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Laura Rotter and Rock Robinson: Building Businesses of Purpose and Value After a Long Corporate Career
Episode 14910th June 2022 • Going Solo • Smashing the Plateau
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After 30 years of successfully managing money for institutional investors including Citicorp and Para Advisors, Laura Rotter founded her own firm, True Abundance Advisors, a fiduciary, fee-only financial planning firm located in White Plains, NY with a satellite office in New York City.

Laura created a business that was in alignment with her own values and took advantage of her strengths.

Rock Robinson is an accomplished Sales Executive with 40 years of achievement growing revenue with the likes of McGraw-Hill, Sallie Mae, Stericycle & the Univ. of Phoenix.

Rock developed a framework for developing new relationships that can open up fabulous opportunities.

Learn more about them here:

Laura Rotter: https://trueabundanceadvisors.com/

Rock Robinson: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rockrobinson9

Transcripts

David Shriner-Cahn:

from smashing the plateau.

David Shriner-Cahn:

I'm David Schreiner Kahn with going solo.

David Shriner-Cahn:

In today's episode, we hear from Laura Rotter and rock Robinson.

David Shriner-Cahn:

After 30 years of successfully managing money for institutional investors,

David Shriner-Cahn:

Laura Rotter founded her own firm, true abundance advisors, a fiduciary

David Shriner-Cahn:

You'll learn how Laura was able to create a business that was in

David Shriner-Cahn:

Brock Robinson is an accomplished sales executive with 40 years of achievement

David Shriner-Cahn:

Sallie Mae Stericycle and the university of Phoenix.

David Shriner-Cahn:

You'll learn how rock developed a framework for developing new relationships

David Shriner-Cahn:

Stay with us to hear all the details.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Do you struggle to take consistent action on building your business?

David Shriner-Cahn:

How do you feel about your business building products?

David Shriner-Cahn:

Would you like to be part of a structured, supportive process to help you implement

David Shriner-Cahn:

As a member of the smashing, the plateau community you'll have

David Shriner-Cahn:

You'll also be a member of a community that is built to be a

David Shriner-Cahn:

You'll find a range of tools and resources to support you as an

David Shriner-Cahn:

If you're committed to getting your consulting, coaching or small business

David Shriner-Cahn:

Learn more@smashingtheplateau.com.

David Shriner-Cahn:

We begin with Laura Rotter discussing her.

David Shriner-Cahn:

After 30 years of successfully managing money for institutional

David Shriner-Cahn:

True abundance advisors, a fiduciary fee, only financial planning firm

David Shriner-Cahn:

Laura, welcome to the show.

Laura Rotter:

Thank you

David Shriner-Cahn:

so much, David.

David Shriner-Cahn:

It's great to have you on it to alert.

David Shriner-Cahn:

What caused you to start your own firm after.

David Shriner-Cahn:

A very successful 30 year career on wall.

Laura Rotter:

First of all, I want your listeners or our listeners

Laura Rotter:

So it's important piece of information.

Laura Rotter:

I often talk about my time working as an institutional analyst and investor on

Laura Rotter:

The first 10 years, I loved love, love what I did the second 10 years.

Laura Rotter:

I was raising a family and just took it for granted as the primary

Laura Rotter:

But by the end of my career, and again, it was close to 10 years.

Laura Rotter:

I did not like what I did at all.

Laura Rotter:

The work was not interesting.

Laura Rotter:

I found that the investments didn't reward you for the risk and I didn't

Laura Rotter:

So you can hear though that.

Laura Rotter:

It was a long time till I actually left.

Laura Rotter:

And the precipitating event, actually, there were two in 2008, clearly

Laura Rotter:

I considered leaving and.

Laura Rotter:

In 2013, when I was working for the hedge fund group of city bank, there

Laura Rotter:

And so I never considered at that point going back.

Laura Rotter:

And I thought about how do I use.

Laura Rotter:

My gifts on understanding markets, understanding numbers, to understanding

Laura Rotter:

And during that tenure feel like I have a run on sentence, but

Laura Rotter:

I had started to practice yoga and learn to hear deep inside what I needed.

Laura Rotter:

I took a meditation teacher training.

Laura Rotter:

So when the time came to rethink my personal life journey, I felt like.

Laura Rotter:

There was some mission for me to use the skills I had developed on wall street

Laura Rotter:

And so that was my initial thought.

Laura Rotter:

I wanted to work with women having.

Laura Rotter:

Spend most of my career surrounded by men.

Laura Rotter:

I wanted to work with women and help them with their finances.

Laura Rotter:

And that was what I set out to do in when I left wall street, November, 2013.

David Shriner-Cahn:

And how soon after you got your notice that you are going

David Shriner-Cahn:

I'm now an entrepreneur

Laura Rotter:

pretty immediately.

