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Finding Success Through Difference: How Wala Loubani Left Google to Create Coachendo
Episode 446th February 2023 • Be Well, Do Well. • Amin Ahmed
00:00:00 00:22:35

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In this episode of the podcast, I have a conversation with Wala Loubani to explore the meaning of difference and how being unique can lead to success.

Wala shares how she left Google to find balance while parenting and working remotely on a startup. We discuss the power of choice, unlocking talent, receiving and responding to feedback, and the benefits of remote working.

Wala also talks about how to celebrate wins in a remote environment and having a guilt-free relationship with children, developing a wellness routine, and making an impact with clients.

We wrap up by discussing the origins of Coachendo.

You can jump through the episode using the timestamped chapter markers below:

[00:00:00] Start and introducing Wala Loubani

[00:00:28] Exploring the Meaning of Difference: How Being Unique Can Lead to Success

[00:02:59] Navigating Work and Parenting: Leaving Google to Find Balance

[00:04:43] Finding Balance While Working Remotely and Running a Startup with Kids Around

[00:06:38] The Power of Choice: A Story of Letting Go and Growing a Child's Spirit

[00:08:40] Encouraging Freedom of Choice with Responsibility

[00:09:51] Unlocking Talent: Unlocking the Potential of AI-Based Coaching

[00:12:32] Mastering the Art of Effective Receiving and Responding to Feedback

[00:14:08] Benefits of Remote Working: Optimizing Time and Flexibility

[00:15:00] How to celebrate wins in a remote environment

[00:15:40] Developing a Guilt-Free Relationship with Children

[00:18:09] Recharge and Reflect: Creating a Wellness Routine

[00:19:03] Making an Impact: Testing and Pivoting with Clients

[00:20:04] What you may not know about Wala

[00:20:54] Connecting with Wala Loubani

[00:21:31] Origins of the name Coachendo

Transcripts

Amin Ahmed:

Hello and welcome back to the Be Well, Do Well podcast.

Amin Ahmed:

I'm excited today to have a conversation with a remarkable entrepreneur.

Amin Ahmed:

A Stanford grad, and an ex-Googler Wala Loubani is now the founder and CEO of Coachendo, a personal, emotionally intelligent, AI powered career coach.

Amin Ahmed:

We're gonna be talking about being different, mingling with royalty, startup mental health, and a lot more today.

Amin Ahmed:

Welcome to the show, Wala.

Wala Loubani:

Thank you so much.

Amin Ahmed:

All right, so the first thing I'm really curious to talk to you about is the idea of difference.

Amin Ahmed:

I read a really interesting article that you had written about how when you were younger being different was actually something that, you felt like maybe held you back.

Amin Ahmed:

Can you talk a little bit about the difference in maybe the change that you felt?

Wala Loubani:

Absolutely.

Wala Loubani:

And, thanks for reading the article, first and foremost, and I received a lot feedback and, many, people reached out and, felt that this is part of their story as well.

Wala Loubani:

So suddenly it's no longer my story, it's everyone's story.

Wala Loubani:

When it comes to being different.

Wala Loubani:

I, I think what happened is, I came across this very early, the thing of who am I and how do I relate to my environment?

Wala Loubani:

And we all go through that.

Wala Loubani:

So I went through that at an early age.

Wala Loubani:

I was already at the age of 12, I started asking those in the existential questions and put science on them just to understand my relation to my environment.

Wala Loubani:

And now I see that there are many people who are adults, like in the mid thirties and upwards who are asking those same questions.

Wala Loubani:

My conclusion of difference is that, we always assume that we are similar, but we're not.

Wala Loubani:

we're actually, all of us are different.

Wala Loubani:

You have two siblings in the same household and they think differently, they act differently.

Wala Loubani:

And the difference is less of like how we look, it's more what's inside of us.

Wala Loubani:

And, I think like it's a challenge that is not taken, seriously because we have so many people who have extraordinary skills and they cannot utilize them because they're categorized outside of what we're normally used to.

