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Meet Your Host, Sonya Stattmann | The Importance of Self Discovery
Episode 16th September 2022 • Reclaiming Ourselves™ • Sonya Stattmann
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In this introductory episode of Reclaiming Ourselves, host Sonya Stattmann talks about the importance of self-discovery, and gets candid about her own lifelong journey to reclaiming herself. 

Sonya opens up about her self-discovery process and why this was so important to reclaiming her power & gifts. She also discusses her calling to help others in their journey to reclaiming themselves. In this episode, you get a chance to know Sonya, why she started this podcast and some of the fundamental experiences that shaped who she is today. 

Join us as we discuss

  • 11:11 Some of the pivotal moments that shaped Sonya’s personal journey to reclaiming herself.
  • 25:58 Why Sonya felt called to step away from business coaching and focus on helping people develop and nurture their full selves. 
  • 32:16 What “reclaiming yourself” means, and how the process of reclaiming ourselves can change the impact we have on the world.
  • 42:45 How to recognize when life is telling you it’s time to reclaim yourself.

Resources mentioned in the show

Learn more about the co-hosts

---> Sonya Stattmann is the host & creator of Reclaiming Ourselves™. She is a TEDx & corporate speaker and has been working with leaders around personal development for the last 22 years. She teaches workshops & offers small group programs around emotional intelligence, transformational & embodied leadership, and energy management. You can find more about her here:

Website: https://www.sonyastattmann.com/

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sonyastattmann/

---> Laura Shook-Guzman, co-host of Reclaiming Ourselves, LMFT, and Somatic Psychotherapist for entrepreneurs has been a mental health professional for 23 years. She’s the founder of three businesses; the world's first Wellness Coworking Community Soma Vida, the global community Women Who Cowork, and her own therapy practice, Conscious Ambition. You can find more about her here: 

Website: http://www.laurashookguzman.com/

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurashookguzman/ 

What you can do next:

  1. For more episodes, opportunities, and information on the hosts, visit http://reclaimingourselvespodcast.com/
  2. Love the podcast? Get episodes delivered to your inbox with articles related to the topics we talk about. You can sign up at http://reclaimingourselvespodcast.com/
  3. Need a little weekly magic? Sign up for Worthy Love Notes & weekly affirmations here https://www.sonyastattmann.com/self-worth-affirmations-2/  

Thank you for being you. We are so honored to have you as a listener!

Transcripts

Laura Shook-Guzman:

How would someone that's listening recognize that they

Laura Shook-Guzman:

need this level of reclaiming, that they, that they would need to work with you.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And what does that even look like?

Sonya Stattmann:

I I'm really big on trusting your gut right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And trusting the, a feeling.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I feel like when people listen to me and they know they're ready to work with

Sonya Stattmann:

me, there's a, there's a feeling there's a, there's something that pulls them.

Sonya Stattmann:

But oftentimes some of the circumstances are they're feeling blocks in their

Sonya Stattmann:

world in what they wanna create.

Sonya Stattmann:

And of course, a lot of people, when you look at sort.

Sonya Stattmann:

The topic of this conversation that we're having.

Sonya Stattmann:

So reclaiming ourselves, you know, they're feeling disconnected to who

Sonya Stattmann:

they are, or they struggle to tap into what their mission is or purpose

Sonya Stattmann:

is, or maybe they've remembered in the past and they've forgotten again

Sonya Stattmann:

in their current circumstances.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I feel like at the core of the people who wanna work with me,

Sonya Stattmann:

there's this desire to know themselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

This desire to understand how they work and operate and how to craft

Sonya Stattmann:

their life in a way that really is aligned with who they are.

Sonya Stattmann:

If you know, there is something deep inside of you that is yearning to be

Sonya Stattmann:

seen, to be known and to have expression.

Sonya Stattmann:

If there's something you need to reclaim and remember maybe it's your

Sonya Stattmann:

power or your purpose, your gifts.

Sonya Stattmann:

This is the podcast for you.

Sonya Stattmann:

Welcome to reclaiming ourselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

I'm your host, Sonya Statman and I'm honored to have three amazing

Sonya Stattmann:

co-hosts Lauras Guzman, Belinda Hahn.

Sonya Stattmann:

And Emily SEI here with me on this journey to self discovery every week,

Sonya Stattmann:

we're gonna help you unravel and remember what it means to reclaim

Sonya Stattmann:

yourself to own who you are to recognize your innate worth and greatness.

Sonya Stattmann:

Now, those podcast is a deep dive into self development,

Sonya Stattmann:

healing, and empowerment.

Sonya Stattmann:

So hold on.

Sonya Stattmann:

Here we go.

Sonya Stattmann:

Just a quick note, before we dive into today's episode, these initial

Sonya Stattmann:

episodes are introduction episodes.

Sonya Stattmann:

One of the reasons I chose to have co-hosts instead of guests, was to give

Sonya Stattmann:

you the opportunity to get to know us.

Sonya Stattmann:

And to spend the topic episodes talking about the topics.

Sonya Stattmann:

So today's special episode is a deep dive into one of the co-host stories.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's gonna give you context for why we are here and what we

Sonya Stattmann:

have to contribute this season.

Sonya Stattmann:

Enjoy getting to know us.

Sonya Stattmann:

Thank you for listening.

Sonya Stattmann:

And if you wanna learn more, be sure to visit reclaiming ourselves podcast dot.

Sonya Stattmann:

Welcome back to reclaiming ourselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

And actually this is kind of our first pre episode.

Sonya Stattmann:

I'm so excited because basically before we start really diving into the

Sonya Stattmann:

topics in this podcast, I'm going to be interviewing all the co-hosts and today

Sonya Stattmann:

Laura is going to interview me, which is very, very weird for me because I'm

Sonya Stattmann:

usually the one directing the questions.

Sonya Stattmann:

So we'll see how this goes.

Sonya Stattmann:

So, Hey Laura, thanks for being here and helping me with.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Absolutely.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

It's time.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I know it can feel a little awkward, but it's time for you to be in the spotlight.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

yeah.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And sometimes, and sometimes yeah, it takes like someone else being able

Laura Shook-Guzman:

to pull out all the little GC details to, to help you tell your story,

Laura Shook-Guzman:

which I think a lot of listeners are thinking, oh yeah, I know so much.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I've listened to Sonia for years.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Or they may have worked with you.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

They may know a lot of things.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Well, what we're hoping today is to kind of look at where are you now?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Mm.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Where have you come from across all these different years?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

How are you bringing all that into this new season, into these really awesome

Laura Shook-Guzman:

projects with all of the new hosts?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Co-hosts so are you ready to dive?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Ready?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Ready?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Well, let's start with some of the basics, right?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

We've known that you've traveled around a lot.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So where are you now?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Who are you hanging with?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Tell us all about your family and sort of the current place

Laura Shook-Guzman:

that you are in right now.

Sonya Stattmann:

Okay, awesome.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yeah, we actually right now are in Mexico, which we are loving and we're

Sonya Stattmann:

in a little town called San Miguel de Y day, which is kind of in the mountain.

Sonya Stattmann:

So not near the beach it's in, you know, in kind of the mountain, sort

Sonya Stattmann:

of in the middle, the heart of Mexico.

Sonya Stattmann:

And.

Sonya Stattmann:

Really gorgeous here.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like the weather is absolutely amazing, especially after going to Texas for a

Sonya Stattmann:

brief, you know, week or two recently, we're like, we love our weather.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's like, you know, maybe high of 80, you know, and then the, it cools

Sonya Stattmann:

down at night and there's just so much beautiful, like blue sky most of the time.

Sonya Stattmann:

So we, we kind of have this journey and I think a lot of people,

Sonya Stattmann:

especially listeners from the old podcast, We'll think and, and be

Sonya Stattmann:

like, wasn't she going to Portugal?

Sonya Stattmann:

Wasn't she going to Europe?

Sonya Stattmann:

And we were, we were like on our way to Portugal.

Sonya Stattmann:

And two weeks before we were about to head on a plane, we made this amazing decision

Sonya Stattmann:

that Europe just didn't feel quite right with everything that was happening there.

Sonya Stattmann:

Energetically.

Sonya Stattmann:

And we were like, okay, well we have two weeks.

Sonya Stattmann:

We gotta go somewhere.

Sonya Stattmann:

Where, where do we wanna go?

