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37. Who Could Say No to Wicked? (with Alyssa Joy Fox)
Episode 3730th October 2022 • Sentimental Men • Theatrely
00:00:00 01:13:48

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Oh, what a celebration we’ll have today! To celebrate nineteen years of Wicked (and two years of Sentimental Men), Kevin and Quincy are joined by Alyssa Joy Fox to chat about cattle call auditions, put in rehearsals and her journey from a non-theatre kid to one of Wicked’s most reliable leading ladies. Plus, the boys get Sentimental about Wicked’s new neighbor – KPOP!

Transcripts

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At the beginning of Let It Go

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starts. You

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hear the inhale and the whispers.

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And not just from kids, but.

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From the gays.

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From the gays.

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Very that.

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My name is Quincy.

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And my name's Kevin.

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And this is Sentimental Men from

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Theatrely.

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We are here to

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Talk and maybe scream.

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About our favorite women in musical

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theater.

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Happy a Wicked day, everyone.

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Happy wicked day, but also

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Happy Second Birthday to Sentimental

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Men.

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The podcast did we launch on Wicked

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Day?

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We did. It was Wicked Day 2020.

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Oh, wow. Happy birthday, Kevin.

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Thank you. I'm so.

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I'm not in the mood to be sappy

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today.

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That's okay. I don't need to be

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sappy. But I will just say

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it's been a fun two years, and I'm

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excited for this next upcoming

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chapter because I think we're going

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to be doing some really cool stuff

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with Aunty Theater early.

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Yeah, it has been a very fun two

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years. How are you celebrating

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Wicked Day. Are you going to do

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anything on? We're recording this

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before we day, obviously.

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Yeah, we do need to go back

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and see Wicked.

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I know.

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Let's do that before we leave for

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the holidays.

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As far as I know here,

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a week out. I do not have any wicked

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day plans to you.

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I mean, I really am hankering to see

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Wicked, and I've been holding off

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because I feel like I've seen it too

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many times without you.

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Not that that's a rule that we have

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to. Or do I think we.

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Should make it a.

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Rule that we have. Yeah,

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well, it just feels like if I go too

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many times seeing Wicked without

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Kevin, it feels a little cheater

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vibes. But if you're not committed

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to seeing it with me before

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Christmas, then I guess I will

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have to make do and go

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with someone else.

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I was going to say that I

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am going on a trip next month

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and I am going to be in London

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and I'm like, Do I, do I like

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DM Lucy Jones and be like, Hey

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girl.

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Yeah, you should. Totally should.

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Lucy Jones if you're listening to

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this.

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But she maybe.

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Kevin is going to come and see you

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this year.

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That is what you should have to see

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about in London.

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Yeah, I hope to.

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How was your week?

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Do you do anything fun?

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Bad and no.

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How is yours?

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It's fine. I went to Rhode Island

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for the weekend. There are a couple

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of things I want to hit on with

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these listeners. I went to Rhode

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Island for the weekend.

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It so happened that I had this fall

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weekend planned and also

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then Taylor Swift announced an album

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and it was perfect.

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I had this great Taylor Swift

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weekend.

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Listen to the album.

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If you haven't listened to Midnight

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yet, please do.

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But on this wicked day, I would like

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to talk about Wicked Next Door

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Neighbor, K-Pop, the

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musical on Broadway.

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Everyone, I went to the first

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preview of K-Pop, which and I met

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Bree, friend of the Pod.

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Bree is working on K-Pop.

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Oh, forgive me. I forget what

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specifically she's doing on K-Pop,

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but she was at the first preview and

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we finally got to meet in real life,

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which was so fun.

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But K-Pop is so good and

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you'll love it. Have it, I think.

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I know. I can't wait.

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I can't wait. It's on.

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It's on my list for between

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Thanksgiving and Christmas.

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Yeah, I saw it a bunch of times when

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it was off-Broadway five years ago

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at Ars Nova, because I was ushering

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there at the time and I fell in love

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with it then. This Broadway

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iteration is very different than

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it was off-Broadway.

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Very different.

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A lot of the same songs are there.

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The best song arguably in the show.

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They have changed so that it's now

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playing on a stereo in the Broadway

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iteration and it's not performed

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live.

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That is criminal.

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If anyone involved with K-Pop is

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listening to this, there's still

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time. You're still in previews.

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Please change that because Windup

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Doll is the name of the song should

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be performed live. It can't be

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reduced to just being played on a

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stereo. It's just such a good song

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and deserves a live performance.

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And I really hope that when I go

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back to K-Pop on November 11th,

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because I already have tickets to go

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out again, that that song

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is being performed live.

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But the whole thing is so great.

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Luna was really impressive.

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She's the K-Pop star who's leading.

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And then I didn't really have any

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expectations going in, but walked

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out, blown away by her performance.

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I'm very excited.

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To see what gets the amount of work

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in and then.

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Oh my God, a double feature.

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That would be fun.

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Yeah. Who are we talking to today?

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Kevin Quincy.

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We're talking to Alyssa Joy Fox

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today.

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This has been a long time coming.

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I think that Alyssa was one of the

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first few green girls

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that started interacting us like

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on social back when we

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launched the podcast like two years

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ago. I feel like pretty early on as

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when we started interacting

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with her. And so it feels really

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cool to have her on the pod,

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especially now that she is currently

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the Broadway standby.

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She has been

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with Wicked for over

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a decade.

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Long time.

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Long time, which Kevin will

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break down for us.

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All right. So Miz Fox first

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joined the Wicked Family in 2010

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in the San Francisco Company.

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She was the alphabet understudy in

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the closing cast after the San

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Francisco production closed from

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2012 to 2015.

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Alyssa was going in and out of

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the second national tour as the

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Elphaba stand by before

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in 2015, when

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she made her principal debut

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on the Second National Tour from

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2016 to

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2017, she was

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in the wicked Broadway company

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as the Elphaba standby, and

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then from 2018

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to 2020, she was

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in Frozen on Broadway as

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the Elsa standby.

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The second Elsa we've had on the

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pod. The second.

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Elsa.

