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Masterclass Edition: Interview with Braden Ricketts | MC005
Episode 817th February 2022 • CEO Matters • Liam Chrismer
00:00:00 00:43:46

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This Masterclass edition is an interview with Braden Ricketts, one of the producers of The CEO Matters podcast. It was our first interview, so we turned the tables and had Braden interview Coach Liam to get his thoughts on why CEO well-being matters and why he specializes in this work.

  

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Transcripts

Liam Chrismer:

Hey listeners, CEO coach Liam Chrismer here. Welcome. This is the masterclass edition of the CEO matters podcast. This is where we take a deeper, a more curated dive into a topic or an issue. You need to know more about sometimes an interview, sometimes a conversation. Other times, I simply go deep into the weeds on a CEO matter, but I think is important. So let's get into this episode of CEO matters, the masterclass Edition.

Liam Chrismer:

Welcome listeners. This is CEO coach Liam Chrismer, and I am so glad you're back to listen to another episode. This is a masterclass episode, and it's really epic. And it's happy because we're actually doing an interview. And when I think about it, this probably should have been the very first episode that we did, because I'm actually talking to somebody else. And if you listen to my podcast, you'll know that other people are far more interesting than I am. I am delighted to introduce to you what a person who has become a friend of mine and a mentor of mine, his name is Braden Ricketts with Amplifyou say Hello, Braden.

Braden Ricketts:

Hello, Leo, I am excited and honored to be here with you. You did say that your guests are more interesting than you. But actually, I'm here today to turn the spotlight back around on you. So that we can learn a little bit more about why CEO Matters has such an important place in the world today. So thank you for inviting me.

Liam Chrismer:

You're welcome. Yeah, we really are going to get into why CEO matters, matters. And so So folks, what it's going to happen here is rather than me as host interview, Brady, he's the host, and he's going to interview me and the purpose is to give you a flavor for, for why I'm doing this podcast, why I'm passionate about why I'm doing it and why I think you should listen what I hope you'll get out of this and certainly future episodes to come. So here we go. Thank you, Braden. Now again, and I must mention in full disclosure, Braden Ricketts is part of AmplifYOU and they are the wonderful people at this company called AmplifYOU one word AmplifYOU that produce my podcast, they have held my hand now for going on five months at least. And helped me get from concept to actual production. They encouraged me to just do it, you know, no matter no matter what you do, you're going to hate it, you're going to you're going to, you're going to know that it can be better in the future. Seth Godin, the great author, and blogger Seth Godin says just ship it, it doesn't matter. Some people will like it, some people will hate it. Just get it out there. Steven Pressfield says, It doesn't matter. Nobody. In his case with authors, he says nobody wants to read your stuff. He doesn't say that. But nobody wants to read your stuff. So. So we're getting practice. And thank you, Brandon, let's go.

Braden Ricketts:

So I'm pretty excited because as you mentioned, that five month journey to get your show launched was plenty of opportunities for me to ask those questions, the questions I had about what is CEO matters. And what brought you to this idea that the world needs a show about wellness for CEOs. And your answers have always been absolutely on point authentic. And from the heart, you have a passion, and you have an articulate way of explaining it. And so being here to ask you these questions to let you showcase that brilliance is my pleasure. So I thought we'd start off with a real easy one. Hey, why don't you tell us? Or how about you give us some background? And why you decided to launch a new venture, when, you know, some people in your position may have retired and ventured off to the sunset.

