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UNCUT: Elite Australian business coach Kerwin Rae – part 1
Episode 23Bonus Episode17th June 2021 • Nerds of Business • Webbuzz Media
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BONUS: special 'uncut' episode.

Kerwin Rae is an entrepreneur, leading business coach & motivational speaker. With 2 million social media followers and a hit podcast 'Unstoppable' he's a powerhouse of inspiration. In the the first of a two-part interview, he shares his incredible story with Nerds of Business host, Darren Moffatt.

Guest Bios:

Kerwin Rae (https://www.linkedin.com/in/kerwinrae/)– founder & CEO of Business Mastery International (https://www.kerwinrae.com) 

What to listen for:

3.00 How does someone become a 'motivational speaker'?

5.06 What it's like being ADHD and dyslexic, and why Kerwin gravitated to entrepreneurship

6.40 Reflecting on a beach with his cat lead to finding the path forward

8.20 Is failure necessary? In life, and in business.

14.56 'I'm a failure freak' - I love to fail

16.20 How watching 1,000's of skydiving fail videos help Kerwin overcome fear of skydiving

19.08 The single biggest mistake Kerwin sees business owners making

21.14 1.6% of business who start today will survive for 10 years

27.54 What does 'high performance' look like in successful humans & entrepreneurs?

32.26 Humans are a trillion dollar piece of bio-tech

33.13 'The Greatest American Hero' TV show as metaphor for life & being human

Resources & links:

  1. The Greatest American Hero - TV Show https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Greatest_American_Hero#:~:text=The%20Greatest%20American%20Hero%20is,ran%20until%20February%202%2C%201983.

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Transcripts

Darren Moffatt:

Hi there and welcome to the nerds of business podcast. My name is Darren Moffatt and I'm a director at webbuzz, the growth marketing agency, and of course, I'm your host. It's great to have you with us for another one of our special uncut episodes. As I mentioned in the last episode, season two on product development has now concluded and we're currently in pre-production for season three. The topic for the coming series is mindset of the disruptor. So watch out for that one. But to tide us over for a few weeks until season three begins, we'll be airing a mix of uncut interviews and amazing bonus content from the last season that no one's heard yet. Today's uncut session features Kerwin Rae. Kerwin is a legend of the business coaching industry here in Australia, and he's an absolute powerhouse. He's helped thousands of businesses across 154 industries, in 11 countries.

Darren Moffatt:

He's also got more than 2 million social media followers. If you can believe that that's a huge number. It's true. And he's the host of unstoppable, which is consistently one of the top Australian business shows on apple podcasts. So when it comes to high performance and what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur and human being, Kerwin is a complete nerd. He's all over this stuff. Today's episode is part one of an in-depth interview I did with him and it's a cracker. You'll hear his amazing story, how he came to be a leading motivational speaker. He shares his thoughts on failure and why he believes it's essential for personal growth and he'll reveal the single biggest mistake he sees business owners making over and over again. So if you're an entrepreneur or business leader, you won't want to miss this. If you like what you hear, keep an eye out for part two of this interview, which will air in two weeks time for now. I hope you enjoy this special edition of nerds of business. Uncut.

Intro Snippets:

I love Data. I love all the things you can do with data. You need to have systems. You need to have structure. You're going to get chopped to pieces. Enthusiasm is Unstoppable. We kind of hit a point where we were like, we need another lever. Surround yourself with people who are smarter than you and Richer than you.

Darren Moffatt:

This is nerd of business. Your website, bio describes you as Australia's leading business strategist and human performance specialist. Now essentially a big part of what you do is as a motivational speaker, how does someone end up being a motivational speaker?

Kerwin Rae:

Well, I'm not sure cause I don't really, I've never identified under that. Uh, under that title, I've never responded to that Um, to that calling. Look, I don't consider myself someone who's a motivational speaker. If anything, I consider myself someone who's, um, you know, a relatively good communicator who perhaps sometimes communicates with levels of passion that, you know, it gets people up and ready to take some action. And, uh, you know, if that's a natural consequence and look, that's a natural consequence of any strong coaching style, you know, any strong coaching style will create some level of tension for people to want to create an action. And you know, some people call that motivation, inspiration, but for me, yeah, I just, I'm a very passionate communicator. Um, and yeah, very effective at getting things done and very effective at getting people to do the things that they need to. So yeah, I don't really see myself as a motivational speaker, if anything, I see myself everything, but a motivational speaker, but I have been put in that category once or twice.

