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Raised Gardens and Composting For Sustainability. Amy Grisak
Episode 14915th November 2021 • Your Positive Imprint • Catherine Praiswater
00:00:00 00:24:52

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Grow your food and become sustainable. Amy Grisak explains how to build and maintain raised gardens. Raised gardens and compost have numerous sustainability benefits including improved soil conditions. What’s in your garden?

Transcripts

Catherine:

Welcome back to part two with AmyGrisak.

Catherine:

Last week.

Catherine:

Hi Amy,

Amy Grisak:

last

Catherine:

week, Amy talked about nature and how to go about getting into nature

Catherine:

with confidence and the understanding that mother nature is bigger than we are.

Catherine:

And how can you enjoy it?

Catherine:

Well, part two today is on the earth which bore us and sustains us.

Catherine:

Today let's talk about those raised gardens and how you start it.

Amy Grisak:

Well, my family on my dad's side had a farm, just a very

Amy Grisak:

small farm back in Ohio and always had gardens going that type of thing,

Amy Grisak:

but I really got into it when I was 10 and that was my first job.

Amy Grisak:

I started weeding gardens for a woman who owned a little shop.

Amy Grisak:

She had an antique shop and herb gardens that was about a mile down the road.

Amy Grisak:

So I would ride my bike up and she was very patient teaching me what to

Amy Grisak:

pull and what not to pull that type of thing and talked about the uses

Amy Grisak:

of the plants, that type of thing.

Amy Grisak:

She was very much into the Shaker s, which was a religious sect in the 1800s.

Amy Grisak:

They utilize the plants.

Amy Grisak:

They were fabulous at everything they did crafts wise, including gardening.

Amy Grisak:

So that's where I got my start.

Catherine:

Why raised gardens?

Catherine:

Why not just plant it right smack in the earth?

Amy Grisak:

Raised gardens are great because you can control the soil better.

Amy Grisak:

Where we are in central Montana while it's a great place to raise

Amy Grisak:

wheat in a lot of these areas, we're part of the golden triangle.

Amy Grisak:

It can be rather challenging for the home garden because we have

Amy Grisak:

so many different soil types, a lot of times, predominantly clay.

Amy Grisak:

So it's a very heavy soil.

Amy Grisak:

So when you are utilizing raised beds, You can decide and you can have better

Amy Grisak:

control over the amendments that you put in the garden and how you improve them

Amy Grisak:

. I didn't have raised beds growing up in Ohio because we didn't need them so much.

Amy Grisak:

I mean, they're great because you can also control weeds

Amy Grisak:

better, you know, looking back.

Amy Grisak:

But as a child, I just took a shovel and turned everything under.

Amy Grisak:

But when shortly after I moved to Montana, had purchased property by West Glacier.

Amy Grisak:

And it was so excited.

Amy Grisak:

I started building gardens before the house was even built.

Amy Grisak:

And I remember getting my shovel and putting it in the ground and jumping

Amy Grisak:

on it and just teetering back and forth because it was nothing but rock.

Amy Grisak:

It was all big.

Amy Grisak:

Cobbles that glacial till, and I'm like, okay, what am I going to do?

Amy Grisak:

And so I just started popping up the rocks and I ended up building

Amy Grisak:

220 raised beds out of stone.

Amy Grisak:

And then I would haul in soil top soil.

Amy Grisak:

I think I went through 14 dump truck loads of top soil to fill

Amy Grisak:

doll, fill all those gardens.

Catherine:

So you did it with stone.

Amy Grisak:

You can use anything, almost for raised beds, which is great.

Amy Grisak:

Outside of things that are potentially toxic, like railroad

Amy Grisak:

ties for the longest time, those have been very, very popular because

Amy Grisak:

they're great.

Amy Grisak:

They're square, they're solid, but with the chemicals that they use to

Amy Grisak:

treat them, and that's the same with also treated lumber, you have to be

Amy Grisak:

careful there, but you can use wood.

Amy Grisak:

You can use bricks, stone.

Amy Grisak:

Stone was always my favorite medium.

Amy Grisak:

These were rounded.

Amy Grisak:

So they didn't stack very nice at times, but it became very much a

Amy Grisak:

Zen thing because you're building those short walls, 10 to 12 inches

Amy Grisak:

tall, and you're looking for those rocks that fit and you're putting

Amy Grisak:

everything together so it fits.