Liam Chrismer:

Yeah. I am 66 as we record this, and this is a time when many years ago when you were 66. Boy, you were you were you were done. You were ready to be put out to pasture and times change and people change and while I am 66 I feel that I'm a young 66 and it occurs to me that and I really learned this from Chip Conley at the modern elder academy that in the last 100 years we've expanded our increased our lifespan by 30 years, and that 30 years shows up right smack dab in the middle of life. So like it or not for many of us who But by the grace of God or, or our will be blessed to live a long life, we're gonna be here for a while. And so I have the opportunity to combine my experience, my education, my passion, to really make a Steve Jobs would have said, and did say, make my dent in the universe. And so, having been an entrepreneur, having been a CEO of my own company, or companies, CEO of one other company, for a number of years, I learned through that process that there are some things that cause companies to succeed, other companies to fail, and for the most, they just kind of Bumble along. And so to the owners, or so do the CEOs of those companies. And a lot of it gets back to their well being, and how well they're doing as individuals, because a company, in many cases does as well as the owner, or as well as the CEO. So that's why I wanted to study this work, and change the world and inspect it, affect as many people as I can, by starting with the top starting with CEOs that are responsible for the people that work.

Braden Ricketts:

Yeah, they say that the effectiveness, or the company is really a top down, when it comes to their approach, their demeanor, and how they engage with their customers. So if you can get wellness, at that top level, it should permeate the rest of the organization shouldn't

Liam Chrismer:

know you, you certainly would hope so. And you know, CEO has served as a role model. In my, in my career as a CEO and working with other business owners, you know, they complain, and they lament that why don't employees know this? Or why can't they think for themselves, or whatever the frustrations are, and in many cases, the CEOs find that they've got to fill in the gaps. Where were their employees, parents, educators, previous employers haven't taught them. They haven't taught them how to live successful lives, how to be good employees, how to think how to manage their money, how to read the manual, how to show your work on time. And, and so the CEOs serve as the role model, not only for how to live and how to work with this company, but how to succeed in life.

Braden Ricketts:

So can you share a little bit of what brought you to focus on the well being of a CEO? How did you come to the conclusion that this was so necessary?

Liam Chrismer:

Great question. Thank you. I read the other day, but when you get when you get into the later stages of life, many people find themselves reverting to what they enjoy doing as a child. And that doesn't mean that they find themselves back in, in diapers and, and drinking insurance all day. But it means that they get back to the very things that they were attracted to spark them early on in life. Now, I was a psych major, a Psych and philosophy major in college. And, and then I went on to get an MBA, because when you graduate with a with a degree in Psych and, and philosophy, you know how to think, but you don't know how to do anything. So, you know, you're essentially unemployable. And, and when I think back to those days, I had a good friend, also a psych major, and we would sit in the Thomas Jefferson Library at the University of Missouri. We're surrounded by all these academic journals and books. And we were reading way back in those days self development books. Before self development, personal growth was really a thing. Maxwell Maltz, Zig Ziglar Augmentee. Know, people like that. And it was about achieving your highest self, doing better, making the most of yourself, I was fascinated by the work of Abraham Maslow at that time in his hierarchy of needs. And so I was I was fascinated at an early age with what makes people people tick, and how can we do better? How can we make the most of ourselves, and then I, my career went on in banking and as an entrepreneur, and I saw these companies, some that succeeded, and some that didn't. And frankly, I saw myself with a company that was very successful. And then one day it came crashing down all around me. And I came to realize that the reason that the company failed, was because I failed. I didn't take care of myself. I was all about the business. was me, my gosh, I was working 1218 hours a day, seven days a week I lived one block away from the company, it was everything I did was my entire life. The problem wasn't my passion for the business. The problem was, I didn't take care of myself. And as a result, the person that I thought I was, was not the person that I actually was. And my company failed, I let myself down Island, my employees down and let my I let my customers down. And it occurred to me that I can't be the only one that that's happened to. And so I fell back on what my first love was, which was psychology, and becoming the best version of yourself. And I thought, You know what, I really should now refine this and develop this, and apply this to make that dent the universe by working with CEOs, because the wellness industry and I know you have a background in that the wellness industry has largely overlooked the business owner or the CEO. We talked about wellness programs for employees, we talk about work life balance, and all of that. But we somehow think that CEOs are Superman or Wonder Woman and they put on their Cape when no one's looking but but their is flawed, and in some cases more frightened and more stressed out than other people. So I wanted to dedicate the rest of my life in this fourth and final chapter of my professional life due to improving the fitness of CEOs, so they can build remarkable companies and live extraordinary lives.