Laura Rotter:

I was lucky enough both to have accumulated assets

Laura Rotter:

The ability to take my time to move towards growing a firm, as

Laura Rotter:

I started to informational interview and I, in the course of this informational

Laura Rotter:

There's a lot of words used to describe what I do.

Laura Rotter:

And so though my intention had been.

Laura Rotter:

To go out on my own.

Laura Rotter:

I quickly realized, especially once I had the offer that I wasn't exactly sure

Laura Rotter:

So it would be helpful to work for another firm.

Laura Rotter:

I learned a lot with that firm and at the same time, learned a lot about

Laura Rotter:

And when you work for a broker dealer there, you're not always working.

Laura Rotter:

In the client's best interest.

Laura Rotter:

I never saw anything inappropriate done, but there's a different standards.

Laura Rotter:

And so there are suitability standards and commissions generated

Laura Rotter:

And I ultimately found that distasteful, even if, again, nothing blatant was

Laura Rotter:

And that made me very uncomfortable.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Yeah.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Even though in theory, there, there isn't supposed to be a conflict of interest.

David Shriner-Cahn:

It's still sounds like there is potentially an inherent

Laura Rotter:

At the same time, back to what I said earlier of wanting

Laura Rotter:

That being said, I wanted a firm where there was a process of asking

Laura Rotter:

And I came to feel that I could only do that by going out on my own.

Laura Rotter:

After a little, under two years, I left actually in February,

Laura Rotter:

Cause I really did enjoy and respect the people I work with.

Laura Rotter:

And I didn't want to be going behind their back, developing anything

Laura Rotter:

So I left that firm in February of 2016 and started my own

Laura Rotter:

And I guess I just want to say one of the things I did is I became

Laura Rotter:

I had already been a certified financial analyst.

Laura Rotter:

That's a designation that I used for many years again on wall street,

Laura Rotter:

But one of the reasons I left is I wanted to pass the certified

Laura Rotter:

I left my tech myself time to study in between starting my own firm and

David Shriner-Cahn:

Yeah.

David Shriner-Cahn:

So it's interesting that you had a particular idea in mind about running

David Shriner-Cahn:

And you made a pivot to go work for somebody else in a slightly, whether

David Shriner-Cahn:

A couple of.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Yes.

David Shriner-Cahn:

And one of the things that I've observed is, especially with entrepreneurs,

Laura Rotter:

It's interesting David, because I think we

Laura Rotter:

Whenever you start opening your heart and being a little more aware of what's

David Shriner-Cahn:

Exactly.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Said.

David Shriner-Cahn:

So with that in mind, what happened following spring of 2016, when you

Rock Robinson:

I'm sure

Laura Rotter:

you hear from many entrepreneurs, it's an ongoing journey.

Laura Rotter:

The first thing that came to mind when you asked me that question is learning

Laura Rotter:

I do remember that.

Laura Rotter:

A friend is a sort of a cute story.

Laura Rotter:

A friend of mine, Sherry Perlman is had a listserv of Jesus psychologist.

Laura Rotter:

If other people in her field.

Laura Rotter:

And immediately I had a couple of call me and I met with them and they were eager.

Laura Rotter:

They became my clients then are still my clients.

Laura Rotter:

And I asked them, how did you meet me?

Laura Rotter:

And they said, oh, we were looking at.

Laura Rotter:

Listserv and our good friend, Sherry Perlman, I see posted your name.

Laura Rotter:

And I asked how they knew Sherry and the way they knew Sherry was clearly

Laura Rotter:

She did not attend the institution.

Laura Rotter:

They talked about.

Laura Rotter:

I have jokingly said, they had written a check for my first fee payments.

Laura Rotter:

I said, would you like your check back?

Laura Rotter:

Because this is a different Sherry Perlman my name, but again, who

Laura Rotter:

They're my they've been my clients longest, but so I feel like when

Laura Rotter:

In a certain way.

Laura Rotter:

It seemed easier.

Laura Rotter:

When I first started my business to find clients, then now three years later, I

Laura Rotter:

And.

Laura Rotter:

Having never run my own business before.

Laura Rotter:

These are all a mix, always of excitement as I continue to learn new things and

David Shriner-Cahn:

challenge.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Yeah.

David Shriner-Cahn:

So what does it feel like to work on some of these things that are

Laura Rotter:

It's I guess the word that keeps coming to mind is

Laura Rotter:

And I feel sometimes blessed that I am challenging my.

Laura Rotter:

So much to grow, to explore new things, to explore new ways of communicating

Laura Rotter:

So I feel like it's very exciting.

Laura Rotter:

It's put me in place to meet a lot of new people, including yourself.