Sonya Stattmann:

And so we kind of made this pivot and ended up in.

Sonya Stattmann:

Mexico.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, yes, I know.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so that's where we are right now.

Sonya Stattmann:

And.

Sonya Stattmann:

And we've really enjoyed it.

Sonya Stattmann:

I'm here with my family.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I've got a 20 year old daughter and I've got a seven year old

Sonya Stattmann:

daughter who's almost eight.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, you know, we are kind of navigating with them and I

Sonya Stattmann:

have my husband here as well.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, yeah, we're just kind of enjoying being in a very different

Sonya Stattmann:

environment, a very different.

Sonya Stattmann:

I don't know, it's energetic, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

Everywhere you travel everywhere, you kind of reside.

Sonya Stattmann:

It has this different, energetic blueprint in this town.

Sonya Stattmann:

And Mexico has a very different, energetic blueprint that I'm

Sonya Stattmann:

really resonating with right now.

Sonya Stattmann:

And we, we quite love.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Hmm.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I love that.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

As I'm listening to you talk about it, I'm just reflecting on, you know, what a

Laura Shook-Guzman:

no nomadic path that you have chosen very intentionally for you and your family.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So I'm curious about like, what does that say about you?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

What do you think that, that.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Is representative of like your personality and like the things, you know, that when

Laura Shook-Guzman:

people describe you, they're like, yep.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

That makes sense.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

yeah.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

You know,

Sonya Stattmann:

what do you think?

Sonya Stattmann:

Yeah, it's so interesting.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's so interesting because I go back in these cycles, like I'm

Sonya Stattmann:

probably gonna talk a lot about.

Sonya Stattmann:

Cycles today, cuz I'm a very kind of cyclical person, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

A lot of death and rebirth.

Sonya Stattmann:

That's a very like prominent theme in my life.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, and I think there is also this cyclical of like travel and then stability

Sonya Stattmann:

and then travel and then stability.

Sonya Stattmann:

I, I don't like getting to, I don't know what you say.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like I don't like getting too comfortable in any place.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I've traveled a lot.

Sonya Stattmann:

I've moved a lot.

Sonya Stattmann:

I really enjoy.

Sonya Stattmann:

New things, new experiences.

Sonya Stattmann:

They, they shift my mindset and they help me to look at everything in a new light.

Sonya Stattmann:

And that's a very important kind of theme for my life.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

That rebirth that transformation.

Sonya Stattmann:

I feel like there's so much of me that is rooted in that piece.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so go, going to a new place, try moving to a new place, traveling,

Sonya Stattmann:

experiencing new things that all really adds to that theme for me.

Sonya Stattmann:

And.

Sonya Stattmann:

I find that then I crave little stability.

Sonya Stattmann:

So it's like this, you know, this back and forth of, you know,

Sonya Stattmann:

stability and then rebirth again and some change of transformation

Sonya Stattmann:

and then a little stability.

Sonya Stattmann:

So we thought we would travel a lot more.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like we were planning to be more fully nomad.

Sonya Stattmann:

We were gonna go to Portugal.

Sonya Stattmann:

We were gonna maybe travel around Europe for a while.

Sonya Stattmann:

And as we've come to this little town in Mexico, you know, I'm

Sonya Stattmann:

really craving a bit more stability.

Sonya Stattmann:

So we know we're gonna stay here for a couple years.

Sonya Stattmann:

We really like this space.

Sonya Stattmann:

I feel like I need some space to kind of root into more of

Sonya Stattmann:

who I am in my life's work.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And that's the thing is that when you're traveling or nomadic.

Sonya Stattmann:

There's a lot of change and I love that and it takes a lot of energy

Sonya Stattmann:

to navigate that change, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Navigating uncertainty, navigating change.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, and so there's like this, this cycle of, of energy towards navigating change.

Sonya Stattmann:

And right now I'm moving into this cycle of internal work, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

The cycle of internal self exploration.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, and so then I need stability during those times because I can't navigate both

Sonya Stattmann:

the inner and the outer at the same time.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I think that's this, you know, kind of share some of why all of this is very.

Sonya Stattmann:

To my journey

Laura Shook-Guzman:

yes, absolutely.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And I, I think it's really beautiful because the way that you're designing

Laura Shook-Guzman:

your life, there's a lot of alignment.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Like you're saying between just sort of your gravitation towards cycles

Laura Shook-Guzman:

and like a deeper understanding and, and a real stepping in

Laura Shook-Guzman:

kind of an embodiment of cycles.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And then you're doing that through the cycle of, of moving uproot.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And then settling, arriving, rooting down again and then uprooting.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So there's this beautiful ebb and flow that you're literally not just thinking,

Laura Shook-Guzman:

talking about, but you're living it.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And, and there is something about traveling outside of our, you know, even

Laura Shook-Guzman:

just like traveling into new countries, new cultures, it helps you see things

Laura Shook-Guzman:

about yourself that you may not.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Understood as clearly before a

Sonya Stattmann:

hundred percent

Laura Shook-Guzman:

:

really, really love it.

Sonya Stattmann:

And you absorb the energetic frequency in a new place.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And you know, one of the things I've talked a little bit about

Sonya Stattmann:

in terms of Mexico is it's a very feminine country, really?

Sonya Stattmann:

And the pace is more slow and you know, and some people that that's

Sonya Stattmann:

very frustrating, they want a more fast pace, but this is actually the

Sonya Stattmann:

energy frequency I need right now.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I think my family needs.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, and there's family and connection is very important here.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so you, you know, when you move to a new place, you get to absorb

Sonya Stattmann:

those frequencies, those that, that sort of energetic blueprint, and it

Sonya Stattmann:

becomes something that, you know, you get to embody and carry with you.

Sonya Stattmann:

So if you, you don't stay somewhere forever, you still

Sonya Stattmann:

carry that blueprint with you.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I think that's, what's so interesting about traveling and

Sonya Stattmann:

experiencing some, a new place.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yes.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yes.

Sonya Stattmann:

So when you're thinking about those different cycles and those pivots in

Sonya Stattmann:

your life, you know, do you have a few moments that you really feel that

Sonya Stattmann:

you've learned that something from.

Sonya Stattmann:

A really significant shift or energetic change, or, you know, what's some,

Sonya Stattmann:

some pivots that would help the listeners understand a little bit

Sonya Stattmann:

about where, how did you get to where you are today and how you're thinking

Sonya Stattmann:

and conceiving of yourself and, and the work that you do in the world.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yeah, it's so interesting cuz I, I kind of did a bunch of journaling,

Sonya Stattmann:

which again is very me, you know, in, in sort of exploring what is sort of

Sonya Stattmann:

these pivotal moments and in particular around this idea of reclaiming ourselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Because, you know, I wanted to, I, I wanted to create this podcast

Sonya Stattmann:

as a very important topic for me and I wanted to understand, well,

Sonya Stattmann:

what is my relationship to it?

Sonya Stattmann:

What, when have I reclaimed myself?

Sonya Stattmann:

What does that look like?

Sonya Stattmann:

What does that feel like?

Sonya Stattmann:

What does that taste like?

Sonya Stattmann:

And for me, it was interesting because so much of like reclaiming myself came

Sonya Stattmann:

at a point when I had to leave something.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

So there's this, you know, breaking away from something that allowed me,

Sonya Stattmann:

maybe the space, the time, the aha moments to really reclaim myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, you know, I've always really resonated and if, you know, TEEX or

Sonya Stattmann:

whatever, there's the burning tower.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I always have really resonated with that card because I feel like

Sonya Stattmann:

that's such a theme in my life.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's like the tower.

Sonya Stattmann:

Everything burns down to the ground and then I can rebirth myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so for me, reclaiming myself has been a lot of rebirthing and,

Sonya Stattmann:

you know, and, and some of that it's like where I've left relationships.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

I can really kind of, especially early on in my life, like.

Sonya Stattmann:

I had a very sort of intense relationship where I was with someone for four years.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, you know, I really loved him.

Sonya Stattmann:

He really loved me.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was this really beautiful relationship, but the life I wanted, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like I had this moment of recognizing that he was kind of on this track

Sonya Stattmann:

for a very normal life, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like house in the suburb.

Sonya Stattmann:

Golfing, you know, kind of this normal life and that's all good.

Sonya Stattmann:

But for me, I realized like I was really needing a life of discovery.