Braden Ricketts:

Amazing. You mentioned my background in wellness 15 years ago, trying to convince organizations to invest in the wellness of their employees. We found the study that reported that $1 invested in Employee Wellness had a return of $3. With employee productivity as they had less sick days. What do you think, is important about the well being of a CEO, and what that return on investment would be for the organization that they serve?

Liam Chrismer:

Well, the studies are still showing that there was a study by there was a study by the north northwest ventures. And they found that for every dollar invested in employee well being that they got a 2.2 return on that investment. I think the most important thing is for the CEO to model that behavior. In order for these programs, whether it's formal wellness programs, or just a culture of wellness, to work and to stick, and to get employees engaged in the process. It has to come from the top down. And the CEO that models that behavior and lets people know that you know what, it's okay. In fact, it's more than okay, it's encouraged for you to take care of yourself. That means you do go exercise. And yes, you can exercise during company time. You want to take a day off for your mental fitness. Fantastic. Do that. You want to work four days a week, so you can have a three day weekend every week. God bless you. I'm all about it. When when the employees see that the person leading their organization, not only cares about them, but he or she cares about themselves sends a different message. I want to see over practices, for example, the seven seven rule. And that is that from 7pm to 7am There's no emails, there's no text messages, there's no phone calls, there's no text messages, phone calls emails during the weekend. And so what employees understand is hey, I don't have to do that. I don't have to I don't have to check my phone at nine o'clock at night when I'm home with my family. So we want to we want to see that not always supports well being but models.

Braden Ricketts:

Yeah, so those are great examples of how a CEO can model the seven seven roll. First time I've heard a call that I think it's absolutely brilliant. Stepping out for some physical activity, you know, engaging the physical body during a workday is important. What are a couple other examples that CEOs can take action on to model wellness for their employees?

Liam Chrismer:

Oh, I think I think you know, rep repetition is repetition is teachable, and I think to continually reverberate that we have to take care of ourselves. And remember long ago there was a there was a TV show called in the US called NYPD. And so each show would start out with the scene in the, in the conference room or something. And all the officers were there before they went out on their various beats and patrols. And at the end of it, as they were getting up to leave, he would say, hey, let's be careful out there on every show, and that's how he ended that appreciate talk. And I think it's the CEO that says, hey, let's take care of ourselves, number one, and repeats it, you know, over and over. Just through the practices that that that person does on a daily basis. They don't work long hours, they don't work weekends, they do take their time off. Now, this isn't, I'm not suggesting that everyone have a strict diet, they work out five days a week with a personal trainer, and they have three, three massages a week, that sort of thing. What I'm suggesting is that the is that the CEO sends a very clear message that if we don't take time, for our wellness, we will have to make time for illness. You know, today, Braden we are we are hopefully in waning stages of, of the, of the pandemic, we had the Great Depression, we had the great recession. And now we have a great pandemic. And I'm hoping that this, that what this really becomes is the great reset, where we begin to rethink what we're doing. Active employee disengagement is at an all time high, some report is as high as 70%. Just last month, 4% of the American workforce quit is quit their jobs. And the other 50% are looking for a job. So the CEO, the practice of self care, can go a long way toward keeping those employees engaged and keeping them there. Deloitte, Deloitte just did a study that showed that for those CEOs that take care of themselves at practice, actively and openly practice self care, they see a 20% pickup in employee engagement. They do the math, the the return on value or the return on investment for that. Staggering. So I think just demonstrating and communicating the message that you get to take care of yourself, in lots of ways, encouraging people not to be on their phones all the time, helping people to understand that it's that you got to get up and move. You know, with this pandemic, we're working from home, we have back to back zoom calls, we won't even get outside. We no longer have that whatever it is 2030 minute commute between between work and home that allows us to de stress, we get up, we check our phone, we walk to a desk or we walk to our kitchen table, we start working. So the so the employer that says hey, he was Be careful out there or be careful in there. We got to we got to watch what we're doing. We got to take care of ourselves. That's the main thing.