Wala Loubani:

So that's like my experience with the definition of difference and how that plays out.

Wala Loubani:

Then when you grow up, you start working in companies and they expect you to do things in a certain way when they hire to look for people who've done the same thing over and over again.

Wala Loubani:

But we're looking for innovation, we're looking for people who can tackle climate change, who can tackle famine, who can support us and build a new world.

Wala Loubani:

And that requires difference.

Wala Loubani:

So we need to allow that, kind of thinking.

Wala Loubani:

not the regular thing, which we then classify, this is a norm, this is not.

Wala Loubani:

So that's, that's how I see it.

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah, you're totally right there when it comes to differences, especially, with siblings, you see they're raised the same way, same parents, same families, but they're so different in their thinking.

Amin Ahmed:

I have two little kids, eight and 10, and they are miles apart, they're so different from each other.

Amin Ahmed:

so I'm glad you brought that point up.

Amin Ahmed:

from a parent's standpoint as well, There's a lot of things that, I've seen out in the marketplace where startups that are different are the ones that get noticed and get traction.

Amin Ahmed:

So let's first talk about the fact that you worked at Google and then you left.

Amin Ahmed:

So was there something there that happened and you were like, I need to make a difference in the world, and that caused you to shift over to what you're doing now?

Wala Loubani:

This is a very interesting question.

Wala Loubani:

Google was an amazing, workplace, and it is, as it says, like it is a place where people are very different, they're very innovative, and it is a climate where you get to test yourself to the limits.

Wala Loubani:

For me I left Google because I wanted to spend more time with, with my kids.

Wala Loubani:

So she was newly born and I thought this was it, like I had to balance things, and this goes back to the parenting thing.

Wala Loubani:

if I am a parent and I have a little baby, I wanna spend more time with her.

Wala Loubani:

And I thought that balance comes from, stepping back from high speed training, going into kind of less requirements in the workplace, but that's not the reality.

Wala Loubani:

The reality of things is like you have to learn how to navigate both of them at the same time, and that's why remote work is amazing because it opens up the possibilities for parents to be both roles at the same time.

Wala Loubani:

For me, working at Google was amazing and I left it with a broken heart, but I will have also without.

Wala Loubani:

second thought because I was spending so much time on commuting, and then you have to tackle that with, when you pick up, when you get that quality time with your child.

Wala Loubani:

So it was a great period, but, I think it's much better now because now remote work is here.

Wala Loubani:

So you can work from wherever in the world and you can adjust the calendar so that you are able to have that quality time with your child and avoid that commute time.

Wala Loubani:

So yeah, that was why I left Google.

Wala Loubani:

I felt like I'd saved some time on the commute.

Wala Loubani:

I'd save some time from to spend more time with my daughter and get that quality in tandem with.

Amin Ahmed:

Beautiful.

Amin Ahmed:

we have, also experienced the same thing where when you've got little kids, it's really helpful to be with them.

Amin Ahmed:

But as a startup founder, you mentioned balance but did you find that it was difficult because now your mind was on the startup rather than on work, which you can leave at the end of the day?

Amin Ahmed:

Was that hard to find that balance, working remotely, but also trying to run a startup with kids around you?

Wala Loubani:

That's very interesting.

Wala Loubani:

I don't see it this way because, we are four excutives close together.

Wala Loubani:

We are all from different backgrounds, different experience.

Wala Loubani:

We're we, it goes back to that different thing we talked about.

Wala Loubani:

And we're all passionate and anyone who is passionate about something, it's not something you can, you turn off and turn on.

Wala Loubani:

, it's on all the time.

Wala Loubani:

So it is something that when I spend time with my children there is, there's something I learned from that time with them that I can then incorporate into my work.

Wala Loubani:

And we learn all the time from the small children around us, and then we learn from what we watch on TV and we will learn when we're walking, to nursery and from nursery.

Wala Loubani:

So it is that kind of mindset as an entrepreneur, everything everything you hear is the learning, and now you need that reflection time to put it together into a cohesive story of how does this relate to each other.