Sonya Stattmann:

I, I needed to know who I was.

Sonya Stattmann:

I needed to understand.

Sonya Stattmann:

I was like about 20 at this point.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, you know, I had been in this relationship, I was in

Sonya Stattmann:

college, you know, I was kind.

Sonya Stattmann:

In these structures that were very normal.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I started to, to feel dissatisfied with it all and realized like

Sonya Stattmann:

I needed adventure, I needed travel, I needed new experiences.

Sonya Stattmann:

I needed to figure out who I was, you know?

Sonya Stattmann:

And, and so I broke away from that relationship.

Sonya Stattmann:

And that really set me on this amazing course of reclaiming myself, like so much

Sonya Stattmann:

self discovery, you know, I was alone.

Sonya Stattmann:

I was, you know, kind of, I moved out into, you know, a house with a roommate.

Sonya Stattmann:

I, you know, changed jobs.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like I kind of like started to really.

Sonya Stattmann:

Figure out who I was and allow life to unfold.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

There was a lot more spontaneity.

Sonya Stattmann:

There was a lot more of an experience.

Sonya Stattmann:

So that was a really important time in my life.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like I often call the years after that kind of my fairy years, because it was,

Sonya Stattmann:

it was the first time I'd given myself to.

Sonya Stattmann:

Follow what was right for me right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Every time before that it was about kind of like making my family happy and, you

Sonya Stattmann:

know, taking care of my mom or my sister or my friends, or, you know, was my whole

Sonya Stattmann:

life had been about how do I serve others?

Sonya Stattmann:

How do I fit in?

Sonya Stattmann:

How do I make everybody happy?

Sonya Stattmann:

You know, and so this was the first time that it was just all about me and how can

Sonya Stattmann:

I make myself happy and what do I need?

Sonya Stattmann:

And it was very painful time, as much as it was a joyous time.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I think, you know, maybe that's part of that cycle as well, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Is like, you know, that depth of pain really kind of creates that depth of joy.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so there's just this beautiful kind of life experience.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so that was my first taste of that.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was a pretty, pretty important time.

Sonya Stattmann:

, you know, kind of another cycle of that time was when I left my first husband.

Sonya Stattmann:

So, you know, there's these, you know, it doesn't have to be, so just, just for

Sonya Stattmann:

the listeners, you don't have to leave someone in order to reclaim yourself.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

That's just what was right for me at that time, you know, as I've matured

Sonya Stattmann:

and grown, I realize I can do things within relationship, but at those

Sonya Stattmann:

times I really needed to break away.

Sonya Stattmann:

But my first husband.

Sonya Stattmann:

I've shared a little bit of my story in other places around this, but, you know,

Sonya Stattmann:

he was an alcoholic and a drug addict.

Sonya Stattmann:

I didn't really understand that when we first met, he was sober.

Sonya Stattmann:

I didn't really, you know, I was like 24.

Sonya Stattmann:

I didn't really have that kind of depth of understanding of their cycles.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Alcoholic cycles or, you know, kind of drug addiction, how that works.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, you know, I loved him.

Sonya Stattmann:

I married.

Sonya Stattmann:

I tried to save him.

Sonya Stattmann:

That's a very big pattern of mine, you know, that I've integrated, worked on

Sonya Stattmann:

for decades and it was very intense.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I lost myself a lot in that relationship.

Sonya Stattmann:

And then, you know, I had a child, I was trying to navigate

Sonya Stattmann:

motherhood without any support from family or friends or my husband.

Sonya Stattmann:

And.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so it was just a really, really challenging time.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I feel like so much of who I was kind of got lost in that process.

Sonya Stattmann:

And when I broke away from my husband at the time, because he was really

Sonya Stattmann:

falling into that, you know, drug addiction and that part of the cycle.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I, it was just too much for me and my child.

Sonya Stattmann:

It.

Sonya Stattmann:

Really interesting because I, you know, talk about the tower burning.

Sonya Stattmann:

I really lost everything.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like my husband trashed my home and I couldn't repair it, you

Sonya Stattmann:

know, and had to kind of leave it in the middle of the night.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like there was just some really interesting experiences I had and,

Sonya Stattmann:

and so kind of my whole life literally burned to the ground at that point.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I had to find out who I was, I had to reclaim a piece of myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

I had to start a new cycle.

Sonya Stattmann:

I had to rebirth myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so that was just such an intense period.

Sonya Stattmann:

And yet, like, I feel like I really recognize my resiliency and my strength

Sonya Stattmann:

and how important it was for me not to lose myself like that ever again.

Sonya Stattmann:

you know, and I haven't at least at.

Sonya Stattmann:

You know, if that amount of it, you know, I think, you know, I think all

Sonya Stattmann:

of us go through cycles of this kind of, you know, rebirth and, and also

Sonya Stattmann:

remembering and reclaiming who we are and then forgetting again, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Remembering and forgetting.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I'd say that those were.

Sonya Stattmann:

Two of the times that, you know, were sort of pivotal in this cycle that I've

Sonya Stattmann:

experienced many times in my life, but you know, really allowed me to reclaim myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I think it's not leaving the relationships that was

Sonya Stattmann:

sort of the thing to focus on.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was choosing myself, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was choosing myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

And in those relationships, I had to leave that to choose myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

I don't think we have to do that all the time.

Sonya Stattmann:

So

Laura Shook-Guzman:

yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And I just, I love that you use the, the word remembering, you know, because

Laura Shook-Guzman:

that's feels very close to reclaiming, you know, and sometimes the remembering.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Comes first because to remember, like there's a self in here mm-hmm that needs

Laura Shook-Guzman:

care that needs to separate from, or set up, you know, set boundaries or be

Laura Shook-Guzman:

able to self, I have self preservation.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

It's like remembering those needs, remembering the self and being able

Laura Shook-Guzman:

then to reclaim, okay, what are these parts of me that I've neglected or

Laura Shook-Guzman:

minimized, or in some cases betrayed, you know, parts of ourselves that

Laura Shook-Guzman:

we've betrayed that we have to.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

To repair with

Sonya Stattmann:

and yeah, I think betrayal is something we're gonna

Sonya Stattmann:

talk a lot about this season for sure.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Mm-hmm yeah.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So I really appreciate those, you know, vulnerable shares.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

It's like, those are the stories that shape so much of who we are.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

In our life's work.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And so you've mentioned that you've, you've used that term life's work.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So how would you define that right now at this stage, in your career?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Looking back, maybe even giving the listeners a little bit of an overview

Laura Shook-Guzman:

of the, of the career, but also just then what is this defining moment

Laura Shook-Guzman:

that you find yourself in right now?

Sonya Stattmann:

Yeah.

Sonya Stattmann:

I love that.

Sonya Stattmann:

I'll start with my background.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I actually have to go back to my childhood to sort of like talk about

Sonya Stattmann:

my background because I think I read my first self development book at nine.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was called positive solitude.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I think that really defines so tight.

Sonya Stattmann:

I love it.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

It really defines where I was at that point.

Sonya Stattmann:

I was a very introverted child.

Sonya Stattmann:

Although I played the game, played whatever game anyone needed.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

I was, I was there.

Sonya Stattmann:

I was supporting others.

Sonya Stattmann:

I was always kind of there, but internally I had this, this very big.

Sonya Stattmann:

Questioning curiosity.

Sonya Stattmann:

I always was exploring things and I was incredibly interested about human

Sonya Stattmann:

behavior and motivation and psychology people really talked to me you know,

Sonya Stattmann:

honestly way too much when I was a young child, it was like, Someone would

Sonya Stattmann:

sit down next to me and they would just tell me their whole life story.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I would hear all their secrets and, you know, somehow I have

Sonya Stattmann:

that vibration about me that feel people who feel comfortable to open

Sonya Stattmann:

up, which is a gift, although I didn't see it that way as a child.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, you know, I think that kind of tells a lot about me and as I'm.

Sonya Stattmann:

as I grew up, I was quite interested in psychology.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was always something I was studying and interested in.

Sonya Stattmann:

And even in high school, I took a, a college level like psychology

Sonya Stattmann:

class because I just loved it.

Sonya Stattmann:

And then I went to college and I studied psychology.

Sonya Stattmann:

And about halfway through, I realized that I didn't wanna teach psychology and

Sonya Stattmann:

I didn't wanna be a normal psychologist.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I was like, oh, what am I gonna do?

