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Networking and Advocacy within the LatinX and Hispanic Community
Episode 1189th November 2022 • This Shit Works • Julie Brown
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Each year, September 15th through October 15th is designated as National Hispanic and LatinX Heritage Month. This month-long observance recognizes and celebrates the histories, cultures, and contributions of Hispanic and LatinX Americans past and present.

It was during this month that a listener of this podcast Becky reached out to me to ask if I would cover the topic of networking and advocacy specifically within the LatinX and Hispanic community. 


Listen in as I talk with listener Becky Aquino about her journey as a Latina in corporate America, her experiences networking and the importance of having advocates for the LatinX and Hispanic community. 


Drink of the week: PASIÓN MADRAS

 

If you liked what you heard today, please leave a review and subscribe to the podcast. Also, please remember to share the podcast to help it reach a larger audience.


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Julie:

Each year.

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September 15th through October 15th is designated as national,

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Hispanic, and Latin X heritage month.

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This month, long gum servants recognizes and celebrates the histories, cultures,

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and contributions of the Hispanic and Latin X Americans past and present.

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It was during this month that a listener of the podcast, Becky reached out to

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me to ask if I would cover the topic of networking specifically within

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the Latin X and Hispanic community.

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Welcome to episode one 18 of this shit works a podcast dedicated to

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all things, networking, relationship building and business development.

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I'm your host, Julie Brown professional speaker.

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Author.

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And networking coach.

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And today I am discussing networking and advocacy within the Latin

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X and Hispanic communities.

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I was nervous to cover this topic.

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A hundred percent transparency.

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I had been asked to cover this topic once before.

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But that was back when I had first started the podcast.

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Ah, at that time, I wasn't prepared to create an episode around the subject.

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When Becky reached out to me, I asked her if she would help me, if

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she would guide me in my research.

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She provided me with articles and studies.

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And we ended up talking for about an hour about her experience being

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a Latina in corporate America.

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Now.

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The amount of research.

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And the time I spent talking with Becky didn't make me an expert, but it did

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offer me information and insights that I am now comfortable sharing with you.

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As I continue to learn more about this subject.

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She mentioned that when considering the Latin X struggles in business, we

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need to think about the stereotypes.

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People's concepts of Latinas and Latinos in the United States.

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Predominantly that they all come from the same background.

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She went on to tell me that every country has its own culture in distinction.

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There are approximately 62 million people of Latin X or Hispanic origin in America.

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And yet we put all these people.

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With complex identities under a single umbrella.

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This has its roots in the census taking almost a hundred years ago.

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The pew research center reports that in the 1930s, Latinos living in the United

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States, regardless of their place of birth or family of origin were noted as Mexican.

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By door to door, us census bureau counters.

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It wasn't until 1970 that the agency began asking Latinos living in the United

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States to self identify as either Mexican.

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Puerto Rican.

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Cuban central or south American other Spanish or no, none of these.

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As of 2020, the Hispanic and Latin X population in the United

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States is almost 20% of the population of the entire country.

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And yet.

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Uh, Latino corporate directors association, recent study shows 65%

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of 2022 fortune 100 companies lack a single Latin X director on their board.

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And just a fraction of the small number of these board seats are held by Latinas.

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This might help explain why in America today, Hispanic women must work 22 months

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to equal the 12 month salary of white men.

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A recent Forbes article highlighted the fact that despite making

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up 17% of the us workforce.

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Uh, Hispanic Americans currently hold just 4% of executive roles in 6.5% of

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stem related roles in the United States.

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This might help explain why.

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According to McKinsey, 50% of black and Latino scientists are routinely mistaken

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for janitorial or administrative staff.

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We can do better than this.

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Uh, we know that when we see people that look like us in positions of power and

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authority, we begin to believe that we can also inhabit those high profile positions.

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We not only need comfortable and welcoming networking opportunities for

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the Latin X and Hispanic community, but we also need mentors and advocates

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for the Latin X and Hispanic community.

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I want to share an excerpt from my conversation with

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Becky in regards to this topic.

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when I was looking at my goals for 2022.

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There were two things that were really, resonating constantly.

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I wanna do things that were centered around women issues.

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And then the other one was about background of being Hispanic.

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And, luckily enough I think I've been able to accomplish both

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and so one of the avenues that I got to work on the women's

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part was through provisors.

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So now I'm part the executive committee of the Women's Affinity

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Group for the DC chapter.

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And it's been really an amazing experience because now I get to connect with so

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many different women and it's to learn from their experiences and to help and

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lift each other up has been amazing.

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But when I still look around, I am the only Latina in my group.

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That's the one thing that really has struck me the most, and as I

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have reflected on my past and my journey, I have had many mentors.

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None of them have been Hispanic females, and they have only been . Either

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white females or, people that are not really representing me necessarily.

