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Creating and Honoring Our Boundaries with Barb Flowers [#132]
Work/Life Balance Episode 13211th June 2024 • Educate & Rejuvenate: The Podcast • Kelsey Sorenson, Elementary Teacher, Homeschool Mom, and Life Coach
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Key Themes from Creating and Honoring Boundaries with Barb Flowers

  • The importance of boundaries to prioritize self-care and well-being
  • Ways to set limits for managing your time and avoiding over-commitment
  • How to effectively communicate boundaries and maintain healthy relationships

In today's fast-paced educational landscape, educators often find themselves juggling numerous responsibilities, leading to stress, burnout, and a struggle to prioritize their own well-being. In episode 132 of "Educate & Rejuvenate: The Podcast," teacher burnout coach Barb Flowers and host Kelsey Sorensen shed light on the critical role of setting boundaries in the context of teaching and personal life. 

Resources mentioned:

Connect with Barb:

Connect with Kelsey:



Transcripts

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Welcome to episode 132 of educate and rejuvenate

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the podcast, creating and honoring boundaries with Barb

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Flowers. Do you get sucked into checking emails or responding to

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messages 247 or just feel like you can never

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honor yourself and what your needs are when it comes to

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other people? Today, I'm interviewing teacher burnout coach Barb

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Flowers at all, and we're talking all about how to create boundaries

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and how to actually stick with them, which is one of the big keys to

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having boundaries. So let's get to it.

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Welcome to educate and rejuvenate, the podcast to help you

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revitalize your teaching, renew your spirit, and reignite your

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passion for life. I'm your host, Kelsey Sorensen, a former

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teacher, current homeschool mom, published author, and certified life

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coach. Whether you are a teacher in a traditional classroom, homeschool

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from your kitchen table, or anywhere in between, I am on a mission to help

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you not only survive as an educator, but thrive. Get

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ready to up level your skills with incredible insights from guest experts

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and discover the missing piece, rejuvenating yourself. Are

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you ready to both educate and rejuvenate? Let's

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go.

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I am so excited to have Barb on the show today. She is

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a fellow certified life coach for educators. She's the host of the

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teacher burnout podcast and also the principal's

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handbook podcast because she has been a teacher. She's also now

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an administrator and a certified life coach for educators

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and administrators. So super cool, and we are so lucky to

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have her as one of our speakers at Educate and Rejuvenate this year. She'll be

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teaching a session called energize your teaching, preventing burnout

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and staying inspired. Like, who needs that? We

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all wanna prevent burnout. We all wanna stay ignited and excited about

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what we do as teachers. So I'm so looking forward to that session. She's going

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to offer valuable tips about preventing burnout and strategies to

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reignite your passion for teaching, which is really part of what I love to do.

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Like, even my subtitle for my book is to revitalize your teaching, rejuvenate

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your spirit, and reignite your passion for life. So I feel like what she has

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to share really aligns with our mission. So I'm so excited to have her with

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us at Educate and Rejuvenate, but also here on the podcast today

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with you. So when we decided to do this interview, I

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had Barb fill out a form, schedule her interview, and she had a list of

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topics there. And the one that just screamed out to me was boundaries because it's

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a topic that has come up a lot in in our coaching instead of the

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educate and rejuvenate club, but I have not yet done a full podcast episode about

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it. I think it was mentioned during the self love challenge back in February, but

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we haven't done a full episode on it yet. So I was like, yes. We

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need to do this. We need to talk about boundaries. So I'm really excited for

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today's conversation. I feel like you'll probably gain some great insights on

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how you can create and honor boundaries in your own life. Now this episode is

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probably geared a bit more towards those who teach in a traditional setting. If you're

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a homeschool parent listening, guess what next episode is really geared

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towards you. We'll be talking all about the lies we tell ourselves as homeschool moms.