Sonya Stattmann:

You know?

Sonya Stattmann:

Cause I'm quite interested in psychology, but this isn't the path I wanna go.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I gave myself permission actually.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I think this is a pivotal piece because I don't feel like

Sonya Stattmann:

we do this enough in our lives.

Sonya Stattmann:

I gave myself permission to take an entire semester of random subjects in college,

Sonya Stattmann:

whatever interested me, whatever I was curious about, you know, and, and I just

Sonya Stattmann:

wanted to try, because I didn't wanna get stuck in a, you know, career that I hated.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so one of the classes I tried was advertising.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I realized, Ooh, there's a lot of psychology in advertising.

Sonya Stattmann:

Okay.

Sonya Stattmann:

I'm gonna try that.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I went on to kind of graduate and get a degree in journalism

Sonya Stattmann:

and advertising and marketing.

Sonya Stattmann:

and so, yeah, it kind of started me on this business path, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

To, you know, I, I mean, my parents were entrepreneurs, both of them as well.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, you know, I kind of had that, that history, but I never even thought

Sonya Stattmann:

of going into business for myself, but I found myself in an advertising agency

Sonya Stattmann:

that was kind of my, my first real job.

Sonya Stattmann:

And in that process, it was really interesting because this agency

Sonya Stattmann:

was very toxic workplace was.

Sonya Stattmann:

Sexist workplace.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I had kind of all these like interesting experiences.

Sonya Stattmann:

And in, in like, you know, 10 months I had done like four years worth of work.

Sonya Stattmann:

I had won a lot of awards and, you know, I mean, this is like my first real job.

Sonya Stattmann:

And it was like 10 months.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

So the, the sort of person that I worked with in there was another young woman

Sonya Stattmann:

and, and we decided, you know, what.

Sonya Stattmann:

Toxic environment.

Sonya Stattmann:

Isn't a place for us.

Sonya Stattmann:

Let's just start our own branding agency.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

and we were like young whipper snappers.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right?

Sonya Stattmann:

We have no idea like what we're doing, who we are, how the hell to run a business.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was a serious, serious education, but we did, we leaped out.

Sonya Stattmann:

We started a branding business.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, you know, for me, sort of the core of what I did in that branding business

Sonya Stattmann:

was try to pull out the essence of people.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right?

Sonya Stattmann:

I was, you know, I used all that psychology, all that understanding

Sonya Stattmann:

of human behavior to look at the business owner and help describe

Sonya Stattmann:

who they were, what their mission was, what their vision was.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I loved that process and it gave me just this amazing.

Sonya Stattmann:

I, I ran that company for five years.

Sonya Stattmann:

It gave me this amazing kind of experience in business, you know,

Sonya Stattmann:

entrepreneurism, but I got to use all that kind of psychology and those pieces.

Sonya Stattmann:

And through that process, I became kind of disillusioned

Sonya Stattmann:

with advertising and marketing.

Sonya Stattmann:

And sort of like the manipulation and just the, just the way that field runs.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I started to get really interested in working with the business owners.

Sonya Stattmann:

I thought, wow, there's so much they're navigating.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I'm sure Laura can relate to this.

Sonya Stattmann:

And you'll hear more about this in her interview as well.

Sonya Stattmann:

But you know, there's so much that they're dealing with psych.

Sonya Stattmann:

The issues that they're facing in their business are often not

Sonya Stattmann:

even related to their business.

Sonya Stattmann:

They're actually related to their internal development

Sonya Stattmann:

what's happening inside of them.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so that became just this obsession, this, this passion of mine to, to

Sonya Stattmann:

study everything I could about this psychology and the, the behavior

Sonya Stattmann:

and the motivation, and sort of understanding what makes us tick.

Sonya Stattmann:

And that's something I was just always interested in and I applied that.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I applied that to business owners.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I became a coach and pretty much I did that for a long, long time.

Sonya Stattmann:

I've been basically been an entrepreneur for 22 years.

Sonya Stattmann:

I've gotten the opportunity to work with thousands of leaders in both

Sonya Stattmann:

corporate and business environments.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I've, I've sort of been, you know, in the inner world of many, many leaders.

Sonya Stattmann:

And it's allowed me to understand that so much of our blocks success really have

Sonya Stattmann:

nothing to do with the outside world.

Sonya Stattmann:

The things we're doing or not doing the goals we're achieving or not achieving.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's like there's all the internal processes that are

Sonya Stattmann:

stopping us and self-development.

Sonya Stattmann:

Is something I've not only done through all of the work that I've done in

Sonya Stattmann:

my coaching and working with others.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's also what I've done in myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

I've done so much, self-development work, you know, since I was young,

Sonya Stattmann:

especially picked up in my twenties.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I've applied all that to my work.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I, I, I love it because.

Sonya Stattmann:

You know, in, in the thousands of people I've worked with over 22 years, I've

Sonya Stattmann:

just, I learned stuff and I apply it.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I've been able to test all of these things.

Sonya Stattmann:

And over that time, I've really developed my own processes and my own ways of,

Sonya Stattmann:

you know, kind of navigating obstacles and what we're facing in leadership.

Sonya Stattmann:

So all that said , I, I made a very big change last year.

Sonya Stattmann:

And for those people who followed me and known me and you know, maybe not, not

Sonya Stattmann:

yet know the changes that I've made, but.

Sonya Stattmann:

Last year, it, something I've been sitting with for quite a few years is that my

Sonya Stattmann:

interest, my passion, and for anyone who's worked with me, they're gonna know this

Sonya Stattmann:

right away is in the self work, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

It's in the self development.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's, it's helping people understand who they are and how they operate

Sonya Stattmann:

and the psychology of that and how we can sort of move past our obstacles

Sonya Stattmann:

and how we can reclaim ourselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Reclaiming ourselves as a big piece of my work and.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was very kind of distorted at times by working with businesses.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right?

Sonya Stattmann:

So I was a business coach for a long time.

Sonya Stattmann:

I was kind of boxed into this sort of business coaching structure, even

Sonya Stattmann:

though people would come to me for business, we'd do all the self work.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I made sure there was those alignments, but still everybody

Sonya Stattmann:

wanted to work on their.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was, it's still this like really interesting process of, you know.

Sonya Stattmann:

Okay.

Sonya Stattmann:

That's great.

Sonya Stattmann:

I agree.

Sonya Stattmann:

I'm dealing with shame and fear, but, but I just need to

Sonya Stattmann:

know how to market my business.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right?

Sonya Stattmann:

Like it was a, so it was this like for me, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was a, it was this constant conflict.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I was like, but I, I wanna work on the self because that's where the issues are.

Sonya Stattmann:

That's where everything's gonna unfold.

Sonya Stattmann:

That's the ripple effect.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I was still often being pulled towards sales and marketing

Sonya Stattmann:

and, and all of those things.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, and, and so for, for actually, if I'm really honest for.

Sonya Stattmann:

Quite a long time.

Sonya Stattmann:

I think, you know, when, when we were moving, when we were going nomadic

Sonya Stattmann:

again, last year, I went through a lot of old, old journals, like to, that I had.

Sonya Stattmann:

And even 10 years ago it was like, I think I should take my business coaching

Sonya Stattmann:

hat off and and I still didn't.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so last year, I made this decision that I needed to focus on my life's work,

Sonya Stattmann:

which is in the personal development realm and the self-development realm.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I I'm, you know, it was very hard decision to take off

Sonya Stattmann:

that business coaching hat.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I think because the way I teach business, the world needs to be

Sonya Stattmann:

honest, mm-hmm , you know, and it.

Sonya Stattmann:

But it's not my joy and it's not my passion.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, and so it, it took a lot, but it was a really, really important

Sonya Stattmann:

pivotal decision to focus all my work in the self-development realm

Sonya Stattmann:

and to let go of the business.

Sonya Stattmann:

Teachings and all of the things related to business.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I still work with business owners.

Sonya Stattmann:

I still work with people in leadership, but I work around the

Sonya Stattmann:

topics that are more internal.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so now I'm, I absolutely love it.

Sonya Stattmann:

I I'm actually doing a lot of.

Sonya Stattmann:

Speaking.

Sonya Stattmann:

So, you know, that's something I've always done events and speaking.