Darren Moffatt:

Yeah, well it's on your Facebook page, but of course you can't really choose, you know, the very limited, limited options, what you can choose on your Facebook page. So, um, but I mean maybe share with us very briefly, um, before we get to some other questions, just that journey. I know that you've obviously you've had a number of businesses over the years, you know, you've been an entrepreneur for, you know, 20 years or more, but you know, what, what, how did you sort of end up here? Like, I mean, and did you foresee it in your future?

Kerwin Rae:

Nah, Look, not at all. Look, I got into business because I worked out, um, you know, relatively early in life that I wasn't very employable. Um, you know, I had about 48 different jobs before I found it, found what I'm doing right now. And so for me, yeah, look, I, I got the opportunity to try a whole range of different things. And that for me was I think quite important because I I'm someone who gets bored quite easily. And so it's like trying every, every, every flavor of ice cream in the, in the ice cream shop to make sure that you don't assume what your favorite is. And, and for me, that was a big part of my journey that got me here is I got the opportunity to try lots of different things. And I started, um, a number of businesses along the way, um, and by virtue of their failures and then ultimately successes, I started to realize that I've just really enjoyed the process of moving things quickly.

Kerwin Rae:

Um, I'm ADHD, I'm dyslexic, but for me, one of the things identified if things don't move fast, I get bored very quickly. And so when I got into the game of, you know, working for myself, I worked out pretty quickly that if, if that, if I couldn't make the business grow quickly, I'd get very bored. And if I got bored, I checked out and there'd be no effect. And, you know, I, I, I saw what happened when that, when that was the case. Uh, and so for me, yeah, I had to pick something that I was a little bit inspired by and by virtue of business, being an environment that is fundamentally affected by our ability to show up and perform, it just seemed like a natural fit for me. And yeah, I won't say it was easy, you know, people say to me, oh, you know, you've blown up overnight, and I say, well it's taken me 20 years of hard work to get there. You know.

Darren Moffatt:

That's always the case, isn't it? Like people don't see all the time that sort of led to that. Uh, all, all the work behind the scenes the team, as you've alluded to, you've got a big team there. I learnt earlier today, you've got a team of 55. Um, it takes, you know, uh, it's, it's that sort of cliche, if you like, of the, of the Swan gliding across the lake, you know, very, very grateful that there's, there's a lot of furious energy going under, under the water.

Kerwin Rae:

There's a lot of energy under the surface.

Darren Moffatt:

And, um, so, you know, to the point of, you know, getting to where you are now, like, was there a key moment of transformation along the way I'm guessing there must've been a few, a few moments where, where you realized, I think I, I think I'm in the zone. I think this is what I'm meant to do, uh, with the rest of my life.

Kerwin Rae:

Yeah, Look, there's been a number of realization moments, and I guess from a professional perspective, um, the, the biggest realization moment that, that kind of Springs to mind, I had taken some time off. I sold the business in 2005, 2006, and I took a couple of years off. Uh, and then when I got back into the business, after taking two years off, I spent all my liquid cash, got to the point where I had no choice, but to either sell assets or, you know, do something again. And, you know, I sat on a beach for a couple of days with a notepad and pen and my cat, sounds unusual, but it's true, to try and identify the things that I really enjoy to do. And one of the things that I identified that I really enjoyed to do was to educate and speak. Um, but yeah, for a long time I had resistance towards that.

Kerwin Rae:

Um, especially once I came, you know, coming back and I still remember the very first time that I spoke after taking two years off from business two years off from doing anything. And I came back and I did an event. Um, and I think it was like 2008, Yeah, 2008, 2009 into 2008, actually. Um, and it was only a small event to a group of maybe 40 people. And it was at that point where I realized, you know, cause I've been on and off the stage at this point as an educator and a communicator for a number of years. Um, and it was at this point where I got up and I was out right, okay. This is where I know I'm going to have some significant impact. It was a moment of, I guess you could say realization where I was like, okay, I need to find out how to do this. And the strange thing was, I still even remember going my message. I knew at that time, my message was going to evolve significantly. Uh, and I even say that today, like I can, I could imagine probably 10 years from now, still we talking about business, but 80% of my message will probably be around human performance and human potential. And yeah, that, that aspect of life.

