Artwork for podcast Bitcoin Homeschoolers
₿HS002: Physical Freedom = Enhanced Growth
Episode 228th September 2023 • Bitcoin Homeschoolers • Scott and Tali Lindberg
00:00:00 00:40:03

Share Episode

Shownotes

SHOW TOPIC:

By not controlling everything for kids, and by not protecting them too much, kids better learn how to live in this world.  In this conversation, Tali and Scott go deep on how allowing kids to be in physically free environments helps more than intellectual and physical development.  

IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:

  • A feature of taking self-custody of education is being in control of the agenda and the environment
  • Separating parents from kids enhances the state’s control over the population
  • Public schools focus on and reward conformity
  • The unique approach of a Japanese kindergarten (see TED Talk link in the resources section)
  • Staying physical healthy is part of a low-time-preference life
  • “Don’t control them too much”
  • “Kids need small doses of danger”
  • “Kids need noise”
  • You have SO MANY resources within this community … Commitment is the first step
  • Help make this show more valuable … What do you want to learn about homeschooling?

RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THE SHOW:

HAPPY TO HELP:

  • Tali's Twitter @OrangeHatterPod
  • Scott's Twitter @ScottLindberg93
  • Scott's nostr npub19jkuyl0wgrj8kccqzh2vnseeql9v98ptrx407ca9qjsrr4x5j9tsnxx0q6
  • Free Market Kids' Twitter @FreeMarketKids
  • Orange Pill App @FreeMarketKids
  • Free Market Kids' games including HODL UP https://www.freemarketkids.com/collections/games

WAYS TO SUPPORT:

We are essentially our own sponsors and are so grateful for all of you who support this show.  Thank you!

STANDING RESOURCE RECOMMENDATIONS:

Transcripts

Scott:

Hi everybody.

2

:

Welcome to today's show.

3

:

Tali and I go deep on a subject and it

was inspired by a video that she found.

4

:

She's really good about finding

interesting resources, even if they're

5

:

not in education and then applying them.

6

:

So you're going to hear

us refer to a video a lot.

7

:

I encourage everybody to check that

video out and also just realize we

8

:

don't have any sponsors for this.

9

:

We're supporting ourselves.

10

:

So if you like what you hear, we want

to hear what you would like us to talk

11

:

about, people you'd like us to interview,

subjects you'd like us to cover.

12

:

And if you like what we're doing,

then please support us and check out

13

:

our website free market kids.com.

14

:

Right now we have a 21% off

special for a presale of our

15

:

2024 HODL UP collector's edition.

16

:

It is a 2024 Halving Collector's

Edition that we're working on.

17

:

It's gonna be pretty wild.

18

:

if you're doing homeschooling and

you want to check out the traditional

19

:

game, that's $55 for the HODL UP game.

20

:

That's a way you can support us

and help this show keep going.

21

:

So with that enjoy the show.

22

:

This is our second installment

of Bitcoin Homeschoolers.

23

:

And today we're going to experiment.

24

:

There's a really cool resource we're

going to get to in just a second.

25

:

Tali found this one and we think

a lot of lessons learned just to

26

:

kind of set the context again.

27

:

This is for anybody who's either

thinking about homeschooling, thinking

28

:

about having a family, or even if

you already have small kids and maybe

29

:

you just want to teach some extra

things to you while they're at home.

30

:

There's just a lot to share with regard

to taking self custody of education.

31

:

And today we're going to apply some

first principles of freedom to learning.

32

:

So I'm pretty excited to dig into this.

33

:

The idea of this too, let me also

say for context that homeschooling

34

:

to me is way more than just

picking the right curriculum.

35

:

Like, did I go to classical conversations?

36

:

Did I go to whatever it is, some other

thing it goes beyond that you are free to

37

:

experiment when you self custody education

You are free to experiment with things

38

:

that you want to try that you think fit

You do not have to conform to someone

39

:

else's ideas and if you try them and you

find them they work That's great sharing

40

:

with others But maybe they don't work

and you just go on and you try the next

41

:

thing Contrast that to public schools

where heaven forbid a boy won't sit still

42

:

for 45 minutes or an hour in a chair and

We give them drugs and we label them

43

:

with some kind of thing and by the way the

demand for those drugs go to manufacturers

44

:

and guess who they give their donations

to the same political elite who

45

:

influences the laws is about education.

46

:

So in a bigger context where I'm

going with this is the school is

47

:

an extension of government control.

48

:

They want to control what you hear on

everything on social media and things,

49

:

but going beyond that, getting into

what kids actually are exposed to

50

:

and how they think is a huge way of

controlling a populace and it goes to

51

:

essentially separating parents and kids.