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But then they have been great mentors.

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And one of the conversations that I was having earlier with somebody else

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was about the big difference between having a mentor and having an advocate.

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And it really didn't hit me until I had that conversation of the big difference

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so you could have tons of mentors and which are really important to have in

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your life and in your professional career.

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But the advocate is just as important as the mentor , I had

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many mentors that have helped me.

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Polish myself professionally, and become a better person,

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a better version of myself.

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But the advocate is the one person that will go out of their way, even

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when you're not there to say, you need to give her a chance or you need

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to give this person an opportunity.

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And that's where I feel that perhaps that's missing.

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And that's one of the things that I want at least to see if there's

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an opportunity to bring that to, to a podcast, because I think.

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Latinas are underrepresented in so many different ways,

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The definition of an advocate is a person who

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publicly supports or recommends.

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It doesn't matter who you are, or what background you come from?

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We all have the ability to be advocates and we all have the ability to create

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networking events that are open and welcoming to the Latin X and Hispanic

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A recent article in WGBH highlighted how isolating being in an immigrant

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can be even, and especially if you are in a professional work setting,

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the article highlighted Mexican immigrant named Carl Palmer, who said,

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I don't have any school buddies here.

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I don't have any kids that I went to primary school with.

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I don't know their parents.

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I don't have these networks where people can just trust me.

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I asked Becky about her experience, moving to the United States from

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Puerto Rico in her twenties.

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in these days, because you have so many different types of backgrounds,

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you have Latinos that have been born and raised in the states that really don't

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even feel like they're fully Latinos.

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They feel like more American than then they feel Latinos

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because they've grown up here.

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They, established roots here.

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So they feel more American than they do.

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So in my case it's a bit different because I was born and

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raised, in a Hispanic country.

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So now I've been planted here and I consider the US my home, but I

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still have a lot of things that really define me because of where I grew up.

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Becky went on to discuss how varied Hispanic culture is, but also

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how it serves as a thread to connect with others within the community.

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There are a lot of misconceptions, about what Latinos

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are, about how we do things.

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There are so many different misconceptions about Latinos in general

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just to begin with, because there are tons of countries with different

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cultures, different backgrounds.

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And so there are many misconceptions depending on where you grew up,

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what your background is, and.

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It's funny that the one thing that at least within Hispanics, we have learned

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to come together is just the fact that we feel like, we're one bubble.

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So we find each other just to connect because we feel like at least there's

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somebody that understands me, even though we are different in so many different

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levels, so it's interesting to see that even within the Latino community,

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there's so many things that make us different, but still finer way to connect.

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And if that, if we can do that within, the Hispanic community,

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why not do it in general?

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So why not do it in general?

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Well, That's where we come in.

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By providing and creating welcoming events by mentoring and advocating by

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looking at the makeup of our boards and committees and asking ourselves

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if there is Hispanic representation.

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By encouraging people to network with diverse groups of people to

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understand that meeting somewhere where they are at, maybe admitting

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that you have a lot to learn.

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I don't know all the answers and I'm just beginning to learn about this subject, but

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as Becky reminded me, I have the platform.

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So I also have the responsibility to shine a light on things

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that need to be discussed.

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I want to thank Becky for reaching out to me, for helping

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me learn for sharing her story.

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And happy to report that Becky has been asked to join a board in DC.

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She's literally becoming the change that she wants to He or she discusses how

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she went from looking for representation to becoming the representation.

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And what's interesting is my conversation with this person, when she

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brought it up, I was telling her how, when I was looking at for compositions,

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I always try to look for the person that would be able to represent me.

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And her reply back just hit me.

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It hit me like a brick wall.

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She said, Why not

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and I, I had never thought about it, honestly.

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It was just one of those moments where I'm just like, speechless.

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And I went gaga

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Again, I could not have created this episode without guidance

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from Becky and I want to thank her.

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I asked Becky if she would share her favorite cocktail with

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us for the drink of the week.

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As I mentioned, Becky's from Puerto Rico, which is also where Don Q rum is produced.

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And is her favorite?

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So she shared a drink with us called Passy Madras.

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Here's what you're going to need one and a half ounces of Don Q Passy on rum.

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So this is a passion fruit from.

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One and a half ounces of orange juice, four ounces of cranberry juice

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and one orange slice for garnish.

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What you're going to do is you're going to mix all ingredients and serve on ice and

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then garnish with that slice of orange.

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That's all for this week.

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I'm so glad that you were here.

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And I'm so glad that I have listeners like Becky.

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To remind me that I have a platform and who pushed me to cover topics

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that I might otherwise have missed.

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If you like what you heard today, please leave a review

Julie:

and subscribe to the podcast.

Julie:

Also, please remember to share the podcast to help it reach a larger audience.

Julie:

And until next week.

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