Wala Loubani:

And I think that's the difference between entrepreneurship and being in a company which does not change the person.

Wala Loubani:

Because when I worked at Google, I was also thinking, okay, this is the challenge we're facing now.

Wala Loubani:

How do we solve that?

Wala Loubani:

And it was constantly on, it is something we have to learn in our way of living now, as well as how do we unplug and how do we mentally become more aware of the moment that we're spending right now serving for dinner.

Wala Loubani:

I need to enjoy that dinner with the, the company that I have and focus on that.

Wala Loubani:

I don't see the line as clear as it used to be before.

Amin Ahmed:

That's a great point because whether you're an entrepreneur or not, you're right that your mind is probably still thinking about it, but it's your role or your responsibility to decide where you're putting your attention at that moment.

Amin Ahmed:

Now, there's a interesting story that, I read where you and your daughter had an experience that helped you see things differently.

Amin Ahmed:

and this is the story of the ballerinas.

Amin Ahmed:

Can you share that story with us?

Wala Loubani:

Yes, of course.

Wala Loubani:

and it, many people reacted to that too, and I think they, recognized their children in that.

Wala Loubani:

so I was walking, I was standing by the door and I'm telling her like, we need to leave.

Wala Loubani:

And this was early morning.

Wala Loubani:

I also had my newborn son in my hand.

Wala Loubani:

So come on, let's go out.

Wala Loubani:

And she said, yeah, I'm, I wanna wear these shoes.

Wala Loubani:

The ballerina.

Wala Loubani:

And it was snowy outside, so I was like, no, you can't, like you have to wear those shoes.

Wala Loubani:

It's snow, it's cold.

Wala Loubani:

And she was very stubborn about it.

Wala Loubani:

And no matter how much conversation we had, I could not put that argument forward for her to agree with me.

Wala Loubani:

So I wanted like a quick solution to this.

Wala Loubani:

I was like, okay, listen, if you don't put your shoes on, I'm gonna take your favorite toy.

Wala Loubani:

I'm just gonna throw it away.

Wala Loubani:

And she went back to her room and I looked at her and I felt devastated.

Wala Loubani:

What a horrible parent I was.

Wala Loubani:

And then she comes back, she looks at me and she's here is a bag of all my favorite toys.

Wala Loubani:

Now you can throw them away.

Wala Loubani:

I'm gonna wear my ballerinas and that's it.

Wala Loubani:

And then when I looked at her, I thought, wow, she is expressing herself.

Wala Loubani:

That's what we're meant to do.

Wala Loubani:

And I'm not meant to dictate her on what she needs to do.

Wala Loubani:

She needs to come to that conclusion herself.

Wala Loubani:

And I don't wanna break that spirit in her.

Wala Loubani:

I wanna grow it and flourish it.

Wala Loubani:

And she needs to come to that conclusion that I have in mind.

Wala Loubani:

So that's why I started studying, child psychology, but also that incident, ended with us going out.

Wala Loubani:

She was wearing the ballerinas and as she, we were walking in the snow, she looks at me, and she's thinking, is she gonna say, it's cold change them.

Wala Loubani:

And I can see that she was thinking that, but I didn't really tell her, until she then said, Hey, you know what, it's cold.

Wala Loubani:

And then we changed the shoes and next time she could choose to do it, like she, she would understand that it's cold.

Wala Loubani:

These are the shoes for the cold.

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah, I'm really happy that you let her wear those shoes.

Amin Ahmed:

A lot of parents would just say no, and, force their way.

Amin Ahmed:

I read something from a child psychology perspective is that when children are younger, we try to get them to follow this mold and, we tell them what to do.

Amin Ahmed:

This is the way that things are done, but then when they get older, we expect that they think for themselves.

Amin Ahmed:

But we're not training them to do that when they're younger, and yet we expect that when they're older.

Amin Ahmed:

Were you like that as a child as well, where, this is what I'm going to do and I'm not gonna bend, is that were you stubborn, I guess is what I'm asking?