52

:

You divide the family unit and you

can push whatever agenda you want.

53

:

Climate, gender, a CDBC.

54

:

Maybe we should have fearful

COVID lockdowns again,

55

:

and you need to get a jab.

56

:

The roots of this really go back to

communist manifesto where dividing the

57

:

family unit is essential to state control.

58

:

All that's kind of dark.

59

:

We're going to actually have fun today.

60

:

So Tali, can you take the baton from me

here, explain the resource that inspired

61

:

today's talk, and then we can get into it.

62

:

Tali: I came across this video and I

thought it was really interesting as a

63

:

contrast to the way most people think

of schools, especially when we talk

64

:

to people who are new to homeschooling

and they're wondering about the

65

:

number one concern I think everybody's

wondering about is always socialization.

66

:

So I came across this video and.

67

:

It is such an opposite to the

experience that my kids had

68

:

when they were very, very young.

69

:

And we were experimenting with putting

them into the traditional school setting.

70

:

And in our case, they didn't go to

public school, but they went to a

71

:

private preschool and I'll just describe

our experience really quickly and then

72

:

tie into the video that we're going

to share with you and talk about.

73

:

Our oldest was three, and I decided to

put her in preschool because by then I

74

:

had decided to homeschool, but of course

everybody was telling me that she would

75

:

get no social skills, so I put her in this

really popular preschool in the area that

76

:

we lived in that had a long wait list.

77

:

I mean, you had to sign up almost

a year before kids start school.

78

:

So, she went there for a year.

79

:

Our second child went there also.

80

:

And the whole time, I just

assumed that they were doing great.

81

:

They were learning to

socialize with other kids.

82

:

They were coming home with

beautiful art projects.

83

:

And I thought, Oh, they

must be doing really well.

84

:

Well, when our third child was born and

we were looking at also possibly putting

85

:

her in that same preschool, I decided

at that point that I wanted to spend

86

:

time from drop off to pickup there to

find out exactly what they were doing.

87

:

I don't know why it took me two years

before I did that, but anyway, so made all

88

:

the arrangements I went in and here's what

I observed in a place that we specifically

89

:

put the kids to, to socialize.

90

:

Okay, so what happens is the kids

get dropped off, and immediately

91

:

they are brought into the foyer

area of the school and lined up.

92

:

The kids are told to put their hands on

each other's shoulders and follow the

93

:

line on the floor marked by tape to go

to the area where they have the cubbies.

94

:

So, in a straight line, mouth

closed, told to be quiet, walk to

95

:

the cubby room, they, in that room,

again, no talking, they're told to

96

:

be quiet repeatedly, they take off

their backpacks put into the cubby.

97

:

They are again lined up, following a

line on the floor, brought into their

98

:

classroom, and they are told to sit.

99

:

Where they sit is they would go

to a stack of carpet squares.

100

:

They would each pick a carpet

square, put it on the floor, and

101

:

they're allowed to sit on the square.

102

:

They're not to talk to anybody.

103

:

They're not to touch anybody.

104

:

They're told to be quiet.

105

:

Then the teacher comes in and I

don't even remember what exactly

106

:

they did, if they did the ABCs or

if they told a story or something.

107

:

But again, emphatically, they're

told to be quiet, keep their

108

:

hands to themselves, they're not

interacting with each other at all.

109

:

They do some kind of exercise, then

they have an art and craft time.

110

:

The children were told to bring a book

off the shelf so they can read quietly.

111

:

Again, no interaction with each

other, no talking, no anything.

112

:

And one by one, they were called

up to the arts and craft table.

113

:

And it was around Christmas, The

teacher picks up the student,

114

:

in her lap, holds the student's

thumb, pushes it into the ink pad

115

:

and makes a perfect Christmas tree.

116

:

Then she puts the child on the floor,

tells him or her to go sit on the

117

:

square and they call the next person.

118

:

So everybody had the perfect

Christmas tree that they can then

119

:

hand to their parents and say,

look at what I did in art class.

120

:

Every single one of them looked

exactly the same, except for the

121

:

fingerprint that was on the picture,

because it was their own thumb.

122

:

Then it was social time.

123

:

So again, they're lined up, told

to be quiet, walked in a straight

124

:

line out to the playground.

125

:

And then they have 10 minutes

to quote unquote play.

126

:

They were released from the line.

127

:

The kids separated.

128

:

And I was watching them like this is

what I send my kid to preschool to do

129

:

to socialize and what did I observe?

