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Electromagnetic Energy is Killing Hawai’i Coral Reefs. Marine Biologist Terry Lilley
Episode 1607th February 2022 • Your Positive Imprint • Catherine Praiswater
00:00:00 00:25:26

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Where is electromagnetic energy coming from that’s killing the reef? Marine biologist Terry Lilley shares his ocean studies of coral reefs globally, especially off the shores of Hawai’i - the islands of Kaua’i and O’ahu. Why are some reefs living while others are struggling, even dying?

Transcripts

Terry Lilley:

Marine biology right now is incredibly fascinating.

Terry Lilley:

All Marine life studies and primarily because of our changing ocean environment.

Catherine:

Well

Catherine:

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Catherine:

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Catherine:

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Catherine:

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Catherine:

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Catherine:

What's your PI?.

Catherine:

Biologist, endangered species manager, cinematographer, diver, activist, and advocate, Terry Lilley, joins the show today with remarkable information about the ocean and its wildlife.

Catherine:

Terry is everything wild, wild in nature that is.

Catherine:

His extensive wildlife management background and diving expertise has allowed him to move forward with underwater Marine life studies and cinematography.

Catherine:

With over 4,000 hours of underwater and really anything nature footage, Terry is able to educate and bring awareness to the changes to the coral reefs, wildlife populations, the landscapes, and so much more.

Catherine:

Terry Lilley is also associated with National Geographic's Go Wild regarding shark behavior.

Catherine:

Terry's legacy is to bring not only awareness to the preservation of our natural world, but the active engagement by humans to save the environment.

Catherine:

He was featured on my podcast episodes 156 and 157 as well.

Catherine:

Terry is everything wild, wild in nature that is.

Catherine:

Terry.

Catherine:

Welcome to the show.

Catherine:

It's so good to see you again.

Catherine:

Aloha.

Terry Lilley:

Thanks for having me.

Terry Lilley:

It's a broadcasting right now from the beautiful island of Kaua'i.

Terry Lilley:

And as we talked about a little while ago, we have had three weeks of no rain, no wind and sunshine.

Terry Lilley:

You know what mother nature can dish out, some pretty nice conditions from time to time, to get my work done out in the ocean.

Terry Lilley:

So it's been really beautiful.

Catherine:

Well, your work out in the ocean is so imperative.

Catherine:

The last time you talked about how many times you were arrested when we talked about the United States endangered species act, we laugh about it, but when you look back, if

Catherine:

Not that I'm glad that you were in prison, but

Terry Lilley:

I know, Hey, Catherine, you know, uh, as you live to be a little bit older, and then you kind of maybe discover what your path is on

Terry Lilley:

With every action, there's an equal and opposite reaction.

Terry Lilley:

And I'm a firm believer there is no negative on this planet at all.

Terry Lilley:

If you learn to discover why you're here, what you're supposed to be doing, and you follow your path, then everything's a positive.

Terry Lilley:

So breaking my neck, breaking my back, having a hip replaced, having a heart seizure, all of the, you know, getting thrown in jail three or four times, all of these crazy things have led

Terry Lilley:

And every one of them was a very good thing to have happen.

Terry Lilley:

If like you said, if it didn't happen, I wouldn't be here right now doing what I'm doing.

Terry Lilley:

So once again, I really love to teach kids.

Terry Lilley:

And I really liked to tell them that look at anything that happens in your life, that you may think as a negative right now.

Terry Lilley:

Just give it some time, look at yourself, figure out who you are and you'll find out it was a positive.

Catherine:

Absolutely.

Catherine:

Your attitude is remarkable, you've given up a lot to do what you're doing.

Catherine:

Marine biologists like Terry Lilley are bringing information to the world and to other biologists, so that comparisons may be made with their data

Catherine:

In episodes, 154 and 156, Terry laid a background for where he came from and his early years of biology advocacy.

Catherine:

As a Marine biologist today, he brings us crucial data in understanding the ocean's ecosystem and its life.

Terry Lilley:

Marine biology right now is incredibly fascinating.

Terry Lilley:

All Marine life studies and primarily because of our changing ocean environment.