Laura Rotter:

And of course the moments of frustration, but frankly, having been so unhappy for

Laura Rotter:

I do pinch myself every day that I get to choose how I spend my

David Shriner-Cahn:

Yeah, that, that is definitely quite a

David Shriner-Cahn:

Yes, Laura, what have been some of the most helpful kinds of.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Resources as you've been going through this journey over the last, I guess

David Shriner-Cahn:

I

Laura Rotter:

not quite, 2016, yes.

Laura Rotter:

But it's been awhile.

Laura Rotter:

Yeah.

Laura Rotter:

I was

David Shriner-Cahn:

thinking about since you got laid off, but you've had

Laura Rotter:

Yes, I guess it's interesting.

Laura Rotter:

What comes to mind now?

Laura Rotter:

And so a message I'd give to anyone going on this entrepreneurial journey.

Laura Rotter:

It's very easy to fall into the rhythm of being an employee.

Laura Rotter:

Again, an employee of your own.

Laura Rotter:

And therefore, in some ways, a victim of the worst boss in the world, who's

Laura Rotter:

And it's only been the last couple of years, perhaps the last year where I

Laura Rotter:

I truly do believe that we all on this earth have a mission.

Laura Rotter:

And that mission is to find what makes you come alive and then go do it.

Laura Rotter:

And I would say the first couple of years, I clearly wanted stability.

Laura Rotter:

And so I kept to the same routine of getting up and how I spent my day.

Laura Rotter:

And I'm coming to realize that's not the gift I want to give myself.

Laura Rotter:

And that's not the gift I want to give my client.

Laura Rotter:

And as I look here, I see, I have a book called the Firestarter

Laura Rotter:

Again, talking about.

Laura Rotter:

Who do you want to be?

Laura Rotter:

What do you want to feel during the day?

Laura Rotter:

And I try every morning to journal to myself and write down what

David Shriner-Cahn:

day.

David Shriner-Cahn:

And Laura, what are some of the things that, that you've done or ways that

David Shriner-Cahn:

Clarifying what your mission is and then fulfilling it.

David Shriner-Cahn:

The one

Laura Rotter:

thing that comes to mind is finding like-minded people.

Laura Rotter:

I feel like I've been blessed in having both coaching groups in a coaching

Laura Rotter:

So as someone who spent a lot of my previous career, basically in front

Laura Rotter:

That's where I get a lot of my ideas from that's where I got, I get a lot

Laura Rotter:

And I guess another thing I'd like to say, I'm in a group with other financial

Laura Rotter:

And perhaps I take it for granted, cause I did have the wall street background,

Laura Rotter:

I feel like that's something that it's not an easy activity.

Laura Rotter:

It doesn't come easily to people of learning just to perhaps sit

Laura Rotter:

So that's also resources I've reached out.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Yeah.

David Shriner-Cahn:

And Laura, at this point, given everything you've done over the

Laura Rotter:

Closer than I ever been.

Laura Rotter:

As I said earlier, I had started my firm believing that my most

Laura Rotter:

I turns out at this point, most of my clients are couples.

Laura Rotter:

And yet I'm still drawn to work with women and specifically women in a

Laura Rotter:

We teach what we continuously need to learn.

Laura Rotter:

I still identify, I still self identify as someone in a career transition.

Laura Rotter:

I let go of a Eben identity that I they'll perhaps towards the end.

Laura Rotter:

I didn't like the work.

Laura Rotter:

I certainly liked the identity and I want to help others.

Laura Rotter:

Explore, others who feel dead inside from having to keep doing the same thing

Laura Rotter:

So both help with the exploration of.

Laura Rotter:

As helping with the financial aspect of the change.

Laura Rotter:

And that's certainly in my case, a big thing, understanding, what my

Laura Rotter:

How do I invest appropriately?

Laura Rotter:

How do I make sure I have enough insurance, all these kinds

Laura Rotter:

The life goal.

Laura Rotter:

You can't have one without the

David Shriner-Cahn:

other.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Yeah, they're very much intertwined.

David Shriner-Cahn:

So Laura, for anyone who may want to go deeper with anything we've

Laura Rotter:

First of all, to learn about me, please go to my

Laura Rotter:

And please feel free to reach out to me.

Laura Rotter:

My email address is Laura L a U R a at true abundance advisors dot.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Great.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Laura, I want to thank you so much for taking the time to join us today.

David Shriner-Cahn:

I'm going solo and sharing your insights, sharing your

David Shriner-Cahn:

My guest today has been the owner of true abundance advisors.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Laura Rotter.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Thank you again, Laura, for joining us.