130

:

75 percent of them went to the playground

and sat alone for 10 minutes couple

131

:

of them play with each other You can

tell that they probably knew each other

132

:

from outside preschool Then again,

they were lined up brought back to

133

:

the room same thing same drill until

they were picked up by the parents

134

:

And I was stunned because I thought

this is what they call socializing.

135

:

Like we're paying this expensive

tuition to train up our kids to

136

:

walk in straight lines and be quiet.

137

:

So when I came across this video

that we're going to start talking

138

:

about, it is exactly the opposite in

a country where they are known for

139

:

conformity and discipline, and yet

they take such a different approach.

140

:

And the reason I compare these

two is because as parents, if

141

:

we decide to try homeschooling.

142

:

These are the choices that we're going

to make that will impact our kids

143

:

as people, not just their intellect

but emotional, social, everything.

144

:

It's just a really important aspect

of homeschooling that I think we can

145

:

pay attention to and be aware of, and

the possibilities that are open to

146

:

parents that are not experienced in

either private or public schools here.

147

:

Scott: Yeah.

148

:

Can I say one quick thing?

149

:

While you're saying that the

expression that comes to mind for

150

:

Bitcoiners is don't trust and verify.

151

:

You essentially verified you and I

just want to see what's going on.

152

:

You went and checked it

out and you're like, whoa.

153

:

I thought that we're sending our

kids here to socialize and that is

154

:

not at all what you're witnessing.

155

:

It's more like conformity on steroids.

156

:

So, I mean that's an interesting thing.

157

:

I did not even think about

when we, we saw this video.

158

:

I do think we need to get to that

video because we've now referenced

159

:

it a couple of times and people are

like, what are we talking about?

160

:

So you want me to do it?

161

:

Okay, fine.

162

:

I, so.

163

:

So this, so Tali is really good.

164

:

She's always, she always has a

radar on looking around and saying,

165

:

that's an interesting concept.

166

:

And it could be anything.

167

:

It could be an entrepreneur self

help book or something else.

168

:

It's a health book.

169

:

It's something in, she'll take

it and use it in homeschooling.

170

:

Today's video is from a TEDx talk.

171

:

It was done in 2014.

172

:

We're going to have

the show link in there.

173

:

It's only nine minutes long,

so you got to check it out.

174

:

I want Takahara Tezuka, I'm probably not

saying that correctly, but if you search

175

:

for The Best Kindergarten You've Ever

Seen, TED Talk, you'll see it come up.

176

:

And the idea of this video,

essentially, this is the architect.

177

:

He gets up and he talks and they

show a lot of examples throughout.

178

:

They essentially built, looks like

a giant courtyard where the building

179

:

that surrounds it is a circle.

180

:

So if you looked at it from a

helicopter, it'd look like a big O.

181

:

And the top part of the actual

roof of this is like a deck

182

:

and it's a really low deck.

183

:

So if you're standing on the deck, you can

see everything going on in the courtyard.

184

:

And if you're in the courtyard,

you can see all the, all your

185

:

friends running around on this

big deck and it's pretty wide.

186

:

It must be at least 50 or 60 feet wide.

187

:

And the whole idea of this is.

188

:

Kids are just, they just let them go.

189

:

Now, my understanding from Tali is,

since she spent time in Japan, that

190

:

they probably do have times when they're

required to sit, they're not showing

191

:

that, they're not highlighting it.

192

:

But it's amazing.

193

:

He will go step by step what they were

looking for when they designed it.

194

:

And an example is the principal

asked the architect, the one

195

:

speaking, to not have handrails.

196

:

And said, why can't we just put a

little net out to extend from the roof

197

:

to catch the kids when they fall?

198

:

And he said, no, no, no, we

have to have handrails.

199

:

So this is an example of the

thought that was going on.

200

:

When they designed this and, there's

no walls from the classrooms are all

201

:

on the first floor and most of the

year they keep the inside walls open.

202

:

So now there's no separation

from indoors and outdoors either.

203

:

Kids can get up and literally leave

the classroom, go outside where there's

204

:

trees and some playground equipment.

205

:

They can go up and down to the

roof, there's trees popping up

206

:

through the deck, and the walls are

open most of the year, they have

207

:

watering stations all over the place.

208

:

Step by step, he goes through

what was the thought process on

209

:

why they designed it this way.

210

:

And it basically has a lot to

do with letting kids be kids.

211

:

And we should go through some

of the examples on there, but

212

:

Tali help me explain Thank you.

213

:

Because without seeing this, it's really

hard to envision this kindergarten.

214

:

Yeah.