Amy Grisak:

And so, yeah, it was, it was almost therapeutic as well as practical.

Catherine:

What's on the bottom?.

Amy Grisak:

When I first did those I didn't put anything, but in subsequent

Amy Grisak:

times when I'll build a raised bed, depending on where I'm going to put it,

Amy Grisak:

if I'm going to put it in a yard, you know, right on top of the grass, I'll

Amy Grisak:

put cardboard down first or sometimes oh, eight layers or so of newspaper, and

Amy Grisak:

that's just helping smother out the grass that's below it, because if you put enough

Amy Grisak:

between the lawn, the grass and the top, then you can pretty much smother out the

Amy Grisak:

grass so it's not going to come through.

Amy Grisak:

Oh,

Catherine:

okay.

Catherine:

So the, the rock beds that you started, the raised rock beds that

Catherine:

you started and you didn't put anything underneath it, did you have

Catherine:

a problem with the grasscoming up?

Amy Grisak:

There wasn't any grass there.

Amy Grisak:

It was all glacial.

Amy Grisak:

So, and I did have some weeds eventually, but weeds are going to

Amy Grisak:

come in, regardless., with raised beds, you can control them better,

Amy Grisak:

but even with the soil that you bring in, even with airborne weed seeds.

Amy Grisak:

Raised beds, definitely minimized the weed impact, but it doesn't eliminate it.

Amy Grisak:

Just because you have so much more soil that a weed has to come through.

Amy Grisak:

If it's going to come from the bottom.

Amy Grisak:

And sometimes they do.

Amy Grisak:

Cause I even have some raised beds and we have bind weed,

Amy Grisak:

which is, it's a tenacious.

Amy Grisak:

They need to find a good use for bind weed.

Amy Grisak:

Cause it'll grow.

Amy Grisak:

The roots will grow 20 feet deep and it will stretch out more

Amy Grisak:

than 20 feet wide per plant and it will grow through anything.

Amy Grisak:

It will.

Amy Grisak:

Yeah, it will go through any fabric you put down.

Amy Grisak:

Anything, but it's still, even with raised beds, you can keep on top of it easier,

Amy Grisak:

you know, pull it easier and weaken it.

Catherine:

How high.

Catherine:

Would would listeners want to do their rock bed?

Amy Grisak:

Uh, how minimum you want a minimum, depending it kind

Amy Grisak:

of depends on what you want to plant, but a minimum of six inches.

Amy Grisak:

And then, but you can go from there because a lot of people,

Amy Grisak:

the beauty of raised beds too, you can bring them up to waist height.

Amy Grisak:

And so if you did something like that, you may not put soil the entire

Amy Grisak:

say two and a half, three feet, whatever you want it, you might put

Amy Grisak:

bricks or rock or, you know, something to kind of take up space in the

Amy Grisak:

bottom, but yeah, you can bring it up, so you never even have to bend over.

Amy Grisak:

So it's great for people who have wonky knees or yeah, you just don't don't

Amy Grisak:

need to bend over, which is great.

Amy Grisak:

It brings gardening to everybody.

Amy Grisak:

So instead of you going down to your garden, the garden comes up

Amy Grisak:

to you and it makes it accessible for more and more people.

Catherine:

Now that is awesome.

Catherine:

with raised gardens, can people use heaters?

Amy Grisak:

There's heating coils that you could put in the soil

Amy Grisak:

if you want to warm up the soil.

Amy Grisak:

And the thing that I found with the raised beds, particularly the ones

Amy Grisak:

that I had out of stone is they would warm up earlier in the spring and

Amy Grisak:

then they retain that heat in the fall.

Amy Grisak:

And so it kind of buys you a little bit extra time on either side of the growing

Amy Grisak:

season, which was lovely, especially where I lived outside of West Glacier.

Amy Grisak:

You can put a nice hoop over it and create a mini greenhouse effect.

Amy Grisak:

And so when you have say a plastic hoop over it.

Amy Grisak:

And then you can use floating row covers on the inside.

Amy Grisak:

You can really keep your garden going into the fall for a long, long time.

Amy Grisak:

If you're going to create a simple hoop system, you can just use, I

Amy Grisak:

think it's half inch PVC and you get holders and you push those down in

Amy Grisak:

the soil and just arch it over.

Amy Grisak:

And then use like a six millimeter, greenhouse plastic.

Amy Grisak:

So that's going to be nice and heavy.