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So either today's episode or the next one will totally be for you. Granted, I

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feel like either way, you could definitely gain some insight from both episodes. Like today,

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we're going to talk about boundaries in the classroom setting, but also in life in

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general. So, if you are feeling the need

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to create and honor some boundaries in your life, no matter what, today's episode is

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for you. Like I said, we're gonna talk about it in everyday life, so you'll

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definitely get something out of it. K. Take that last bit off. Okay. So a

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little bit about Barb before we just dive in that

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she like I said, she has experience in education as an elementary

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principal and teacher. She's married with 2 kids in in elementary and

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2 step kids in high school and college. She has a PhD in k

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twelve leadership, and she's a certified life coach. So she knows what

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she's talking about. She loves supporting educators in improving their

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well-being and improving their professional skills. And

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so today, we're going to be talking all about boundaries together. So let's get to

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that interview.

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Okay. Welcome, Welcome, Barb, to educate and rejuvenate the podcast. I'm so

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excited to have you today. Thank you so much for having me on the podcast.

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I'm excited to be here. And I am so excited to have you on

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talking about today's topic of boundaries because that's one that's actually come

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up a lot, but I haven't even done an, like, an episode fully about it

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yet. I mean, it's been mentioned, but we haven't done a full episode on boundaries.

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And we're over a 100 episodes in. I'm like, how did this happen?

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Here we are. I'm so excited that we get to do it together. So first,

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Barb, how can you tell us? How would you define boundaries? Well, I

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look at boundaries as they're like your standards. Right? That's

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how you choose to live and where you set. I always think

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of a fence when I think of a boundary. Right? So where you put a

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fence up to when something's not okay or what your

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limits are. So when I think of boundaries, I think you can set

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boundaries around your time. You know, what are your limits on your time,

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you can set boundaries with your coworkers as an educator,

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you can set boundaries with administration and just

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setting boundaries and putting limits that work for you and

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what your capacity is as an educator, because we all have

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different capacities that we that we function at, and so you have to know

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what those limits are and where you need to put those boundaries. Absolutely.

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And one thing that I found is sometimes people think, like, a boundary,

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and I wanna see what your thoughts are on this. Like, they think a boundary

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is like, oh, I'm gonna tell you you can't do that. But that isn't

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exactly a boundary. Right? Right. Right. And so you

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have to know what works for yourself, and you can't, your

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boundaries are only things you can control. Like you can't

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focus on what people say to you because that's

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their boundaries and that's, you know, what they can control. You just

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have to control how you react and what limits you set on

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that. Exactly. So basic one might be like, and this isn't even in the classroom,

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but maybe just in general, like, hey. If you yell at me, I will leave

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the room, or I will hang up the phone, or I will go somewhere else.

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You can't tell them you can't yell at me, but this is what I'll do

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if you choose to do that. Correct. I think about myself. I set a

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boundary. I'm currently an elementary principal, and so when I have an angry

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parent and I find I'm getting nowhere, I set a boundary that this

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conversation is over and we'll have to have it at a different time because I

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won't let somebody scream at me and be rude to me. You know? So I

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think I can't control what they're saying or how they're thinking about me, but I

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can control to sit there and take that language toward me.

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So setting a boundary that way, I think, is huge. Yes. So it's not like

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you're like, okay. I'm not going to have this conversation right now. You know, we're

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going to have to do it another time, but it's not like, oh, I can

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control exactly your reaction or what you're thinking about me and what you're thinking

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about this discussion. So, yes, that's Right. A perfect

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way to think about it. How do you successfully honor a boundary? I feel like

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sometimes we are like, oh, I have this boundary, but then if we don't

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actually hold the boundary for example, you're a teacher and you tell a parent,

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I'm not going to check email or respond to emails after 5 PM, but

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then you still do it. Right? What like, what kind of message is that

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sending? How do we successfully honor a boundary?