215

:

Tali: So I think I'll just start with

what jumped out at me other than the roof

216

:

because obviously the roof is absolutely

amazing that the kids are allowed

217

:

to run and nobody's telling them to.

218

:

Walk, don't run.

219

:

I heard that so much when our kids

were growing up, everywhere that we

220

:

went, whether it was at a church or,

you know, at a shopping mall or at a

221

:

park or anywhere where there was some

kind of authority figure, the children

222

:

are repeatedly told, walk, don't run.

223

:

Why?

224

:

Children run naturally.

225

:

If a child, like if nobody's telling

a child how to behave and the child's

226

:

going from point A to point B,

most likely they're running, right?

227

:

So anyway, so the, so the roof

really jumps out at you right away.

228

:

But the part that I loved was what the

architect was talking about, which is we

229

:

are so accustomed to thinking that school

equals put children in a quiet room.

230

:

And basically sit them down at a desk.

231

:

And in this school, they have no walls.

232

:

It's just a giant open area.

233

:

And I, I'm guessing the walls

are on the outside of the school.

234

:

So once they enter, they're enclosed.

235

:

But once they get inside, there are no

walls separating any of this huge area.

236

:

And the kids are allowed

to interact with nature.

237

:

Also, there's no noise.

238

:

Isolation.

239

:

So there's nobody being told

to be quiet because you don't

240

:

have sound bouncing off of walls.

241

:

And so the kids end up able to learn

in their natural state, which is an

242

:

active, very active state, whether

they're running or climbing trees or

243

:

interacting with each other or splashing

water on each other or filling their

244

:

rain boots with water instead of

cleaning the boots from the outside.

245

:

I mean, children are being children.

246

:

Scott: Yeah, that, to me,

there was, he emphasized.

247

:

That one of their principles designing

this was not to control them.

248

:

If someone was upset and would

normally hide in a corner, the teacher

249

:

would just let them walk and they

knew that because it's in a circle,

250

:

they can eventually come back.

251

:

The idea that you're describing with

no noise, he gave a great example.

252

:

He said, in real life you

don't get to control that.

253

:

If you're at work, if you're in

a bar, you have noise around you.

254

:

And by having this completely

open, like acoustic.

255

:

The way it was set up, there's no, if

you can't, if any classroom could go out

256

:

into the courtyard, that also means that

if there was some activity in a different

257

:

classroom, that noise would come through.

258

:

And , he commented specifically that not

having any acoustic barriers between the

259

:

classroom, that it led to an ability for

the kids to show amazing concentration

260

:

levels while they were in the class.

261

:

And he basically said they need noise.

262

:

And today we try to keep

everything under control.

263

:

And when you say don't control

them, these little things matter.

264

:

Sit down, be quiet, no noise and

these are, these are kindergartners.

265

:

I mean, I, I get it when you get to, when

you get to elementary school and high

266

:

school age, things are going to be, you

know, your, your environment might change.

267

:

But to me, like this, this this idea

of like leveraging kids being kids, as

268

:

opposed to trying to control them and get

them to do exactly what you Want your kid

269

:

to do that's not the way they're wired.

270

:

It's not how they are naturally.

271

:

Tali: Yeah I don't think that kids

should be treated like tiny sized adults.

272

:

Kids at their different developmental

stages have certain energy levels.

273

:

So for example, in our children's case,

in the preschool that we put them in, how

274

:

much energy do you think they're expending

trying to control themselves to sit still?

275

:

And if at the same time you're

requiring them to expend energy

276

:

to learn new concepts, you're

really asking a lot of these kids.

277

:

Now, I'm not saying that children should

have no discipline because anybody who

278

:

knows Japanese culture, discipline is a

big, big thing, yes, they're showing in

279

:

this video, the kids running around, but

rest assured they are teaching discipline

280

:

somewhere in there, but they are not

doing it against the nature of the kids

281

:

physically when they're that age, being

active is absolutely normal, you know,

282

:

and if we start labeling them with ADHD or

whatever, because they can't quote unquote

283

:

sit still, that's exceptionally unfair.

284

:

Scott: Can you give a couple examples,

because I mean you didn't see this video

285

:

before you were developing our homeschool

curriculum or environment, our environment

286

:

I guess is the right way of saying

that, and how you let our kids be kids.

287

:

Tali: Yeah, I think for me , it

was personal because when I was

288

:

growing up with my siblings, I

have younger brother and older

289

:

sister, and my younger brother was.

290

:

Very, very active.

291

:

And I just remember all the time he

was being reprimanded for how active

292

:

he was, like it was a negative thing.

293

:

And yet at the same time, I was watching

how it was a very positive thing because

294

:

he was able to exert leadership with kids.