Sonya Stattmann:

I've never highlighted it or focused on it quite in the way I am now,

Sonya Stattmann:

but I've done, you know, I think 700 plus events over the years, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

I've done a lot of events and now I'm doing a lot of speaking in corporate

Sonya Stattmann:

environments on emotional intelligence, on energy management, on transformational

Sonya Stattmann:

leadership, on women's empowerment and.

Sonya Stattmann:

I'm seeing how important it is right now that we're planting these seeds,

Sonya Stattmann:

particularly around emotional intelligence and as Laura and I will talk a lot

Sonya Stattmann:

about whole body intelligence, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

Emotional and somatic intelligence that this.

Sonya Stattmann:

Intelligence in our bodies, this understanding of who we are,

Sonya Stattmann:

this embracing our emotions, even understanding what emotions are.

Sonya Stattmann:

These are such important topics that we need to be bringing out in the world, in

Sonya Stattmann:

our leadership and in our organizations.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so that's a lot of what I'm doing now.

Sonya Stattmann:

I still do some coaching groups here and there.

Sonya Stattmann:

I still do a few one on one retreats a year in Mexico, which are pretty

Sonya Stattmann:

amazing, but that's, that's where my focus is a lot on the corporate speaking.

Sonya Stattmann:

And it's so wonderful to be talking about the things that matter, you

Sonya Stattmann:

know, and not to say that business isn't wonderful and that sales and

Sonya Stattmann:

marketing isn't necessary, but the stuff that really matters is how we're.

Sonya Stattmann:

Operating right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And who we are.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

So the reclaiming ourselves for me, you know, I kind of,

Sonya Stattmann:

I've done three podcasts, so.

Sonya Stattmann:

Laura.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I, we, we did, you know, women in the business arena.

Sonya Stattmann:

I created one season of a podcast called the feminine lens and you

Sonya Stattmann:

know, we've Laura and I have been podcasting for almost six years now.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I wanted to let go of the business.

Sonya Stattmann:

One women in the business arena, which is incredibly successful.

Sonya Stattmann:

And it was a really hard decision to let it go.

Sonya Stattmann:

But I needed to take off that business hat a hundred percent.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, you know, as I was exploring, what could we do?

Sonya Stattmann:

Cause I love podcasting.

Sonya Stattmann:

I realized that at the core of everything I've ever taught, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

The core of my life's work is this piece about reclaiming ourselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

And that's what led the inspiration to, to kind of create this podcast.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I knew that I wanted to pull in people who.

Sonya Stattmann:

First of all I know have reclaimed themselves are, you know, at least

Sonya Stattmann:

a lot, a lot of different pieces of themselves and who could talk to these

Sonya Stattmann:

different threads around what this topic really means, because this is

Sonya Stattmann:

such an important piece until we reclaim ourselves, we can't really rebalance

Sonya Stattmann:

our lives until we reclaim ourselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

We can't really experience joy until we reclaim ourselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

We can't do our life's work until we reclaim ourselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

We can't embrace our purpose.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Really at the thread of every single thing we want in our lives

Sonya Stattmann:

deeply and passionately reclaiming ourselves as the first step.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, you know, that's kind of, you know, how I wound here was through all

Sonya Stattmann:

this experience as I was starting to look at what have I learned, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

What have I seen in all the people that I've worked with and reclaiming

Sonya Stattmann:

ourselves as a really core piece?

Sonya Stattmann:

And so just to kind of wrap it up, Laura, what you were asking me about

Sonya Stattmann:

my life's work, and I feel like.

Sonya Stattmann:

I've called it many different things, but at the core of it, it really is

Sonya Stattmann:

about helping people reclaim themselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

And that means really seeing who they are, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Not who they should be or who they could be, but who they already are.

Sonya Stattmann:

And there's many different threads of things I've talked about over the years.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like, you know, you are worthy just by breathing.

Sonya Stattmann:

See, you are already worth.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so we just have to reclaim that we have to reclaim our work.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's already there.

Sonya Stattmann:

We don't have to do anything to become worthy or embracing our feminine

Sonya Stattmann:

power is a key part of this as well, because when we're reclaiming

Sonya Stattmann:

ourselves, it is a lot about surrender.

Sonya Stattmann:

It is a lot about letting go.

Sonya Stattmann:

It is a lot about some of those feminine tools that we don't

Sonya Stattmann:

always understand or talk about.

Sonya Stattmann:

And in my corporate work, I talk a lot about bringing

Sonya Stattmann:

humanity back into leadership.

Sonya Stattmann:

Because it is embracing the fullness of who we are, our messy cells, all

Sonya Stattmann:

of our emotions, our anger and our sadness and our happiness and our joy.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like when we embrace all of who we are at all of what makes us human

Sonya Stattmann:

that's when we really start to change the world and, and transform things.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I think that is really kind of the core of my life's work.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yes.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And as you talk about it, I mean, I can just feel.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And see the passion that you bring in to this stage of your career.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

It sounds like there's a synthesis of experience, lived experience, you

Laura Shook-Guzman:

know, you're taking all of it and, and really bringing it into service

Laura Shook-Guzman:

with your clients in a whole new way.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And that takes a lot of courage to step away from an old identity.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Yeah.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So I'm gonna ask you a little juicy question here.

Sonya Stattmann:

Okay.

Sonya Stattmann:

Juicy question fire.

Sonya Stattmann:

. Laura Shook-Guzman: So I'm curious,

Sonya Stattmann:

really important aspects that we have to reclaim in general.

Sonya Stattmann:

You know, people reclaiming things that are their birthright

Sonya Stattmann:

reclaiming, certain things that they've always had, but they've maybe

Sonya Stattmann:

forgotten sense of worth and value.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I'm curious if you would share with us today and the listeners, you

Sonya Stattmann:

know, what have you really had to give yourself permission to reclaim.

Sonya Stattmann:

In order to make this transition.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yeah.

Sonya Stattmann:

And it's a good one.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So I say it's juicy, cuz I love it.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

You know, kinda like going in, but it's like, what if you were to name it?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Like what do you think you've had to really give yourself permission

Laura Shook-Guzman:

to reclaim in order to do that?

Sonya Stattmann:

Yeah.

Sonya Stattmann:

There's so many different little pieces, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

So I've reclaimed so much over the years and, and it's been such this

Sonya Stattmann:

constant process of forgetting and remembering, as I mentioned before,

Sonya Stattmann:

mm-hmm I feel like I've had to reclaim.

Sonya Stattmann:

Selfishness mm-hmm in a way, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

Like good, empowered.

Sonya Stattmann:

Beautiful selfishness because most of my life I've spent serving others and,

Sonya Stattmann:

you know, and that was very much a, a pattern I learned from my mother.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was very much a pattern we learned in society as women, you know, it,

Sonya Stattmann:

you know, it's about supporting others and serving others and.

Sonya Stattmann:

You know, I think wearing my business coaching count for

Sonya Stattmann:

so long was also about that.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was about, you know, people need me, people need this

Sonya Stattmann:

work that I've, I've done.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like, you know, people get benefit from it.

Sonya Stattmann:

You know, it was all this thinking about others.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I can't, I can't let that go.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so this was in a way, a very big selfishness and,

Sonya Stattmann:

and for my family too, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Because I made good money being a business.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's a in, in, it's not that it's more accessible money, but there's

Sonya Stattmann:

something that people, people are willing to invest more in their

Sonya Stattmann:

business than they are themselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

As a whole thing, we could talk about that thread, but you know, it was also.

Sonya Stattmann:

Pivoting so dramatically, cuz really like my whole identity for years has

Sonya Stattmann:

been rooted in that, in that business coaching side is, it was a very big change

Sonya Stattmann:

financially, a big change, energetically, a big, I mean on so many levels.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was something I had to do for myself and ultimately the world.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

but I had to do it for myself first.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I feel like I really reclaimed sort of this responsible

Sonya Stattmann:

selfishness and, you know, it was.

Sonya Stattmann:

It was really good.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, and I had to reclaim what I'm really passionate about because I can

Sonya Stattmann:

weave my passion into lots of areas.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I know, you know this too, and anyone who's been a longtime

Sonya Stattmann:

entrepreneur, they will have fit themselves into different boxes.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Cuz we do, we kind of, we're able to flow in all these, oh, well this is relevant.

Sonya Stattmann:

This is what I love to do.