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Well, the number one thing is you have to be consistent. Whatever you

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say you're going to do, you have to be consistent with that. You have to

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look at it like when we're, you know, with kids, we know

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if we give any leeway, right? Kids know what the

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boundaries are and they're gonna push that boundary with behaviors. And

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it's the same thing with anything else that you do. If you're not consistent

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and let's say you tell parents, I don't answer,

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dojo messages or messages from a messaging service after 5

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o'clock and you do it one time, you've already put that boundary

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down. You've already said I don't stick to my boundaries. So

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consistency is the number one thing you can do. And it's also important to

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be clear about what those boundaries are. Yeah. As a principal, I send out a

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letter for the teachers, but I have I could even share it

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saying what the boundaries are with communication. You have to be really

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clear with families that they know what that boundary is or

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whoever you're setting a boundary with, and even being clear with yourself. Right? If

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you're not clear with yourself that you're, that that's,

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an area that you need to work on. I've had to work with teachers a

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lot on checking, messages over the weekend because we'd

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have, yeah, we'd have conversations that it would ruin their whole

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weekend. And so it took those conversations and the

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reflection to realize that a boundary needed to be set.

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So once that boundary was realized that it needed to be set, then we

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could focus on being clear with what the boundary is that needed

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to happen and being consistent with making sure that we

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showed up and we were constantly sticking to what we said with our

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boundaries. Oh, those are both so important. Like, being clear about

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it and then, yes, honoring. And I think there are things you could do to

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make it easier to do that too. For example, maybe you turn off, like,

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dojo notifications on the weekend, so you're not tempted to be

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like, oh, I just got a message or whatever. You don't even see it. I

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find that can help if you're like, I need a little bit of help for

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myself honoring this boundary if you created those bad habits. I find things like

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that can definitely help. Yeah. And it's hard to go back. Once you've already

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broke a boundary, it's hard to reestablish that

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boundary. So and that is another great thing about teaching is

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that we get to start over every year. So if you know that there were

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boundaries that you didn't have last school year, summer

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is a great time to reflect on that, think about what boundaries need to be

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set and put in place to help you be more successful and maybe

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less stressed, less overwhelmed, and put those in place and be really clear

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and, consistent with them starting new. And that is such a great way

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to refresh. Right? Because you're gonna have new parents. You're gonna have new students. The

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new year is like a new beginning, and that's a great time to be like,

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okay. I'm going to get more clear with these boundaries. This is what I'm going

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to do. So for example, what are some boundaries that teachers might need

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to set? And I know you even talked about an email that you sent out

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on behalf to the parents or whatever. What what are some examples of a

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clear boundary that they could set? You could either describe what was in

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that email or just some other ideas. Yeah. So definitely some clear

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boundaries that we have to set as a school that I have to help teachers

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with our with communication, that one communication

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times are crucial. But another thing that happens a lot with

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messaging and it being so easy to message the teachers is I see

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that parents will message the teachers instead of calling the office and

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notifying us. So teachers are then stuck dealing with things that are

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really office issues. Oh, yeah. Yeah. So helping parents

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and sometimes they just don't know, and so helping parents know

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who to communicate with in the school, that's not the teacher. Like,

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if their child complains, there's a recess issue, you don't necessarily need to

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notify the teacher. You can call the

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to take that off of them. But I just think as a teacher, the more

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that we can communicate and be clear about what those boundaries are,

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I also think boundaries with I I see all the

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time cell phones too, and and this is where I think it can tricky,

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like parents wanting teachers' cell phone numbers. So that's a

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boundary. If you have a boundary about parents, like, requesting you as a friend on

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social media, again, if that's a boundary you have, you wanna be really

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clear that I don't request. I don't take friend requests from

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parents and be consistent on that. So whatever

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those boundaries are, consistency is key there, but I think

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I would say communication for sure is the biggest boundary that we need to set.