Darren Moffatt:

Obviously a big part of what you, you just touched on it, then a big part of what you do is teaching people how to succeed, um, in your view is failure necessary.

Kerwin Rae:

Oh, it's critical. I think most people, the reason a lot of people kind of, um, don't necessarily enjoy the process of business or anything for that matter. But businesses are great metaphors because of failure. You know, people look at failure as something that's bad, they look at something as failure. They look at failure as something that is wrong, that shouldn't be happening. And it's, you know, we've got to understand failure serves a very important purpose that identifies gaps in skills and knowledge and experience. And when we can fail consciously and identify what that skill, knowledge, and experience that is missing, you know, failure serves its purpose, the purpose of failure is to identify what's missing, you know, and unfortunately most people are so embarrassed and ashamed and are trying to avoid their failures, but then when they fail, then not only do they hide a bit, hide them, that I'd talk about them.

Kerwin Rae:

You know, they don't look at them. And in some cases they even lie about them, you know, and as a result, they become these repetitious cycles of behavior that they can't escape because they're not really taking the lesson from it. And so for me, I'm failure mad. Like I love you can ask anyone that gets close to me. Who's worked with me. I literally just love to fail because I immediately will sit back and reflect either momentarily or afterwards. And I'll ask a series of questions to get the balance out, to get the skill, knowledge, and experience that's missing. And, you know, I think if there's one reason that I've done, perhaps better than other people in this industry or peers is because I'm just not afraid to fail. And I'm really, um, I'm very pro falling on your face. I'm very pro daring to suck. Uh, cause it's the only way you really find out where your wings are.

Darren Moffatt:

I love that. And you know, that's such an interesting point you raised because in Australia, compared to the states, there is still a more stigma around that failure. And more shame as you put it. Over in America, you know, there's a real culture of start-ups, you know, failing. Everyone, You're not really an entrepreneur until you've had one or two failures over in America. You know, there's very much a culture there now. I think that's changing slightly in Australia, but still there is that stigma around failure, which leads me to sort of a related question. I mean, uh, I agree with you. I think, I think failure is necessary in life, but you know, you're teaching success, you're teaching high-performance. Is it possible for someone to evolve so far that failure becomes you know more or less unnecessary in life.

Kerwin Rae:

That someone evolves to the point where they become unnecessary or failure becomes unnecessary? Failure Becomes unnecessary. I don't think you can escape failure. And again, to me it's always a perspective because failure to me is the, is the inability to achieve a specific outcome. And we're failing every single day. You know, sometimes I fail 50 times before I've even made it to the, you know, before I've even made it to the kitchen because we go to do things that don't necessarily go the way that we want. You know, I, I go to pick up my toothbrush, but I knock it and it falls on the floor. You know, what's my relationship with that moment. Do I get frustrated and angry and self abusive or I just go, ah, you know, these things happen. I think there's, we never achieved the point where we no longer fail.

Kerwin Rae:

I think we sometimes achieve the point where our ego becomes. So self-inflated that we don't think there's anything else to learn. And I think that's a really dangerous place for anyone to, to get to the point where they think there's no failure left, you know, because to me it's like looking at the pursuit of mastery, understanding the pursuit of mastery is understanding the pursuit of the student. You know, the, the, the student never becomes the master. Mastery is never achieved. It's just in the pursuit that the potential is, you know, tasted and realized. And so for me, it's very much along those lines.

Darren Moffatt:

Yeah, And I mean, I couldn't agree more, but you know, it's, uh, I think the myth is perpetuated that you can have this perfect life, that you can be, this brilliant high, but its a myth, it doesn't, it doesn't exist.