Sonya Stattmann:

But this is also what's relevant to the world.

Sonya Stattmann:

This is where we can help.

Sonya Stattmann:

Oh, here's a gap.

Sonya Stattmann:

We can fill it.

Sonya Stattmann:

Where's all these pieces that were.

Sonya Stattmann:

That we, we see and we do, you know, trying to, to help the

Sonya Stattmann:

world and change the world and make the world a better place.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, and that's kind of the core of our motivation, but being able

Sonya Stattmann:

to reclaim what really matters to me, all that matters to me, not

Sonya Stattmann:

wrapped in a pretty package that the.

Sonya Stattmann:

that was really powerful.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I still feel like I'm on that journey.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like mm-hmm, , you know, there's a lot of years of default I'm having to let

Sonya Stattmann:

go of, and you know, sometimes I, I was saying recently a couple months ago,

Sonya Stattmann:

it was like, sometimes I wake up and I still feel this heaviness, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

That I used to feel because I'm doing something that's important,

Sonya Stattmann:

but not something that is fully me.

Sonya Stattmann:

and when I have that aha moment of like, Ooh, I don't have to do

Sonya Stattmann:

anything today, except what I love.

Sonya Stattmann:

It is such joy.

Sonya Stattmann:

It is such a relief.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yes.

Sonya Stattmann:

So, you know, that's, that's something really important that I've had to reclaim.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Yes, yes, yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And I, I'm gonna hold onto this phrase that you used responsible selfishness.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And, and that's exactly what I was curious about is, you know, what is it

Laura Shook-Guzman:

that you had to kind of dig in deep and, and it's, it takes a lot of courage in.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Culture.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

We, we have very much condition tendencies to serve at the cost

Laura Shook-Guzman:

of ourselves, especially women.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And this culture is about being rewarded for being tuned in being empathic

Laura Shook-Guzman:

and being, you know, the caregiver.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And we don't get a lot of accolades as far as financial rewards for that

Laura Shook-Guzman:

is a lot of unpaid emotional labor going on, but there is so much wrapped

Laura Shook-Guzman:

up in our worth as perceived from.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

The cultural view.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So I love what you're saying is that to be just self centered in a very

Laura Shook-Guzman:

empowering way mm-hmm and you know, there's more and more research about

Laura Shook-Guzman:

self-compassion self connection.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Mm-hmm that, that is a way in which we thrive as an individual human being.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

It's like firing all the right places in the brain and getting us the

Laura Shook-Guzman:

health and wellbeing that we need, because why, because then we serve.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And that's what you said is that you said, well, I've gotta serve

Laura Shook-Guzman:

self in order to serve the world.

Sonya Stattmann:

That's right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, you know, what's really interesting is because, you know, this is a, I'm

Sonya Stattmann:

constantly in development, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

so, you know, work in process, right.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Work in process.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right?

Sonya Stattmann:

So on, on therapy, healing, exploration, you know, all the

Sonya Stattmann:

above, I'm always doing it.

Sonya Stattmann:

And recently I was, I really had this awareness, cause my therapist

Sonya Stattmann:

was asking me, have you ever served from a place of optimum energy?

Sonya Stattmann:

And I was like, Honestly, no, like, you know, and so it's interesting

Sonya Stattmann:

that my norm is depletion, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

You know, energy depletion.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, and this is, you know, this is a topic I talk about.

Sonya Stattmann:

Cause it's a topic I know really well.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

I teach energy management because I have worked on this in myself

Sonya Stattmann:

for decades and with others.

Sonya Stattmann:

And it's a constant work in progress.

Sonya Stattmann:

There's so many ways we're taught to deplete our energy.

Sonya Stattmann:

And we're taught to serve and, you know, self last.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I love what you said earlier, because I also teach a lot

Sonya Stattmann:

about the self coming first.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like when I'm teaching emotional intelligence, a lot of people

Sonya Stattmann:

are more interested in how, how do you have empathy for others?

Sonya Stattmann:

We can't have empathy for others.

Sonya Stattmann:

If you don't have empathy for yourself.

Sonya Stattmann:

You can't have compassion for others.

Sonya Stattmann:

Not real compassion.

Sonya Stattmann:

If you don't have compassion for yourself, you can't have nonjudgment for others.

Sonya Stattmann:

If you don't have nonjudgment for yourself, everything starts with the self.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, you know, selfishness is the same.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like we have to, we have to pull back in that self-centeredness so that we

Sonya Stattmann:

can heal so that we can understand how we function at optimal level.

Sonya Stattmann:

And then from all those places we're able to serve in such a higher

Sonya Stattmann:

vibration in such a better way in such a, you know, more surfaceable way.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I think, and I think we struggle with this in families, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

Like, And I know this, like, I, I feel like I've nailed a lot of things outside,

Sonya Stattmann:

you know, still working on the family but you know, we serve the family first.

Sonya Stattmann:

We make sure our kids are well.

Sonya Stattmann:

We make sure our husband's well, we make sure, you know, all the

Sonya Stattmann:

things are handled and then we give ourselves something last and, you

Sonya Stattmann:

know, you know, to kind of talking about something else I've reclaimed.

Sonya Stattmann:

One of the things I've reclaimed about myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

And it's more right now in the knowing phase rather than the practicing phase.

Sonya Stattmann:

But I had to reclaim that I need a massive amount of space and

Sonya Stattmann:

time alone, like massive, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

Like, I don't know.

Sonya Stattmann:

I think it's more than average, but you know, I don't know.

Sonya Stattmann:

Maybe no, one's honest with themselves that how much they need.

Sonya Stattmann:

I need dedicated time where I am not managing.

Sonya Stattmann:

Or anything else.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I can just self explore.

Sonya Stattmann:

I can do nothing.

Sonya Stattmann:

I can, you know, read a book all day.

Sonya Stattmann:

I can, you know, like I need massive amounts of that time

Sonya Stattmann:

to get at my optimal level.

Sonya Stattmann:

And it's really hard to carve that out.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's really hard to create that in the society that we have in the ways

Sonya Stattmann:

that the world functions, even in the ways that our family functions.

Sonya Stattmann:

and so, you know, it's this really interesting piece of like, I've started

Sonya Stattmann:

to reclaim that, to understand that, and then I'm still in practice with trying

Sonya Stattmann:

to create enough of that in my life.

Sonya Stattmann:

But I think that's a really important piece too.

Sonya Stattmann:

Mm

Laura Shook-Guzman:

yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Yes, yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Okay.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So for those that are listening kind of to move from the, the, the theoretical

Laura Shook-Guzman:

to a little more pragmatic, you know, how would someone that's listening

Laura Shook-Guzman:

recognize that they need this level.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Of reclaiming that they, that they would need to work with you.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And what does that even look like?

Sonya Stattmann:

Yeah.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I think that.

Sonya Stattmann:

I'm really big on trusting your gut right.

Sonya Stattmann:

And trusting the, a feeling.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I feel like when people listen to me and they know they're ready to work with

Sonya Stattmann:

me, there's a, there's a feeling there's a, there's something that pulls them.

Sonya Stattmann:

But oftentimes some of the circumstances are.

Sonya Stattmann:

They're feeling blocks in their world in what they wanna create.

Sonya Stattmann:

And of course, a lot of people, when you look at sort of this, the topic of this

Sonya Stattmann:

conversation that we're having you, so reclaiming ourselves, you know, they're

Sonya Stattmann:

feeling disconnected to who they are.

Sonya Stattmann:

Are they struggle to tap into what their mission is or purposes, or

Sonya Stattmann:

maybe they've remembered in the past.

Sonya Stattmann:

And.

Sonya Stattmann:

Forgotten again in their current circumstances.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I feel like at the core of the people who wanna work

Sonya Stattmann:

with me, there's this desire to know themselves again, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

This desire to understand how they work and operate and how to craft

Sonya Stattmann:

their life in a way that really is aligned with who they are.

Sonya Stattmann:

So much of the work I did, even the business work was.

Sonya Stattmann:

About helping people reclaim themselves.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like, there's this process that I created where it's like reclaiming self and we're

Sonya Stattmann:

like, Ooh, there's a piece of myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

Oh, this is who I actually am.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yay.

Sonya Stattmann:

And then we have to realign our life.

Sonya Stattmann:

I call it resynchronization mm-hmm because, you know, we

Sonya Stattmann:

are new, we're reclaimed it's different and nothing's gonna quite.