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And I think it's because we're in such an instant world right now where it's

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like, oh, I could just message the teacher and hopefully she'll message me back right

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now. Or even I know that parents will message

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teachers thinking that their child's only child in the class, Like, how is their daughter

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going? Right. You know? And I I have teachers who are

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like, well, I have 25 kids. I can't do that. So it's like you've gotta

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set that boundary. They had a great day. I'll let you know if anything goes

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wrong, but I generally do not message parents every single day about their

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child. You know, things like that as well. I think we just have to be

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really clear because you have to look at it from their perspective too. They

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sometimes they don't realize everything teachers do and they don't know. So we just have

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to be clear about. Yes. Absolutely. I think just, yeah, being

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clear with those boundaries and communication is a big one because, yeah,

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we just we're used to instant gratification, right, with being able to

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just order something on Amazon and it arrives the next day. That's what we're really

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trained for. And even social media, they've studied that. Right? And when you're

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scrolling, it's all about that instant gratification, that dopamine hit.

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And so parents might be reaching out. They don't have bad intentions.

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It really is just about holding those boundaries and being clear

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and communicating. That's really the big thing.

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What about I know because you've been you kind of

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understand both the teacher side and the administrator side. What are

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some boundaries that teachers might need to have with administrators? And what I've

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heard from some of the members in our educate and rejuvenate club is,

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like, they really wanna make their principals happy. Right? They really

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want their administrator to like them, and they might say

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yes to things that maybe they don't feel the capacity for. And it's not even

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necessarily the administrator's fault or anything, but what are just some boundaries in

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general that might be appropriate? Right? There are some things that

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might not be appropriate. So what might be appropriate for boundaries between teachers

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and administrators and what might not be? I always tell my teachers because we

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have lots of committees in the school, and I have people who want to be

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on every committee and then I have people who don't want to be on a

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committee. And I talk to teachers and I might ask them to do

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something. And some teachers are like, no, I can't do this. And some just say

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yes. And I just kind of going back to what I've said,

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you have to be really clear. I'm asking because I think that you would be

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a good fit on the committee, but I don't know what you're thinking and what's

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going on in your life as a teacher. And so I think

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you just have to know that it's okay not to, like,

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people, please. You know? And most administrators

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that I know would not hold it against anybody if they said,

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no, I can't join that committee due to things that you have going on. Everybody's

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at a different stage in their life, and if that's pointed out, I

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think that that's a really good way to set a boundary. I

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always just say I'm not a mind reader. Just please be clear with me.

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If you can't do it, I never want to put extra stress on you. I

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need you to be open and transparent and I'll try to be the same with

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you. But I think just communicating and having those conversations,

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but it definitely it's boundaries with committees, can be a hard

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thing. If, if you're staying late or coming in

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early, having boundaries about that, I think that's okay to communicate

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that. I don't think there's anything wrong with communicating like, hey, I need

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to leave here at 4 o'clock every day because of whatever, or I

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just need to leave every day at 4 o'clock. There's not a problem with that.

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And I think you just if you have an issue with that, need to communicate

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that. I also think, I'm just thinking of some possible things that

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could be an issue, but, like, taking a sick day. Oh, yes. That's a big

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one. And one I've helped a lot of teachers with. Right. And I

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know I, as a in all of my roles, I have felt guilty

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every time I take a sick day. And it's like, no, you have to have

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those boundaries. If you don't feel good, like, you're an adult. You get

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to decide that. And I say that because my friend and I would call, like,

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I feel like this, and we're both teachers. You know? Is that enough to take

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a sick day? So guilty about it,

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but it's like, we're adults. We know if we don't feel good. We know if

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we need to be home. We know if we have to be home with our

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kids, and we need to not feel guilty. We have the sick day, put

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it in. That's our boundary. It is what it is. We don't need to be

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questioned about it. And I know every contract's different with teachers and

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things like that, but I do think that's a boundary there too, is

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that you have yourself and your family to take care of. So I think that's

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a boundary you always need to communicate and be clear about. Absolutely. And I can

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and I have done full episodes on sick days and everything. I don't know if

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you know, but our whole the way my brand even started and grew was we

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did our ready to go sub plans and our sub binders. So that's, like, a

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big thing we've helped teachers with, and there's a lot of mindset with that. There's

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a lot of, oh, I can't take a day off because there's a sub shortage.