Kerwin Rae:

It is a myth. But also, the really interesting thing is obviously we're living in a social age now where there's a lot more documentation of content than ever before. And here's what was really interesting from a marketing perspective. Here's what I've discovered. My audience love watching may file a hundred times more than they love watching me succeed. And it's not because they love seeing me in pain. You know, one of the things I've observed is yes, people do love drama, but they love observing different responses. They love seeing people fail, but they love seeing a different response and alternative response. You know, the dramas in the failure. Yes. But, oh man, he responded differently. Oh, he reacted differently. Wow. That's interesting. You and I, and I think that's a really important aspect that a lot of us can really look at now in terms of how do we make failure actually, a mechanism that drives success in our business from a marketing perspective?

Kerwin Rae:

Well, one of the things we do is we understand that finally is a relative concept. Everyone can relate to it, you know, and the more we can share it, the more relatable we become. And, and as a result, we become more relatable, build, better relationship, you know, potential for greater levels of transaction and commerce. Um, so again, our relationship with failure will determine not only our ability to succeed, you know, effortlessly, but it also determine in some cases our ability to market in a really human way. And you know, how, how vulnerable and willing are we to talk about the failures that we have and show them to the rest of the world in a way that endears us to our clients and our audience. Yeah.

Darren Moffatt:

Yeah, Brilliant answer. And, and of course, you know, that sort of, when people do fail, it's humanizing, isn't it? It shows people.

Kerwin Rae:

Oh Man. Uh, and that's the thing, that's why I love to fail. Like, people don't really understand, like I love to fail and it's not because I am self abusive. It's because I'm, so I've got to the point now where I spent the first, I'm going to say, twenty years of my life, maybe more losing everything. The only thing I won was the hundred meters and 200 meters sprint, every single competition, every single report card, every single thing I ever did, I lost. really? except for, everything! except for athletics. That was the only thing that I was any good at ping pong. I would lose hopscotch, chess, you name it. I became a crack loser, but here's the key I became so good at losing that It felt normal. And so when I lost, I didn't get upset. I was just like, oh, that just happens.

Kerwin Rae:

And then all of a sudden, when I started to develop skills and I started to apply discipline and I started to learn, you know, I started to get better and I started to win. And what was really interesting is winning felt really weird. I started to get triggered by, I would get close to winning and I choke because I didn't know what winning felt like. I knew what losing felt like I could lose like good champion, but winning, Man, that was a new concept. Right ok. So I had to learn how to build a relationship with success because I already had a very strong relationship with failure. But as it turns out, as I built my relationship with success, my relationship with failure was so bad that whenever it popped up, I was like hello, my old friend, I don't resent you, I've lived with you for 20 years.

Kerwin Rae:

We know each other well, you know what I mean? And so I don't have that polarity that, you know, that psychological bias towards failure. I welcome it into my life, you know, and I welcome it in my, with my, with my son, with my daughter, you know, with my partner, when anyone of us fails, we always talk about it very openly. You know, as a way of everybody being able to take a lesson from it, it sounds really strange. And I know it can even sound cliche, but I am just, I'm a failure freak. I just love. Another perfect example of the way that I study failure. When I first got into skydiving, I had a fear of Heights. And so I did 200 sky dives in 12 months and cured myself of a fear of Heights and gave myself an enormous therapeutic advantage.

Kerwin Rae:

Oh, I used to spend, no ****, when I first got into skydiving, I used to spend easily two and a half hours a day watching skydive, malfunctioned videos. So I used to watch two and a half hours a day of people failing and skydiving and a very high level, right? At a super high level, the worst malfunctions, the worst failures, some of them fatal, you know, some of them not fatal, some of them catastrophic, but I, we used to watch hours and hours now, as I used to search the internet. And I used to find every single malfunction video I possibly could. And I'd watch it over and over and over and over and over and over and over again to the point where it didn't scare me. Because when you first watch a malfunction video and a serious malfunction video and your a sky diver, you **** your pants, cause you look at that, that could happen to me.

Kerwin Rae:

But if you watch it a thousand times, you get to the point where it doesn't affect you anymore. You become desensitized. You become completely desensitized to the failure and the catastrophic nature of failure. Because the reason that failure is so dangerous for most people, isn't the failure itself. It's the, it's the, it's the emotional consequences. It's the stress response to failure. And so by virtue of made spending two and a half hours a day, fast forward 12 months, I had two major malfunctions in one day, which in most cases could have completely ruled me out. One of which could have been fatal, but by virtue of me constantly watching failures when the failure happened and I was in the middle of it, I didn't freak out. I didn't lose my shit, I was cool as a *********** cucumber, flying 300 and something Ks an hour through the sky, I've got a twisted pile of nylon behind me and ropes that I've got to get rid of quickly.