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Yeah. After the Broadway shut down

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in 2021, Ms..

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Fox was back on the second national

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tour of Wicked as an

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emergency cover.

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She also she did the whole run of

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Frozen Broadway.

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She did the whole run.

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Yeah. So.

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She was in the second national tour

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as an emergency cover December

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2021, and then from July

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2022 until right now,

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which is October 2022.

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Alissa has been back in the Broadway

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company of Wicked as the alpha

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of a stand by, which honestly

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I love the transition of power

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from Jenny to Noyer to Alissa

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Joy Fox.

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The transition of the cushy gig from

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Jenny to No.

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Two as a.

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When one supreme leaves, the other

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supreme rises.

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Like that's that's such a powerful

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handoff.

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I also love that we've had the

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current alphabet principal and the

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current of Stand By Now on our

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little pod.

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Yes. And we also we had Lindsay

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and Jenny.

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Oh, yeah.

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Is this going to be a thing that we

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are doing? I guess that makes sense.

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Yeah.

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And that brings us to today, October

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today, 2022.

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I saw her like a month ago,

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probably at this point.

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Oh, yeah. Actually, I talked to her

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after seeing her so fresh.

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Before we get into that and these

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wicked apps we do stuck on a ship

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right until 100.

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Do I have one?

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Yes.

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So this stuck on Ashby.

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I'm happy because as I have

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mentioned before, there are a finite

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amount of videos of Stephanie

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J. BLOCK on YouTube.

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And so sometimes finding

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the stock on SJ B is like

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a very deep dove, which I

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obviously love.

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But since the last time we

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recorded Ms..

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BLOCK is back on Broadway and

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she.

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Has been doing press.

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Well, that is literally

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the first bullet point on my

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discussion is if there's

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if yes, if there's one thing

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Stephanie J. BLOCK is going to do,

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it's nail it at a press

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event. She is so good at

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press. She's good at soundbites.

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She's good at like the banter of it

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all. She's so.

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Good. Sure I do.

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Yeah. She is one of those that comes

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across that they genuinely enjoy

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doing those kinds of press moments.

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Yeah, sometimes.

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Which is fun because you want to

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watch someone who does want to be

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there do an interview or something,

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you know?

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Yeah, she's a joy to watch, I should

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just say, because I didn't say right

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now I am referencing the

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Into the Woods revival cast

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performance on the Today

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show is the I'm.

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Amazing that we

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get Stephanie J.

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BLOCK on the Today show

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and that in 2022.

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I'm so thankful and I

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loved it. It was like Sarah Burrows

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opened this this musical

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who is like.

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Did they do the Today Show opening

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cast?

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Well, no, because it was like

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Broadway week.

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I think so.

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Like that's why all the Broadway

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shows were on that week.

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But I just love that.

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Like Stephanie J.

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BLOCK as the leading lady

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or one of the the two leading

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ladies and Into the Woods is

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getting to like carry the

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show through its press tour.

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I think it's great.

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The second thing that I noticed

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when watching this video is they

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show a production photo

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of Stephanie and Sebastian

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and like they're facing each other

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and she's kind of like grabbing his

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face, kind of

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like teasingly almost.

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And it's just such a cute picture.

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And I feel like it really

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encapsulates the energy of

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watching them as like

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real husband and wife do the

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show together.

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Last night was Sebastian's last

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performance and into the way I Never

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Know.

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No More, I know.

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And Brian D'Arcy James's coming

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back right.

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Yeah. Mm.

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That's an interesting combination.

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I would like to hear him and

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Stephanie J. BLOCK sing together.

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Have they done

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something together before?

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Why do I think they have?

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Was it like a city center thing?

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No. Maybe it's just because she

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sings. What is it about her that

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I'm thinking that?

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Because in my head, when I read

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that, I was like, Oh, that's going to

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be cute. They're going to like

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reunite. But now I'm like, Wait, I

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don't think they actually have, at

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least that I know of, done anything

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together.

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Another thing that I love about this

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video is Stephanie

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J. BLOCK. I feel like has a very

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decidedly wide

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and grounded stance as

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the baker's wife.

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I just, like, love the physical

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choice that she makes because

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it's so opposite of like

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I feel like the way she kind of

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like, stands and moves in real life.

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And it's like, of course, Miss

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Stephanie J. BLOCK has like a

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movement vocabulary for this

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character.

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I mean, that whole performance was

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so thrilling.

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I don't know, there was such an

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energy because those morning show

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performances don't always, I think,

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translate very well when you see

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them online later.

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But that performance really stood

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out as like being very there

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was just something about the buzz of

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the cast together and they were all

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in sync. It was really.

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Great. Yeah. And especially with

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like this show, like cutting down

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the Prolog into

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like a little capsule

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performance for a TV

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show is really hard and I thought

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that it like they did such a good

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job with it. Anyways, all of this is

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to say one of my favorite.

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It's like right up there with

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justifies the beans for me.

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One of my favorite moments and into

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the woods is when the baker's wife

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goes the hair because

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it's such like a throwaway line.

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But it's always fun to hear how

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the baker's wife places it

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because it's like, kind of just

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like.

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Right. And a lot of people like mix

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the place.

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And I am happy to say

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that RMS BLOCK, Miss J.

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BLOCK, gives us a solid mix

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and a healthy spin in a way that

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it's like she has no business

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putting all of that into a

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tiny little throwaway two

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word line.

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But she does.

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It's never a throwaway when it's

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Stephanie.

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Jay That's exactly right.

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It's never a throwaway.

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She is like, you

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know, I'm going to butcher this,

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which is bad. But, you know, when

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they say like this is sensitive

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because of into the words, but like,

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isn't it like when you kill a cow,

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you use every part of it?

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Am I making this up?

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I mean.

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I've never heard that, but.

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Sure, terrible analogy.

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Anyway, that's Stephanie J.

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BLOCK. When you hand her a script,

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that is Stephanie J.

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BLOCK, she says, I have to use every

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single part of this script

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to tell this story, and that's the

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way to do it.

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That's that Virgo Energy go part.