Braden Ricketts:

Absolutely, yeah. This new world of work we're in right now. You, you mentioned the numbers of people that are transitioning. They're calling it everything from the great resignation to the or the mass resignation. But it is absolutely a reset. I think we're recalibrating to see what is actually important in our lives and where the priorities lie. And that is wellness in itself. I believe people are looking at how they're spending their days and making adjustments to live the life that they're more aligned towards. So they're moving into a direction of work that is more aligned with their own wellness. What would you advise people who are looking for their new work experience? Mainly now working from home? How would you recommend incorporating wellness into their days? And what are your practices of wellness on your day to day?

Liam Chrismer:

Oh, what a great question. I think one of the things that starts with this is boundaries. Where does work again and where does it end? I mentioned the seven seven rule. So I think having morning routines getting movement early in the morning, getting divorced from our digital devices. We're on the cell phones all day long. I don't have the statistics at the ready. But we've all heard those numbers of the statistics of the number of times that people check their cell phones during the day. We're on cell phones all day long. And then we go home, and we're watching TV, and we go to bed, and we're watching TV, and we have our cell phones with us. Wake up in the morning. And the first thing we do is check for emails, man, that's not healthy. So I think setting boundaries, divorcing ourselves from from digital devices, making certain that we get movement in our day. Not having back to back zoom calls all day long. We've had meetings all over our lives. And meetings have been debated. I think now it's so easy to have a meeting, you can set up a zoom call, I think we have to start questioning, do I need to be on this meeting? Do I need to be here for the entire meeting? I have a guy that I work with. I get emails from him at 3am in the morning. And he works coast to coast. So I think his name is Jason and I think he is I think Jason is on Zoom calls as much as 12 to 15 hours a day. Normally we talk later in the afternoon, do you really think you can be effective on a zoom call at four in the afternoon, when you've been on a zoom call at four in the morning used to be that we go to a meeting on the fourth floor, the meeting would be over we go down to our desk or office we do this do that return a phone call, and then maybe go somewhere else we were moving around now we're not moving, we're sitting there. And instead of glancing out the window, we're staring like I'm staring at you right now. And I'm staring at me over the screen. That's all changed. So we've got to understand that we're under different stressors now than we've been before. So get up, move around. Again, set boundaries, make certain that you're you're looking at your energy, and we have all kinds of energy, physical energy, didn't get enough sleep, monitor your sleep. Gone are the days of the hard charging person to say, Oh, I don't need sleep, I can go out and get by on four hours or six hours. No, you can't. And you may be able to stay awake the other 20 hours. But I guarantee you from personal experience, you're gonna be making bad decisions. Make sure you get enough sleep, make sure you're hydrated, make sure you're getting supplementation, that you're eating the right foods that you are seeking awe and wonder in the world, you know, the Japanese have a practice there's a name for it. And I can't think of it but but essentially, is forest bathing. And it's not something we can actually do. But but you can increase your energy by running naked through the forest. So I don't want to become known as the CEO coach and encourages his clients to run negative forests. But the point is moving and getting out and getting sunshine and just doing the natural things that just simply makes sense.

Braden Ricketts:

Absolutely. You You mentioned the the transition away from the mentality of hustle and grind, you know, put in the extra hours no sleep for the successful, that mindset really seems to be shifting towards a mindset of taking care of yourself. So that you can be in the best position to provide the most value for the people that you serve. Because when you think of it in, in the sense of a doctor, you don't want a surgeon coming in, who hasn't had any sleep because they've been hustling and grinding and doing their work. You want somebody who's well rested, well prepared to provide the best support and service

