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Building Homes with High-Speed Internet in Mind with Scott Sampson
Episode 426th July 2022 • Construction Disruption • Isaiah Industries
00:00:00 00:33:37

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“The internet today is just a teenager. It’s a messed-up teenager that doesn’t know what it’s doing, throwing things out, pissing people off”- Scott Sampson CEO of Fiber Fast Homes

 

Since COVID, our collective home internet use has skyrocketed with work-from-home, homeschooling, and video streaming. 

 

Scott Sampson, CEO of Fiber Fast Homes in Jacksonville, Florida, has partnered with builders to ensure new homes are fitted with the fastest internet available, cutting out lag and frustration.

 

Now they connect fiber cables directly to the home, instead of using a neighborhood cable. This allows for faster download speed AND upload speed. Imagine buying a home with the fastest internet available and TV with your favorite channels. 

 

Pay attention builders! Fiber is a great way to add value to a home, and to be part of the future. Our world is only going to become more digital, and we’ll need the bandwidth to support it.

 

Topics discussed in this episode:

  • Scott’s progression in his communications and internet services career
  • How COVID changed internet infrastructure
  • How technology advancements are changing the internet
  • The importance of GOOD customer service
  • The unlikely symbiotic relationship between builder and internet provider
  • How fiber cables are installed during building
  • Home fiber vs neighborhood fiber 
  • The future of the internet and why builders should pay attention

 

Follow this link to learn more about Fiber Fast Homes! 

 

To hear more Construction Disruption episodes you can visit us on iTunes or Youtube.

 



This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

Podtrac - https://analytics.podtrac.com/privacy-policy-gdrp
Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Transcripts

Scott Sampson:

:

I will say this about the Gen Y and the Gen Z. I think I'm smart. I'm not even half as smart as those kids. They know what they want. They might be a little more minimalist than my generation. The gen Xs that we were, you know, let's drive a Ferrari or a Lamborghini in the world. They might go a little smaller than us, but they knew what they wanted, like from the Internet side and the technology. And I think the builders are now catching on to that with what they need to sell to these people.

Todd Miller:

:

Welcome to the Construction Disruption podcast, where we uncover the future of building and remodeling. I'm Todd Miller of Isaiah Industries, manufacturer of specialty metal roofing and other building materials. And today my co-host is Seth Heckaman, also of Isaiah Industries. Our goal here at Construction Disruption is to provide timely and forward-looking information regarding the construction and building world. As part of that, we look at new innovations as well as trends and practices, building materials, the labor market, leadership, and other subjects. Basically what we do, is if we detect something out there that we think is going to have an ongoing impact on the building or construction industry, we go out and find ourselves an expert and bring them in as a guest to spotlight. So today we are taking a look at a subject that is quickly changing, and has been for some time, and that is home Internet access. With us today is Scott Sampson, the CEO of Fiber Fast Homes, based in Jacksonville, Florida. Fiber Fast Homes works with builders and developers to create the fiber infrastructure for communities before ground is ever broken on the actual homes. By using the electric and water trench used for those utilities, they can prepare communities for fast fiber internet service with minimal future disruption or installation services. Scott, welcome to Construction Disruption. This is both literally and figuratively, groundbreaking stuff you're doing here, and we're looking forward to learning more.

Scott Sampson:

:

Thank you for having me.

Todd Miller:

:

Sure. I look forward to this conversation. You've had a really long career in communications and also Internet services. Can you tell us a little bit about the progress and development you've seen over your career in those areas and really how you came to be doing what you're doing today?

Scott Sampson:

:

Yeah, the industry has been a fun one to be a part of because always my best quote for this is, just wait till tomorrow, everything will change. I mean, we started off with, I think my first Internet modem was a 14.4 baud modem, did no speed at all. And today I have gig internet in my own home. The technology is advancing so rapidly, it's really fun to try to keep up with. I fell into this just out of total luck. I was in the restaurant industry, was a bartender, had a customer come in and said, you should be in sales. Went to work for him and then they got bought out three months after I was there. So they shut down our office. But I went to work for an Internet service provider right after that. It was a company called People's Choice TV, but they had a product called Speed Choice, and it was a point to multipoint wireless Internet company. And getting into that industry, I found my true passion and what I love to do and seeing the Internet and seeing how fast it was going and what we could do. And I'd look at like the Internet today, you know, I think it's just a teenager. I think it's a messed-up teenager, doesn't know what it's doing half the time, throwing out things, pissing people off. And then tomorrow it's apologizing and saying, hey, what can we do next? And we're always looking for what it will do.