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I know she is using

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every single part of the cow, the

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cow, the cape, the slipper and

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the hair.

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Okay. Should we go talk to a less

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adroit fox?

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I think we should.

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Elissa Fox is here with us today.

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Thank you so much for joining us.

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My pleasure.

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I know finally after all this time.

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Yeah, this has been in the works for

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a while. We've been circling each

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other. And you sent us into two

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truths in a lie for an episode a

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while back, right?

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Yeah, I. Absolutely.

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Which we will get to.

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Yeah. Because we have.

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Yeah, because we need the stories

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behind the truth.

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Absolutely. Yeah.

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Okay, so we start every interview

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with how did Wicked come into your

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life as a real person, not as

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actress?

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Alicia Fox.

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I'm trying to remember the first

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time it was definitely the

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The Cast album, and I wasn't

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really a theater person before.

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Wicked actually.

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Really kind.

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Of.

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And in a way, I grew up singing in

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church and I knew that I wanted to

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be a singer, but I didn't really

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know how that would translate to

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like a career.

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But I heard the

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cast album for the first time and I

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was just like, I heard Idina

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sing and

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they had a defying gravity.

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And I was just like, This is what I

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want to do. It was like immediate,

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like, I'm going to do this kind

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of thing.

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Do you remember what juncture of

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your life you were at?

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I was I think in my I had just

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left high school.

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I just graduated high school.

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And I got it maybe like

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a year or two late from when it came

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out.

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You know, I was.

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Behind not being a theater person.

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Yeah.

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I don't even know how I came

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across. I don't remember if it was a

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friend that shared it with me and

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was like, Check this out, you should

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sing this.

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Or.

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Whatever, because how does a

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Broadway cast of them get in your

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orbit if you're not a theater?

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Exactly. And it was very much

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like, what is this world?

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Like, I always knew Broadway is a

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thing, but wicked and specifically,

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like, was like I felt a

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very strong pathway into

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that world.

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Yeah. And where did you grow up?

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Dallas or a suburb of Dallas?

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I was born in Dallas, but I grew up

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in Garland, Texas.

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Okay. So when did theater become a

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thing?

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If you weren't a theater person, why

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did you decide to pursue it?

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I was always a performer.

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I always wanted to sing, and I was

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kind of trying to figure out how to

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do that after I was, you know,

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getting out of high school, going

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into college.

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And I thought maybe I would do like

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vocal performance or choir

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or something or other.

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Like, I really enjoyed that kind of

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singing with other people and

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the way that that feels live with

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an audience.

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And so I

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always do Broadway was a thing, but

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I didn't know. I thought, maybe you

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have to like dance.

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And I've never done that.

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And I was terrible at that, so

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I never knew that it would.

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That's a popular Elphaba response.

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When I tell you,

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it starts off.

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She's not a dancer.

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So.

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So it was kind of like I went to

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school and I went to Oklahoma City

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University and at that point I

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was like, Oh, I want to I want to do

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musical theater because I then I

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was just like really absorbing every

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piece of musical theater that I

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could get my hands on.

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When I first started college, so it

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was really.

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What else was like on your

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on your iPod Shuffle at that point?

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Oh, what.

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Other musicals were.

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You? Oh, my God.

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That's a great question, because it

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was it was just I was saturated

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in it. I really like indie rock

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music, but it just, like, took me

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out of that first.

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Yeah.

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And I just listening to musicals,

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my, my friend Neil and I had had

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this thing where we would basically

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listen to a new musical that

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we had never heard every week.

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That's very theater, kid review,

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very few.

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And I was like a late bloomer with

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the theater kid thing, but so it was

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just like all at once I was just

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kind of like, this is my life.

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But like Emily, Molly was a

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good belt song to that.

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A whole.

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Cast album.

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Yeah, sure.

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That was big. Yeah.

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Anything like Sutton Foster was so

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fun because I was just like, this is

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so, like, joyful and and

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exciting.

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And then, of course, like, Jekyll

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and Hyde.

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You know.

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So you knew you were a Belcher as

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from the start parade.

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Like we're going through all the

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things, you know.

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Exactly.

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I was most drawn to the things that

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I just enjoyed singing.

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And especially like in the car, I

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would just go balls to the wall in

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the car driving from Oklahoma

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City to Dallas every weekend.

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But just like belting out any

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any possible random,

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obscure musical theater song that I

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found.

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So were you studying theater in

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school?

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It was it was a music major, so

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it was a little different.

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But I was supposed to learn dancing

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there, and I did not.

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I was just not a good student.

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I eventually dropped out

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and we'll get to that because the

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reason was that I wanted to audition

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for other things.

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Outside of school.

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Yeah, well, that's a natural segway,

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because then we want to know

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the first audition

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for Wicked. How did it even come

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about and what was the thought

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process then?

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I have a really interesting story

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because I got cast initially

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from an non-equity cattle.

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Car ride and

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I was like, so

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I was I had.

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Already I knew that I wanted to

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go and do Broadway

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and audition for Broadway and get

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into that world.

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But I was was at the.

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Time when you initially went to

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school for music or did you think

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you were going to do that?

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Eventually, I went to community

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college for a year.

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I didn't really know what I was

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going to do. And then I got really

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like into musical theater then

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and I was like, okay, well I would

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like to go to a university for this,

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you know, took out way too much in

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loans to go to a private.

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School that.

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I eventually dropped out of because

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I wanted to, like, work.

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So I was just kind of like I

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learned by doing in a way that I was

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just like, This is not for me.

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So I kind of

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I didn't have a lot of money at

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all. And I had never been to New

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York City before, but I saw on

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Playbill.com.

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Ever heard of such job of it?

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That's exactly what it was.

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Filter.

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Yeah.

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All those. Yeah.

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Yeah.

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And that's how I found the first,

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like the non-equity cattle call.

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And it was just kind of like a

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general blanket come

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this day to

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Telsey casting what it was right

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there. And.

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Yes, yeah.

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Come and audition.

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And I guess you had no frame of

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reference for any of that.

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I had semi done

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one Rocky Horror

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Picture show that was technically

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like an equity show.