Kerwin Rae:

And I didn't lose my ****. I thought very coherently, very clearly and short version is I lived, but this is where the lesson is. When it comes to failure, by exposing ourselves to failure, we condition ourselves. We desensitize ourselves to it by removing ourselves, by hiding ourselves from failure. We become sensitized to it. Okay. And so our goal is how do we desensitize the thing that is going to be a problem? Cause this is the thing. Failure is not a probability. It's a guarantee. It's not, there's not a probability of failure. There's the expectation. Okay. It's the only thing that's going to really be measurable is how much you're gonna fail. You're gonna fail ******* heaps. The question's how much, you know, and the sooner you can get to a point where your failure becomes effortless and there's no psychological resistance, there's no psychological abuse. There's no psychological bias.

Kerwin Rae:

There's just this genuine curiosity. Its like I ****** that up, right? Why? Okay, what was the benefit of this? What skills knowledge experience that I gained from this? How's this going to make me better sharper, faster tomorrow than I am today. And that's why to me, I think the reason that I'm, I can do what I do in a whole range of different areas is cause I just love to fail. And I'm not afraid of failing publicly. I'm not afraid of failing in front of my team. My team see that firsthand. And whenever I do in most cases, the most humble *********** in the room, because I love it. And it's where I get my juice from. It's where I learn.

Darren Moffatt:

Wow. What an answer. Well, you know, I'll tell you what, uh, you almost had me clapping. Yeah. That was. I all most felt like I was at one of your events, cause that was a really brilliant & inspiring Answer. And um, you know, there's obviously so much that everyone can take from, from that. Um, and, and your experience of failure, but on the subject, just to kind of really focus it in for a minute to business owners and entrepreneurs. Okay. I know that you, you, you know, these are your people, small, medium sized businesses in Australia. These are your people, right? What's the single biggest mistake. You see business owners making again and again.

Kerwin Rae:

They don't ask for help. Uh. And You know, I know it sounds cliché, but here's what I've observed. Most people want to get into business because they hate being told what to do. They want a level of autonomy. right?

Kerwin Rae:

I don't know about you, but that was one of the reasons I was like, I, you know, I loved the job because I loved the paycheck, but I had being told what to do. You know? And I think a lot of people hate being told what to do. And so they start a business because they don't want to be told what to do. And by virtue of being in that mindset, you don't ask for help because you want to do things your way. And if you've never built a successful business, people are chances are, you're not going to build a successful business unless you know how to do that. And so if you're trying to build a business and you've never done it before, you've never done it even successfully before you've got no map, no model, no blueprint, nothing, I'm pretty sure it would make sense to ask ******** someone who's done it and go, Hey, what did you do?

Kerwin Rae:

You know, it's like, you know, saying I'm going to run a marathon. And this is like a marathon that most people would never even consider. This is like a marathon of your life, but I've never met anyone that says I'm gonna run a marathon and I'm not going to do any training whatsoever. I'm just going to buy a ******* Jersey. I'm going to buy a pair of shorts. I'm going to buy myself a stop watch, and a pair of good, really good pair of shoes. I'm just going to turn up. And when that gun goes off, I'm going to give it a red, hot ******* crack. Now I'm sure that every now and then there's some stupid ************* out there that tries that, Right?

Darren Moffatt:

It sounds like approach I would use actually to be quite frank. Me too right, me too. Lets be honest.

Kerwin Rae:

But we know that is in most cases why people don't finish their, their marathon. Cause they started off with the best intentions, but there was no preparation. There was no training. There was no development, you know? And that's where if you're going to run a marathon, first thing you do go on Google, how to run a marathon and you can do the same in business. It's not that difficult. But I think people fall into this false sense of security that they, they experience what I call this uninformed optimism, where they become absolutely intoxicated with their optimism, that they think that anything is possible that the world is their oyster. And it's not until something happens that they have a realization about it, and they go holy **** its harder than it looks and I, and it is. And I don't think a lot of people realize when a business goes down, there is a whole range of consequences.