Todd Miller:

:

Wow. So you very much think there's a whole lot of more upside and and changes to occur in the future, is that right?

Scott Sampson:

:

I don't think we're even close to seeing what the Internet could do. I mean, you watch the sci-fi movies and you can see from behind me, you know, like I'm big into Star Wars and I like Star Trek, you know, where does it go? I mean, right now, it's just passing information from like your photos and being able to book flights and doing your banking, you know, and now we're getting into, you know, podcasts and video conferencing. I think COVID actually changed how we look at the world. I mean, in an aspect not from a sickness, but how we work remotely and how we work from home, and how much of this is going to help a planet from not having to drive in to work and not having to really dictate our lives on what we do. I think the Internet is, it is the product. It is going to be our advancements, you know? You know, am I going to have the holodeck in my house? Am I going to be able to just walk to a transporter because it's going to be transported over fiber lines? Who knows? But I think we're just scratching the surface of what it can do.

Todd Miller:

:

That is exciting stuff. And you're right, I mean, COVID suddenly forced us into these directions that had, you know, maybe somewhat been there before. And suddenly we pursued them. And everyone on them eventually was like, Well, this isn't all bad. There's a lot of upside to this. So good stuff.

Seth Heckaman:

:

And thinking about that, the next stage of that Internet revolution, something I keep hearing more and more about and have no idea what it is, is this Web 3.0? Are you able to explain that to me and what that is and what we can expect?

Scott Sampson:

:

I'll be honest, I am not an expert in Web 3.0. I've heard it get thrown around every once in a while. I don't know, to be honest. I haven't really dug into that. I mean, my world, what we look at, you know, I mean, where I think the biggest jump for us and not to disregard your question, but the biggest jump for us is high speed to home. I mean, I remember when I was working for Speed Choice, I had a 56 K modem in my house. We put wireless on my house and I was pulling 7 mb. I thought that was the greatest product ever.

Todd Miller:

:

Wow.

Scott Sampson:

:

COVID happened. I had DSL in my house and I was getting 40 mb. It was interesting because I always thought 40 mb was fast enough and it got me what I needed. You know, I was streaming TV when I wanted to. It did buffer, but my daughters both came home from school, you know, had to work school from home. And the video conferencing side of it was the thing I never thought about. The upload speeds, this is, you know, a bigger change in this world as the upload speeds and where we're going. Upload speeds were something nobody thought about because it was like, what do I do at home? I download, I download movies, I download, I download photos, I download Facebook, I download, download, download, I don't upload. And the upload side of this was where where to me the biggest changes for today where we really got to look at this because the upload speeds. My kids were upstairs, I was downstairs, my wife also works at home. We're all online, we're all doing whatever we do. I'm doing a video conference with my team and my daughter walks down says, Dad, are you on Zoom? And I'm like, Well, yeah, I'm on Teams. What, what's going on? Because you've got to shut something off. I can't be seen and I'll be marked tardy if nobody sees my picture.

Todd Miller:

:

Wow.

Scott Sampson:

:

So I had to shut off my video so my daughters could be on camera. So I turned around and had to upgrade to a full gb internet in my own home because it is a service that's going to be needed. You know, where we go in the next technology and different layers in the web. You know, that's the back end of what we do. Mine is the pipe that gets you there. How fast can I get you there? You know, the next thing where I look at like is TV. You know, right now we've got 4K coming out and it's, you know, it's hitting hard. But you go to Costco and you see an 8K TV sitting up there for $13,000 and you're going, Why? Why do I need to see that?

Todd Miller:

:

Mm hmm.

Scott Sampson:

:

But it's coming. It's going to be an 8K TV, and you're going to need more and more speed. And the upload speed on the other side is, you know, it's like my own house. I got security cameras. I, you know, I can turn up and down my thermostat. I need faster speed. So if I want to see who's at my front door, I get a good picture because of the upload speeds in my house. It's not buffering or rendering the picture in a poor quality. And that's also you have me in the beginning, what was the biggest change I've seen? That's probably the biggest one besides speeds and downloads, but it's upload. Upload speeds are getting faster and faster. I mean, I never thought I would need upload speed at my house. I'm not running a server, I just run basic Internet just like everybody else.