Amy Grisak:

So it's not going to tear in the wind

Amy Grisak:

. And it'll last several seasons, but it

Amy Grisak:

Cause that that's what you're balancing.

Amy Grisak:

You're balancing that durability with allowing enough light

Amy Grisak:

for the plants to grow

Catherine:

and where you are in Montana.

Catherine:

What is the, growing season period?

Amy Grisak:

We are zone three, which means we'll go down to about negative 30 in the.

Amy Grisak:

And our spring can get a little iffy.

Amy Grisak:

A lot of times we will freeze.

Amy Grisak:

We had a huge snow storm the third week of may this last year.

Amy Grisak:

, but we'll typically go till the third week of September for a frost.

Amy Grisak:

So we have a pretty solid three months, you know, sometimes you might

Amy Grisak:

get nipped in between, but as long as you have floating row covers or

Amy Grisak:

some way to protect your vegetables, you can usuallyget through it.

Catherine:

This is very educational.

Catherine:

Talk about the zones and what you mean by zone three.

, Amy Grisak:

every country has a different scale pretty much, but ours are from the

, Amy Grisak:

USDA and they basically look at the winter time temperatures and how cold something

, Amy Grisak:

gets, because that's going to determine what trees you can grow, what perennials

, Amy Grisak:

you can grow, that type of thing.

, Amy Grisak:

And so zone three, like I said, we get to be about negative 30.

, Amy Grisak:

Really nice temperate zones are 5, 6, 7.

, Amy Grisak:

So those are ones that have a fairly mild winter.

, Amy Grisak:

So you can grow a lot, lot more.

, Amy Grisak:

It's much, much more forgiving.

, Amy Grisak:

My sister-in-law lives in Hungary and I don't think they have

, Amy Grisak:

the same type of scale in Hungary as what we do.

. Catherine:

Let's go to

. Catherine:

Soil.

Amy Grisak:

Soil is tough because it's very regional and you can mix

Amy Grisak:

your own with soil that you could find at a nursery using a combination of

Amy Grisak:

compost, peat Moss or cocoa Corp is actually more sustainable to use than P.

Amy Grisak:

And some people use perlite in it or vermiculite to help lighten the soil.

Amy Grisak:

And sometimes you could get bags of topsoil.

Amy Grisak:

Other times you can go buy a truckload and be able to fill.

Amy Grisak:

So it really kind of depends.

Amy Grisak:

, no matter what kind of soil you start with, you're always

Amy Grisak:

going to have to amend it.

Amy Grisak:

So you always want to add that compost every year, manuers,,

Amy Grisak:

depending, after testing the soil to understand what your soil.

Amy Grisak:

And just keep improving, improving that soil.

Amy Grisak:

There are kits that you can buy at gardening centers that you just take

Amy Grisak:

a small soil sample and with distilled water, I think typically and shake it.

Amy Grisak:

And it'll tell you how your levels are for your macro nutrients.

Amy Grisak:

So the nitrogen potassium and.

Amy Grisak:

Once you know where you were there, then you can add amendments accordingly

Catherine:

So can you just put a whole bunch of earthworms in and

Catherine:

then you never have to amend anything and just leave the earthworms to

Catherine:

do what they do.

Amy Grisak:

No, because different nutrients come from different sources.

Amy Grisak:

So earthworms are definitely beneficial, but without a balance, like with the

Amy Grisak:

phosphorus and things like that, those have to come in from other sources.

Amy Grisak:

And a lot of times those are mineral sources, too, like bone meal type thing.

Amy Grisak:

Because even though we have the big three macro nutrients, You also have

Amy Grisak:

all these micronutrients that they all balance and they work with each other.

Amy Grisak:

So if you're lacking one, the plant can't use another.

Amy Grisak:

So it sits a gradual process and it's a lot of learning by trial and error.

Amy Grisak:

And, but I always tell first time gardeners in particular,

Amy Grisak:

just, just add some compost.

Amy Grisak:

, it'll be fine.

Catherine:

And compost is another

Catherine:

topic for sure,

Amy Grisak:

I burying my scraps.

Amy Grisak:

That that's all I do to compost.

Amy Grisak:

Compost piles are great with your brown materials and greens.

Amy Grisak:

But I never had the patience for them because you have to water and

Amy Grisak:

watch the temperature and turn them.

Amy Grisak:

So there's a lot of different ways to compost.