Kerwin Rae:

There are familiar consequences. There are psychological consequences. There are community consequences. Mental health consequences, school choices, food choices, housing choices, consequences. And so for me, whenever someone comes to me and goes, oh, I'm thinking about getting into business. I'm like, dude, you need to know what you're getting yourself into. You know, first of all, 98%, about 1.6% of businesses that start today will survive and be going in 10 years time. So the chances of you living for 10 years is ******* minuet, right, minuet, minuet. You have more luck coming back as a bike seat. You know, the chances of survival are just minuet and the chances of being successful, they're even smaller. You know, it's on average, it takes 17 years to build a million dollar business. But of the businesses that survive the 10 years, it is about less than 1%.

Kerwin Rae:

Maybe two, if you're lucky that actually will even crack them. Yeah. So you've got to ask yourself the question, am I cut out be a business owner because not everybody is cut out to be a business owner. Some people are cut out to be a really good number two, you know, and this is a mistake that I see people ask us. Not only they don't ask for help, but I must say the makers, they don't ask for help, but they actually get into something that is not designed for who they are. They don't have the risk profile that don't have the stress profile. And I didn't have the physiological, the biological, because some people, as you know, mate, you've been around this game long enough to know, don't deal with stress really well. And no matter how much you try and condition them, it's just not something that they are willing to learn, how to adapt to.

Kerwin Rae:

And they are people that just shouldn't run businesses. You know, business is stressful. It's chaotic things go wrong. And as a by virtue. And that's why I treat business. Like I treat business no different than I would treat a military mission, no different to the way I would treat a sporting objective. And whether it's a solo sport or a team sport, the same is the same is true. Our goal is to be able to perform at a very high level. And the way that we perform is at very high levels is learning how to mitigate the response to stress and pressure that is created in the situations that we know we're going to encounter. If you're going to be a high level professional athlete, you know, you're going to encounter high stress situations. If you're going to be a military operative, active, you know, especially special operations, you know, you're going to be exposed to high stress, high pressure situations as an entrepreneur, by virtue of being an entrepreneur, you're choosing a profession, that's going to expose you to high stress, high pressure situations, not avoid them.

Kerwin Rae:

It's going to expose you to them. But if you expose yourself to these things intelligently, you can actually build stress, muscles and much like I can with whether it be a military or a sports or an entrepreneur, I can take the same concepts in special operations use. And I can teach them to a sports professional. I can architect the same concepts that a sports professional uses and I can teach them to a military operative. And I can take those same concepts that both as a professional athlete and a professional military high-level special operative can use, and I can teach them to a business owner. Now you've got a weaponized entrepreneur because you've now got someone who has what I refer to as a professional athlete and business. And I think we may have even said this earlier. Like, I don't understand why entrepreneurship isn't considered a sport. We can set up ******* in video games or sport.

Kerwin Rae:

You know, everything has a scoreboard, but we don't consider entrepreneur sport. Or why not? This is our game is more like a marathon. You know, my game isn't measured over ******* 20 laps, you know, of, of, of the shopping centre. My, my, my, my, my goal is measured over 20 years of performance or 10 years of performance. The only difference between me and E and E gaming or any sporting person is, you know, I'm competing in most cases for longer periods of time. But for those people who are in business, who are professional entrepreneurs, you are a professional athlete. So my question to you is as a professional athlete, how much time do you spend training? How much time do you spend resting? How much time do you spend in active recovery and passive recovery in to ensure that when you do compete, you can actually compete like a professional would at a very high level. You know, cause if we don't take care of self, if we don't treat itself, we become amateurs. And what amateurs do they just show up and hope for the best in most cases?

Darren Moffatt:

Well, that's a, that's a compelling, compelling pitch. I mean, I, I agree with pretty much all of that. You're preaching to the converted here, but, uh, and I think that's a great message for all business owners. You need to make that investment in yourself, you need coaching, or you need a mentor. You need some sort of help, as you say, most of them, most people won't ask for help. Um, what are your thoughts very quickly, Kerwin? I mean, do you think we should even teach some of this in school? You know, like, I mean, how would think back to your, you know, 10 or 12 year old self, if you, were uh, if you're in school and someone had have said, okay, we're going to do a term on what it's like to run a business and be an entrepreneur. Do you think that, that might've really connected with you at that point?