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Even though I, like, earned these sick days or whatever, I just can't because that

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would inconvenience people. And I think, again, that's really

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good to want to think about your team and maybe be like, okay. Maybe this

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time I won't take a sick day, but this time I will because I do

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need to take care of myself. And then I know that if a teammate, they

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need to take a day off, I will help with their class if needed, even

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if the class has to split. I know that's been happening in some areas, but

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if that needs to happen for someone to be able to take care of themselves

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and take a day off, then you can help each other out with that. Yeah.

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And I'm like, nobody wants you here. Exactly. It could make the problem worse if

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it then suddenly goes around the whole school instead of only you. I'm sure you

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can. I'm sure you've had experience with that. Right. And I'm like, you know, we

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will figure it out. Kids will not be left unmonitored. Yes. Like it

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it'll be sorted out one way or the other, and it won't be the end

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of the world. It might not be, oh, this is the ideal day.

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Like, there can be a normal day that's not the ideal day. So

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we we know that in education. It's just some days are

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different than others depending on, like, the kids and where they're at

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and their nervous system regulation and everything going on.

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Yeah. Yeah. So I I think just being clear about what you

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need and having that self care. I talk to teachers about that a

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lot. Don't feel guilty for taking care of yourself. And I

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talked to principals about that. We all in education are

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guilty of taking care of others first and a boundary

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of self care who can argue with a boundary of self care. I just feel

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like that's so crazy to even think about. We have to put

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ourselves first. We have to put our families first and make them a

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priority. I always tell my staff, like, we all love education.

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We love kids, but at the end of the day, we work because we wanna

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provide for our families. It so that's number 1.

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Right? So Right. And one thing I actually did while I was writing my book

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too on what you were saying about not wanting to put ourselves first, but I

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look because people think, oh, if I put myself first that's selfish. But I

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actually looked up the dictionary definition of selfish and it was saying that

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being selfish is chiefly concerned with only yourself at

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the expense of others. And that isn't putting

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yourself first. That is trying to step on people because you wanna be above

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them. But just like putting yourself first, I need to make sure my cup

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is full before I take care of these students or work with my grade level

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team or whatever. Like, I need to make sure that I'm taken care

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of. And that isn't being selfish. That's just making sure that you're being taken care

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of. The opposite of that selfish, like, being chiefly concerned

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with only other people is or only yourself is only being concerned

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about other people and not caring about yourself. And I think that sometimes the

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direction teachers tend to go, they really are pouring it out in everyone else

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and not enough to themselves. I always say boundaries is the number one thing to

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help prevent burnout. Because, like you said, if you're pouring into

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everybody and never yourself, there you might feel like you're okay,

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but there will be a point where it'll just hit you and you'll be burnt

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out because we can't do that forever. Our bodies are not made for

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that. We need self care. We need to regulate ourselves. We need

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to take care of our own mindset and just focus on being

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the best version of us so we can help others. So that I think is

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where those boundaries come in. Because I mean, this is just a personal boundary

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for me, but starting my day every day with exercise, that is a

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boundary I set with myself and my family. Like, I work out at home,

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I get up every morning. Sorry. If you need something, figure it out. This is

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my half hour to myself to exercise. And it's something

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that is like a non negotiable for me because that's my

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only time in my day that is truly focused on myself. So I think having

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something like that is really important. Yes. I think it's so

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important. And then, and I actually, I am with you. I love to do my

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exercise in the morning and kind of having that time because I get up before

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the rest of my family is out. So it's really that time of stillness and

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to be with myself and to exercise and just

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fill my cup so then I can fill up everybody else's

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after I feel complete. You know? Yeah. Oh,

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I love this. So what's just we're kinda wrapping up here, but

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what boundaries again, I like to talk about on this show, not just

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teaching, but our full lives. Right? Because we're teachers. Teaching is

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one aspect of our lives, and then we've got everything else going on. What are

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some other ways that boundaries can help us in our life outside of teaching

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as well? I feel like it's a skill that when utilized in teaching, it helps

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us use it in our lives and vice versa. Well, I know for me, I

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can be a one thing I've worked on a lot is being a people pleaser.