295

:

In our neighborhood and wherever

he went, he was always the guy

296

:

who came up with the ideas and was

directing a group of kids do stuff.

297

:

He was a natural born leader.

298

:

And I think a lot of that comes

from his energy level and his

299

:

ability to, to think quickly.

300

:

But if you're forcing someone like

that to sit still at a table, holding

301

:

a pen, tracing lines on paper, when

their natural state is to be energetic.

302

:

I I saw the consequence of that,

you know, to, to feel defeated,

303

:

to feel like a failure when he

was asked to do those things.

304

:

So when our kids were younger, I just

always remember that part about what I

305

:

observed growing up watching my brother,

because for me and my sister being girls,

306

:

we didn't have any trouble sitting still.

307

:

It was our natural state.

308

:

We liked being quiet and we liked

sitting still, but when we had our kids,

309

:

we had a girl and then a boy I want

it emphatically to make sure that our

310

:

kids, no matter what their personalities

were, were not mislabeled that way.

311

:

Scott: No, I mean, there's, I mean, I

think examples help color this a little

312

:

bit so that the next thing that was on the

list that I thought was a great call out

313

:

is not trying to protect them too much.

314

:

And this is different than control.

315

:

And he, he comments specifically.

316

:

That if kids, like, for example,

they had around the trees that were

317

:

coming up through the decks, they

had netting there, and the kids, if

318

:

they fell, could fall in the netting.

319

:

They basically turned it

into like a playground.

320

:

And they let the kids run when

they were outside on the deck.

321

:

So, to me, he basically said,

let them get some injury.

322

:

And they intentionally designed,

like, this separate little building

323

:

in the center of the courtyard where

they had a lot of different floors

324

:

that were very, very close together.

325

:

So it almost looked like a...

326

:

A jungle gym to me, but it was,

it was much nicer than that.

327

:

And he said it's okay for them to take

some risk and to have some injury.

328

:

And I do think we're, we're so

overprotective now as a society, if you,

329

:

you know, you're going to go outside,

well, you better have your helmet

330

:

on, elbow pads and everything else.

331

:

And, kids, they need to take some

risk and get some, some injury.

332

:

And this also had some

great social examples.

333

:

Where, while the kids were trying to

figure out how to get up and down,

334

:

whether or not they should jump,

that the other kids would help them.

335

:

Maybe they would push them up, or

help pull them up, or whatever it is.

336

:

But I think we should explore

a little bit this concept of

337

:

not overprotecting our kids.

338

:

And it's a delicate balance.

339

:

You don't want your kids to be...

340

:

In unnecessary danger on the

other hand, I think it is possible

341

:

that we've gone too far in the

spectrum to overprotect our kids.

342

:

And what does that teach them in terms of

critical thinking, in terms of confidence,

343

:

in terms of other things later in life, I

do think there's some consequence with it.

344

:

And that's one of the things that struck

me is, yeah, don't overprotect them.

345

:

What are your thoughts?

346

:

Tali: I agree with that.

347

:

Just remembering again from my

own experience growing up in a

348

:

developing country where most parents

were focused on just survival.

349

:

And children were given a

responsibilities really early that

350

:

the result is kids learn very early

on that they are capable people.

351

:

For example, when I was in elementary

school, I remember one kid in my class

352

:

who had epilepsy this was a class of 50

kids and everybody knew that if she ever

353

:

went into a spasm, the kids sitting around

her would get on the floor with her, open

354

:

up her mouth, and put a ruler between

her teeth so she didn't bite her tongue.

355

:

We were in early elementary.

356

:

It wasn't like older elementary.

357

:

It was early elementary

and all the kids knew.

358

:

Whoever was near her, their job was to

go and put something between her teeth

359

:

so she didn't bite down on her tongue.

360

:

Nobody said go call the teacher, you know,

today I feel like we are so quick to take

361

:

power away from our kids to make them feel

like they can't help each other because if

362

:

you have trouble, go to the authorities.

363

:

But when I was growing up, all the

kids were tasked with that very

364

:

important life saving response.

365

:

It wasn't if you see her fall

down, you go get the teacher.

366

:

It was if you see her fall down, you go

put a ruler in her mouth and protect her.

367

:

So when we're homeschooling, that's

one of the things that we get to expose

368

:

the kids to, to show them that they are

capable people instead of protecting

369

:

them so much that you make them feel

like they are so fragile, you know,

370

:

and they are so much more capable

than we give them credit for today.

371

:

Scott: Yeah.

372

:

I.

373

:

Man, there's a lot to this.

374

:

I think it's huge for building confidence.

