:

I did not know about the warnings to not get close to these warships.

Terry Lilley:

I'm one of the only scuba divers on the north shore of Kaua'i during the winter time.

Terry Lilley:

Almost no one dives here.

Terry Lilley:

And so I'm basically the only Marine biologist and the only diver on the whole coastline.

Terry Lilley:

So I went out scuba diving.

Terry Lilley:

I was out diving about a thousand feet away from this Navy ship, holding onto the reef shooting video of a diseased coral.

Terry Lilley:

And I basically got zapped and most doctors and physicians that know how the body responds to being electrocuted; they did test on me and my heart basically spasmed and turned backwards.

Terry Lilley:

So your heart's a muscle.

Terry Lilley:

And if you stick your finger in an electrical socket and you get a shock, what happens all your muscles contract.

Terry Lilley:

So I was under water.

Terry Lilley:

I had no heart attack symptoms whatsoever, nor was I a candidate for heart attack; good shape, all that kind of stuff.

Terry Lilley:

So underwater, I basically contracted and I couldn't move my arms.

Terry Lilley:

I couldn't move my legs.

Terry Lilley:

I could barely barely breathe at all.

Terry Lilley:

And after a period about a half an hour, it loosened up enough where I finally, I could swim to shore.

Terry Lilley:

And then I drove to Lihue our medical clinic at Wilcox medical center.

Terry Lilley:

And when I got there and was checked in, they told me, Mr.

Terry Lilley:

Lilley, your, your heart is, uh, in a spasm, you have no blood flow.

Terry Lilley:

Your arteries are clogged.

Terry Lilley:

And, uh, and you're not going to live.

Terry Lilley:

Just that simple.

Terry Lilley:

And then they said to me, uh, I have to laugh at this.

Terry Lilley:

I think I know this is flat out.

Terry Lilley:

I mean, it's crazy when you think about, and they showed me all of my heart enzyme tests, my heart enzyme levels were at 14.

Terry Lilley:

That means your heart dissolved.

Terry Lilley:

And it breaks down and dissolves.

Terry Lilley:

When you're inside levels.

Terry Lilley:

Through that high, I had no pulse hardly at all.

Terry Lilley:

I mean, nothing.

Terry Lilley:

My heart, you could look at all the arteries.

Terry Lilley:

They were totally clogged.

Terry Lilley:

So anyway, the doctor there, the physician said, uh, would you like to have your last rights?

Terry Lilley:

You know, because I'm going to die.

Terry Lilley:

And I laughed with him and I said, no, not really.

Terry Lilley:

Unless your preacher knows all the old Hawaiian fishing chants, I don't want to talk to him

Terry Lilley:

on the table.

Terry Lilley:

And they kept saying, you're going to die.

Terry Lilley:

You're going to die.

Terry Lilley:

You're going to die.

Terry Lilley:

I'm sitting there going.

Terry Lilley:

No, I'm not.

Terry Lilley:

No, I'm not.

Terry Lilley:

No I'm not..

Terry Lilley:

Make a long story short.

Terry Lilley:

They finally medivaced me to Oah'u Straub hospital.

Terry Lilley:

They relaxed my heart with drugs, morphine to get it, to relax.

Terry Lilley:

And then they put in heart stents through my femoral artery, in my leg, up into my heart to stabilize the arteries.

Terry Lilley:

A month later, I was back scuba diving and I've been since then and surf every other day.

Terry Lilley:

So I'm all fine now.

Terry Lilley:

But the positive of all of that, I did all these movies and public broadcast and a radio show every week about this event.

Terry Lilley:

And it really bombarded the military public relations department.

Terry Lilley:

And so I threatened to Sue the military for billions of dollars for electrocuting me underwater, but that wasn't the right thing to do.

Terry Lilley:

I'm not doing what I do so I can get a bunch of money.

Terry Lilley:

I'm doing what I do because it's my path in life.