Amy Grisak:

And my personal favorite is I just bury all my kitchen scraps.

Amy Grisak:

So every day I have my bowl on my counter and I throw my coffee

Amy Grisak:

grounds in there, complete with the paper because that'll decompose.

Amy Grisak:

Eggshells, everything else from the kitchen.

Amy Grisak:

And then in the evening just go out in the garden and I dig a hole and I think.

Amy Grisak:

And it breaks down extremely quickly and the earthworms are happy.

Amy Grisak:

That's what I love because when I dig into the soil, I had all

Amy Grisak:

these earthworms per shovel.

Amy Grisak:

And so when the earthworms are happy, that's always a good sign

Amy Grisak:

that you're doing something right.

Amy Grisak:

And then I bury it.

Amy Grisak:

And the only things you don't really want to compost are like avocado pits.

Amy Grisak:

They'd take or citrus peels.

Amy Grisak:

Those take a really long.

Amy Grisak:

But pretty much anything else you would throw in a compost pile just bury

Amy Grisak:

it just a few inches under the soil.

Amy Grisak:

So how, when

Catherine:

can you use

Amy Grisak:

it?

Amy Grisak:

It's just there all the time.

Amy Grisak:

It's just, so right now I've been planting in the area where I'm going

Amy Grisak:

to put my garlic in about a month.

Amy Grisak:

And so it'll, it'll be fine.

Amy Grisak:

Oh, so

Catherine:

you don't unbury it to use it anywhere.

Catherine:

You just plant

Amy Grisak:

that it's easy.

Amy Grisak:

No turning.

Amy Grisak:

Yeah.

Amy Grisak:

Okay.

Catherine:

The way you're composting, it can go right in

Catherine:

the raised flower or raised.

Amy Grisak:

Absolutely.

Amy Grisak:

It's, it's super easy way to go.

Amy Grisak:

Tomato

Catherine:

plants tend to, at least in New Mexico, they tend to

Catherine:

grow very tall and very quickly.

Catherine:

Does it matter that the soil is going to be so deep when you plant your tomato?

Amy Grisak:

Well, with the tomato, they're really good to plant deep

Amy Grisak:

and, you know, with if at all possible when I have a tomato plant, I'll take

Amy Grisak:

off at least the first row, sometimes several rows of leaves, just so there's

Amy Grisak:

maybe three or four on the three or four kind of rows of leaves on the top

Amy Grisak:

and planet deep because with tomatoes, as deep as you plant

Amy Grisak:

it, roots are going to form.

Amy Grisak:

And anytime you have a good root system, you have a good, healthy plant.

Amy Grisak:

And so you can plant tomatoes pretty deep.

Amy Grisak:

And then when they're growing so tall.

Amy Grisak:

So number one, that's probably an indeterminant tomato, which is a tomato

Amy Grisak:

that's going to keep going until you cut it back or frost or freeze kills it.

Amy Grisak:

If you want a shorter tomato, you want a determinant plant.

Amy Grisak:

And it's just, there's different varieties, different, really cool

Amy Grisak:

cultivars that are these different ones.

Amy Grisak:

So a determinant plant is going to grow to a certain size and all its fruit

Amy Grisak:

is going to ripen about the same time.

Amy Grisak:

So if you're somebody who likes to can tomatoes or freeze them in large batches,

Amy Grisak:

you want determinant plants because then all your tomatoes are going to be ready

Amy Grisak:

so you can process them.

Amy Grisak:

If you're somebody who likes to enjoy them throughout the season, and you love those

Amy Grisak:

big plants grow the indeterminant, and they grow really tall and they just keep

Amy Grisak:

producing until something shuts them down.

Amy Grisak:

And I like both.

Amy Grisak:

I like both the different varieties.

Amy Grisak:

In my greenhouse I have an indeterminant, but like for us here,

Amy Grisak:

you know, we're into September.

Amy Grisak:

And so any of the little tomatoes that are on the top of the plant, I know

Amy Grisak:

there's no way they're going to ripen.

Amy Grisak:

And even in August, I did this actually.

Amy Grisak:

There, there was not enough time for them to mature.

Amy Grisak:

So I cut the plant back, severely pruned it because then all the energy

Amy Grisak:

goes into ripening the tomatoes that are big enough to mature.

Amy Grisak:

So got it.

Amy Grisak:

Got to kind of be rough with the tomatoes and the cold.

Catherine:

Okay.