Todd Miller:

:

Right. But you're right. And you got a family and you know, you got all those needs to take care of and makes every bit of sense. So tell us a little bit how Fiber Fast Homes engages with builders and developers, what that process looks like to build these new communities with this sort of leading technology and and these sort of speeds.

Scott Sampson:

:

The first thing where really I want to change the world in this aspect. I mean, Internet is Internet, you know, it's the speed that we're offering is what we're offering. It's you know, we say it's going to be a gb. It's going to be a gb. You know, we do have some slower times when a lot of people come home, but our slower times is a gb. You know, right now most of my customers are pulling 1.2. When it does get to the higher end, it will slow down to a gb with what we're selling, where we're differentiating ourselves versus our competition is customer service. You know, I think as a society we've gotten used to just bad customer service. You know, it's like, I call you up and you, you know, you beat me up, try to sell me something else, and make me feel like I'm an idiot. And then I hang up and I'm like, Okay, well, I'll just wait until you fix it. And the way I look at this is going, we need to take care of the customers. And my side of it's very interesting because we, Fiber First Homes has two customers. We have the home builder and the developers and then we have the homeowner. And the easy side is trying to keep the homeowner happy. Because if I keep the homeowner happy, I'll keep the builder happy. But the builders never saw it from that side. It's where I come in to try to be helpful with them. You know, their main goal is to build a house and to sell a house. The Internet is not their primary focus. But I wanted to make sure because I don't want to be like everybody else and just come in after the fact, makes a mess of a bunch of yards. We want to come in and work with the developers as they're doing their builds. You know, we'll supply the conduit, their crews can put them in. You know, we'll pay for it, but we'll still supply it. So we're working with the construction teams upfront and where we're really a bigger change is the Internet will be up and running when the customer moves back. It's ready to go. They move in, it's going, it's hot there. You know, I always say for any homeowners moving in to one of our developments that we're we're going is you go sit there, had your kids, the iPad or the Xbox or the PlayStation, and they go off into the bedroom and start playing while the parents unpack. So they actually get some free time to get a lot different. And a bigger one is in our customer service, we have a concierge department. Our concierge department is going to call you before you move in, before you close on your house, walk you through the service, what you're getting, walking through the streaming services. You know, we partnered with a company called MyBundle.TV, and they have a great package. Our concierge walks the customer through it, helps them pick out the channels they're going to watch, what channels they want to see, what you know, what shows are doing and this helps them pick it out. In our concierge department's really helping the customer. And then then we're there for closing to make sure everything working when they go to closing, they get done. They've gone through and blue taped everything. We walk up and say, Hey, here's where the fiber box is, don't touch it. If you have any problems, here's our card. Let's make sure your Internet's working and then our guys leave. You're not seeing that from anybody else. No other carrier, Internet provider, cable company is going to come out and walk you through to try to make you that happy from the builder to the homeowner.

Todd Miller:

:

You're probably not working at all then in existing neighborhoods at all, as new builds, I assume. Would that be correct?

Scott Sampson:

:

Our division does not. Fiber First Homes is owned by a company called Boston Omaha. Boston Omaha does own a couple other ISPs.

Todd Miller:

:

Okay.

Scott Sampson:

:

And those ISPs do actually go into existing neighborhoods. But my division, we actually just work with building developers and just in the new home builds, in the greenfield.

Todd Miller:

:

So the builder then is the one who actually you'll go in and put in the main access using these other utility trenches, and then the builder actually pulls it on up into the home, is that my understanding? Correct?

Scott Sampson:

:

Not correct. We actually we'll pull it up. We'll pull the conduit up into the house.

Todd Miller:

:

Okay.

Scott Sampson:

:

Now, the builders, we're working with them. We actually work with their design teams and then we will pull conduit from the utility side of the house. They will actually pull it into what we call a security panel. On Q is a brand that makes them there's just a panel inside either utility or master closet, which is where our electronics go. They'll pull the all of that in there for us. Then we come in and pull a drop cable, which is fiber and it is, by the way, fiber into the home, not fiber to the neighborhood. This is fiber in the house. And then it goes into we're using Wi-Fi routers to distribute service. And if the homeowner then buys extra Ethernet, they can actually run Cat6 throughout the house wherever they want. They pay that through that low voltage company or the home builder.