Terry Lilley:

And if I keep doing it, I get all of this beautiful gifts from nature given to me.

Terry Lilley:

So, you know, stuff, money can't buy.

Terry Lilley:

The military kind of owed me one on this one, then they allowed me to get together with them all have direct communication with president Obama in the White House.

Terry Lilley:

His, uh, Admiral Harris, his chief of staff, a Congresswoman Tulsi gabber came on is kind of my partner for a while doing these reef studies.

Terry Lilley:

And I got a big meeting with the military and got to present all this scientific information.

Terry Lilley:

And even the science, by the way, on how the discharge of electricity from a submarine kills the coral.

Terry Lilley:

It's called electrolysis.

Terry Lilley:

And so we even went into the exact science of how it's killing the reef and you know what the military said, this was pretty wonderful thing to hear from the U S military.

Terry Lilley:

At the end of the presentation, the military said, and I quote, 'Mr.

Terry Lilley:

Lilley has hyper documented this coral reef problem and us the military,

Terry Lilley:

we've never even put a diver under water to monitor our activity.

Terry Lilley:

we will use Mr.

Terry Lilley:

Lilly's information as fact.

Catherine:

Well, incredible it's just awesome.

Terry Lilley:

So the bottom line is the military moved their operation off shore, and now we got trillions of new corals growing back.

Terry Lilley:

So it's a really good example once again, how a negative can be turned into positives.

Terry Lilley:

There are no negatives.

Terry Lilley:

And that's just the way nature works.

Terry Lilley:

You know, it doesn't work on negative energy.

Terry Lilley:

The earth only spins one direction.

Terry Lilley:

Spins forward.

Terry Lilley:

It doesn't spin backwards.

Terry Lilley:

There is no past.

Terry Lilley:

There is, there basically is only a now and what is going to come to be.

Terry Lilley:

And so it's always going to be a positive

Terry Lilley:

if you learn how to flow with that forward, spin.

Terry Lilley:

, I had a wonderful conversation, by the way, with the Dalai Lama on all this stuff, I got together with him in Oah'u, , he was completely told about my problem, getting electrocuted

Terry Lilley:

And I got together with him, you know, and he gave me some absolutely beautiful, beautiful, beautiful advice.

Terry Lilley:

And first thing he told me, which was really cool , Mr.

Terry Lilley:

Lilley, there is no negative.

Terry Lilley:

So what happened to you is all good.

Terry Lilley:

Only positive.

Terry Lilley:

Okay.

Terry Lilley:

And then he said now for you to go forward, I love this statement

Terry Lilley:

it's the cutest thing I've ever heard for you to go forward you don't need any more Terry's out there.

Terry Lilley:

You only need one of you.

Terry Lilley:

You don't need anymore because what you need is to develop a beautiful garden.

Terry Lilley:

He speaks in metaphors.

Terry Lilley:

I just love it.

Terry Lilley:

So I'm going fill up a beautiful garden.

Terry Lilley:

And he goes, yes.

Terry Lilley:

And you know what a beautiful garden has?

Terry Lilley:

What?

Terry Lilley:

Many different types of flowers.

Terry Lilley:

And you know what I said?

Terry Lilley:

This guy's right.

Terry Lilley:

He's always right.

Terry Lilley:

So since 2015, instead of going at this, on my own, I've developed a team of hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people worldwide that are now studying the

Terry Lilley:

Matter of fact, there is an article sent to me almost every day concerning these issues that are being studied worldwide right now.

Terry Lilley:

And so we have a big, beautiful garden growing out there and we need more people in it.

Terry Lilley:

We need more flowers.

Terry Lilley:

But once again, teaching our kids about electromagnetic energy from military microwave towers to smart meters to 5g cell phone towers is going to be highly important for the health of our planet.

Terry Lilley:

In the future.

Catherine:

This is so interesting.

Catherine:

Well, I'm so glad that you survived because that's a big positive for sure.

Catherine:

And that your garden is spreading and growing.