Terry Lilley:

15, 20 years ago, when I started writing articles and doing movies for TV about Marine life, there was a complacency that was going on with the public.

Terry Lilley:

There were hardly any articles in the news or the media about our oceans, about our beaches, about our coral reefs, kelp forest, whales, dolphins, and sea turtles.

Terry Lilley:

It just literally didn't come up on the radar screen, so to speak in the mainstream media.

Terry Lilley:

Now, all of that is changing in a huge and very quick dramatic way.

Terry Lilley:

We have climate change happening, which we know is being accelerated by human activity.

Terry Lilley:

And then we also have natural changes that happen on the earth.

Terry Lilley:

Every 26,000 years, the earth goes through a complete magnetic change all on its own, and it's been happening for a long period of time.

Terry Lilley:

So what being in the ocean day by day has taught me that in order to understand these changes, you really need to be out there.

Terry Lilley:

There there's nothing that

Terry Lilley:

suffices for knowledge on a first-hand event.

Terry Lilley:

So if you're going to be studying the surf and the reef, let's say, well, you better be out there surfing and diving and looking with the reef looks like and following the changes.

Terry Lilley:

If you're going to be studying whales and dolphins, to see what they're doing, you need to be out there with the whales and the dolphins.

Terry Lilley:

And it's one of the things when I travel around the world, I always get ameshed in whatever indigenous culture lives in that area.

Terry Lilley:

Whether it's in the Philippines or Australia or, or Bora Bora, I love to meet with the people that have lived in the environment, studied it through their

Terry Lilley:

All too often right now in the scientific community, you hear all of these reports all around the world.

Terry Lilley:

For instance, that global warming is killing our coral reefs.

Terry Lilley:

Okay.

Terry Lilley:

When I heard that, yeah, three to four years ago, I got the funding and I went around the entire planet; thousands of hours under water, studying coral reefs.

Terry Lilley:

From Indonesia to the Philippines, to Caribbean, to Mexico.

Terry Lilley:

And what I found by direct observation, a lot of the coral reefs we have on earth right now are doing just fine.

Terry Lilley:

They're thriving.

Terry Lilley:

They're growing really well.

Terry Lilley:

There was just an article in the newspaper today, here in Hawaii, about how the scientists found a new coral reef off of Tahiti

Terry Lilley:

that's absolutely pristine.

Terry Lilley:

Doesn't appear to have any effects whatsoever from human activities.

Terry Lilley:

We got to balance the positive with the negatives.

Terry Lilley:

We have a lot of destruction of our ocean that's probably induced in created by human activity.

Terry Lilley:

And at the same time, we have a lot of the ocean that, is developing along with climate change and doing very well.

Terry Lilley:

And this Direct observation is going to help us to learn how these changes are happening on earth right now.

Catherine:

Certainly now as a teacher, we depend on the scientists around the world to provide information so that we can bring it into the classroom.

Catherine:

So I'm going to go back to something that you brought up about the complacency.

Catherine:

Jacques Cousteau brought back so much information on his cruises.

Catherine:

They aired those.

Catherine:

And we watched them all the time and that changed our lives growing up for sure.

Catherine:

And I became absolutely enthralled with Jacques Cousteau.

Catherine:

And then of course, John Denver came along with his music and it was, yes, it was during a time when people were too complacent.

Catherine:

So his music was viewed as this activist, uh, and, and not viewed as we need these messages to continue to move forward so people are not complacent.

Catherine:

So they find their own positive imprint and engage it and work on it.

Catherine:

Mainstream media has a lot to do with it.

Catherine:

Scientists like yourself need a place to get the information out when mainstream media

Catherine:

isn't there to help you.

Terry Lilley:

With social media right now with podcasts like we're doing right now, we have the ability to take a visual of what's going on underwater anywhere in the

Terry Lilley:

so they can see for themselves what's going on in that area right there.

Terry Lilley:

The COVID issue taught us all that education has got to change.

Terry Lilley:

Education has got to be a little different than it was previously because we're not going to be able to pack 200, 300 kids or college students into

Terry Lilley:

So what it is allowed now is the public to say, okay, wow, we have all this incredible technology.