Laura Rotter:

Thank you so much, David, for inviting me.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Now we shift to rock Robinson, sharing his career.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Rock is an accomplished sales executive with 40 years of achievement growing

David Shriner-Cahn:

For the last seven years, he has provided services as a fractional sales

David Shriner-Cahn:

Cincinnati has been his home for the last 30 years.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Rock.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Welcome to the show,

Rock Robinson:

David, thanks for having me.

David Shriner-Cahn:

So you've had a long career and clearly from.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Sat in the introduction, a couple or more unexpected bumps in the road,

David Shriner-Cahn:

Tell me a little bit about your career and how these incidents

Rock Robinson:

Oh, thanks.

Rock Robinson:

The majority of my career David has been with fortune 500 companies.

Rock Robinson:

And really at the end, some midsize companies that were positioned for sale.

Rock Robinson:

And that was what I was brought in to do as a sales leader, I was on

Rock Robinson:

That was just gone all the time.

Rock Robinson:

I'm traveling three out of the four weeks.

Rock Robinson:

I'm in hotels, I'm in airports.

Rock Robinson:

Way too much food.

Rock Robinson:

I can tell you that.

Rock Robinson:

And I'm away from my family.

Rock Robinson:

And at some point in time, I think that was a huge contributor to say, really

Rock Robinson:

So for those that are listening, that.

Rock Robinson:

Lost their job or in transition, I've been there.

Rock Robinson:

I've understood it.

Rock Robinson:

I've tried to figure some things to do for the next time that came around.

Rock Robinson:

So I call them God winks.

Rock Robinson:

They're not coincidences or God winks that all of these things happen

Rock Robinson:

I wouldn't be where I'm at.

Rock Robinson:

If those things didn't happen.

Rock Robinson:

So I want to encourage others.

Rock Robinson:

That those things didn't feel very good when they happen, but you'll be

David Shriner-Cahn:

What did you learn each time that helped you deal with them?

David Shriner-Cahn:

The next time something

Rock Robinson:

happened?

Rock Robinson:

I would tell people, I talked to a lot of people in transition because they

Rock Robinson:

You've been through some of these things.

Rock Robinson:

And I say, you always have to be building your brand.

Rock Robinson:

It sounds too easy.

Rock Robinson:

It's when we lose our job, we go out and say, man, I got to meet some folks.

Rock Robinson:

I got to figure out how I'm going to get my next gig, but you have

Rock Robinson:

And it's easier said than done, but you'll hear a lot of reference in our talks

Rock Robinson:

And please network, when you have a job, this is my strongest suggestion.

Rock Robinson:

Yeah.

David Shriner-Cahn:

You know what that reminds me of, I have a friend who's a

David Shriner-Cahn:

Time to apply for credit is when you don't need it.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Cause that's when you get it.

David Shriner-Cahn:

If you wait until you need it, you're not going to get it.

Rock Robinson:

Absolutely.

Rock Robinson:

Absolutely.

Rock Robinson:

So

David Shriner-Cahn:

what were some of the techniques that.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Employed to build your brand.

Rock Robinson:

You know what?

Rock Robinson:

First and foremost I think networking itself is easy to say, I got to

Rock Robinson:

I knew nobody really, when you think about it, it's a big city,

Rock Robinson:

I didn't want to know the people that I did, but when I met people,

Rock Robinson:

Connection leads to like likely leads to trust and trust leads to an

Rock Robinson:

And what I found along the way, my experience told me I was doing this

Rock Robinson:

Because I'm from Michigan.

Rock Robinson:

And there was a basketball team that was the fab five.

Rock Robinson:

So I said there was a fab five questions that you always asked during networking.

Rock Robinson:

And when I'd meet with people, I'd share that.

Rock Robinson:

And it's just not the questions themselves, but how you ask the

Rock Robinson:

And I think helped a lot of people and it helped me lot.

Rock Robinson:

Alright.

Rock Robinson:

So I

David Shriner-Cahn:

have to ask you why, what are the five questions?

Rock Robinson:

Let's see, I tease ya.

Rock Robinson:

You're coming at it and they're so simple, but they're how you asked the question.

Rock Robinson:

The first one's a geographic question.

Rock Robinson:

I'd say, David, where are you originally born and raised?

Rock Robinson:

I'm looking for connections.

Rock Robinson:

I don't ask where you live today.

Rock Robinson:

I want multiples.

Rock Robinson:

So myself, I'm from Detroit.

Rock Robinson:

Then I moved to Chattanooga and then I lived to live in Cincinnati.

Rock Robinson:

I have three potential connections or something about geography.

Rock Robinson:

When we talk and ask, I could be in Florida and I see somebody

Rock Robinson:

And where are you from in Cincinnati?

Rock Robinson:

There's a geography.

Rock Robinson:

So easy, simple, soft number one.

Rock Robinson:

Number two is family.

Rock Robinson:

And I say it that way.