Liam Chrismer:

where you know, they've actually done studies of judges and surgeons and they find that right after lunch, if your import right after lunch, chances are that you're going to get that it's not going to go your way. Because that judge is in a is in a food coma, they're in an energy low. The same thing with surgeons, they find that the the amount of complications due to surgery right after lunch go up. So it's all about maintaining this this energy you know there are some companies that actually put half have a nap rooms in their businesses. I don't know if it's still there, but years ago, there was an entire floor. Or maybe maybe it wasn't the entire focus a big space in the Empire State Building where they had the sleep pods and and you reserve the time on your cell phone and you would be in the sleep pods for 20 minutes only. And so you get into this thing and you cover up with a blanket it gently reclines the lights gently down and you take a nap and at 17 minutes it begins to vibrate. The lights begin to gently come on and brings you out of the nap. The purpose is to go to sleep the purpose is to take a scientifically engineered nap. And forward looking companies are creating nap rooms. So go take a nap, don't have a heavy lunch, have a light lunch, at two in the afternoon, take a nap, go for a walk, get some sunshine, get a little protein in your body with a snack, it's water, man, you're good to go for another three, four hours. monitor that energy.

Braden Ricketts:

It really is energy and energy out. That's what we're working on here, isn't it?

Liam Chrismer:

When you drive your car. In Britain, you have this dashboard. It's got all kinds of lights and dials and buttons and knobs. What are the two things you pay attention to?

Braden Ricketts:

Yes. And the maintenance like

Liam Chrismer:

gas in the maintenance lab, very good. A lot of people pay attention to the speedometer as well. Because if you don't wash your gas, and you don't wash your speedometer, bad things happen. But what do we do with our days, we have no idea where our gas tank is, we have no idea how much fuel we have left in the tank, you know, you can't pour from an empty cup. And if you're a CEO, you can't lead your people from an empty cup. And your dashboard. You're right you pay attention to the maintenance. If there's a light blinking on your dashboard, if the check engine light comes on, you get a little nervous. But we don't have a check engine light. We have? Yeah, maybe we make bad decisions. Maybe we fly off the handle with somebody when we when we didn't mean to say something we wish we hadn't done we make a decision that we wish we hadn't hadn't made on. I'm constantly reminded of a quote from Warren Buffett who says, If I don't want to read in tomorrow morning's newspaper, on the front page of tomorrow morning's newspaper what I did last night, I don't do it. So, you know, monitoring that dashboard and our energy levels helps us to make better decisions, you know.

Braden Ricketts:

So Liam, tell me this vision for CEO matters. Clearly, you have a background that really ties together the need to focus on the wellness of CEOs. And this is culminating in this show CEO matters. Tell me a little bit about your vision and your goal with the show. What do you hope the impact will be

Liam Chrismer:

my passion and my my deepest hope for the CEO matters podcast is that this is a place where people that are responsible for organizations can come and there's two formats to one is the magazine edition and the other is the masterclass edition. The magazine edition is is exactly that. It's where you can go and get bite sized pieces of information that will educate, inform, entertain. There are wonderful podcasters out there God bless Tim Ferriss. But Braden, I don't have two and a half hours to listen to a Tim Ferriss podcast, as good as he is. I don't, and some of the authors that that write these 300 400 page books. Again, God bless him. Some of them start with a summons. And they balloon it with fluff and interviews and case histories into a 400 page book. They don't have time. CEOs have companies to run their lives to live they have spouses to look after children to look after they've got full lives. And my hope with a CEO matters podcast is that you can come and you can get news you can use. And that came from really the seventh grade when I was in junior high. And they had in two libraries, the big library and this little one in the little library. They had a it's kind of like a newsstand and a magazine rack. And every Tuesday US News and World Report would come in on my whatever they called it back then home class or basically it was just a dead hour. I would go to this library and I would get US News and World Report and I returned to that yellow page. That was news you could use and it was just Kiplinger style. It was just one or two sentences about various topic that they thought you could get some value out of that's what the magazine is designed to do. Now the masterclass edition is designed like this to have an interview with someone. It's a CEO that's doing it right or a CEO that's frankly did it wrong. Maybe it's an author that talks about sleep, or nutrition, or hydration, or exercise or resilience, stress mindfulness, I don't know what it is. But it's this whole set of skills that equip the CEO, again, to build remarkable companies, and at the same time, live extraordinary lives. And in the process, they become role models, that their employees and their customers, everyone they deal with, and they look at them. And they say, they got together, I want to be like that. And that's the goal of SEO matters that you use this as a, as a high content, high ROI, quick source of information that allows you to do your job and, and live your life better.