Sonya Stattmann:

Fit the same.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so we've gotta kind of reclaim those pieces.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, and then only when we go through that process a few times, can we step into what

Sonya Stattmann:

I call embodied leadership, where we're leading from that reclaim self, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

We're not leading others because we have influence or we're trying to tell

Sonya Stattmann:

all the people what to do, or even that we're trying to be the example.

Sonya Stattmann:

I mean, what happens is when we're embodied, we are the example,

Sonya Stattmann:

but that's not the mission.

Sonya Stattmann:

The mission is to lead from a place of.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

From a place of understanding who we are shining brightly.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I think that that's kind of a, a, a cool piece in

Sonya Stattmann:

terms of how people resonate.

Sonya Stattmann:

And in my corporate work, it's really about recognizing that your organization

Sonya Stattmann:

needs some emotional intelligence, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

needs some, there needs some care happening in there,

Sonya Stattmann:

and there's some interest.

Sonya Stattmann:

In actually shifting the way people are operating, not just coming in

Sonya Stattmann:

with a nice coat of paint and saying here, let me just teach you about

Sonya Stattmann:

something that no one's gonna integrate the work that I do in corporate, the

Sonya Stattmann:

speaking and the workshops that I do, they're about creating new awareness.

Sonya Stattmann:

So, you know, like for instance, I teach about understanding emotions just an hour.

Sonya Stattmann:

In a workshop where you're learning about what emotions even are and how important

Sonya Stattmann:

they are and how to embrace them.

Sonya Stattmann:

It changes the dynamic in the workplace.

Sonya Stattmann:

And people have these, these awarenesses that, ah, you know,

Sonya Stattmann:

that's, what's been going on or that's what's happening to me are.

Sonya Stattmann:

Oh, wait, I can just embrace it.

Sonya Stattmann:

I can brace it in myself and others.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like what does that mean?

Sonya Stattmann:

And so there's some really cool seeds that can be planted and quite a lot

Sonya Stattmann:

of transformation that can happen.

Sonya Stattmann:

So that's my corporate work and in my individual work with leaders, it's

Sonya Stattmann:

about, you know, wanting to lead fully.

Sonya Stattmann:

So it's not just about embodied leadership.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's like wanting a full life as well.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

We're we're so big on separating our work in life and, you know, departmentalizing,

Sonya Stattmann:

which is truly impossible, but we sure as hell try right to go compartmentalizing.

Sonya Stattmann:

But what I think most of us want is, is total fulfillment.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Fulfillment in our life, fulfillment in our work, a better

Sonya Stattmann:

blend of what that looks like.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, you know, that's a, a call to work with leaders who are ready for that.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Oh, well, I don't know about everyone else,

Laura Shook-Guzman:

but this conversation has me.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Eager to hear more about where you're going with this conversation,

Laura Shook-Guzman:

where we're gonna be going in this conversation with reclaiming ourselves.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And you know, it really struck me that this is definitely a deep dive into.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Self and it's, it's a lot more convenient and easier to focus on.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

What's wrong out there and what's going on with the other.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

It's a lot more vulnerable and takes a lot of courage to examine the self.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And that self awareness is what I hear is a big focus and passion for you is just

Laura Shook-Guzman:

illuminating more and more that people can be comfortable in this body of theirs

Laura Shook-Guzman:

and in their wholeness and from the self.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Leading from that space things open up in a whole new way and

Laura Shook-Guzman:

in a whole new perspective.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So I love that.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Thank you.

Sonya Stattmann:

Thank you for tying that up.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I know.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And it's I'm like, yes, yes, yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So all of you listeners, mark your calendar.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Every podcast is gonna be coming out.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Cause this is gonna be really good.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

But before you go, I also just wanna bring it to some fun questions off.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So get a little bit little rapid fire inquiry and the things that, that you do

Laura Shook-Guzman:

love things that excite you, delight you.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So what's on your book stand.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

What are your favorite books?

Sonya Stattmann:

Oh gosh.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like it's so hard when you have to like start contemplating books.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like there's so many so most everybody who's ever listened to any

Sonya Stattmann:

of the other podcasts knows that I'm a huge fan of Judith Dirk, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

Yes.

Sonya Stattmann:

Who wrote circle of stones and I sit listening to the wind and.

Sonya Stattmann:

In particular.

Sonya Stattmann:

I love those books because I think they're one of the few real representations of

Sonya Stattmann:

what I would call the feminine energy.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like she describes, well, she describes both the masculine and the feminine

Sonya Stattmann:

energy, but she, she does it in such this really powerful way that I don't know.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's.

Sonya Stattmann:

Embodied it's really palpable and you can really feel it.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, and I think it's just, it's just this great example.

Sonya Stattmann:

And no matter how many times I read those books or open those books,

Sonya Stattmann:

like it's just more and more insight.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like, it's just really interesting.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I remember it sat on my shelf for a long time, because I was like,

Sonya Stattmann:

ah, I don't wanna really run, read.

Sonya Stattmann:

These stories are, you know, it's kind of old, it's like done in

Sonya Stattmann:

the nineties, but I, I use it kind of like a Bible these days.

Sonya Stattmann:

So, you know, it's really powerful.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, and then something I've been doing and, and Laura and I have talked about

Sonya Stattmann:

this as well, is like, I really love fiction and I love, I it's like such

Sonya Stattmann:

a beautiful indulgent day when I can lay in bed and re fiction all day.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I love fantasy and I love magic.

Sonya Stattmann:

And Laura it titles.

Sonya Stattmann:

What is it?

Sonya Stattmann:

You say like

Laura Shook-Guzman:

magical realism,

Sonya Stattmann:

magical realism.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yes.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yes.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so there's so many great authors and books who do that, but.

Sonya Stattmann:

One of my favorite books recently, well, in the last year was there's

Sonya Stattmann:

an author named Amy Harmon and she writes, she, she actually doesn't

Sonya Stattmann:

usually write magical books.

Sonya Stattmann:

She writes more historical books, but they're like so emotional and involved

Sonya Stattmann:

and just, they're just amazing.

Sonya Stattmann:

She's a really, really amazing writer, but she wrote this one fantasy

Sonya Stattmann:

book called the bird and the sword.

Sonya Stattmann:

And.

Sonya Stattmann:

You know how, like when you have a book, I maybe I'm just the only one who does this,

Sonya Stattmann:

but I have a book that I love so much.

Sonya Stattmann:

I don't wanna finish the last chapter because it's like, I don't, I do that.

Sonya Stattmann:

that's OK, good.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like, I don't wanna wrap up.

Sonya Stattmann:

I don't wanna finish.

Sonya Stattmann:

I just don't.

Sonya Stattmann:

I don't wanna end.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so that was one of those books for me, where I think I sat for like

Sonya Stattmann:

a month with like the last chapter is I'm like, I don't want it to end.

Sonya Stattmann:

She just writes characters.

Sonya Stattmann:

In such this emotional and beautiful and empowering ways.

Sonya Stattmann:

And this particular book was like, About, well, I don't wanna

Sonya Stattmann:

tell you what it's about because you should just go and read it.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yes.

Sonya Stattmann:

I'll have to go read it.

Sonya Stattmann:

Cause it's on my list now.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yeah.

Sonya Stattmann:

But it it's a lot about reclaiming your voice.

Sonya Stattmann:

Mm.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so, you know, that's another sort of passionate topic for me, so yeah.

Sonya Stattmann:

I think, I think that's, that's my book for,

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I love that I ruin anyone else, but

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I'm, I'm writing that one down.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So what about for listening?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

What do you like for music or podcast?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Is that,

Sonya Stattmann:

yeah, so.

Sonya Stattmann:

Music.

Sonya Stattmann:

I really love music and I listen to it all the time and I usually

Sonya Stattmann:

create my own playlists because there's, I love so much varied music.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right, right now I'm really into this playlist that I created.

Sonya Stattmann:

And if you are interested, you can actually find it on Spotify

Sonya Stattmann:

because I put it out there for

Laura Shook-Guzman:

this.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I was gonna ask.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I was like, yeah, you create a playlist.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

You better make that public

Sonya Stattmann:

yeah, I did.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

:

Sonya, everyone listening.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

:

She's actually very good at creating music playlists.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

:

I used to enjoy that when we were working together and living together.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

:

yes.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so it's called embodying me and yeah, it's a, it's a very

Sonya Stattmann:

emotional playlist cuz like the, like one of the, my favorite songs right now is

Sonya Stattmann:

this song called unveiled and it's by LOA.