Wala Loubani:

Yeah.

Wala Loubani:

Yeah, I was very stubborn.

Wala Loubani:

I guess I was a real pain and I was brought up with a single parents and we were four.

Wala Loubani:

it doesn't help to have four stubborn children in different degrees.

Wala Loubani:

I was the most stubborn one, but my mother was a coaching, she is the coaching parent, so she's always been like, okay, how do you mean?

Wala Loubani:

Why do you.

Wala Loubani:

Do you think this way?

Wala Loubani:

and at some point I came to realize that it was, my freedom of choice.

Wala Loubani:

But there is a responsibility behind that freedom.

Wala Loubani:

and I think the earlier we teach that to children and also in the workplace, the better it is because as you said, we teach children and we teach employees and we teach everyone around us to be a worker, and then we say, can you innovate?

Wala Loubani:

but that's a completely different journey.

Wala Loubani:

We need to let free thinking grow.

Amin Ahmed:

and how do you let that, I know your business revolves around AI-based coaching and emotionally intelligent coaching.

Amin Ahmed:

Can you talk about how that helps employees to grow themselves.

Wala Loubani:

Absolutely.

Wala Loubani:

So what we saw, I is that, you have many people who have certain skills and those skills are not, visible, to everyone around them.

Wala Loubani:

And when we looked at, and when we came to experience coaching, we found that it is that unlocker of talent.

Wala Loubani:

It is that kind of puts you in a position to ask yourself, why am I doing this and not that?

Wala Loubani:

And how did this work?

Wala Loubani:

And maps out your thinking in a structured way and gives you perspectives.

Wala Loubani:

And it goes back to what we talked about the ballerinas.

Wala Loubani:

but this service is so exclusive, it's so expensive, and it's only offered to a small set of people, which is completely unfair because the rest of us who actually need it, we don't have access to it.

Wala Loubani:

So how do you democratize a coaching service, a service?

Wala Loubani:

human related, it's like human to human.

Wala Loubani:

that's where technology comes in very nicely.

Wala Loubani:

And so we are able to look at the, co existing coaching practices, put them through an AI service where people can chat away with a coach that is built with the same principles and that coaches those techniques and that goes to the employees.

Wala Loubani:

And now we work very intensely with remote workforce because now it's even harder, to build relationships to, start working much more effectively and to manage talent, you as a manager, you need to see talent.

Wala Loubani:

You need to develop talent, and how do you do that when you only have a video call maybe once a day, or like you have so many video calls, it's very difficult to get that sensation.

Wala Loubani:

That's why we are tackling this.

Wala Loubani:

It's so hard.

Wala Loubani:

I'm focusing so much on helping the managers, but also helping the employees to surface their skills, but also to build relationships.

Wala Loubani:

Because as you grow up and as you work in complex organizations, you don't perform on your own.

Wala Loubani:

You have to work with other people, and in order to do that, there are certain skills that you need to get by in order to deliver on those tasks.

Amin Ahmed:

Is the coaching more on a professional level or is it also personally like building your personal development as well?

Wala Loubani:

This is so interesting because like professionally, if you do well at work, you're happy, right?

Wala Loubani:

You're growing, what you learn, in your life, you have great leadership skills, you also have great parental skills.

Wala Loubani:

Somehow they go together.

Wala Loubani:

if you are great at building relationships online, then it is also easier for you to build relationships offline and with people around you in your personal network.

Wala Loubani:

So I don't see that.

Wala Loubani:

I see that line is very blurry.

Wala Loubani:

So that is personal development at the highest level.

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah, very true.

Amin Ahmed:

is there something that you've seen with maybe a success story where somebody has had an ah-ha moment as a result of getting coaching where they didn't have that?

Wala Loubani:

Yeah, absolutely.

Wala Loubani:

So we have close to 200 sessions done through the ai now, with the, with companies.

Wala Loubani:

Before that, we did pivoting with, beta testers.

Wala Loubani:

And from those conversations we've had a lot of feedback.