Rock Robinson:

I'd say David family, because in today's environment, I'm not asking somebody.

Rock Robinson:

If they're married, I'm not asking if they have kids.

Rock Robinson:

Now I'm more of a senior player.

Rock Robinson:

People come to me and they'll say rock, do you have grandkids?

Rock Robinson:

You know why they're asking me?

Rock Robinson:

Why do I have.

Rock Robinson:

Because they want to tell me about their grandkids.

Rock Robinson:

Okay.

Rock Robinson:

So I figured out that based on the questions it's so open-ended right.

Rock Robinson:

Yeah.

Rock Robinson:

I want them to tell me what family is.

Rock Robinson:

I've had people tell me their family.

Rock Robinson:

Is there two German shepherds?

Rock Robinson:

Oh, they're awesome.

Rock Robinson:

I go, you got dogs.

Rock Robinson:

I got dogs.

Rock Robinson:

They tell me about their parents.

Rock Robinson:

They tell me about their siblings.

Rock Robinson:

They'll tell me about a wife.

Rock Robinson:

If they had one.

Rock Robinson:

How about if I asked him if he was married a gentleman.

Rock Robinson:

And he's going through a nasty divorce.

Rock Robinson:

I think we've really not connected right there.

Rock Robinson:

I've just brought up something I didn't want to bring up.

Rock Robinson:

And so it's, open-ended question that's two family three is tell me school.

Rock Robinson:

Same thing with school.

Rock Robinson:

Open-ended David, I'm not asking you where to cut, where you went to college.

Rock Robinson:

How about if you didn't go to college, how does that make you feel?

Rock Robinson:

I want to not be threatening in my questions and I want to hear feedback.

Rock Robinson:

I went to a high school.

Rock Robinson:

70% of my graduating high school class went to work for three companies.

Rock Robinson:

Guess who they were general motors, Ford or Chrysler.

Rock Robinson:

Okay.

Rock Robinson:

And they're all retired.

Rock Robinson:

And they've told me they may have went in the service.

Rock Robinson:

I go, awesome.

Rock Robinson:

Tell me what service you were in.

Rock Robinson:

If I was a service guy and you were in the army and I'm in the army, we've connected.

Rock Robinson:

Or I went to work.

Rock Robinson:

I had to provide for my family right away.

Rock Robinson:

I had a young family.

Rock Robinson:

So my school is number three for is.

Rock Robinson:

Tell me about your career journey.

Rock Robinson:

You've done that a little here.

Rock Robinson:

I want people to tell me, I want to see if I can connect with the types of jobs

Rock Robinson:

And then the very last one is David, tell me what your passionate.

Rock Robinson:

When I can learn what you're passionate about, it's a little

Rock Robinson:

I could be passionate about giving to the church and I just, but that's not a hobby.

Rock Robinson:

So when I could find out those five things, I've got opportunities to

Rock Robinson:

And now I have the ability with all that intelligence to do unique.

Rock Robinson:

Follow-up.

Rock Robinson:

If you can imagine that.

Rock Robinson:

And one of my favorite stories, I was, I did this on a client,

Rock Robinson:

He gave me the answers.

Rock Robinson:

He tells me he's from Cincinnati.

Rock Robinson:

He's played baseball at the university of Cincinnati.

Rock Robinson:

He's got four daughters, the whole nine yards.

Rock Robinson:

I gather all this intelligent, he's a wine kind of sewer.

Rock Robinson:

He's a big red machine fan.

Rock Robinson:

And it was true that I was able to uniquely follow with.

Rock Robinson:

Nobody else has ever done with him.

Rock Robinson:

He was a big red machine baseball fan and his favorite player.

Rock Robinson:

He told me it was Tony Perez.

Rock Robinson:

So I sent him a hand note and follow up.

Rock Robinson:

I said, Hey, thanks for getting to know you personally and professionally, it's

Rock Robinson:

That's 50 years old.

Rock Robinson:

I think he didn't it.

Rock Robinson:

And I put a Tony Perez baseball card in an envelope and send it to him.

Rock Robinson:

I, would've never been able to do that.

Rock Robinson:

Create a connection if I never asked the questions.

Rock Robinson:

So fed five, there you go.

David Shriner-Cahn:

And is there a particular order that you asked them in?

David Shriner-Cahn:

I like

Rock Robinson:

them that way, born and raised family school,

Rock Robinson:

I see a lot of, and I do this with salespeople too.

Rock Robinson:

When I coach them, a lot of people start with the passion first and they

Rock Robinson:

And what did they do it, they may have just watched the Cincinnati reds.

Rock Robinson:

They go, Hey, what'd you think about the reds game?

Rock Robinson:

I go, how do you even know I'm a baseball fan?

Rock Robinson:

So again, they're asking because what they like it.