Terry Lilley:

Why can't we study our environment around the world and bring it directly to all the kids and teach them online.

Terry Lilley:

It's unlimited.

Terry Lilley:

And it's very, very, very powerful.

Terry Lilley:

In the past some of the universities would put out a study.

Terry Lilley:

I'll just give an example of coral reefs.

Terry Lilley:

And those studies were done in Florida.

Terry Lilley:

Some of the studies were done here in Hawaii.

Terry Lilley:

A few of them in French Polynesia.

Terry Lilley:

So these scientists were studying a coral reef and that coral reef was dying.

Terry Lilley:

And then they tried to find a reason why it was dying.

Terry Lilley:

You know, they're good scientists.

Terry Lilley:

I mean, I know all these people really well and I love them dearly.

Terry Lilley:

They're looking at a very limited part of the ocean, trying to figure out why these coral reefs are dying.

Terry Lilley:

So what happened due to COVID is that we now can be all around the world and we can be at a hundred, 200, 300 coral reefs all at the same time.

Terry Lilley:

And we can have divers and videographers under water at all of these places and share it all at the same time with education in the schools.

Terry Lilley:

And I call it comparative analysis.

Terry Lilley:

If you are having a problem with your left finger, okay.

Terry Lilley:

And your left finger hurts and it's swelling up and it's giving you a headache and it's very painful.

Terry Lilley:

Well, then you have to study your whole body to see what's going on with your left finger.

Terry Lilley:

You can't just isolate your left finger and say, okay, well, I'm going to take my left finger off and I'm going to try to figure out why it's hurting so darn bad, Kate, doesn't that sound silly.

Terry Lilley:

You know, if you left fingers hurting that bad, you better go in and you better get a blood test and maybe some x-rays and an electrocardiogram and find out if something's

Terry Lilley:

We all do that when it comes to medical professions, but we don't do that when it comes to studying the ocean.

Terry Lilley:

I look at things a little bit differently.

Terry Lilley:

That earth is incredibly complicated.

Terry Lilley:

Mother nature has designed this beautiful planet that has millions upon billions of variables.

Terry Lilley:

Remember in Jurassic park, I always love the first Jurassic Park and it primarily is because I supplied some of the reptiles for the movie that were animated.

Terry Lilley:

But if you remember Malcolm, the mathematician talked about the chaos theory, and if you add too many variables into nature, then that individual system is going to fall apart

Terry Lilley:

because you can't control nature, there's way too many variables.

Terry Lilley:

So knowing this principle, I just said to myself, and I raised some funds in 2014, and I went to all these coral reefs around the world and I took my video camera and I shot

Terry Lilley:

And then I did temperature changes of the water and all those areas.

Terry Lilley:

And I found out, especially in Indonesia, the water temperatures changed over 10 degrees from summer to winter.

Terry Lilley:

So a two degree change, average of sea temperatures around the world is not likely to affect these reef systems that are used to going through a 10 degree temperature change.

Terry Lilley:

Okay.

Terry Lilley:

So the first thing that I found out, and I'm doing a whole series of movies on this right now, uh, in some with National Geographic and on mainstream media and television is to show that our environmental

Terry Lilley:

That is kind of a way that high powered companies and government officials get out of paying attention to what they're doing to the planet.

Terry Lilley:

So each reef system, just like our left hand and our right hand are completely connected.

Terry Lilley:

All the oceans are connected.

Terry Lilley:

All the coral reefs are connected.

Terry Lilley:

All the Marine life are connected.

Terry Lilley:

So if you've got a dead reef in one part of the world and a live reef in the other part of the world, then you need to look at the whole world body and say, okay, what is out of balance here?

Terry Lilley:

What is out of whack, what has lost its harmony.

Terry Lilley:

You can't just study one little individual area and say, this is what's happening on the entire planet.

Terry Lilley:

So using good technology and social media, my intention is to have hundreds upon thousands of coral reefs that are being videoed and studied every day.