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And when I think of a people pleaser, it's really like a lack of boundaries.

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Right? It's about everybody else, and I'm not setting boundaries. And so what I

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see that happens in my personal life when I don't set boundaries is I

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am like, yeah, I'll go to that event and that event and that event. And

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so I'm running me and my kids around to 3 different events that we're

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not even enjoying any of them because I'm like, I

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can make it to everything. You know, I can do it all. And in

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the process, I'm stressed out. I'm not enjoying myself.

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I'm yelling at my kids. So I just think another way in your personal life

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is really thinking about your time management and how you create those boundaries

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around it. My husband is so great at being like, we have one

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event planned. We're gonna leave it at once. There's one's planned. We don't

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need to plan anything else. And I'm like, well, we could do something else too.

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He's like, nope, one event. And it does, it helps so much with your

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stress. And because when you're constantly feeling like you're

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running from one thing to the next and you're just trying to get everything in,

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I know for me, it just makes me feel like I'm doing nothing well. I'm

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overwhelmed. I don't even know. I don't have a second

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to breathe and really think about the things that I have going on. So I

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think a thing that we need to make sure we're doing in our personal life

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is that time management piece because I'm guilty about even before work,

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I do 10,000,000 things in the morning because I'm like, if I can do it,

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I go to work, it makes me feel better when I get home. But then

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I have to stop and think, is it worth being stressed in the morning?

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Yeah. And stress my entire family. So I think really putting those

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boundaries into place on what can you actually get done in the

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morning, what can you get done in a certain amount of time so that you

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don't feel overwhelmed and stressed out and can just be more relaxed

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and more present in your life. Yes. I think boundaries around time are crucial, and

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this is one I honestly personally really relate to right now with working on my

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book and the event and the rebrand and homeschooling still, so many things

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that we're doing. And there was like a weekend where we just had so

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much going on and then we got invited to another family dinner and I was

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like, well, we could go. We don't have anything at that time, but I was

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like, I just, I can't, I literally, my mental, emotional, I can't.

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And you can always say no, even if you don't have a valid

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reason, like something else you're at. A valid reason is just, you need

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that time to decompress. And yes.

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So I I love that you mentioned trying not to have too much in your

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schedule because I do think that's where overwhelm can come in,

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and we don't have that time to regulate ourselves and rejuvenate.

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So love that. Okay. And then one last question about boundaries. I know that

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a lot of people are like, okay, this all sounds great. I wanna do it,

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but I'm worried this is going to ruin my relationships if I try to hold

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a boundary. So what what do you have to say about that? I, when you

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set a boundary, you just have to do in a way that's kind. If you're

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like, you're breaking my boundaries, I can't do that. And you talk to people like

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that, of course, they're gonna be like, okay, and get upset. But if you communicate

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and have a conversation with people about what those boundaries

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are, nobody's gonna get upset with you. I think it's in

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our own mind that that's gonna happen. It's it's like I said, it's

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that people pleasing mentality. I always think when I

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set a boundary or when I say I can't go to something like you said,

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if I don't have something else going on that I have to have an excuse.

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And it's like, no, you don't. And so I think just

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being more confident in yourself and your ability to know that it's

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okay to have that boundary for yourself and

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saying it in a confident clear way. Brene Brown says clearest points.

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I think if you don't say it in a clear way, then what what I

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know I do Me too. Is I would do the event anyways and

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I would be mad the whole time anyway. And is that helping your relationship? Really?

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Think about it. You're like, I don't wanna do this because I don't wanna ruin

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my relationship, but is you feeling resentful, like, helping your relationship?

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Right. And so I think if you can think of it from that lens

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because I was volunteering, at church for a while, and I enjoyed

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it, but at the same time I was kind of resentful. And I'm like, I

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need to back away a little bit because I'm doing this from a place of

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like resent and not from a place of I want to do this.