Catherine:

And we get late freezes every year so we don't plant and

Catherine:

we're at 6,000 feet, our house.

Catherine:

My husband, doesn't like to put the tomatoes in until after April

Catherine:

30th or even, the first week in may because we get those late freezes.

Catherine:

And then you end up losing your plant and then you have to start all over again.

Amy Grisak:

I can give you a trick for that if you want to.

Amy Grisak:

Okay.

Amy Grisak:

My absolute favorite gardening tool, and we've used this ever since.

Amy Grisak:

I've been little, they've been around for decades.

Amy Grisak:

They're called wall-o-watersand it is a water-filled TeePee basically.

Amy Grisak:

And so you plant your tomato plant and you put a five gallon

Amy Grisak:

bucket over it, upside down.

Amy Grisak:

And you slipped this Wall-o-water around the five gallon bucket just

Amy Grisak:

to hold it just holds it upright.

Amy Grisak:

And then take your hose.

Amy Grisak:

And you fill each of these little cylinders around the Wall-o-water

Amy Grisak:

with water, pull the five gallon bucket off and it collapses.

Amy Grisak:

So it's like a little teepee.

Amy Grisak:

During the day, the sun warms that water.

Amy Grisak:

I've had them blizzard buried in snow.

Amy Grisak:

And I've never lost a plant in probably 40 years of using Wall-o-waters.

Catherine:

Okay.

Catherine:

I'm

Catherine:

going

Catherine:

to have to get a better visual here.

Amy Grisak:

Okay.

Amy Grisak:

And if soil isn't warm enough in the spring, you can put up the Wall-o-water

Amy Grisak:

ahead of time and just reach down and plant the tomato inside of it.

Amy Grisak:

It's a little bit more awkward, but if your soil is a little cold,

Amy Grisak:

you put the Wall-o-water up first, it warms up the soil for a week.

Amy Grisak:

Get your plant in you're good.

Amy Grisak:

Don't lose one.

Amy Grisak:

So the

Catherine:

bucket, a five gallon bucket with a bottom to it.

Catherine:

Yep.

Amy Grisak:

upside down over the plant.

Amy Grisak:

Yep.

Amy Grisak:

And then how do you do that Wall-o-water?

Amy Grisak:

Then you just set the Wall-o-water it's empty and you put that around

Amy Grisak:

the bucket and then you just fill it.

Amy Grisak:

And then once it's you just reach down and grab that bucket and pull it off.

Amy Grisak:

And then the Wall-o-water is self-standing.

Catherine:

How can that be?

Amy Grisak:

They're great.

Amy Grisak:

Other great.

Catherine:

Do you buy it?

Amy Grisak:

Yeah.

Amy Grisak:

Yeah.

Catherine:

Oh, I thought

Catherine:

we were trying to create it ourselves.

Amy Grisak:

Oh no.

Amy Grisak:

They've been around.

Amy Grisak:

They were actually developed in Kalispell, Montana.

Amy Grisak:

And have we used them when I was growing up, back in Ohio, they were great.

Amy Grisak:

I think $4 a piece maybe, but they last for years.

Amy Grisak:

If I was you in New Mexico, I would take them off as the tomatoes are getting big.

Amy Grisak:

I would remove it, but some years, some years I forget to take them

Amy Grisak:

off and the tomatoes grow and the tomatoes tend to ripen first within

Amy Grisak:

the Wall-o-water, because it's this nice, perfect little environment.

Amy Grisak:

I put squash in 'em and peppers in the spring.

Amy Grisak:

Cause a lot of times I get ancy and I want to plant things outside, but I know

Amy Grisak:

it's too early, you know, you, you know, you're going to get a frost, but if I

Amy Grisak:

can put them in Wall-o-waters, they'll be fine and protects it from the wind.

Amy Grisak:

The wind for us is such a big force to deal with that when they're in the

Amy Grisak:

wall-o-waters they're protected there too.

Amy Grisak:

Another thing that's really good with raised gardens or really

Amy Grisak:

any other garden is mulch.

Amy Grisak:

Nature

Amy Grisak:

doesn't like bare soil.

Amy Grisak:

so many times we'll have gardens that are very neat and tidy looking, but

Amy Grisak:

it's just not how nature would have it.

Amy Grisak:

And that's why weeds are always growing.

Amy Grisak:

But I've always liked straw because it's nice on your knees in between.