Terry Lilley:

And then all that information can come to the schools to give our children a better idea of what's happening on planet earth, not just what's happening in their own backyard.

Catherine:

When you were talking about the one area where the coral reef, the temperature was changing, could there be specific reasons for that area?

Terry Lilley:

So what I call that is a localized problem, not a worldly problem, but it's local.

Terry Lilley:

I just smashed my left finger with the hammer, building my house.

Terry Lilley:

Okay.

Terry Lilley:

That's a localized problem.

Terry Lilley:

I like to put these, uh, I like to put the earth in the context of the human body because people understand their own human body.

Terry Lilley:

They don't quite understand that the earth is very similar to an individual human body.

Terry Lilley:

So you're absolutely right.

Terry Lilley:

You can go to one coral reef in Hawaii, that's dying and I'm doing this.

Terry Lilley:

It's what I'm doing right now.

Terry Lilley:

Every single day of the week, then you can go to another coral reef in Hawaii.

Terry Lilley:

That's thriving.

Terry Lilley:

They have the same environmental changes from climate change, the same effects from tourism, the same effects from almost everything.

Terry Lilley:

So why is one reef dying and one reef not?

Terry Lilley:

And what we have found is that there's a whole bunch of things out there that can affect the health of a coral reef that people weren't even paying attention to.

Terry Lilley:

One of them is microwave radar towers, especially used by the military.

Terry Lilley:

We have shown that anything near these microwave radar towers, the coral reefs all died.

Terry Lilley:

And so we actually did a map of these military microwave towers in the Hawaiian islands.

Terry Lilley:

Sure enough.

Terry Lilley:

All of the coral reefs that died here in Hawaii, were in direct line of these military microwave towers.

Terry Lilley:

On the east coast of Australia on the great barrier reef, everyone knows about the great barrier reef dying and part of the great barrier reef dying.

Terry Lilley:

If you go in the Northern parts,

Terry Lilley:

and then around the point down to Darwin, and then up through Indonesia, the coral reefs are fine, and these are areas that even have hotter sea temperatures.

Terry Lilley:

So what's going on off the great barrier reef.

Terry Lilley:

Well, first of all, farm chemicals are running out into the sea.

Terry Lilley:

Second of all, they have intense sewage problems along that part of the coastline.

Terry Lilley:

And third of all, This came right from the Australian government.

Terry Lilley:

It's the permitted area for the Australia Navy and the U S Navy to practice underwater submarine weapons training that discharges electromagnetic energy into the coral reef dissolving and killing the corals.

Terry Lilley:

Once again, we're kind of at a really pivotal point here right now, where we got to start paying attention to what we're doing in individual areas.

Terry Lilley:

. That's one side of the coin.

Terry Lilley:

The other side of the coin is how that's affecting the entire planet.

Terry Lilley:

So it, you know, we, we got to look at taking care of nature in a completely different way, in my opinion, than we have been in the past.

Terry Lilley:

And we need to go back to the way our indigenous cultures did it by direct firsthand observation in each area.

Terry Lilley:

And then comparative analysis to what other experts are seeing in their area.

Catherine:

We were out at Poli Hale once and.

Catherine:

I thought that the Navy ship out there got pretty close to shore.

Catherine:

Obviously that large of a ship isn't going to be right at shore, but I thought it was pretty close and we didn't know why until we found information in the newspaper there in Kauai about what they were doing.

Terry Lilley:

I'll give you an example of Kaua'i north shore and what you saw back at that point in time and the north shore on Oahu at the famous surf spots like Pipeline,

Terry Lilley:

So in Kauai, in 2012, the military started their near shore submarine and Navy ship, electromagnetic weapons training along the north shore, of Kaua'i.

Terry Lilley:

They ramped up 26 military microwave towers

Terry Lilley:

to use, to produce microwave weapons, use for communications and also to use for surveillance submarine and ship activity.

Terry Lilley:

So basically in 2012 on the north shore, Kaua'i, the electricity was turned on by the U S military and they practice all this weapons training underwater near shore.

Terry Lilley:

Well it so happens three months later is when all the coral reef started dying along the north shore of Kaua'i.