Wala Loubani:

One of the people that worked with ai, coach's AI coach said that, okay, after a meeting I had, I didn't realize I was not being attentive on that call.

Wala Loubani:

Realized that I was not actively listening or giving feedback in an appropriate way.

Wala Loubani:

So I went back to the presenter and said, Hey, I wanna give you feedback.

Wala Loubani:

I wanna hear you out, and I'm sorry I was distracted.

Wala Loubani:

Small things that make a very big difference.

Wala Loubani:

Small things, everyone wants to feel understood, and when you're coaching someone to understand other people, they don't only understand other people, you understand yourself as well.

Wala Loubani:

So there is a clear benefit.

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah.

Amin Ahmed:

And if a coach, or sorry, if a manager understands that as well, and the employees or your staff understand that there's that synergy right, between how their communication styles are.

Wala Loubani:

Yes, absolutely.

Wala Loubani:

How do I give feedback online?

Wala Loubani:

What happens after that online meeting?

Wala Loubani:

We close the laptops.

Wala Loubani:

Or we just closed the window and now I'm back to work.

Wala Loubani:

And you're back to work.

Wala Loubani:

And I don't know how you're feeling.

Wala Loubani:

How did you take the, improvements, the good things that I just said to you?

Wala Loubani:

There are a couple of things we need to learn to master better, both on the sender, but also on the receiver side.

Wala Loubani:

So that is exactly what coaching can support with.

Amin Ahmed:

Wonderful.

Amin Ahmed:

Your team is entirely remote, isn't?

Amin Ahmed:

Correct.

Amin Ahmed:

Do you find that it's difficult from a mental health perspective to work with somebody every day and not have that physical contact?

Wala Loubani:

I personally don't feel this way.

Wala Loubani:

We are, and no one in the team has expressed anything of that.

Wala Loubani:

just on the opposite, we are able to optimize our time.

Wala Loubani:

We get that flexibility, those benefits from working remotely, but we also use our own product in order to, can become better at resolving, not issues, but resolving different challenges that we can we face as a team.

Wala Loubani:

We tend to meet like once every six months, to get, some physical time together.

Wala Loubani:

But again, like the relationship is built online, relationships are built because we work together, we achieve together, we support each other, we challenge each other.

Wala Loubani:

and that's where it happens.

Wala Loubani:

And then we meet and that's for, socializing.

Wala Loubani:

And that's more kind of fun.

Amin Ahmed:

How do you celebrate wins, in a remote environment.

Wala Loubani:

Oh, there are so many ways.

Wala Loubani:

you have online meeting, to celebrate that you have, we use Slack and communicate through that.

Wala Loubani:

you can send funny memes. And that's really nice because that breaks the, everything has to be structured, everything has to be around a certain topic.

Wala Loubani:

Now you can have fun and you can have humor, in the remote environment.

Amin Ahmed:

I love that.

Amin Ahmed:

It's, for us, when we started working remote, it was a bit challenging because I was so used to having physical presence and taking coffee breaks and walking around.

Amin Ahmed:

You lose that in-person touch, but then you gain a lot more because like you said, you've got that time freedom where you can send a message, you don't have to get a response immediately, and then you come back and you see something funny or something playful.

Amin Ahmed:

Now, as a parent, do you have any, productivity tips to get work done when you've also got children around you as well?

Wala Loubani:

Yeah, I think, what's most important is to be present when you have time with your children.

Wala Loubani:

And that goes back to mentally, blocking time and being present with the children.

Wala Loubani:

I read the study that more than 60% of parents feel guilty because they don't spend enough time with their children.

Wala Loubani:

And we always feel guilty as parents about everything.

Wala Loubani:

I forgot the shoes.

Wala Loubani:

I forgot the food.

Wala Loubani:

They shouldn't eat sugar.

Wala Loubani:

They shouldn't eat salt.

Wala Loubani:

It's like all of those things.

Wala Loubani:

It's very difficult to be a parent.

Wala Loubani:

But the best thing we can give them is an undivided attention, and it doesn't have to be too long.