Todd Miller:

:

Gotcha. So I hear a little bit, I think, correct me if I'm wrong about some neighborhoods that are being built where the whole neighborhood is wireless. They're not having to pull any wire fiber up to the home. How does that compare? I assume yours is a whole lot more reliable and faster.

Scott Sampson:

:

Wi-Fi runs at about, well the ones we're using run about 550 to 600 mb, which is a high-end box. There is a 1k wireless out there, the wi-fi that's out there. In some of our developments that we have that are old existing RV parks. The biggest worry I always have with wi-fi is RF interference. You know, we have so many RF devices, so many things put off RF that, you know, in some of the mobile home parks that we're doing business in Arizona, they have an RF interference. Fiber is always going to be faster, always going to be more reliable.

Todd Miller:

:

Sure.

Scott Sampson:

:

And it will get faster and faster. I mean, you can go in, depending on how much money you want to spend on the back end, we can put in 10 gb into everybody's house if we wanted to. We're not going to because you don't need it for four, three, four, or five people. But definitely it will go. Wireless will have its limitations all the time. I like wireless, but I think it stops at a point.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah, makes a lot of sense. And you folks, you already talked about you do television and phone as well.

Scott Sampson:

:

We partner with other companies to help. Everything we do is over the Internet. We are a true ISP. We offer Internet service where, like I said, we partner with my bundle to help them find the Hulu and YouTube. So, you know, whatever they want to find, Netflix on the Internet to stream. And then we will also walk them through how to get a VoIP service, you know, from different VoIP providers that are out there.

Todd Miller:

:

Okay, now. Is Fiber Fast Homes, are you folks regional or are you working all over the place?

Scott Sampson:

:

We started in Jacksonville, Florida, right? Since Jacksonville we've expanded into Orlando, Virginia. Now we're just starting up our new projects in Texas, California, where we actually had a conversation today. We'll be expanding into Reno, Vegas. So we are pretty nationwide. We're trying to not roll out super fast to try to keep controlled chaos going. But we are rolling out as fast as we need to for our clients.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, no doubt the demand is there. I'm sure that, yeah, you have lots of folks clamoring for it.

Scott Sampson:

:

Yeah, it's sad when I have building developers call me and they say, Hey, we want to do this; this is great. By the way, can you do my neighborhood? And I'm like, no, I do greenfield, but, you know, we have different divisions that might be able to and it's just not cost-effective to go into the older home.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah.

Scott Sampson:

:

It's really the new homes that are easy to do, but they're different packages the government's been putting together like RDOF and things like that to help their rural areas.

Todd Miller:

:

Okay.

Scott Sampson:

:

But even that, you know, that money is really, really trying to be spent and it's just hard to get in some of the already existing building neighborhoods.

Todd Miller:

:

As you folks have grown and expanded, any particular challenges you've encountered that have maybe been surprising?

Scott Sampson:

:

Well, I think a lot of people get this pain, is supply chain.

Todd Miller:

:

Oh, my goodness. Yes, amen.

Scott Sampson:

:

Just like everybody else on the planet. We you know, I mean, the prices are going up. Plastic is which is our conduit is really tough to get. It's getting you know, that one's actually loosening up a little bit. Electronics have been a nightmare to find and to source. I mean, we were looking for one of our products that we use. It's called NOLT. We were sourcing it and just calling everybody all around the world just to see where we could find it. I mean, when you're looking at eBay and Amazon to buy electronics for an ISP, you know, it's tough.

Speaker:

:

Yeah.

Speaker:

:

And the other one and this, I can say this, the builders are having the same problems with doors and windows.

Speaker:

:

Oh, yeah.

Speaker:

:

But one of the other ones is where I think we're all running into the same problem is staffing.

Todd Miller:

:

Yes.

Scott Sampson:

:

I mean, finding... We have entry level, we'll call them kids. They're young, twenties, you know, young gentlemen, women that come to work for us and just finding them. And I mean, we put an ad out in the paper for a role in Orlando. We think we got 50 resumes, which we thought was great, but only five of them were qualified. And out of those five none of them called us back.

Todd Miller:

:

Mhm.

Scott Sampson:

:

I mean we call and set up an interview and none called back. We're running into such a staffing problem and you know for like my industry, I think I got like the greatest lead on a startup with a great backer. We've gone from four people to twenty-four people in a year. And so there's all this runway for all these jobs in this world and we can't get people to apply.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah, it's unprecedented times, no doubt about it. Very frustrating, that's for sure.