375

:

I'm actually having a little flashback

when I was at West Point, they had

376

:

indoor and outdoor obstacle courses.

377

:

So for those that have not had the

benefit of being in the military,

378

:

you're You're put together maybe

with a small squad of nine or 10 20

379

:

year olds you're wearing fatigues.

380

:

It's probably hot in the summer.

381

:

And I personally hate the

combination of ledges and heights.

382

:

And you would be responsible as

a team to get over some obstacle.

383

:

And you had people of all different,

all different makes and sizes.

384

:

Like you just, it wasn't like you just

had, you know, all these Jackie Chan

385

:

gymnasts that just could run up and do it.

386

:

You might have a football player.

387

:

You might have a petite woman you

might have like whoever in your squad.

388

:

And you, you do a couple things with this.

389

:

One, it builds confidence.

390

:

Are you at risk of getting hurt?

391

:

Yes, you could fall, and if you did,

it, you're pretty good chance that

392

:

you could get a really bad bruise or

a, even break, a bone or something.

393

:

But I, I don't recall anybody

actually breaking a bone on it.

394

:

Maybe I just don't remember it correctly,

but it's huge for team building.

395

:

It's huge for leadership qualities.

396

:

It's huge for confidence and you don't

need to have huge levels of that

397

:

little bit of risk or danger, that

small dose of danger that he mentions

398

:

in the video for them to learn to work

together, to build confidence to grow.

399

:

And, I think that's pretty huge.

400

:

I look back at things that

people thought we were crazy.

401

:

But Tali, when you asked me to build

monkey bars in the house because you

402

:

had read a book on brachiation, I,

I thought, what the heck am I doing?

403

:

But it was great.

404

:

The kids in between whatever you had

them doing, they could be, you know,

405

:

literally swinging from, from bars or

putting a jump house in and letting a an

406

:

inflatable jump house, putting that up in

the living room or a fort in the basement.

407

:

You don't, you may not have the, the

ability to go to someplace like this high

408

:

end kindergarten that probably has a long

waiting line to get in that's, you know,

409

:

ergonomically designed for development.

410

:

When you are thinking about what to do

for your kids, you can get creative and

411

:

if you can't do it in your house, maybe

you have a small house or you're renting

412

:

and you can't do that kind of thing.

413

:

Well, you can, you can seek out

activities with other groups

414

:

and get them exposed to that.

415

:

Everything from ice skating

to, I don't even know what else.

416

:

So, I mean, you could do almost

anything, but I just think it's really

417

:

insightful that at an early age, at

this kindergarten level, you can really

418

:

apply those to a education curriculum

for elementary, even high school levels.

419

:

And if you look at the military,

look, I mean, there's, they're

420

:

using those same principles, even

for young leaders in the military.

421

:

So to me.

422

:

Huge opportunity.

423

:

You take self custody of your education.

424

:

You get to try out these things.

425

:

See what you can do.

426

:

If you can't do it literally

in your own house.

427

:

Maybe you go down to a playground

or a park and you let kids climb

428

:

the trees and take a little risk.

429

:

Anyway, so I think there's a huge, huge

learning there for kids in this formative

430

:

age to learn about leadership, taking

risks, confidence, and you talk about

431

:

socialization, wow, that is a much more

social than sitting on your little square

432

:

of, of carpet and following a line.

433

:

Tali: Yeah, and I want to

go back to letting the kids

434

:

naturally help each other.

435

:

I don't know if most people have read

that book, Lore of the Flies, where

436

:

the kids were alone and the social

structure got horrible and violent.

437

:

I think we, as parents, we always need

to be very mindful of our assumptions.

438

:

And if we assume that kids with out

rules will eat each other, then yeah,

439

:

we're going to be really careful.

440

:

We're gonna overprotect but if our

assumption is most people are good and

441

:

kids are usually, you know born filled

with love and bravery and courage and

442

:

the desire to be helpful and if you spend

time with little kids at all you learn

443

:

very quickly that they want their effort

to count and they want to be helpful.

444

:

And so if we assume that they cannot

be, then we take the opportunity

445

:

away from them and let's say

they're trying to help us I don't

446

:

know, bring in groceries, right?

447

:

And we go, no, no, no, that's going to

take too long and you might drop it.

448

:

Here is a tablet.

449

:

Go play some video games

while I do the work.

450

:

What did you just tell your child

you're not capable of helping me?

451

:

But if you, If you go with their desire

to be helpful, and yes, they drop a few

452

:

apples or, you know, they bruise your

pears or something, that's okay because

453

:

that's a very small price to pay for

them feeling capable and helping you.