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I was in the ensemble, I danced

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and it was the time warp.

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That's the cap.

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Well, that's about the

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dance instruction.

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The song is in

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the song like.

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Yes, yes.

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So when you were going into the

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non-equity call, were

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you like, I'm dead set on booking

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this or are you just. Well, I'll try

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and see what happens.

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It was like it was going to happen.

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Like I knew it's like I knew

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like.

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I and I.

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Didn't have a lot of money.

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So I was like, okay, I'm going to

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fly up to New York for the first

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time. My best friend lived there at

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the time and lived here at the time

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on St Mark's and I flew in.

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It was like, you know, like a $500

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plane ticket in the fall

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of 2008.

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Wow. Yeah.

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At the.

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Time.

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What a time to be.

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Is probably.

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Elphaba in Broadway.

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She probably was, but I couldn't

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afford a ticket to go see the show.

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So the first show I ever saw was

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Miss Ali Trim and 13 The

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Musical.

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They had a rush and I was like, I

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can afford that. Let's go there.

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And so now.

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I see that story now.

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Yeah, it's like the first.

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Thing I said to her, I was like, You

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are my first Broadway show.

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This is like full circle.

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So I had no idea what I was getting

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into. So. So I was going to I

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just came in town for maybe two

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days, was going to fly back the next

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day for like a cocktail

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dress. And it was like raining

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outside. And they made you line up

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outside of.

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The on.

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The street.

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And there was like a.

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Line and this was just a general

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call. He didn't know you weren't

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like alphabet, right?

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No, it was general.

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So there were there were maybe

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I don't feel like I'm exaggerating

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by saying that there were about 500

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people there waiting in the

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rain out on the line.

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Out on the street.

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Yeah.

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Going around the corner,

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you know, go to the bathroom at the

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McDonald's across the street, right?

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Yeah.

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So dedication, real dedication.

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And so I get in there finally, you

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know, after being like freezing in

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the cold in this cocktail dress.

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And I go up and

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it's a bunch of different rooms and

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each one has like a casting

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associate, I guess in it.

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I don't remember I had I just was

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like, I don't know what this is.

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I'm just going to do whatever they

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tell me.

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And I imagine it's probably pretty

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cool to be in like a real audition.

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It was.

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It was because.

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I just was just like, what is this?

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And for a few years,

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I was like, This is how auditions

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go. And I got in there and they were

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like, Can you sing?

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Like, we'd like you all to, like,

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sing eight bars a

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cappella.

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Of anything you want.

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Yeah. What do you think I say?

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I had just done Little Women at OSU,

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and I did the end of astonishing

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classic.

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And then my kids, like, they were

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like, okay, that's good.

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We'll send you to the other room

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with Craig Burns, the casting

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director. And so I sang for him and

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he was like, Can you sing some of

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this Elphaba stuff for me?

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And I was like, Sure.

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And then I went.

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Oh, so he saw that in.

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You? Yeah.

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Oh yeah, that's right.

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It was cool.

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But it was one of those things where

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I was like, my mom was like, Are you

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sure you want to spend your money

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and go up there and do this

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audition? I was like, Mom, if I

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do this, I'm going to play

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Elphaba. She was like, okay.

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Great. Wow, I love it.

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There was like a very it was a very

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sure thing in

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my head.

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And you had known the show at this

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point already, so I.

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Assume it was.

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Incredibly attached.

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Yes. And I had seen it on tour

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in Dallas at that point.

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I'm just like so obsessed with the

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fact that like there wasn't even a

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doubt in your mind.

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And then, like, not only did it come

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true, like eventually it came

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true, like that day kind of.

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It took me about a year and a half

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to actually get.

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The job, but think there was

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back.

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A few times but yeah that

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that was the initial one though.

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Yeah.

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Okay.

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So what was the journey after that

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initial audition like?

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Did you get any feedback or anything

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after that audition?

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Yeah, they.

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Were like, We would love to call you

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back at a later time.

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You know, they were kind of at one

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point, they they kind of put the

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necessarios material in front of me.

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I was like, Can you sing this?

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And I think I was too like khaki

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for that or something or

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loud.

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Which might be the.

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Delineation because I feel like we

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hear a lot from Elphaba is where

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when they are auditioning they kind

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of get put in this nasal rose or

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Elphaba.

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Right on right.

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Is being quirky.

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What brings you to Elphaba?

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I don't know.

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But there's something there.

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Yeah, I feel like.

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Because I understand, like singing

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wise, if you can sing alphabet, you

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can sing. That's a rose. Yes.

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And I feel like NASA's just a little

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bit chiller, you know what I mean?

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And I guess some of

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the alphabet is we

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that we're loud.

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Yes. Rose is more buttoned up.

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I feel like she is.

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More buttoned up. She is more like

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I know the rules, I'm going to

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follow them.

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And Elphaba is more.

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Like and

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I feel very I've always felt

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very much so.

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And thus they were like, Oh, I

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did the next rose material.

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Like they were just like go out

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there and read it first like it and

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then come back in here and do the

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material. And I did it and they were

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like, okay, no.

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The pick of the alphabet material.

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Yeah.

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Oh, my God.

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So I said it was Oh yeah.

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And I was like, well, I knew that.

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I was like, I don't want to be the

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rose. I want to see the

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Elphaba songs like That's my

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character.

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She was bullied too.

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I would have to be her

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for being quiet.

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Okay. Yeah.

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So what was the next phase of

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auditions that brought you to

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Elphaba?

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So I was working at a

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Teavana Inn in Penn Square

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Mall in Oklahoma City.

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Wow.

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That's.

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I roll back to.

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What I'm telling.

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You. Starbucks bought them and now

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they do not exist, basically.

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Yeah.

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But yes, I was working at the mall

Speaker:

at the time, but I was they every

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time that Craig Bergman would call

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me personally on my cell phone being

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like, Hey, can you be

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here next week to

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sing for the team again?

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Or To read and sing for the team?

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And I was like, Yeah, of course.

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Were you auditioning for other

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things at this time?