Amy Grisak:

So many of my gardens when they're in the ground, you know, raised beds are

Amy Grisak:

great because you don't have to kneel down a lot of times or, or as much, but

Amy Grisak:

straw in the pathways was really nice.

Amy Grisak:

And even in raised beds, even straw around the plants or other mulching

Amy Grisak:

materials, there's so much available, but it helps keep moisture in.

Amy Grisak:

And then it also breaks down and becomes part of the soil.

Amy Grisak:

And another thing that I'm getting into more, which last

Amy Grisak:

year was a bit of experiment.

Amy Grisak:

I'm going to try it again, are living mulches.

Amy Grisak:

So planting, clovers and Betches and things like that that grow

Amy Grisak:

right alongside your plants.

Amy Grisak:

And the hard part is, is the appearance, because we're used

Amy Grisak:

to that nice and neat look.

Amy Grisak:

But when you have these plants, they look like weeds growing

Amy Grisak:

next to your tomatoes.

Amy Grisak:

What you do is you grow them and then you cut them down or mow them down

Amy Grisak:

depending on where you're growing them.

Amy Grisak:

And you just put what you trim right next to the plant.

Amy Grisak:

So that's a mulch within the living mulch and it really

Amy Grisak:

builds up the soil structure.

Amy Grisak:

The worms love it.

Amy Grisak:

The insects love it.

Amy Grisak:

It's really good.

Amy Grisak:

It just is getting past that mental barrier of the appearance of it.

Amy Grisak:

So that's something I've been playing with more because even though I

Amy Grisak:

constantly add to the soil, you can never do enough to improve it.

Amy Grisak:

It's a living thing and you always have to feed it and keep it happy.

Amy Grisak:

Cool.

Amy Grisak:

This is so awesome.

Amy Grisak:

It's fun.

Amy Grisak:

As long as I've been doing this, there's so much to learn and that's, what's cool.

Amy Grisak:

You know, there's always a new variety to try.

Amy Grisak:

There's always a new technique to try and, and that's the other thing too, is what

Amy Grisak:

a technique that may work for somebody may not work for other somebody else.

Amy Grisak:

And that's okay.

Amy Grisak:

It's, it's perfectly fine.

Amy Grisak:

It's like every gardener finds their own groove.

Catherine:

Oh, and

Catherine:

you have such a groove.

Catherine:

You've got

Catherine:

it.

Catherine:

So then we're going to go into the last minute inspiring

Catherine:

words then you want to share

Amy Grisak:

I think when it comes to gardening I just encourage

Amy Grisak:

people to get out and grow.

Amy Grisak:

Even if you're growing a single pepper plant in a pot, or you're putting in

Amy Grisak:

a quarter of an acre of corn, it's just no matter what you're growing

Amy Grisak:

the sheer fact that you're putting something in the ground and having that

Amy Grisak:

faith in the future, I think says a lot about each individual and about society.

Amy Grisak:

And there's a reason that gardening is one of the most popular hobbies in the world.

Amy Grisak:

You know, a lot of people garden for their livelihood or for sustainability,

Amy Grisak:

but there's that absolute joy with watching something from seed to

Amy Grisak:

whatever you harvest at the end, whether it's a flower that you adore

Amy Grisak:

or something that you have for dinner.

Amy Grisak:

There's just something about gardening that is super, super special.

Catherine:

This has been absolutely phenomenal in learning about gardening.

Catherine:

Amy Grisak, thank you so much for sharing your garden groove and your joy

Catherine:

of gardening.

Amy Grisak:

Thank you very, very much.

Amy Grisak:

It's absolutely my pleasure.

Amy Grisak:

One of my favorite things to do.

Catherine:

I can tell.

Catherine:

You have such joy in doing it and, and I appreciate that

Catherine:

you've shared how to do it.

Catherine:

So thank you for being on the show, sharing your positive imprints.

Amy Grisak:

Thank you, Catherine.

Amy Grisak:

Grow your garden and become sustainable while enjoying the benefits documentary

Amy Grisak:

filmmaker sarah linear features amy's gardening on the youtube channel north

Amy Grisak:

40 outfitters And learn more about amy and gardening from her website

Amy Grisak:

Amy GRI, sac.com a m y g r i s a k Please leave positive reviews on apple

Amy Grisak:

podcast google podcast or your favorite listening podcast platform Download

Amy Grisak:

subscribe or follow this podcast your positive imprint What's your PI.

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