Sonya Stattmann:

And it's just this emotional, like, Oh unveiling.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right?

Sonya Stattmann:

It's like there there's a lot of like stripping bear that

Sonya Stattmann:

I, I quite like in music.

Sonya Stattmann:

I like when there's these raw vocals or there is, you know,

Sonya Stattmann:

something that emotionally taps into something that most of us have

Sonya Stattmann:

experienced, but we don't talk about.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so that's that this is that playlist it's like, It's the thing that brings me

Sonya Stattmann:

into my emotions and back into my body.

Sonya Stattmann:

And I think that's a very powerful place that music can take us to.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I'm gonna be looking that one up.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So what about favorite TV shows?

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Do you have a favorite TV?

Sonya Stattmann:

I love watching TV shows, like just to say,

Sonya Stattmann:

like I'm a Netflix binger.

Sonya Stattmann:

This is, I love doing that in my spare time.

Sonya Stattmann:

There's so many great TV shows.

Sonya Stattmann:

I could list like a million, but I just to kind of share sort

Sonya Stattmann:

of my favorite kind of TV show.

Sonya Stattmann:

If you've never seen it on Hulu, there's this really great

Sonya Stattmann:

series called normal people.

Sonya Stattmann:

And it's done.

Sonya Stattmann:

I think it's done by an Irish producer.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I love slow.

Sonya Stattmann:

Things right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Slow TV should slow, slow.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yeah.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like that are very intensely focused on relationship.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Mm-hmm so I like that connection that, you know, relationship I love when

Sonya Stattmann:

characters are very fully developed and I like when there's quietness.

Sonya Stattmann:

Right.

Sonya Stattmann:

I think so many people are scared to do quietness.

Sonya Stattmann:

I mean, there's all the, you know, everything's about the big

Sonya Stattmann:

thriller and the, the more intensity and, you know, blow up effects.

Sonya Stattmann:

And, but when you have someone who can develop a story, In

Sonya Stattmann:

slowness, it is truly magical.

Sonya Stattmann:

And that's that show.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so that kind of shares with you.

Sonya Stattmann:

Some of my favorite shows are like that.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yeah.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

yes.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

All that relationship based that's yeah.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I'm gonna have to, I'm gonna have to watch that one too.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Yeah, that's good.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

What about your favorite foods?

Sonya Stattmann:

So is coffee, a food ha

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I think we can put it into a category here.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Favorite food and beverage.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I just edited that.

Sonya Stattmann:

Okay.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I love coffee.

Sonya Stattmann:

I'm a big coffee.

Sonya Stattmann:

Stop.

Sonya Stattmann:

I go into a new location.

Sonya Stattmann:

And the first thing I do is look for the best coffee shops.

Sonya Stattmann:

Yeah.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's like, it's a, it's a very important part of my process.

Sonya Stattmann:

So love coffee and, you know, good coffee is just the best.

Sonya Stattmann:

I won't drink bad coffee.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I really am a snob.

Sonya Stattmann:

I love Mexican food, which is really good to be in Mexico.

Sonya Stattmann:

you're in a good spot.

Sonya Stattmann:

oh my God.

Sonya Stattmann:

Everything I go out, I'm just like, oh, so good.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's like, you know, all the flavors in this.

Sonya Stattmann:

Spices and the, so love all of that.

Sonya Stattmann:

And actually, you know, I've had people ask me in the past, like

Sonya Stattmann:

if you could only take one food to a, to a desert island, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

Have you ever been asked that question?

Sonya Stattmann:

Yes, for me, it's eggs.

Sonya Stattmann:

Like it's the funniest thing, but I freaking love eggs.

Sonya Stattmann:

I eat eggs every single morning for breakfast.

Sonya Stattmann:

I could eat eggs all day.

Sonya Stattmann:

I never get sick of eggs.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's like my favorite food.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I know this is all about you right now, but

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I have to say it's so funny.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Cause I just told my husband,

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I was like, honey, if I ever just need a few things, I need

Laura Shook-Guzman:

eggs, tortillas and cheese.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And

Sonya Stattmann:

I like, that's why you're fine.

Sonya Stattmann:

If you could, if you look in my fridge right now, there's a ton of.

Sonya Stattmann:

Bacon tortillas and cheese

Sonya Stattmann:

. Laura Shook-Guzman: This is why

Sonya Stattmann:

It was not everyone, but we were roommates for a short time and it was

Sonya Stattmann:

amazing cause we had very much similar.

Sonya Stattmann:

So last rapid fire.

Sonya Stattmann:

What is your favorite indulgence?

Sonya Stattmann:

Really doing anything by myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

, I mean, I love people.

Sonya Stattmann:

I love connection.

Sonya Stattmann:

I love being around all, all kinds of people, but where

Sonya Stattmann:

I really truly get energy.

Sonya Stattmann:

I mean, I really am an introvert is like time by myself.

Sonya Stattmann:

And the biggest indulgence is like having a day or a couple days, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

To just make decisions for myself, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

To not think about what the family.

Sonya Stattmann:

To not think about what my clients need to not think about what the

Sonya Stattmann:

world needs, but to literally just be like, I'm not hungry, so I don't have

Sonya Stattmann:

to worry about food or I am hungry.

Sonya Stattmann:

So I'm gonna go get some food or, you know what, I just wanna lay in bed

Sonya Stattmann:

and do literally nothing like that.

Sonya Stattmann:

Sounds amazing.

Sonya Stattmann:

That is my favorite indulgence.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

That sounds so divine.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Right.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

I love it.

Sonya Stattmann:

And it shouldn't even be an indulgence, right?

Sonya Stattmann:

Like should be a norm.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Should just be like,

Sonya Stattmann:

But that's a whole topic

Laura Shook-Guzman:

should be what we all get to do, and we're

Laura Shook-Guzman:

gonna talk more and more and more.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And so I hope everyone is excited as I am about this season and this

Laura Shook-Guzman:

conversation around reclaiming ourselves.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

So thank you.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Is there anything else that you wanna add before we go,

Laura Shook-Guzman:

just for the listeners to know?

Sonya Stattmann:

Well, I just have to say, I am so excited about this

Sonya Stattmann:

podcast and this season, like I have some amazing co-hosts Laura.

Sonya Stattmann:

The most amazingness.

Sonya Stattmann:

I mean, like, you know, you all know Laura and you know, so excited to

Sonya Stattmann:

unravel this topic and I feel like it's truly gonna be an unraveling.

Sonya Stattmann:

It's already been an unraveling energetically, I think for all

Sonya Stattmann:

of us who are hosting it, you know, I think all of us feel.

Sonya Stattmann:

As we've just embarked upon this journey that we are all going through some sort

Sonya Stattmann:

of unraveling and recreation and rebirth.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so I really truly invite you in as a listener to allow that energy space

Sonya Stattmann:

vibration, to, to also sit within you and see what there is to unravel, right.

Sonya Stattmann:

What there is to rediscover what there is to re.

Sonya Stattmann:

Because those are the most magical times that we have in, in this

Sonya Stattmann:

lifetime, in this world and in sort of this place that we, we live in.

Sonya Stattmann:

And so that's, that's kind of what I would invite you to do.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

Mm, well, thank you Sonya, for your time in this conversation.

Sonya Stattmann:

Thank you.

Laura Shook-Guzman:

And I'm looking forward to all the future

Laura Shook-Guzman:

conversations to be had me too.

Sonya Stattmann:

Me too.

Sonya Stattmann:

And thank you all for listening and we will see you next.

Sonya Stattmann:

I hope you enjoyed this week's episode of reclaiming ourselves, looking

Sonya Stattmann:

for a speaker for your organization, or wanna dive deeper into the

Sonya Stattmann:

process of reclaiming yourself.

Sonya Stattmann:

I would love an opportunity to work with you.

Sonya Stattmann:

You can find more about my services, read articles and listen.

Sonya Stattmann:

All of my podcast episodes@sonyastatman.com.

Sonya Stattmann:

Have an amazing day.

Sonya Stattmann:

And thanks for listening.

Sonya Stattmann:

See you next time.

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