Braden Ricketts:

And if there's any question as to your authority on the matter, I would just go back to the story you shared, and your curiosity as a grade seven student led you to read the newspaper, on your lunch breaks, where you're picking out the news you can use, and that information is taking you this far, you've got, you've got an incredible wealth of knowledge and experience and the heart to really care for what matters for CEOs.

Liam Chrismer:

Well, thank you, you know, I'm, I'm reading an article right now on the ROI, CEO well being, and there was a study that was just done by Price Waterhouse Coopers and they found that 59% of CEOs, you know, they say what, you know, what wakes you up at night. But what wakes up 59% of CEOs is the fear of failure, the fear of failure in business, the fear of their company, family. And what qualifies me is not having a degree in wellness, or 20 years experience as a health care practitioner, anything like that? No, it's the fact that my company crashed and burned. A company that I devoted 15 years of my life to, and I loved. I loved it more than anything in my life. In it took me two years after that, to realize that the reason that my company failed was because I failed. As I said earlier, I didn't take care of myself, and what qualifies me to help other CEOs and other business owners not to lead their lives better, because I am a guru. That's not it. No, I'm not the Tony Robbins, of how to run your company better. But what I am is one person that's made a lot of mistakes. And I've learned from those mistakes. What I'm doing now is I'm doing work through the podcast, through my coaching through my writing, to send the kind of message that I wish I had gotten early on when I was running my company, because if I'd gotten that braid, I'd still be running their company. And and it's the it's the trial by power Carlye fire, you know, I was acaricide through I flew too close to the site, and in the process melted down. And burnout. epidemic levels, absolutely. epidemic levels, and it's not so much that that somebody is somebody is burned out. And they're done washed up, or they've lost their company as I did, but it's the levels of burnout, it's that it's that degradation, that slow burn to burnout, that you're not quite as on top of it. Your energy isn't as high as it used to be your enthusiasm isn't what it once was. You lose the sparkle. And people as we all know, people don't put companies they quit management. They want to they want somebody they can lead they want somebody they can lead somebody, they can innovate. They need somebody they can follow. They want an example to follow. And what qualifies me is that for many years, I will someone to follow and then for a number of years, I wasn't it that burnout didn't show up overnight. It wasn't a cute kind of disease that said it was just something that settled in because I wasn't aware I was asleep. You know, it's about self awareness. That's part of wellness as well. Where am I? How am I doing? Am I solid? Am I eating right? Am I getting enough rest? Do I know how to communicate? Am I listening? All those kinds of things.

Braden Ricketts:

Self awareness was such a huge piece. And to gain that clarity. It sounds like you're advising CEOs take time away from work in the evenings and mornings they look at resetting themselves physically with exercise and the foods that they eat. And they focus on their mental health and well being. And then role modeling that to their staff. What other recommendations would you share, from your experience to help CEOs focus on what matters?

Liam Chrismer:

I think slowing down, you know, we get caught up in the day to day that, you know, particularly today we've got, we've got supply chain issues, we've got the great resignation, we've got employees that perhaps don't want to come back to work. So there's a whole new set of challenges that we've never had before. We have inclusion, we have diversity, we have multi generations in the workforce we have. We have all these stressors that we've never had before. And you can get on this hamster wheel, right. And you're just running and running and running and running. And I like to tell the, the silly story that I spoke to a hamster wants and I said, are you aware of the fact that you're not getting anywhere? on that wheel? Hamster says, Yeah, I've been on this hamster wheel a long time. I'm pretty pretty, pretty clear that, in fact, I'm not going anywhere. But why don't you get off? The hamster kind of looks over at me and says, Yeah, well, as soon as the wheel stops spinning, I will. And for CEOs and business owners, I think you've just got to get off that wheel, settle out and say, Okay, where am I? What's going on? Take your temperature. You know, it's that whole mindfulness thing I'm not suggesting to you, that you get into, you know, sit on the floor, or get cross legged and chant mantras. But I am saying maybe a little mind, and maybe a little mindfulness makes some sense. Focus on focus on your breathing. Just take stock, say, Okay, where are we? Let's focus on what's right in front of us. Right now. I can't solve everything. The products not in the warehouse, customers upset, somebody didn't come in today. truck broke down on the highway, whatever it is, what do I need to deal with right now, and do the best we can and say, You know what? That's okay. And by the way, it's, it's six o'clock, I've got a family waiting for me at home. And so to all of you, it's time to turn off the lights, close the door behind us. And we'll pick this up again tomorrow.