Scott Sampson:

:

Yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

I have to imagine that for a builder or developer that brings you guys in, that has to be a huge selling point for their homes, doesn't it, compared to other homes or other developments?

Scott Sampson:

:

That is one of our biggest key selling points to them is we're a value-add.

Speaker:

:

Absolutely.

Speaker:

:

You know, we're a value-add product. You know, we don't want to hinder them. We want to be something that they can add. And it's taken a little bit of education. The building industry has been very set in the way that they do it. You know, if you want it high speed and technology, you want all this stuff, you were definitely custom home. You know, we call the entry to mid-tier home, you know, your first, second home, which a lot of these big developments do. When we were talking to them, it was some bit of an explanation to them to understand, you know, with our product and them coming in and working with them, they got the construction side, they didn't get the homeowner side. And what the benefit was to sit there and say, 1gb fiber, the first company we did our projects with is Dream Finders Homes. They actually got it. And you know what I've noticed actually over where our initial pitch to them two years ago to the day, developers are starting to realize that they've got to have saying you know fiber internet in the neighborhood because I will say this about the Gen-Y and the Gen Z, I think I'm smart. I'm not even half as smart as those kids. You know, these young adults, new families that are coming out that are, you know, twenties and thirties. They know ten times, they know what they want. They might be a little more minimalist than my generation, the Gen X's that we were, let's drive a Ferrari or a Lamborghini in the world. They might go a little smaller than us, but they knew what they wanted, like the Internet side and the technology. And I think the builders are now catching on to that with what they need to sell to these people.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense and I certainly understand that what you're talking about with the different generations. It's a very smart group coming in right now and know what's going on. So you've seen a lot of changes over the years of your career, which, you know, has been long, but but not eons either, as you were opened up with change happens so fast and you kind of alluded to that that it's going to continue to advance. But what do you really see as far as the future may hold in regards to home internet service?

Scott Sampson:

:

The first one, like I said, I think entertainment is going to take over. And I might misquote Steve Jobs, but he said, if I remember right, it was phone, internet, and TV are all going to merge into one at some point in our lives. That's getting closer and closer. I mean, look at this. I mean, I can watch TV while doing this podcast and be on the phone all the same time. That's where we're getting to really fast. Where's the next step? To me, it's this is still an entertainment product. The Internet is an educational entertainment project, product. It's where does the next one? I mean, 8k's coming. You know, I would really like to see more interaction, the VR world, you know, how can we how can we sit in this, put on a headset or have, you know, a camera on us where it puts us all into the same room? It might be a VR simulation, but we're in the same room and it looks like we're there to give us sort of that thing. The Ready Player One scenarios where you can live virtually in a world. I think that's where it's coming, because with high-speed internet becomes high-speed resolution and it's how fast and the computers are already there. How do we get the Internet, really the backbones to set it up?

Todd Miller:

:

Right. Well, we had a recent guest here on the show and we were talking about how VR and augmented reality could really play a role with this labor shortage in terms of helping speed up how we train people and how we get people up to speed faster, how we shorten those onboarding times, how we shorten the learning curve. And that's fascinating stuff to me as well.

Scott Sampson:

:

I worked on a project for a mining company five, six years ago and we were working with Google Glass.

Todd Miller:

:

Oh yeah.

Scott Sampson:

:

Sort of the same concept of say was a it was a nice failure. It didn't work like we thought it would. We had some great ideas, but that's exactly where it was going was training. It was really cool. Some of the concepts that Google and we came up with was like, how to train an electrician when they have to go to a certain pump site on a mine site. And this way a guy could look over their shoulder from the camera, watch what they were doing, and they could draw diagrams on what they were going to work on. It was really a cool concept, just on mine sties, Internet is sort of a secondary product, it's really hard to get in some of these remote areas. But it was a cool concept and I think you're right. I think that VR and that virtual reality side of it, it is going to be... I always say this, I can't wait till tomorrow. I mean, always gives me a headache because somebody changes something in my world. But what the Internet does is too cool. I mean, the whole computer technology, I think we will surpass any of the, you know, Star Trek, Star Wars, you know, any of those movies at some point in our time. And, you know, we go to Mars and we do things like that. I think we still got a lot to do here in just what we have in tech.