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No, this was it.

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The eggs were in the basket.

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That was it. And that and that was

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after that first initial audition,

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that open call I had like got

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a taste in. Like Craig Burns is

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like, we're going to call you back

Speaker:

at a later date. I didn't he was

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like, it could be an yeah.

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And I. I was just like, okay, I'm

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out of school now.

Speaker:

And just like immediately I was just

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like, I'm done with school.

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I'm just going to, like, put my eggs

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in this basket and make sure it

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happens. So it was really.

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Okay. So so you dropped out of

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school after that audition?

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I dropped out of school after that

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initial open audition.

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And then I worked at the Teavana

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in the mall for a year and a half.

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And then I finally, like maybe

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my like fifth or sixth time

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flying back and forth to New York.

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They had me do some dancing

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and I did some dancing.

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Dancing.

Speaker:

And and they were

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like, okay.

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And I booked that same

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day, I think Craig called me and

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was like, Hey, congratulations.

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We would like you to be

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Elphaba understudy in the ensemble

Speaker:

in San Francisco, and that was 2010.

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And they said, You have two days to

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move to San Francisco.

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They always seem to say that.

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Yeah, you would think you'd have

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a little bit more

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time.

Speaker:

It's crazy because we keep hearing

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stories like this and it's crazy me

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that actors are just like, Yeah,

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okay, so I'm just.

Speaker:

Expected to do it.

Speaker:

And they do because like, nobody's

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going to like pass up that.

Speaker:

It's wicked.

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It's wicked.

Speaker:

It was like my eggs were.

Speaker:

There, like, right.

Speaker:

Got to go get a hot

Speaker:

chicken. Okay.

Speaker:

So you had two days.

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You fly to San Francisco.

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Is this your first

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so Rocky Horror happened?

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Would you say this was your first

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like big leagues?

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Oh, yeah.

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Gotcha. I was like three.

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Versions versus reality.

Speaker:

I was so green.

Speaker:

And I had no idea what I was doing.

Speaker:

I had to, like, learn the rules.

Speaker:

Nobody, like, gives you, like, a

Speaker:

rule sheet or, like, this is

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etiquette, theater etiquette.

Speaker:

I had just never done that.

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I wasn't like a theater kid, like

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a theater kid kid.

Speaker:

And so I kind of had to learn it

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later while.

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Everyone else.

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Is a lot. There's a lot of like.

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There was a lot exactly.

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Like a warm up in the dressing

Speaker:

rooms and like you literally will

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get written up and find if you

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relate this many times or,

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you know, just like so many things.

Speaker:

Did you have a mentor

Speaker:

in that cast that kind of took you

Speaker:

under their wing?

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I think some of them were super

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irritated with me.

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Oh, because

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I came in and like I said, I danced.

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And so.

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They were kind of trying to teach me

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the ensemble track and they were

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like, Oh, this girl has no idea.

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What she's doing.

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Why?

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They were probably like, Oh, why the

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hell did she get hired

Speaker:

that?

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So I was being taught and I didn't

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know what in turn was.

Speaker:

And so how do you put a person into

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an ensemble that doesn't even know

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what that is?

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So I think they they switched

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some of the ensemble tracks around

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really.

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And I don't think some of the

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ensemble members enjoyed that

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because it was just like, Oh, this

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girl can't dance, let's make

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everyone else do the harder work.

Speaker:

But also just because you're special

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enough to make a nomination for.

Speaker:

Yes, I think back.

Speaker:

About it now and I'm like, well, I

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would be upset if that were me, too.

Speaker:

Like those girls were right.

Speaker:

And now one of my one of my best

Speaker:

friends, Lauren Houghton, who was

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she was out in San Francisco with

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me. And we were also on the tour

Speaker:

that whole time.

Speaker:

She didn't like me at first, and I

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think we got really close after she

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was like, Oh, you just did it.

Speaker:

She just didn't know.

Speaker:

I just didn't know any.

Speaker:

She was just a kid.

Speaker:

I was just a kid.

Speaker:

A bright eyed, bushy tailed kid

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with, you know.

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Very brave

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hair, you know, very brave.

Speaker:

But it was.

Speaker:

And you went on as alphabet while

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you understudy. And I went.

Speaker:

On the day after my

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put in.

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Oh, my.

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God. Yeah.

Speaker:

I went on the day after my put it

Speaker:

my Elphaba put in.

Speaker:

It's always so.

Speaker:

Chaotic. There's never like.

Speaker:

An.

Speaker:

Alphabet review story.

Speaker:

No, it was crazy.

Speaker:

And at least I had to put in, you

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know what I mean? Because later on,

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you know, I didn't really have many

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put ins since then.

Speaker:

But um.

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Yeah, so, so that was,

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that was kind of my journey getting

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into and the first person I,

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the first effort by understudying

Speaker:

for it was Eden Espinosa.

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And she was amazing.

Speaker:

And that was just incredible

Speaker:

because like, how many times did I

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listen to Once Upon a Time from

Speaker:

Brooklyn?

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Right. Like at that point as a

Speaker:

theater kid, I'm sure it was

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a thing for you.

Speaker:

Absolutely.

Speaker:

And she had already done like a few

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runs as Elphaba, so it was just

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like, ooh, I can like learn things

Speaker:

from her. And I did.

Speaker:

She was like a master class and like

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this is how you can do Elphaba

Speaker:

without. Yeah, completely.

Speaker:

You have like one eat in memory

Speaker:

that sticks out to you and put you

Speaker:

on the spot.

Speaker:

You know.

Speaker:

I remember the first

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week I was there and I think I was

Speaker:

shadowing backstage for

Speaker:

my new ensemble track that

Speaker:

I was coming into, and

Speaker:

they had me watch right there on the

Speaker:

side. And you can kind of see

Speaker:

during Defying Gravity, they were

Speaker:

like, okay, you're going to watch

Speaker:

for the ensemble members to come out

Speaker:

at the end. And I was like, okay,

Speaker:

but I got to watch the entire

Speaker:

defying gravity from the side during

Speaker:

the show and when she

Speaker:

just seeing the way she got

Speaker:

up and got into the lift and

Speaker:

just sang her soul

Speaker:

out was so incredible.