Rock Robinson:

So you gotta make it open-ended rock.

Rock Robinson:

What are you passionate about?

Rock Robinson:

And if I told them, then they know, and they can see if we can connect on that.

Rock Robinson:

But that order.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Yeah.

David Shriner-Cahn:

I find that when people ask me about what I'm passionate about first, or if

David Shriner-Cahn:

Yeah.

Rock Robinson:

Yeah.

Rock Robinson:

I found in my experience has told me that, that geography question associate.

Rock Robinson:

As long as I, I'm not like a stalker telling me where you live right

Rock Robinson:

I had a guy tell me he's from Jersey and I go, wow, why can't you pump your own gas?

Rock Robinson:

I just know some stats about the state and I could create a conversation.

Rock Robinson:

Cadet.

Rock Robinson:

That's all I'm trying to do

David Shriner-Cahn:

now.

David Shriner-Cahn:

If you're really doing a lot of networking, and you're

David Shriner-Cahn:

How do you track the information?

David Shriner-Cahn:

Because it's, there's a lot of details buried in this.

David Shriner-Cahn:

I don't know about you.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Once I get past about 10 people, I would probably forget most of it.

Rock Robinson:

Yeah.

Rock Robinson:

In that crazy too, because I think, this is my sales background.

Rock Robinson:

We used to write stuff on the back of a business card, or then we got

Rock Robinson:

Then we put them in folders.

Rock Robinson:

I print off their LinkedIn profile and make notes on their LinkedIn profile.

Rock Robinson:

Then I'd make an Excel spreadsheet.

Rock Robinson:

And finally I wised up and it came up with something that.

Rock Robinson:

Sales CRM software.

Rock Robinson:

And I've got a software that I use and I tell the audience I've

Rock Robinson:

And I was a power Salesforce user way, too big for people like me now, what

Rock Robinson:

I use one today called pipe drive and I've actually incorporated.

Rock Robinson:

I have fields for my fab five about that.

Rock Robinson:

So after we talked.

Rock Robinson:

I take my notes.

Rock Robinson:

I automatically put them in my CRM and I throw my notes away.

Rock Robinson:

I'm trying to be so good paperless and it's got an app.

Rock Robinson:

So I'm out and about.

Rock Robinson:

And I bumped into David and then I see some facts about

Rock Robinson:

And now all of a sudden I'm intelligent connecting when I've talked to

Rock Robinson:

I can't remember everything, but when I could store it.

Rock Robinson:

So when you get good intelligence, you have to store it.

Rock Robinson:

And save it.

Rock Robinson:

And that's how I do it.

Rock Robinson:

I use a software.

Rock Robinson:

Yeah.

Rock Robinson:

Are

David Shriner-Cahn:

there other CRMs that you like.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Particularly for solo consultants,

Rock Robinson:

you know what?

Rock Robinson:

I just resonated on a bike drive.

Rock Robinson:

I've rolled it out for probably seven of the companies I've worked for.

Rock Robinson:

I'm not a programmer and it's that easy.

Rock Robinson:

So I'm a sales guy.

Rock Robinson:

So if I can, I get my way around a tech stuff, pipe drive for me go to that easy.

Rock Robinson:

I'm not jumping off them.

Rock Robinson:

I've seen the more complex ones.

Rock Robinson:

And for me, it's been intuitive.

Rock Robinson:

And let it drag and drop and stuff like that.

Rock Robinson:

I just love that.

Rock Robinson:

But fields that some of the softwares that's out there, they have names

Rock Robinson:

I can call it whatever I want.

Rock Robinson:

I can call it the fab five.

Rock Robinson:

It works.

Rock Robinson:

So I love it.

Rock Robinson:

I

David Shriner-Cahn:

love it.

David Shriner-Cahn:

One thing that, that struggle.

David Shriner-Cahn:

As you were describing your transition from working inside organizations,

David Shriner-Cahn:

And I would think that as somebody who is involved in sales, As a profession would

Rock Robinson:

in a lot of cases, this is the one thing,

Rock Robinson:

It's a consulting business, right?

Rock Robinson:

And I'm a fractional sales leader and I'm a sales coach.

Rock Robinson:

But what I was doing prior to this, I was a sales leader for 30 years.

Rock Robinson:

I wasn't carrying a bag.

Rock Robinson:

I wasn't the frontline guy out having a coffee.

Rock Robinson:

So I had all the team doing.

Rock Robinson:

And they did that work.

Rock Robinson:

So it was almost reversed.

Rock Robinson:

I became a frontline contributor again, where I had to do those

Rock Robinson:

And I did it, but it'd been a long time.

Rock Robinson:

And I think where I've seen some of my peers and associates that

Rock Robinson:

And I think I see it in consulting too, because there's peaks and valleys.