Kerwin Rae:

Oh, look, to be honest, I'm not sure. I'd say probably so, because I did start my first business at 13 and voids breed values, and I didn't have a lot of money growing up. And so that was what I valued. I got into entrepreneurship based on this belief that making more money would make me feel better, which was it's own journey, but yeah, a hundred percent, I think there should be taught in school. Yeah. Because when you look at the practicality of most academic in education where academic downloads, it's just not practical anymore. You know, we are not training kids in school to leave with practical skills, expertise, and knowledge that is setting them up for the world that we're living in right now. Now the education and most kids are getting right now is setting them up for the world that existed ******* a hundred years ago.

Kerwin Rae:

and we need to change that. And entrepreneurship is the future, as far as I'm concerned of independence, not just at an individual at a community level, you know, but also when it comes internationally and multinational now forget about globalization. I'm, I'm more into the individualization of globalization. How do we all become, you know, more geared as entrepreneurs to become self-sufficient as individuals and as a whole, and as individuals and as a family, as a community, you know, as a state, as a country, as a world, why not, let's just reinvent civilization, Darren, while we are here. We may as well, We've come this far.

Darren Moffatt:

Well, I think we've made a pretty good start on that. Yes. Um, I'll, uh, I'll get back to you on that, Kerwin. And thanks a bit of, bit of homework for me, just, uh, just a small, small task there. Um, so I mean, this is a related question, um, yeah. To what you were just talking about, you know, your vision, what we should all be striving for and when it comes to, um, your key value proposition to SMEs, to smaller, medium sized business, it's helped with, uh, not just business, but actually mastering life, you know? Uh, and, and, and, you know, you talk as you have today a bit about high-performance, you know, and, and your coaching, high-performance not just in business, but in humans, right. So can you explain for our listeners what you mean by high-performance? So what does it, what does it look like in a successful person?

Kerwin Rae:

High-performance to me is being able to access the resources to competently and coherently, you know, complete, um, a task or a range of processes in, you know, situations or circumstances that most people couldn't do. And most of those situations in certain circumstances would be indexed by some level of stress or pressure. So to me, a high-performance is the ability to be able to perform at a high level, in a range of situations, not just normalized conditions, you know, anyone can perform, anyone can be personally developed when it's 28 degrees, um, and there's dolphins off the star. But, you know, I bought, what I want to know is how do you navigate, how do you lead when you're on the edge of a cyclone, in the middle of a cyclone, In the eye of the cyclone, because that's where, that's where the truth really lies when it comes to performance.

Kerwin Rae:

And so, you know, when you look at the difference, it makes a difference with us because, you know, we've created one, one of the most powerful coaching networks, business, coaching networks, anywhere in the world, you know, K two elite, we've got about one and two, one in three of our clients were two X to 10 X in their first 12 months, 18 months with us. And these aren't small businesses. And I wonder 50 mils, some startups as well, some 300 Millers, as well as some big gorillas, but it's, it's a huge proportion of our client base will accelerate their businesses very quickly and don't get me wrong. Our business processes are some of the best in the world. Like we draw on military, all ranges of military, entrepreneurship tech. We bring it all together. But the thing that we do differently that not many people can do because they don't have the experience or, or the expertise is we actually focus on life performance.

Kerwin Rae:

So we focus on how do you perform as an individual, as a human being, how do you develop way of life strategies, So you're a better human being. Cause if you can develop way of life strategies so that you become a better human being, okay, you're healthier, happier. Think clearly you're smarter. Guess what? As a natural consequence, you're going to be a better parent. Okay. It gets a natural consequences. You're to be a better partner as the natural consequences, you're going to be a better leader as a natural consequence, you're going to be a better entrepreneur, a better CEO. And so for me, I think a lot of people look at business as a context sport. And it's not, you know, if you want to look at performance, performance is a 360 degree equation. It's not something you do here. It's something you do everywhere.