Terry Lilley:

So we studied this weapon trainings program and microwave radar program.

Terry Lilley:

None of this was classified at the time.

Terry Lilley:

We studied it every day for five years, as it became more intense, more of the coral died.

Terry Lilley:

In 2015, almost all the coral was dead along the north shore of Kaua'i.

Terry Lilley:

Now in 2015, we had a high profile meeting with, the head of the military here in Hawaii.

Terry Lilley:

And the military said in a public event that they would move their operations 30 to 50 miles off shore, just as a preventative measure.

Terry Lilley:

Well guess what?

Terry Lilley:

Since 2015, we haven't seen the warships.

Terry Lilley:

We haven't heard any sonar.

Terry Lilley:

We haven't seen even a military helicopter airplane on the north shore of Kauai.

Terry Lilley:

And guess what?

Terry Lilley:

Our coral reefs are all growing back and they're growing back in time.

Terry Lilley:

This is see, this is again, firsthand observation, not making grandiose statements.

Terry Lilley:

The coral reef's north shore of Kaua'i and I've got video of these corals over a million corals on video every couple months, growing at this astounding rate of six to seven inches a year.

Terry Lilley:

Okay.

Terry Lilley:

Now, facts are, when the Navy stopped doing their underwater training, the coral started growing back and they're growing well.

Terry Lilley:

And we're documenting that coral growth even in time lapse photography.

Terry Lilley:

So you'll actually be able to see a coral reef grow when we get down with this, you'll be able to see it as if it was happening in a day, but this took seven years now.

Terry Lilley:

Now let's do comparative analysis.

Terry Lilley:

On the north shore of Oahu,

Terry Lilley:

the corals all also died and it's so bad on the north shore of Oahu that the reef actually is lowered in elevation about three feet down because the corals died and dissolved.

Terry Lilley:

This allows more of the energy to come across the reef and hit the beach, which tore up the beaches from Pipeline to Sunset Beach.

Terry Lilley:

And all these homes are falling into the ocean.

Terry Lilley:

So direct cause and effect.

Terry Lilley:

Now what's different about Kauai and Hawaii.

Terry Lilley:

Go to Oahu right now, sit on the beach at Pipeline to watch the upcoming surf contest you're going to see Navy ships, jets flying over, dozens of military helicopters.

Terry Lilley:

Go under water

Terry Lilley:

you can hear all their sonar blasting right left.

Terry Lilley:

So north shore Oahu is still doing all their weapons training right in the nearshore reefs and the reefs are dead.

Terry Lilley:

In Kauai, they moved 30 miles off shore and the reefs came back to life.

Terry Lilley:

This is a kind of scientific information that I believe needs to get out.

Terry Lilley:

You have to look at each individual area to figure out if it's a thorn in your finger.

Terry Lilley:

So it's something happening just in that area versus you have bone marrow cancer and your finger's hurting and your whole body's in danger of dying.

Terry Lilley:

So it's a little bit of taking an old tradition of first-hand observation and mixing it with modern Western science.

Terry Lilley:

With the ability of using satellites, drone, helicopters, drone, submarines, um, instantaneous education, where I can get out of the water at Haena at Tunnels Beach

Catherine:

That's something that we've talked about is getting the information out to the teachers and working on that.

Catherine:

And I'm, I'm really proud to be able to, work with you on that in the upcoming weeks . And it's, it's something that will be ongoing.

Catherine:

Next week Terry continues sharing his positive imprints along with his experiences.

Catherine:

Terry was scuba diving when...

Terry Lilley:

yeah, I had to learn the hard way, but once again, I look back at it now and I see why it happened.

Terry Lilley:

I did underwater electrical studies to pick up a electromagnetic discharge into the coral reef, which shouldn't be there.

Terry Lilley:

There should be no electromagnetic energy naturally underwater on a coral reef.

Terry Lilley:

Thanks for listening.

Terry Lilley:

Please leave positive reviews and hit that download, subscribe, or follow button now.

Terry Lilley:

Terry Lilley, everything wild, wild in nature that is, again next week.

Terry Lilley:

Your positive imprint.