454

:

And that kind of thing grows.

455

:

And on the opposite side, if you

constantly give them something to

456

:

occupy themselves because it'll

be faster and easier for you to do

457

:

something, then that sense of, oh,

I can't help, I am only going to

458

:

mess things up, that will also grow.

459

:

So just be mindful of your

assumptions, when your kids are

460

:

little and it's very nuanced.

461

:

It's a day by day, moment

by moment kind of awareness.

462

:

So I'm not saying you have to be perfect,

but it's just something to keep in mind.

463

:

All

464

:

Scott: right.

465

:

We just keep on going

through these examples.

466

:

And again, I know it's for those that are

listening that haven't seen the video yet.

467

:

When you see it and you see the

examples of what these kids are doing

468

:

and how intentional the environment

is designed to help them develop.

469

:

I guarantee you will be inspired for your

own kids on what you can do for them.

470

:

The next thing on my list that

I wanted to get into was a,

471

:

just a note on physical health.

472

:

And again, as most people know, I was in

the military for a short period of time.

473

:

I remember had an exchange program.

474

:

I got to spend a week in the Netherlands

and those cadets got to spend a week here.

475

:

And another cadet and I asked

them what they thought and they

476

:

looked around and they basically

said we think Americans look fat.

477

:

And you, you just look at what's

going on with recruitment these

478

:

days in the military and there's, I

mean, there's, there's some things

479

:

in our society where we are really

not taking care of ourselves.

480

:

And so tying this back to what

are you teaching your kids?

481

:

This was what I mean by going way beyond

the curriculum with what are you going

482

:

to use for math or what are you going

to do for reading or whatever it is when

483

:

you are designing the environment for

your kids to learn and you can teach

484

:

them the importance of physical health

at an early age, this is tremendous.

485

:

And this, this also gets into the low

time preference type of thing, too.

486

:

If you're thinking about your

health for the long term.

487

:

Think about the, the proven links between

someone who is physically fit and their

488

:

ability from an intellectual standpoint,

from an emotional standpoint, their

489

:

health in other aspects of their life.

490

:

And I don't think anybody denies that

there's links there between physical

491

:

health and the mind and the body.

492

:

So teaching kids early to

be active and not just to sit

493

:

there is actually a good thing.

494

:

In the video, the architect says that

the circumference of the building

495

:

is, I think it was 180 meters, it

was something close to 200 meters.

496

:

And then he put up an example of, they

had followed a boy around just in the

497

:

morning to kind of see, he went from

one place to another and they mapped

498

:

it out to see how far he had gone.

499

:

And just in the morning,

he had gone 6, 000 meters.

500

:

So in terms of those that may track

how far they've walked in the day.

501

:

That's almost four miles.

502

:

That's like 3.

503

:

7 miles that this little kindergarten

boy that they had followed and the

504

:

architect's call out was that kids

are active and way he said it was,

505

:

they have some of the highest athletic

abilities amongst other kindergartners.

506

:

He said on average, the, including

literally all students, they move

507

:

an average of 4, 000 meters a day.

508

:

So again, these are

kindergartners that are moving 2.

509

:

5 miles on average every day.

510

:

I think that sets them

up for a lot of success.

511

:

I think.

512

:

Being physically active is healthy,

not just physically, but also in

513

:

terms of being able to concentrate

in terms of brain development,

514

:

in terms of emotional health.

515

:

And this is something that I, I

personally believe has to be part

516

:

of a homeschooling curriculum.

517

:

This video really shows that you

can start this at an early age.

518

:

So I guess what I'm saying is that the

physical activity that was encouraged with

519

:

this, not just the social and the learning

and all those other things, but the

520

:

physical side of this is a huge takeaway.

521

:

Well, I

522

:

Tali: disagree a little bit with

what you said about we need to train

523

:

them up to be physically active.

524

:

I think kids are naturally

physically active.

525

:

We don't need to encourage

them or train them up.

526

:

I think we need to not discourage

them from physically active.

527

:

I mean, if we go to the playground,

You know, at a local park,

528

:

what do you see kids doing?

529

:

They run around, but you also

see parents there saying, don't

530

:

run, walk, don't run, walk.

531

:

So when you say stuff like that

to a child who is actively running

532

:

around, they learn to become inactive.

533

:

They learn that running

is dangerous, right?

534

:

So I think physical activity

comes very naturally for children.

535

:

We just need to allow them the freedom to.

536

:

to express that and to maybe hopefully we

do it with them instead of just standing

537

:

around watching them because while we're

watching them, they're also watching us.