Rock Robinson:

You always have to be.

Rock Robinson:

Networking.

Rock Robinson:

You always have to be prospecting because when you get the business, then

Rock Robinson:

Then all of a sudden you're out of business, you got to go find it again.

Rock Robinson:

So it's usually a peaks and valleys and some folks don't have the

Rock Robinson:

So they tap out and they go back and get that job in corporate America and

Rock Robinson:

I think that's part of it too.

Rock Robinson:

You really have to stay on top of that.

Rock Robinson:

Yeah,

David Shriner-Cahn:

no, that makes a lot of sense.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Rock.

David Shriner-Cahn:

When you went out on your own, how did you figure out what your

Rock Robinson:

I was blessed at the time because that third time of that

Rock Robinson:

They were awesome.

Rock Robinson:

People had 200 plus frontline contributors and salespeople.

Rock Robinson:

I They were spreading education through corporate America.

Rock Robinson:

And I was just so pleased with what they were doing.

Rock Robinson:

And just as it happens in corporate America, a new person comes

Rock Robinson:

And they suffer my boss, who was an awesome architect of what we were doing.

Rock Robinson:

And they go rock a little time later.

Rock Robinson:

I need you to get those 200 plus salespeople on a con call.

Rock Robinson:

Cause I want to talk to them like, oh, sure.

Rock Robinson:

And about 120 seconds later, the entire team and me.

Rock Robinson:

They were going to go in a different direction and that was step one.

Rock Robinson:

I go, wow.

Rock Robinson:

The band broke up.

Rock Robinson:

That's really what it was a little do they know they're destined for

Rock Robinson:

And then 45 days.

Rock Robinson:

My youngest son, Ty at the age of 25 suddenly died.

Rock Robinson:

So now you have a sever job and the loss of a child all within 45 days, and you're

Rock Robinson:

I think there was a sign for me that says, I think there's

Rock Robinson:

And somebody tapped me on the shoulder and told me about this business and with

David Shriner-Cahn:

Wow.

David Shriner-Cahn:

So had you heard about this niche before that?

Rock Robinson:

I really hadn't.

Rock Robinson:

Somebody tapped me on the shoulder and said, rock you're

Rock Robinson:

That's out there for this for we're looking for sales leaders that look just

Rock Robinson:

It sounds like it's in my wheelhouse.

Rock Robinson:

I went through my wife.

Rock Robinson:

I said, it sounds exactly.

Rock Robinson:

She goes, it's exactly what you've been doing all your life.

Rock Robinson:

She says, I'm good with it.

Rock Robinson:

As long as you don't go into a business and involves golf

Rock Robinson:

So she didn't want me in the golf business, but the, as long

David Shriner-Cahn:

Tell me a little bit about who your ideal client is

Rock Robinson:

Yeah, sure.

Rock Robinson:

And what I do with the bandwidth and I'm a sole proprietor, so rock

Rock Robinson:

So you're dealing with.

Rock Robinson:

The creator, the biller, the implementer, the executer, all in

Rock Robinson:

So I'll deal in Cincinnati Dayton or some of the major cities Northern

Rock Robinson:

And I'm looking for mid to small size companies and I've targeted.

Rock Robinson:

It has a, at least it has a minimum, a max of about six sales.

Rock Robinson:

So we're really dealing with a different dynamic than I was used to because what

Rock Robinson:

I want to work with multiple companies.

Rock Robinson:

What I do, it's people in process that come on in, I said,

Rock Robinson:

And are they doing the right stuff?

Rock Robinson:

And I help implement change.

Rock Robinson:

I put in processes.

Rock Robinson:

And then I.

Rock Robinson:

This is what nobody's doing.

Rock Robinson:

And this is why I think there's a huge need.

Rock Robinson:

That's out there.

Rock Robinson:

Somebody that wants to coach, I want to help them.

Rock Robinson:

I don't say, make 10 more phone calls.

Rock Robinson:

I'll show you how to make the first phone call and help you make the next one.

Rock Robinson:

And then let's go, right?

Rock Robinson:

I gotta figure out where you need help and I want to help you.

Rock Robinson:

And in today, nobody wants to coach anybody.

Rock Robinson:

He just said, here's the number.

Rock Robinson:

If you don't hit the number you got 30 days.

Rock Robinson:

We'll see you putting on a performance plan.

Rock Robinson:

I don't want to do that.

Rock Robinson:

So that's my niche market and where I'm operating at.

Rock Robinson:

And I've just been passionate about coaching though.

Rock Robinson:

I just there's something that's I, it resonates with me.

Rock Robinson:

That's missing out there.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Tell me a little bit about the characteristics of a company

Rock Robinson:

Yeah.

Rock Robinson:

You know what, there's something about being a lifelong learner.