Catherine:

When you were talking about the turtle and the whale being injured , by the actions of , the weaponry practices, it makes you cringe and so on and so forth.

Catherine:

But cringing.

Catherine:

Isn't going to do anything.

Catherine:

So cringing is just a reaction and we want reactions to turn into engagement.

Catherine:

And so,

Terry Lilley:

you know, what will happen in your show coming up here sometime in the near future, which would be really, really, really fun is a few of my twelve-year-old students from around the world.

Terry Lilley:

Oh, that would

Catherine:

be great.

Catherine:

I have

Terry Lilley:

12 year olds in the Philippines right now.

Terry Lilley:

And in other parts of the world that are out there with their underwater movie cameras making documentary movies of the coral reefs in their area.

Terry Lilley:

Now I've taught over 2000 kids here in Hawai'i.

Terry Lilley:

And I have students here in Hawaii that started going out with me snorkeling at four years old and at 14 years old right now they're making their own underwater documentary

Catherine:

movies.

Terry Lilley:

Yeah.

Terry Lilley:

In my 12 year old class, down at Anini beach.

Terry Lilley:

This was so cute.

Terry Lilley:

So we had the head of the DLNR, which is our land, you know, environmental management government agency here in Hawaii.

Terry Lilley:

The head of the DLNR came out to, uh, our Anini reef camp with all these kids.

Terry Lilley:

And the gal was writing up on the chalkboard, all of the things that could harm a coral reef.

Terry Lilley:

So she writes on their sewage, too much boating, over fishing, farm chemical runoff, can you think of any other things that might be harming our coral reefs?

Terry Lilley:

And one of my 12 year old students stood up, raised his hand, crossed his arms serious as can be.

Terry Lilley:

He goes, well, it's obvious.

Terry Lilley:

Geoengineering and electromagnetic weapons training along the north shore of Kauai from the U S Navy is going to kill our coral reefs before anything ever even gets to the coral reef.

Terry Lilley:

Oh my gosh.

Terry Lilley:

This is the head biologist for our government.

Terry Lilley:

Whoa.

Terry Lilley:

That's how much these kids are learning.

Terry Lilley:

So the program, the surf and reef program I'm putting together is going to take surfers and divers and marine biologists, all working together.

Terry Lilley:

And the kids in one part of the world are going to make movies and share them with the kids in the other part of the world.

Terry Lilley:

So we look to have children all around the world that are trained in Marine biology, videography scientific technology, and their own cultural ways in their past, and have them

Terry Lilley:

And then where you're at people that are in Idaho or Utah or somewhere that doesn't have an ocean,

Terry Lilley:

that's great.

Terry Lilley:

The kids can go out there and do mushrooms studies and see how mushrooms are affected by climate change.

Terry Lilley:

They can go out there and do mountain lion studies.

Terry Lilley:

They can go out there and do frog and amphibian studies because frogs suck in water through their skin and they don't have kidneys and filters.

Terry Lilley:

So if there's any problems with the water in the area, the frogs are going to be the first to die.

Terry Lilley:

So the kids, no matter where they are on earth can make their own environmental movie, share it with all the other kids.

Terry Lilley:

Then the planet's young children are going to grow up without having all of these barriers that are put on them saying, you're not a scientist

Terry Lilley:

you can't study a coral reef.

Terry Lilley:

Anyone is a scientist.

Terry Lilley:

The kids ask me all the time.

Terry Lilley:

Uncle Terry.

Terry Lilley:

I want to grow up like you and be a biologist.

Terry Lilley:

Well, first of all, you never need to grow up.

Terry Lilley:

Number two, you already are a biologist.

Terry Lilley:

I mean, that's what I tell my eight year olds.

Terry Lilley:

A biologist is someone that goes out there and studies the natural working system on this planet.

Terry Lilley:

You already are.

Terry Lilley:

You're out there every day with a movie camera taking sea turtle movies to see how they're doing.

Terry Lilley:

So you already are biologists.