Wala Loubani:

So what I do is I have a sacred time with my children every day, a minimum of half an hour with every child or with them together where we just play or we just do things that they like.

Wala Loubani:

And also my daughter is in school now, so we have like study time together and that's what I think is the best thing you can do.

Wala Loubani:

You don't have to spend all day, but you have to be present the moment you're there with.

Wala Loubani:

That's, I avoid the phone.

Wala Loubani:

Like seriously.

Amin Ahmed:

The phone is such a source of anxiety, I think, for parents cuz it's so easy to check in every day.

Amin Ahmed:

In fact, one of the things that I did is I turned off on my phone, there's a, I think they call it always on, so you can like, see notifications regardless of if the phone is on, I turn that off, notifications off disconnected all my social media apps.

Amin Ahmed:

And it's been so good.

Amin Ahmed:

And so I'm curious about this 30 minutes.

Amin Ahmed:

During that 30 minutes, is it like whatever the child wants to do, you just read, play with them, cook with them, that sort of thing?

Wala Loubani:

Yes, it's their terms, but also it's their words.

Wala Loubani:

What's even more important, and that's what you learn from coaching too, is that, as parents and also like managers, them to do that and teachers and everyone is is trying to do that.

Wala Loubani:

Teach what you should think, teach, tell you what you should do.

Wala Loubani:

those 30 minutes and that time, which is a holy time.

Wala Loubani:

of course like I spend much more than 30 minutes with my, but there is a 30 minute where it says their command.

Wala Loubani:

In those times, it's them talking and I would not tell them what to do or not to do.

Wala Loubani:

I would ask like, why do you think so?

Wala Loubani:

Why does this happen?

Wala Loubani:

How do you wanna do about that?

Wala Loubani:

And they express themselves and they tell me what I should do.

Wala Loubani:

And that is a completely different kind of setup.

Wala Loubani:

And I think that helps the children to express themselves.

Wala Loubani:

And that's very important.

Wala Loubani:

As a parent that's the best thing you can give.

Amin Ahmed:

Oh, that's lovely.

Amin Ahmed:

parents often force their opinions on kids and then they become managers of kids.

Amin Ahmed:

And I like how you've just structured it where let the child do what they want.

Amin Ahmed:

it's their time.

Amin Ahmed:

Do you have a wellness routine to help keep you grounded when things get shaken up?

Wala Loubani:

Yeah, I think, it's, as we work remotely and you're sitting by the laptop and a whole day can go, and you're we're so passionate.

Wala Loubani:

So we're ending up like in front of computers for way too long.

Wala Loubani:

I'd like to start my day with, morning run, just to get that physics up and to take short breaks.

Wala Loubani:

And we have coaching sessions about meetings when you go back to back meetings that your brain is actually not working, or between those meetings it's tired, you need to rest.

Wala Loubani:

So having those 15 minute breaks at the minimum, and then getting that kind of check in and having a walk and talk.

Wala Loubani:

The benefits of remote work, you can walk and talk.

Wala Loubani:

You can have a meeting as on the go.

Wala Loubani:

You can be, in the park.

Wala Loubani:

so it's that kind of thing.

Wala Loubani:

It's very important not to sit in one office in one room all day long.

Wala Loubani:

That's, and it's difficult to break that, but that, that creates some discipline.

Wala Loubani:

Yeah.

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah you obviously have a lot of passion.

Amin Ahmed:

I can feel the passion in what you're saying.

Amin Ahmed:

Is there something that you're working on right now that's got you really excited?

Wala Loubani:

I love what we're doing and I love the team that I'm working with.

Wala Loubani:

We're all very passionate about this.

Wala Loubani:

We all think differently.

Wala Loubani:

We all have our opinions and our experiences, which makes it, fun every day.

Wala Loubani:

So what we're doing now is we have a conversation with companies who have the remote workforce.

Wala Loubani:

We are onboarding clients, we are testing and pivoting, and every insight, every feedback, every conversation is, something that triggers me.