Todd Miller:

:

Good point. Well, it certainly is exciting stuff, there's no no doubt about it. I am kind of curious if you were to talk to someone young who is just getting started in their career and maybe, you know, what you're doing is of interest to them, what would you recommend to them? What would be a good career path or what should they be paying attention to? Who should they be paying attention to? Obviously get their resume in with Fiber Fast Homes.

Scott Sampson:

:

Yeah, you know, it's interesting. We just hired a young gentleman in Virginia, asked me that exact we were at the dinner a week ago and he asked me the same question, how do I become you? And I'll have to tell you, that's the greatest question I've heard, because it's not about my ego, but it's how do you get to that point? What did I do that was special? I wasn't anybody special. I was a bartender who became a sales guy that got into the engineering side and the programming of it. The biggest thing, as I told him, is ask questions and listen. I never claim to be the smartest guy in the room, I just know everybody in it. And when I owned an ISP years ago and before I left, when I came to Colorado, I assumed that I didn't know that much in IT. And funny story on that is, I was sitting in a meeting and someboqdy said something and I knew the answer. And I was being a consultant for a mining company, and I knew the answer. I actually knew the answer to every question. Osmosis had kicked in over a period of time of sitting in a room for 20 years with guys that are 100 times smarter than me that I caught on. And that's always the biggest, you know, the other one is, the IT field is massive. I mean, do you want to get in programming? Do you want to go to cyber? Do you want to get into network builds? I mean, we hire,we train, we want you to learn how to splice fiber. We'll teach you how to program routers and switches. Most companies today get into that fact don't want to take away from colleges and what they teach. But most of the IT jobs that are really well done come from certifications that you can do on your own. And there's a lot of them out there by security companies that offer free ones to paying ones. You can get Cisco, Microsoft, certified U.S. Azure, you name it, you can get certified in all these different products just by sitting at home. But it's take the time, but then ask. Ask the question, ask if you meet me and say, Hey, can I sit in on one of your IT meetings? And I'm like, Yeah, if you want to learn, sit in.

Todd Miller:

:

You know, that's that's cool. And I and I do think those opportunities are out there all over the place for young folks. Lots of folks would love to engage with them and bring them in and get them brought up to speed or at least, you know, introduce them to certain ideas and concepts and career opportunities and see where it goes.

Scott Sampson:

:

Yeah. And the train to hire now, you know, or hire to train. We're not out looking for the kids that are in the field. We're not looking for these kids that are already went to college to learn how to do this stuff. This is something, you know, we're putting you in a field. You might have a shovel in your hand day one and a week later you're splicing fiber. We have a 20 and 21-year-old, I'm gonna call them kids because I'm old. We have these two kids in Jacksonville. They've never worked with network, never worked with fiber. They now are splicing fiber today, you know, making pretty decent money. And one of them's now looking to buy a house and they're looking at what's my next step. And I'm saying, do you see your boss? That's the job you want. And that job will come available because he is working really hard to want to go, and now he's looking at running both Texas and Florida's projects. So there's all this movement. And with how much and especially if you look at fiber to the home or just networking, my world, it's growing so fast, try to keep up. I mean, these kids can come in and, you know, making 20, 25 bucks an hour today. And within three or four years, they're making 60 to 75,000 a year, with no college education.

Todd Miller:

:

Hmm.

Scott Sampson:

:

And that's really good money.

Todd Miller:

:

Absolutely.

Scott Sampson:

:

You know, go out, buy the starter home, buy the starter townhouse condo and, you know, get the nice car. And then, and I always tell everybody, your goal is to want my job because that's my goal for you. I want you to replace me. I don't want to do this forever. I love what I do. But I want to find the next kid that's going to take my job. I want them to work for me.

Todd Miller:

:

That's good stuff. I hear you, great. Well, this is exciting stuff and certainly a great field. You know, we're getting close to the end of our time, and I want to thank you again for everything. And but I did want to ask you, before we close out, if you'd like to be willing to participate in something we call our Rapid Fire questions. So seven questions, maybe a little silly, some serious. All you got to do is give a quick answer. And our audience needs to understand if Scott agrees to this, he has no idea what we're about to ask. So are you up to the challenge of Rapid Fire?

Scott Sampson:

:

If I could keep anything short, that'd be amazing. But, okay. Fire off.