Kerwin Rae:

And if you're just doing it here, then to me, you're not, you know, you don't understand what really performance is performance to me, isn't, isn't a magnifying glass. It's, it's, it's, it's a perspective. It's a way of life. It's not something you use to magnify. Okay. Although that's what most people do. They develop performance talents that they can magnify in the area of tennis, you know, that they can magnify in the area of business that they can magnify in the area of mathematics. But imagine if you have way of life strategies enable you to magnify your potential in every situation, you know, and to me, that's what it's all about. And that's why our clients, so it's hilarious. We just recently had a gala award where we handed out about 20 awards for clients at two X, 10 X. And, you know, whenever anyone got up on stage, I'd always say, oh, I just can't believe that the impact that this has this, this, this, this, this training community had on my family, um, their relationships are better than they've ever been.

Kerwin Rae:

We've lost weight. Oh. And by the way, we've made an extra $15 million and it's an afterthought. You know what I mean? Because when, when you focus on performance, as way of life strategies, you start to realize cause and effect. If there are certain things that I do as a natural consequence, there are certain things that happen. It's very predictable. And I play the game of consequence. What are the things, that if I do them, consistently as a natural consequence, I get what I want. And that for me is a big part of this game.

Darren Moffatt:

Wow. Yeah. Well, that's, um, there's so much in there. There's so much to unpack. Um, I, you know, I've got a bunch more questions, but I, I would just like to touch on one thing you said there, and that is, you know, in terms of, um, that, that focus, sometimes people just tend to focus their high-performance in one area of their life. And, uh, what are your thoughts on, on this question or proposition, do you think that, that those people, uh, more, more likely to, you know, have problems down the track sort of wider life. If they're putting everything into work or, or business or career, and it's, it's doing well.

Kerwin Rae:

If all your attention goes into business. In most cases, health and relationships start to suffer. All of your energy goes into relationships. In most cases, health and business will suffer, if all of your energy goes into health relationships & business will suffer. So it's like life is a game of spinning plates. Okay. And we're never going to get perfect balance, but here's what we can do. We can understand that in every, at the center of every single one of these orbits, okay, the centerpiece is me. And the more I work on me, the more I develop me, the better I function, you know? Cause we, and this is the thing. And I don't think a lot of people realize this, Darren, I say this all the time and its a ******* joke.

Kerwin Rae:

We literally, you, me, every

Kerwin Rae:

Other human being on this planet, that's listening to this right now. Every single one person can hear this touching their ear lobes. We are a trillion dollar piece of biotech. That's what we're worth. Like if someone could replicate us right now, we are a trillion dollars modestly in biotech. And most people are walking around. Like they treat themselves the value of a ******** plastic shopping bag. And when you start to understand the capabilities of the body, the brain, the networking, the programmatic aspect of what it is that we have, we literally, there's only one thing missing is that the only thing that was missing is no one actually gave us a user's manual. We have a trillion dollar piece of biotechnology that we were gifted from birth. Okay. That we just think is biological, but it's technological. It's has technology way beyond the scope of what we understand. Okay. But no one actually gave us a user's manual to how to optimize, you know, the, the system. And you're old enough to remember, do you remember the greatest American hero

Darren Moffatt:

I do? Oh, well, that's a.

Kerwin Rae:

Ok, so you'll love this. This is, this is something that you can relate to. Um, I loved that show and I love it more in hindsight because I still remember the very first episode the dude's driving through the desert, his car breaks down, you know, the, the source that comes up, beams him up, gives him the package with the Superman suit and the instructions to save the world. And then he goes beam down to earth and he's walking back to his car and the instructions fall out. He gets back home. He unpacks the suit, man suit puts it on. Says we'll how the **** does this thing work. And then he flies through the roof, hits cars, billboards, you know, and the whole series was about him learning how to use this incredible power that had been bestowed upon him because he lost the ******** user's manual. And I honestly feel like that was one of the greatest metaphors for humanity. Like we literally are trillion dollar pieces of biotechnology with the most incredible potentials and capabilities, both at a Newtonian and a quantum level. And we have no understanding of what we're, what we're even, what's even possible. But when we start to scratch the surface, when we start to explore, man, it's interesting what we, what we can do, what our capabilities are. We start to think like a trillion dollar piece of biotech and not think, you know, like a $30 hammer.

Darren Moffatt:

I love your Analogy. Some of those, uh, I, they, are going on the bar wall, uh, some, some great quotes there.

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