Braden Ricketts:

Slowing down, that makes so much sense. Because the world has sped up. And information is flying at us faster than it's ever before. And the tools and the technology is there for instant messaging for instant updates. And it's as if we believe we have to operate at the same speed that information does. But we can't operate at that speed and maintain any sort of health or well being taking that step back and bring our best selves to the solution of those problems. Sounds like that's what really matters.

Liam Chrismer:

Yeah, I think we've got a I think we've gotten to I just listened to something this morning or podcast this morning with Arianna Huffington. Arianna Huffington really is the godmother of the wellness movement. And she said that she she's Greek and very close to her mother, and she remembered a quote that her mother would always say to her, and that was Don't miss the power of the moment. And

Braden Ricketts:

we, you know, we

Liam Chrismer:

all think of special moments in our lives, you know, the, the moment that we that we proposed or that we got the job or we got a we got a promotion or things that we were a special moments in our lives. You know, Braden, there are special moments every single day. You know, they you know, stop and smell the roses, that terrible cliche, but you know what, it's really not. It's really not so tired. We do have to stop and smell the roses. We do have to stop and say what's going on right now? You know, it's a matter of, of taking it all in. Sitting down with someone if you ever have you ever seen someone on the street? You haven't seen him in a while. Nice way to say hey, Joe, how are you? Hey, hi. Great. Good to see. Hey, let's have coffee. Yeah, give you a call. Where we both know neither one is ever going to call the other one. Why don't we just stop and say Braden, hey, how you doing? What's happening? Just take that moment. And really, really really go deep. Go deeper the other person be fully pressed. I'm here for you. I'm listening to what you're saying. Tell me. How are you doing? years ago, there was a very popular pop psychology book it was called. I'm okay. You're okay. You know what Britain we live in a new era now where you know what? It's okay to not be okay. How are you doing? You know what I'm not doing? Okay? You know? What's the standard answer? Oh, yeah, great, busy, busy. Oh, Never better. Both bow. As you say, I'm not doing so well today. Really what's going on? My kid, you know, my kid got suspended from school or my wife says I don't listen to waste. I think that's what she says. Now may I mean, in all seriousness, let's not let things go by let's let's understand where we are. And take each day as it as it comes and focus on what's right in front of us. If we can do that.

Braden Ricketts:

beautiful, absolutely beautiful. Well, I'm excited to see who you bring on this show. I'm excited to see the content that you share. Even just your analogies, they seem to hit the nail on the head with exactly the point you're making, on how we can better take care of ourselves so that we can better serve and have better results for our organizations. We might appreciate everything you're doing to bring wellness to the corporate world. And I'm excited to see how this evolves.

Liam Chrismer:

Thank you. Thank you very much for intense for the the opportunity to draw some of my passions out and let our listeners know what we're all about. And I promise you listeners we are we are going to bring CEO wellbeing front and center. your well being your self care, your wellness is no longer going to be ignored. I hope you'll subscribe to this podcast. And I promise I will not let you down. And together we will make that dent in the universe by showing everyone around us that we are concerned about our well being and we're concerned about their well being. So tune in next time. And thank you very much. I I'm very grateful for the time you spend with me. And please come back. Thank you, Brady. Thank you. Thanks, take care.

Braden Ricketts:

Be well

Liam Chrismer:

be well.

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