Speaker:

And I was like, absolutely moved to

Speaker:

tears, just like sitting there.

Speaker:

Like I tried to hide from the

Speaker:

stagehands, like, sobbing, you know.

Speaker:

Especially at that stage in your

Speaker:

career, I imagine.

Speaker:

Oh, yeah.

Speaker:

And I was just like, I can't believe

Speaker:

that I'm here right now.

Speaker:

It was very much like, I mean,

Speaker:

this is almost 13 years later, but.

Speaker:

I'm yeah.

Speaker:

I'm still like, it's

Speaker:

still emotional for me, you know.

Speaker:

Somehow.

Speaker:

Somehow that's all for me.

Speaker:

Okay. So that's a good segue

Speaker:

way because this happened.

Speaker:

You were understudy in San Francisco

Speaker:

in 2010, 2010.

Speaker:

That's right.

Speaker:

It is now 2022

Speaker:

Eliza Fox and you are the current

Speaker:

Elphaba stand by on Broadway.

Speaker:

I am

Speaker:

it it's been so long journey

Speaker:

my what is my so I don't want to

Speaker:

jump to the end.

Speaker:

I don't want to jump to the end.

Speaker:

Yeah, because I feel like the

Speaker:

journey is very interesting.

Speaker:

So 2010 happened and then you went

Speaker:

the second national tour.

Speaker:

I stand by in 2012.

Speaker:

Well, I believe 1212.

Speaker:

So what was that, two years in

Speaker:

between? Was there a talk?

Speaker:

Did you think your wicked journey

Speaker:

was done? Where you wanting to

Speaker:

continue on?

Speaker:

I had I think

Speaker:

I had gone in another couple of

Speaker:

times. I was auditioning for other

Speaker:

things. I got an agent at that point

Speaker:

when I moved to New York for the

Speaker:

first time.

Speaker:

Because we were like, we are doing.

Speaker:

This now.

Speaker:

Yes. Like that.

Speaker:

That was that was it.

Speaker:

And people were like, oh, you know,

Speaker:

work, you know, like moved

Speaker:

to New York, get an agent.

Speaker:

You're going to work.

Speaker:

I didn't work for like three years,

Speaker:

you know. So it was

Speaker:

very difficult.

Speaker:

And money is very hard in

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New York, especially when you I had

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never had money before, so I didn't

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really know how to keep money.

Speaker:

So it was a rough it was a rough

Speaker:

two years.

Speaker:

So I worked.

Speaker:

I was a nanny.

Speaker:

I love doing that.

Speaker:

I love kids.

Speaker:

And I also worked at

Speaker:

an Argosy in Columbus Circle.

Speaker:

I think those two

Speaker:

I really like 30 year old.

Speaker:

I really.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

I don't drink coffee.

Speaker:

It's only tea.

Speaker:

From your second act,

Speaker:

you're going to open a tea shop.

Speaker:

I would actually love that.

Speaker:

I mean, I'm not much of a business

Speaker:

person, but

Speaker:

look, she has others.

Speaker:

We can make it happen.

Speaker:

It's great. Perfect, perfect.

Speaker:

Okay, so this two years you were

Speaker:

actively auditioning.

Speaker:

Yes. And doing like

Speaker:

day jobs.

Speaker:

You know.

Speaker:

But I wasn't. And I think I was

Speaker:

doing so much.

Speaker:

I was doing the grind

Speaker:

and I was auditioning and nothing

Speaker:

was hitting. Nothing was hitting.

Speaker:

I got to be frustrating after coming

Speaker:

off of Wicked.

Speaker:

Yes, because.

Speaker:

It was like I was at 100 and then

Speaker:

I had to go back down and

Speaker:

then kind of figure out

Speaker:

what a this pathway

Speaker:

looked like for me without.

Speaker:

Money raised

Speaker:

without time, you know, without

Speaker:

guidance.

Speaker:

I kind of was just doing it

Speaker:

like.

Speaker:

I had artistic fulfillment, too, I

Speaker:

think.

Speaker:

And I really missed that because

Speaker:

that was so like doing Elphaba is

Speaker:

so meaty and I'm sure you've heard

Speaker:

so many girls say this, but it's

Speaker:

like once you do that everything

Speaker:

else is easy.

Speaker:

But I am so addicted to

Speaker:

the challenge.

Speaker:

And you've said before that you're

Speaker:

addicted to playing Elphaba.

Speaker:

I am. It's like a drug.

Speaker:

It's like upsetting how much I still

Speaker:

love it after.

Speaker:

Like that is not a.

Speaker:

Common take that we get from the

Speaker:

alphabet.

Speaker:

I love it.

Speaker:

I love it. I don't know why, but I

Speaker:

love it. I feel like I I'm.

Speaker:

I'm built for it.

Speaker:

Like my voice is built for it.

Speaker:

And I've

Speaker:

seen the crazy

Speaker:

stuff that happens to these poor

Speaker:

Elphaba does.

Speaker:

And it's difficult.

Speaker:

And I'm kind of like, okay, I know

Speaker:

what the job entails.

Speaker:

So how did you get back to

Speaker:

the tour after this?

Speaker:

Oh, right. So we're kind of going

Speaker:

all over the place here, but we're

Speaker:

good.

Speaker:

I'm just trying to think of theater

Speaker:

and theater.

Speaker:

Oh, that's.

Speaker:

Great. Just like you can take

Speaker:

the.

Speaker:

Italy we love.

Speaker:

You can see a place you get

Speaker:

love. Good Christmas present

Speaker:

the Italy.

Speaker:

But okay. So I did a couple

Speaker:

auditions one time.

Speaker:

I went in for them as like a

Speaker:

callback and they were like, okay,

Speaker:

we'll call you back for I think it

Speaker:

was for the national tour of

Speaker:

four.

Speaker:

Because there were two at this point,

Speaker:

right? Yes.

Speaker:

Yeah. I'm not sure which one it was

Speaker:

for, but but

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it was for an ensemble member,

Speaker:

again, an understudy.