Wala Loubani:

So the most important thing I think for a founder is to avoid sitting and building a mastercraft that no one knows about and you are just gonna suddenly show it to everyone, is to collaborate with, your users, with your customers, with your colleagues, and that, that kind of thing is what makes, being a founder so interesting.

Amin Ahmed:

You definitely embody the work-life balance.

Amin Ahmed:

I don't ever feel like there is such a thing, but the be well and do well.

Amin Ahmed:

I love that you're embodying all of that together.

Amin Ahmed:

that's really great to see.

Amin Ahmed:

Is there something that your friends would be genuinely surprised to learn about you that they don't know about you already?

Wala Loubani:

I think this whole article was a great surprise for many people, and I, many people that I've worked with for so long said, Hey, wow, I didn't, I felt like I knew you and now I know so much more.

Wala Loubani:

and it was like, our investors were like, why you build this startup?

Wala Loubani:

Can you tell us about your journey?

Wala Loubani:

Why are you doing this?

Wala Loubani:

And you normally just go by oh,

Wala Loubani:

we wanna help the world.

Wala Loubani:

that kind of story.

Wala Loubani:

but the challenges so much and it was very painful to sit down and write personal piece about yourself.

Wala Loubani:

yes.

Wala Loubani:

Everyone has much more depth in their life.

Wala Loubani:

There is so much more that, we can tell each other.

Wala Loubani:

So yes, they'd be definitely to be surprised, but, that doesn't change who I am and who we are and our relationship and how we feel about each other.

Wala Loubani:

That's the important thing.

Amin Ahmed:

if somebody wanted to learn more about you and your work, where can they find you?

Wala Loubani:

I'm very active on LinkedIn.

Wala Loubani:

I am very happy to receive questions, feedback comments, for people to tell me what they find is the most interesting, most painful, most, challenging, and most rewarding.

Wala Loubani:

and also we have our website at coachendo.com to go in, have a look around, see, okay, what does this mean to you?

Wala Loubani:

How do you feel about this?

Wala Loubani:

what questions do you have?

Wala Loubani:

And help us because we're building something.

Wala Loubani:

, that is about changing the way we feel at work so we can be healthier and happier.

Amin Ahmed:

Wonderful.

Amin Ahmed:

I'll put the links in the show notes.

Amin Ahmed:

Is it coach E n d o.com?

Amin Ahmed:

Yes.

Amin Ahmed:

Can you tell me a little bit about the name and where that name came?

Wala Loubani:

Of course thank, actually it came as a suggestion.

Wala Loubani:

We had, many, many different names before we landed in the coachendo.

Wala Loubani:

But, someone in the incubate program that we were part of said, Hey, you're in coaching.

Wala Loubani:

You should have coach and do - coachendo.

Wala Loubani:

And it was brilliant.

Wala Loubani:

So yeah.

Amin Ahmed:

There was another name before, right?

Wala Loubani:

your Kip.

Wala Loubani:

Yes, exactly.

Wala Loubani:

Your coach in pocket.

Wala Loubani:

Yeah.

Wala Loubani:

. So yeah, your coach in pocket.

Wala Loubani:

We were very scientific.

Wala Loubani:

Yeah.

Wala Loubani:

We were very scientific about it.

Wala Loubani:

oh, we wanna transition the feeling and how do we do that?

Wala Loubani:

Yeah.

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah.

Amin Ahmed:

I like Coachendo better.

Amin Ahmed:

I think it rings a little easier to say and definitely easier to do.

Amin Ahmed:

I really appreciate your time.

Amin Ahmed:

I'm so glad we had a chance to talk and that, we got a chance to listen to your story and you were able to share your journey with us.

Wala Loubani:

Thank you so much, Amin, for inviting me and I hope this, gives, some thoughts, feelings, and, that people feel, hopeful about the world and that we are changing something that, can surface skills that we need.

Amin Ahmed:

Yes, absolutely.

Amin Ahmed:

It was my pleasure.

Amin Ahmed:

Thanks so much again.

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