Terry Lilley:

So getting the kids to share through social media, because we can do it

Terry Lilley:

and by the way, COVID is kind of causing it to happen because they can't be in the classroom.

Terry Lilley:

We really have a really neat future of education of kids sharing with kids studying the environment worldwide.

Catherine:

Yes.

Catherine:

So that gives me all the, confidence, I guess, to rebirth the videos that we did in school, back in the nineties and mid two thousands on the environment, and they were so cute.

Catherine:

And these kids now over 18.

Catherine:

They were really fun videos.

Catherine:

And what we did just to kind of share a little bit.

Catherine:

We did CPR.

Catherine:

That was something that I came up with, conserve, protect, recycle.

Catherine:

You know, those beach balls that you blow up.

Catherine:

So it was a beach ball of the earth.

Catherine:

And so we used to do little commercials.

Catherine:

Oh, my gosh, the earth is in danger.

Catherine:

It's dying and we'd have a doctor come out with a stethoscope and this flat earth is, is dying.

Catherine:

And so they bring in all of this recycling and they're cleaning up the area and they said, oh, she's getting better.

Catherine:

And they're pumping up the earth and they're pumping up the earth.

Catherine:

Then she's getting better and better.

Catherine:

And people are doing what they're supposed to around the world.

Catherine:

And then the earth comes back into this great beach ball shape and they saved the earth.

Catherine:

And that was all so many years ago.

Catherine:

Well, I talked about

Terry Lilley:

Do you know how powerful

Terry Lilley:

. Yeah, it would be to have that movie clip you just described and have that

Catherine:

make

Terry Lilley:

a movie of their environment and sharing it back.

Terry Lilley:

I mean, that would be absolutely precious.

Catherine:

Yeah, I will certainly put that out.

Catherine:

And, you know, I talked to one of the students who was part of a, another environmental film that we did.

Catherine:

She lives in Washington, DC.

Catherine:

And she said, I'm 27 years old.

Catherine:

I was working so hard on student council with you back in the mid two thousands.

Catherine:

And now I'm 27.

Catherine:

And I feel like, what did that do?

Catherine:

And I told her it did.

Catherine:

It did a lot.

Catherine:

Because we didn't regress.

Catherine:

We may not be moving as fast as what they want to see, and she said, so what kind of a future do I have as a 27 year old when I look into the future?

Catherine:

Am I going to have to be working this hard in order to just, stay alive within an environment that will keep me alive.

Catherine:

That brings me to a quote that I want to share.

Catherine:

I don't want it to be negative quote because it's a positive quote to get people engaged and to get them to think and reflect.

Catherine:

But I had a fellow on the podcast just this week.

Catherine:

Mike Silvestrini and he is into renewable energies and he's a CEO of a company, but he's also into conservation and he's been working with Africa in preserving their wildlife.

Catherine:

He finds that, you run into obstacles and you have to work through those obstacles, but you cannot stop.

Catherine:

But his quote is this.

Catherine:

"Conservation has to be infinite in order for it to matter at all."

Terry Lilley:

And

Catherine:

absolutely.

Catherine:

So yes.

Catherine:

You do have to work infinitely

Terry Lilley:

I gave a talk recently to the Sierra club and I said, you know what?

Terry Lilley:

Animals on this planet go extinct.

Terry Lilley:

For 5 billion years before humans showed up 99% of the animals on earth have gone extinct.

Terry Lilley:

So the earth is spinning.

Terry Lilley:

The earth is made up of birth, growth, death and rebirth.

Terry Lilley:

Recycling of energy on earth.

Terry Lilley:

Okay.

Terry Lilley:

So what humans are doing right now is we're not paying attention to how the earth actually works as a single unit.

Terry Lilley:

We're accelerating this rate of extinction.

Terry Lilley:

If humans want to stay around on this planet for a little longer, we got to stop with this electromagnetic bombardment of planet earth.