Todd Miller:

:

Hey, you could give as full answers as you want. Well, we, Seth and I will alternate questions. I will let him lead off.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Alright, first question, Scott. Favorite hobby?

Scott Sampson:

:

My favorite hobby is actually snow skiing.

Todd Miller:

:

Oh, and you're in Colorado now. I, I had assumed originally you were in Florida because of the business, but yeah, I realized then later you are in Colorado.

Scott Sampson:

:

I am on the road about 80% of the time.

Todd Miller:

:

Oh, wow.

Scott Sampson:

:

I have a house in Florida, but I travel and I ski anywhere from 20 to 30 times a year.

Todd Miller:

:

Awesome, good for you. Question number two, top or bottom half of the bagel, which is your favorite?

Scott Sampson:

:

Well, I don't eat a lot of carbs, so I'll go with the top because I really don't have an answer for that one.

Todd Miller:

:

Understandable.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Question number three, have you ever seen a UFO?

Scott Sampson:

:

I lived in Arizona for 20 years and I have to admit no. And I'm very disappointed in that.

Todd Miller:

:

I would be disappointed.

Scott Sampson:

:

I missed the ones that fell over the rocks. I was told about them and then the Air Force said it was them. But I don't believe them, I think it was UFOs.

Todd Miller:

:

Question number four, what is your bucket list vacation?

Scott Sampson:

:

My bucket list vacation. Well, it's to actually finally take my wife for our anniversary to go to Greece and Italy for two weeks.

Todd Miller:

:

Oh, very neat. Sounds like this may be in the plans almost.

Scott Sampson:

:

It was in the plans but COVID hit. And so we're hopefully now I got one more daughter getting out of high school. Soon as she's out, I will take her to Europe for a couple weeks and Greece and Italy was where we both want to go. So that's my bucket list today.

Seth Heckaman:

:

If you had a yacht, what would you name it?

Scott Sampson:

:

If I have, it would have to be Star Wars.

Todd Miller:

:

Obviously.

Scott Sampson:

:

What other name are you expecting?

Todd Miller:

:

If you could have a superpower, what would that superpower be?

Scott Sampson:

:

What would my superpower be? My actually, you know, I like the action movies and all of them. I'm sorry, I love Wolverine. I would have to have the adamantium and the blades coming out of my hands. That would have to be it, I would be Wolverine. That was it.

Todd Miller:

:

There you go.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Those are good movies, for sure. Last question. Who in your life can you depend upon to always make you laugh?

Scott Sampson:

:

Oh, who can always make me laugh. Okay, this is going to be a very canned answer. It's going to be my wife. She always entertains me, always. She is my best friend, we will be 28 years this year. So I give her all the credit. But she is, she's always been there if I'm down or up, she can send me a text and they make me laugh.

Todd Miller:

:

Awesome.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Beautiful. Congratulations.

Todd Miller:

:

That's good stuff.

Scott Sampson:

:

Thank you.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, again, thank you. It's been a real pleasure and a privilege to have you as a guest. Is there anything we haven't covered today that you'd like to share with our audience?

Scott Sampson:

:

No.

Todd Miller:

:

We covered a lot of ground.

Scott Sampson:

:

You covered quite a bit. This was a great interview. I really appreciate you guys's time and having me on. I really enjoyed that.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, thank you. We've enjoyed it as well. So if folks who want, folks who may want to get in touch with you, how can they most easily do that?

Scott Sampson:

:

The easiest way is to just go to our website, it's fiberfasthomes.com and just go take a look and send us an e-mail through there.

Todd Miller:

:

Fantastic, easy enough, fiberfasthomes.com. Well, thank you again, Scott. This has been a pleasure. I've greatly enjoyed it. Thank you.

Scott Sampson:

:

All right. Thank you.

Scott Sampson:

:

Todd Miller: And thank you to our audience for tuning in to this episode of Construction Disruption with Scott Sampson of Fiber Fast Homes. Please watch for future episodes of our podcast. We've got more great guests on tap every week and don't forget to leave a review for us on Apple Podcasts or YouTube. But until then, encourage everybody. Change the world for someone, make them smile, bring them encouragement, bring them that smile. Very powerful things that we can do to change the world. And in the meanwhile, God bless and take care. This is Isaiah Industries signing off until the next episode of Construction Disruption.

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