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And nobody wants to be around you when you're in that space. And so

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I think being clear about what those boundaries are and just

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knowing that it's okay, you don't have to have excuse an excuse, be

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confident in who you are and what decisions you make, and

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people respect that. There's nobody that I've ever had a conversation with

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that sets boundaries that I'm like, oh, man. They're so rude.

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I look at that. We respect it. I'm like, wow, that's really

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great. I have a friend who's an educator and she's great about she puts

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her phone away and doesn't respond to group chats out from work and things

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like that. And people know that's her boundary and they just know that about

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her. She's not gonna respond to group chats after work and it's

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not a big deal. So I think just being clear about who you are,

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what those boundaries are and communicating them is gonna help people

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just understand where you're coming from. Yes. And I think what you said about the

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fear of what might happen is so much worse than usually what actually happens when

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you do that. So just try it try it with a small boundary. You can

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always work your way up. Try a boundary. You'll see it feels good, and then

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just keep creating and honoring those boundaries as needed in your life.

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I love how you said that because I started that with email. I actually took

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email off my phone, but it started with, okay, I'm

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not answering this email tonight. And then it started with me doing that more and

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more, and then I'm like, I'm taking it off my phone, so I can't even

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check it. So I think that's a great way to get started is just take

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those micro steps. I love it. Well, this has been so good.

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A great first episode about boundaries. I'm so excited we

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finally did it and that you helped make it happen. So thank you so much,

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Barb. And you're also part of our educate and rejuvenate event coming

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this summer. Can you tell us a little bit more about what you're going to

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be teaching there? Yeah. I'm really excited because I'm gonna be I will be talking

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about reenergizing your teaching. So I'm gonna just talk about

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how you bring that passion back to teaching. If you're feeling burnt out and

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overwhelmed, how do you get that passion back? Because I always think

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about that feeling you have as a student teacher when you're new to

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teaching and everything's so exciting. And then we get into

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the career and time goes on and it gets stressful and

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we, we get these feelings that we're just burnt out and overwhelmed. And so I'm

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gonna give you some strategies and tips on just how to reenergize your teaching

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to love it again. I love that so much. I cannot wait for

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this session to go out there so all the teachers at our

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event can hear it and watch it, and, it's just

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gonna be so good. And just it fits in perfectly with

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the event as a whole, where we're really trying to help teachers learn how to

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up level themselves in their career with teaching and

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also personally. It's really personal development meets professional development.

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So so excited for the event and that you're participating in it.

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But the event isn't happening for another, like, probably about 6

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weeks from when this episode goes live. So can you share

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also, and again, they might wanna just connect with you outside of it. What else

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do you have for our listeners in the meantime and where can they connect with

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you? Yeah. So I have a podcast, the teacher burnout podcast. You can find

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me on that podcast. You can also find me on Instagram at Barb Flowers

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Coaching and find me there. And I'd love the opportunity to connect with

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you and share what I've been doing with teacher burnout.

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Awesome. Well, thank you so much for your time, Barb. This was such a

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great interview. I loved chatting with you, and I love that everybody else

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is going to get so much insight about how they can create and

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honor boundaries in their teaching, in their lives. Well, thank you for having

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me on, Kelsey.

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If you enjoyed this episode, please hit subscribe so you don't miss the

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next one. And if you're hungry for more, be sure to check out the book

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that I wrote. It's called Educate and Rejuvenate, a 3 step guide to

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revitalize your teaching, renew your spirit, and reignite your

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passion for life. It is scheduled to be released in the summer of

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2024. This book takes all the life coaching skills we talk about here on the

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podcast and puts them together in one easy to understand guide.

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Plus, when you pre order, you'll receive a PDF workbook and additional

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resources to deepen your understanding and application of the concepts we've

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covered on the book and on this podcast. You won't find these resources

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anywhere else. Visit the link in the show notes to join the wait list and

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be the 1st to know when the book becomes available for pre order. Let's

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continue this journey of growth and rejuvenation together. Until next

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time.

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