Rock Robinson:

I look at owners and presidents of companies that are open to change.

Rock Robinson:

People that are open to consultants, open people that are open to

Rock Robinson:

It is radically different.

Rock Robinson:

At one point last year I was vice president of sales for

Rock Robinson:

Okay.

Rock Robinson:

You have to be open to that.

Rock Robinson:

It's radical.

Rock Robinson:

They, some folks want you in the office, 60 hours a week.

Rock Robinson:

That's not going to happen, so there's gotta be a fit with that.

Rock Robinson:

And the ones that I've seen that have been served very successful with

Rock Robinson:

They want to grow and they're willing to change.

Rock Robinson:

Do I gather

David Shriner-Cahn:

:

it's industry agnostic.

Rock Robinson:

Yeah.

Rock Robinson:

I've predominantly been always in B2B, so I've never been in retail.

Rock Robinson:

I got family that are in the party store business.

Rock Robinson:

They wait for people to come to their store.

Rock Robinson:

I just couldn't do that.

Rock Robinson:

So always going out, but yeah.

Rock Robinson:

Yeah.

Rock Robinson:

If usually a lot of the companies I dealt with have sold, I'll call it

Rock Robinson:

And I always I'm intrigued by that because now I'm selling

Rock Robinson:

It's just not a, I found if you've got the cheapest products, sometimes

Rock Robinson:

We'll put it on a website and you can pick the lowest price.

Rock Robinson:

And there's people that do that now.

Rock Robinson:

But I love selling value and helping my sales team sell value.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Can you share a story of a situation that you've walked

Rock Robinson:

Yeah.

Rock Robinson:

There, there was a great situation.

Rock Robinson:

It's in the manufacturing industry and they didn't have a lot of process.

Rock Robinson:

They didn't have a CRM family business and they just needed help

Rock Robinson:

And being an outsider coming in.

Rock Robinson:

I literally, because they were a quality company they'd

Rock Robinson:

I just needed to build that trust and let them be able to see that an

Rock Robinson:

And we had one of the sales team members that would be an error

Rock Robinson:

And to see that person be open to growing and me coaching that person

Rock Robinson:

I literally, I wouldn't say it's turning the keys over, cause it's not

Rock Robinson:

And I'm so excited to see where he's going to take it from me.

Rock Robinson:

But those are the situations when that can be involved and feel, I made a

Rock Robinson:

And I don't want to do that.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Rock, this has been a really great conversation about your

David Shriner-Cahn:

And a little bit about the kinds of clients where you solve their problems.

David Shriner-Cahn:

If someone wants to.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Learn more about anything we've discussed or access any resources

Rock Robinson:

for them to go?

Rock Robinson:

The best way to find me is on a LinkedIn rock Robinson, you type that in there and

Rock Robinson:

I'm coming up first.

Rock Robinson:

Okay.

Rock Robinson:

Come see me.

Rock Robinson:

We'll have to have a conversation.

Rock Robinson:

You did all my contact information.

Rock Robinson:

Is there.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Great.

David Shriner-Cahn:

And we will, of course include your LinkedIn profile link in the show notes.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Anyone who's listening can go there if whatever platform you're listening on or

David Shriner-Cahn:

You can find the link in the show notes.

David Shriner-Cahn:

So rock, I want to thank you so much for joining us today and going

David Shriner-Cahn:

Based on many years of experience, my guest today has been the president

David Shriner-Cahn:

Rock Robinson.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Thank you again for joining.

Rock Robinson:

Yeah.

Rock Robinson:

Awesome.

Rock Robinson:

Dave,

David Shriner-Cahn:

both Laura and rock experienced major transitions.

David Shriner-Cahn:

When they left their positions as employees and started their own

David Shriner-Cahn:

Do you struggle to take consistent action on building your business?

David Shriner-Cahn:

How do you feel about your progress?

David Shriner-Cahn:

Would you like to be part of a structured, supportive process to help you implement

David Shriner-Cahn:

As a member of the smashing, the plateau community you'll have

David Shriner-Cahn:

You'll also be a member of a community that's built to be a safe, caring place.

David Shriner-Cahn:

We're inclusive, direct, active, and empowering conversations are welcomed

David Shriner-Cahn:

You'll find a range of tools and resources to support you as an

David Shriner-Cahn:

If you're committed to getting your consulting, coaching or small business

David Shriner-Cahn:

Learn more@smashingtheplateau.com, where we have additional resources to help

David Shriner-Cahn:

Build their business.

David Shriner-Cahn:

After a long career, as an employed professional, we believe you should be

David Shriner-Cahn:

What you're worth consistently.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Learn more@smashingtheplateau.com.

David Shriner-Cahn:

Thank you for taking the time to listen to our show.