Speaker:

And I went in and

Speaker:

there was another dance call and

Speaker:

there was like a partnering because

Speaker:

I think there were at that point

Speaker:

they were like, we're not going to

Speaker:

move around the tracks again.

Speaker:

So it was a partnering thing.

Speaker:

So I go into this dance call

Speaker:

trying to do these partnering lifts

Speaker:

and I have my leg up.

Speaker:

I thought it was in the air,

Speaker:

but they were like, okay.

Speaker:

They're like, Okay, that's it.

Speaker:

Can you just pick your leg a little

Speaker:

bit further? And I was like, That's

Speaker:

as far.

Speaker:

As it goes.

Speaker:

And they're like, Great, we'll call

Speaker:

you back with a standby position.

Speaker:

Opens up

Speaker:

so you can stretch while you're

Speaker:

backstage.

Speaker:

Exactly.

Speaker:

Exactly.

Speaker:

So here.

Speaker:

I am. So I've kind of resigned

Speaker:

myself to being like, okay, I have

Speaker:

other strengths.

Speaker:

One of them is not to put my leg up

Speaker:

in the air while being lifted.

Speaker:

You know, like and there are.

Speaker:

There are so many other girls who

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do those amazing things with

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dance.

Speaker:

And but also.

Speaker:

I don't know when I think of like a

Speaker:

career trajectory, I think kind

Speaker:

of being put in that, Oh, she's not

Speaker:

going to be ensemble understudy,

Speaker:

we're going to put her in this

Speaker:

standby bucket is kind of an

Speaker:

elevation on a career.

Speaker:

Oh, yeah, absolutely.

Speaker:

I mean.

Speaker:

My goal was to have like a principal

Speaker:

contract and and stand by

Speaker:

is a principal contract.

Speaker:

I wanted to do that.

Speaker:

My my goal was not to be an ensemble

Speaker:

member. I knew that that was not

Speaker:

like

Speaker:

what I was good at.

Speaker:

You know, like that

Speaker:

is not what I was good at.

Speaker:

And I have so much

Speaker:

deep respect for anyone who could do

Speaker:

anything more than me.

Speaker:

Dancers are.

Speaker:

Yeah. Blow my mind.

Speaker:

Yeah, totally.

Speaker:

So the very minimal stuff I

Speaker:

could do didn't really work in that

Speaker:

addition.

Speaker:

But.

Speaker:

So did you have to audition

Speaker:

for standby or did they just call

Speaker:

you?

Speaker:

I had to re audition.

Speaker:

I think every time they had me.

Speaker:

Every audition.

Speaker:

Every time until when I'm assuming

Speaker:

that stopped at some point.

Speaker:

It stopped after.

Speaker:

I didn't have to, like, audition

Speaker:

when I was on tour.

Speaker:

And I was the standby.

Speaker:

I was the standby for two and a half

Speaker:

years.

Speaker:

Then they bumped me to lead out

Speaker:

there on tour.

Speaker:

But it took a while.

Speaker:

Two and a half years.

Speaker:

I was there and I really wanted.

Speaker:

And were you like advocacy?

Speaker:

An engineer told us that while she

Speaker:

was sandbagging for a long time, she

Speaker:

started kind of internally

Speaker:

advocating being like, Hey, I would

Speaker:

love to be bumped up to lead.

Speaker:

Absolutely.

Speaker:

Yes. Okay.

Speaker:

And to this day, still doing it.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Right. Like it's and go like, do you

Speaker:

want to do this principal on

Speaker:

Broadway?

Speaker:

You think?

Speaker:

I can't tell you how.

Speaker:

I can't tell you how much I want it.

Speaker:

I really can't tell you how much.

Speaker:

Still, still, like I said.

Speaker:

I still love it.

Speaker:

Like if the second I stop

Speaker:

loving it, I'll be like, I'm out.

Speaker:

By yeah, yeah.

Speaker:

But I still.

Speaker:

There is something in me that is

Speaker:

still so.

Speaker:

Close.

Speaker:

To my heart.

Speaker:

Yeah. And I think you and Jenny are

Speaker:

alike in that way.

Speaker:

We are. And we kind of both moved

Speaker:

up the ranks, you know?

Speaker:

Yeah. Over.

Speaker:

Over a more than a decade,

Speaker:

you know, decade plus.

Speaker:

And I stood by for her three times.

Speaker:

Oh, my God.

Speaker:

And then you two were like trading

Speaker:

places.

Speaker:

Yes, I know.

Speaker:

They're so crazy.

Speaker:

So, yeah, I think there's all these

Speaker:

there's all these Elphaba girls,

Speaker:

too, that you're just like, yeah, I

Speaker:

know you. Or I've understudied

Speaker:

you or you know, we were

Speaker:

all kind of very like we knew

Speaker:

each other's journeys.

Speaker:

So it was neat looking at Jenny

Speaker:

like, Oh, she has advocated

Speaker:

for herself in a way and has

Speaker:

achieved those goals that she wanted

Speaker:

to. She for herself.

Speaker:

And so it was a wonderful example of

Speaker:

like, Oh, I can do this.

Speaker:

I am able to achieve those goals

Speaker:

that I put myself forward

Speaker:

for.

Speaker:

So I did get bumped to lead on

Speaker:

tour.

Speaker:

And that was it.

Speaker:

How long like after you

Speaker:

had decided to stand by on tour?

Speaker:

I want to do lead and I'm going to

Speaker:

start advocating for myself.

Speaker:

Was it a struggle to get bumped up

Speaker:

to lead or did it happen kind of

Speaker:

naturally and organically?

Speaker:

It was a struggle.

Speaker:

Okay. I mean, I.

Speaker:

Had stood by for

Speaker:

a few girls and because Stand

Speaker:

By on tour is harder than it is

Speaker:

on Broadway, just because

Speaker:

just like psychologically, I

Speaker:

feel like because there's not that

Speaker:

there's not a Glinda standby out

Speaker:

there. There's only an of.

Speaker:

Oh.