Terry Lilley:

The kids need to learn all about this stuff.

Terry Lilley:

I

Terry Lilley:

talk to a 12 year old.

Terry Lilley:

They don't have a hundred million dollars in the bank.

Terry Lilley:

They don't own vast estates out in the countryside.

Terry Lilley:

They have themselves and the environment of which they love and they get along with.

Terry Lilley:

I think that's the biggest gift that we have to planet earth right now our kids from eight to 14 years old.

Terry Lilley:

If they're given the proper education worldwide on what's happening on planet earth and how we can get back into harmony and balance with mother . , They get it.

Terry Lilley:

In a heartbeat.

Catherine:

Terry, thank you so much for that.

Catherine:

I'm going to

Catherine:

go back into my archives and pull out conserve, protect, recycle . So thank you for that.

Catherine:

But to end the episode, what are your last inspiring words regarding sea life?

Terry Lilley:

I personally am making a new underwater movie every single day.

Terry Lilley:

And I'm going to post these underwater movies up on my YouTube, which is underwater2web.

Terry Lilley:

So it's underwater the number two web web.

Terry Lilley:

So please folks go on my underwater.

Terry Lilley:

It's all kid friendly, YouTube movies.

Terry Lilley:

99% of these movies are fun.

Terry Lilley:

And beautiful and show you our incredible underwater creatures around the planet because 99% of the earth is still fun and beautiful and flowing and going forward.

Terry Lilley:

Now, I also have movies about the 1%, but they're all very scientific and they're all geared for young kids to watch.

Terry Lilley:

So what I would ask everyone out there in the world, that's listening right now to do two things.

Terry Lilley:

Get closer to your children, make sure that they're educated about the environment, understand how incredibly loving and intelligent they are, and

Terry Lilley:

if you're going to be on the computer or TV, Google Marine life, wildlife movies.

Terry Lilley:

Watch Animal Planet, watch the Blue Planet, listen to David Attenborough.

Terry Lilley:

You know, I mean there, the media right now is filled with all kinds of amazing wildlife and, and movies.

Terry Lilley:

This is a way we need to start educating our kids and the kids then will teach the parents and we'll have a better future.

Catherine:

Terry Lilley.

Catherine:

Everything wild, in nature that is Terry.

Terry Lilley:

Hello?

Terry Lilley:

You know what my ma I got to say one last thing because my mom passed away recently and she was my biggest supporter.

Terry Lilley:

My mom let me run around at two years old, out in the woods and play with sharks and catch snakes, and same with my dad.

Terry Lilley:

So I had this really beautiful upbringing, but when my mom could never figure out what I did for a living.

Terry Lilley:

When people would ask her, she'd always giggle and laugh.

Terry Lilley:

And she said, one day, well, my son Terry knows everything in the world about nature that nobody else cares to know.

Terry Lilley:

And so I say back to my mom right now, she's smiling.

Terry Lilley:

I've gone.

Terry Lilley:

Guess what?

Terry Lilley:

Mom, they're starting to care.

Catherine:

Yes.

Catherine:

Yes, Terry Lilly I've always cared.

Catherine:

And I know there's listeners out there.

Catherine:

Who've always cared.

Catherine:

You are reaching a a huge number of minds, hearts, and souls with your work.

Catherine:

So thank you so much for being here on your positive imprint.

Terry Lilley:

All right, we'll see you.

Terry Lilley:

Bye bye.

Terry Lilley:

Aloha.

Terry Lilley:

Aloha

Terry Lilley:

Next week's positive imprints feature.

Terry Lilley:

The creators of Lanoba Design.

Terry Lilley:

Lars Noah Balderskilde and David Singh.

Terry Lilley:

Terry Lilley and his work may be found at underwater2web.com

Terry Lilley:

don't forget to share episodes, download, subscribe, or follow this podcast and leave positive reviews.

Terry Lilley:

Get inspired to activate your own positive imprint.

Terry Lilley:

Your positive imprint.