538

:

So if they're running around and you know,

the years go by and they're watching,

539

:

you just standing there being inactive,

then eventually they're going to tend

540

:

that way, you know, but when our kids

were little, I made a point to take them.

541

:

To the park and on the trails when

they ran I ran with them I remember

542

:

one time we went and our oldest was two

and a half I think scott was pushing

543

:

a stroller with our baby and our one

year old and our oldest just wanted to

544

:

run and i'm like Hey scott go run with

her and you said no i'm gonna push the

545

:

stroller so I ran with her and she ran

non stop for two miles and Let me just

546

:

tell ya, that was not fun for me, okay?

547

:

Cause I was sore for many days

after that, but I ran with her.

548

:

And I hope that, at least

that day, she learned that

549

:

running was a family activity.

550

:

Mm

551

:

Scott: hmm.

552

:

Wow, I, I think, so I, how do we,

so those are the things on my list.

553

:

They, they, that you could take away.

554

:

This is a nine minute video on how

to design an environment to encourage

555

:

this, the development with kids.

556

:

And there's so many lessons.

557

:

That can actually apply to how

you set up your environment and

558

:

what you do to teach your kids.

559

:

And I, I just think it's an amazing,

it's an amazing application of

560

:

looking at one idea, one place

and applying it somewhere else.

561

:

But we've covered the things that

I wanted to take from the video.

562

:

Is there anything else that we

missed from, from your point of view?

563

:

Tali: I want to emphasize again

that we're talking about striking

564

:

a balance between letting kids be

kids and also instilling discipline.

565

:

Because for those of you who go to that

video and watch the nine minute video,

566

:

they are not showing you the disciplined

side of a Japanese kindergarten, but

567

:

I will guarantee you that it is there.

568

:

So we're not saying let

your children run wild.

569

:

If you're homeschooling, let them

do whatever they want, take them

570

:

from the trees and never sit still.

571

:

That's not what we're saying at all.

572

:

We're saying let them have the opportunity

to do so and also teach them discipline.

573

:

Scott: Right.

574

:

And it's permissionless, right?

575

:

Right.

576

:

Just because we did it a certain way.

577

:

You don't need our

permission to do it your way.

578

:

If you don't like what we're

saying, this is, these are just

579

:

ideas that we're talking about.

580

:

So I, I agree with the balance.

581

:

That's a good call out on that.

582

:

I also think that if anybody's listening

to this and you're, you have not yet

583

:

started to, to do this and you don't

have kids yet, don't overthink this.

584

:

You don't start with the confidence

first when you do this, this

585

:

all comes back to committing to

something that you know is right.

586

:

Start with the commitment.

587

:

You will have the courage,

especially if you and your

588

:

significant other are in sync on this.

589

:

That probably is a whole other

episode, by the way, probably

590

:

should cover that separately.

591

:

Have the courage to stick with it.

592

:

Kids are super resilient.

593

:

You have so many resources available.

594

:

I would wrap this up with this physical

activity in the environment is something

595

:

that you should add to your curriculum

in whatever way you would like to do it.

596

:

Start with the commitment to do it

once you've done it and you've seen

597

:

that and you've gone through it.

598

:

Then your confidence on being

able to do more will grow.

599

:

And kids have such amazing potential.

600

:

If we could just figure out how to let

them be kids and let them grow naturally.

601

:

Tali: Yeah, I just want to end by saying

kids are far more capable then we realize

602

:

and they just need the opportunity

to show it within safe boundaries.

603

:

Scott: Of course.

604

:

All right, we'll wrap it

up We'll see you next week

605

:

If you enjoyed this podcast, and if

you found this valuable, please leave

606

:

a review to help others find us too.

607

:

For those who prefer zapping

sats, we love those too.

608

:

We're on Fountain, we're on Nostr,

and we're on Orange Pill app.

609

:

Also, I host a women's only Bitcoin

podcast called Orange Hatter.

610

:

And the mission of that podcast

is to reach pre coiner women.

611

:

So if you know of someone in

your life that you would like to

612

:

introduce Bitcoin to, check it out.

613

:

So, Tali and I also don't

have sponsors for this show.

614

:

We are trying to build

and run FreeMarketKids.

615

:

You can check out our

products at FreeMarketKids.

616

:

com.

617

:

This includes the Bitcoin

mining game HODLUP, which is a

618

:

great introduction to Bitcoin.

619

:

The school edition of HODL

Up is always available.

620

:

We also have the 2024 halving edition.

621

:

It's going to be super deluxe,

very excited to roll it out.

622

:

It is available on presale

at a 21 percent discount.

623

:

Until next time, happy HODLing.

Links