Speaker:

And so I realized that.

Speaker:

And then if you don't go on for a

Speaker:

while, you're just kind of isolated,

Speaker:

traveling from city to city, not

Speaker:

really having a purpose because

Speaker:

you're not, like, actively in the

Speaker:

show. So all the experiences of

Speaker:

everyone else that you're traveling

Speaker:

around with, you're not

Speaker:

participating actively in the things

Speaker:

that are happening.

Speaker:

The whole reason that we're on the

Speaker:

tour, you know, so it's just like

Speaker:

kind of messes with your head.

Speaker:

I was just like, if I don't do this,

Speaker:

you know, I'm going to lose

Speaker:

it. And so there was it was hard for

Speaker:

a while because stand by the tour

Speaker:

now I'm kind of like I know,

Speaker:

like I enjoy being a standby.

Speaker:

I actually do.

Speaker:

I really.

Speaker:

Especially in New York, if you live

Speaker:

here.

Speaker:

It's great, you know?

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Not bad at all.

Speaker:

And sharing the dressing room

Speaker:

with the girls is so wonderful.

Speaker:

And I and it is it is different

Speaker:

on Broadway on tour.

Speaker:

So how did you find out that you got

Speaker:

bumped up on tour?

Speaker:

How did I find you back?

Speaker:

Yeah, I know.

Speaker:

I think my agent at the time called

Speaker:

me and was like, Hey, so

Speaker:

do you want to stick around that

Speaker:

tour a little longer?

Speaker:

I was like, Oh, yeah, sure.

Speaker:

And I knew that it was I knew that

Speaker:

it was opening up and I was like,

Speaker:

Oh, yeah, sure.

Speaker:

You know, hypothetically.

Speaker:

Yeah, I absolutely like, you

Speaker:

know, that I want that.

Speaker:

And he was like, okay, so so how do

Speaker:

you feel about playing Elphaba?

Speaker:

Eight times a week? And I was like,

Speaker:

Oh, you want to do that?

Speaker:

Give me that.

Speaker:

So I signed.

Speaker:

I was a dramatic stat.

Speaker:

Agents used to deliver news.

Speaker:

Sometimes they're just like, Who?

Speaker:

How can I say this in the most

Speaker:

dramatic possible?

Speaker:

And I love for it.

Speaker:

I love this. Then you get those like

Speaker:

nobody's.

Speaker:

Ever like camera phones were

Speaker:

as much of a thing in 2008.

Speaker:

But if.

Speaker:

Somebody like a recording you

Speaker:

if somebody.

Speaker:

Recorded me while I got those calls,

Speaker:

it would have been.

Speaker:

Like, yeah.

Speaker:

You know, the sobbing, the falling

Speaker:

down, the like laughing, the

Speaker:

screaming. It would have been all

Speaker:

that stuff.

Speaker:

So yeah.

Speaker:

So enjoy your.

Speaker:

Experience. The ball did you notice

Speaker:

like what was the difference between

Speaker:

now having to do it eight times a

Speaker:

week as opposed to being a standby?

Speaker:

And was it an easy transition for

Speaker:

you?

Speaker:

It was because I already

Speaker:

had a relationship with the cast.

Speaker:

The stamina was something that you

Speaker:

obviously have to work up to.

Speaker:

It's different doing like a one off

Speaker:

every week or two show,

Speaker:

you know, and to doing it eight

Speaker:

times a week. That's, that's just

Speaker:

so much more energy for Elphaba.

Speaker:

You have to for playing lead

Speaker:

Elphaba you have to give up

Speaker:

your entire life like

Speaker:

that is what you're doing to

Speaker:

me. It just takes every bit of

Speaker:

energy from you.

Speaker:

And was it because Jackie Burns told

Speaker:

us that it took her until her second

Speaker:

or third contract to feel totally

Speaker:

comfortable and be able to have fun

Speaker:

doing it? What was your experience.

Speaker:

Like from from early, early

Speaker:

on to.

Speaker:

From doing it.

Speaker:

As a lead?

Speaker:

As a lead, I think I don't remember.

Speaker:

That as much.

Speaker:

I think I was a little I think I was

Speaker:

pretty comfortable at that time.

Speaker:

Like I it was kind of like

Speaker:

I wanted this to happen.

Speaker:

Now it's happening and now I'm

Speaker:

enjoying it. And I did enjoy it.

Speaker:

And sometimes, you know, wicked

Speaker:

is crazy in the way.

Speaker:

That, you know, it just.

Speaker:

Is.

Speaker:

We just go a little nuts, you know,

Speaker:

Elphaba crazy and you never

Speaker:

lose your voice or your body or your

Speaker:

brain.

Speaker:

I feel like the standby to principal

Speaker:

journey is very special

Speaker:

in a way that is different

Speaker:

from, like, the tour to Broadway

Speaker:

journey. Yeah.

Speaker:

And did you feel

Speaker:

like any kind of way now

Speaker:

having a standby?

Speaker:

I think being a standby

Speaker:

for so long before being a

Speaker:

principal, before being lead

Speaker:

taught me what that

Speaker:

track goes through.

Speaker:

And so I.

Speaker:

I hope that.

Speaker:

I kind of took the torch

Speaker:

and was like, I know where this

Speaker:

person's coming from.

Speaker:

I'm going to try to

Speaker:

let them know when I'm calling out

Speaker:

because, you know, like, it's hard

Speaker:

to do those eight shows a week and

Speaker:

sometimes you need a rest.

Speaker:

Like, I know that you guys always

Speaker:

say, Let the alphabet and

Speaker:

rest.

Speaker:

LAUGHTER Missed, like, Oh,

Speaker:

come on, please let them.

Speaker:

I want that on a t shirt and t

Speaker:

theater.

Speaker:

Li Yeah, same,

Speaker:

same. I would be so silly, whereas

Speaker:

I would.

Speaker:

Actually wear that.

Speaker:

Let the alphas rest I think.

Speaker:

Really like first.

Speaker:

You can like really?

Speaker:

I think so.

Speaker:

Back over to

Speaker:

Sam.

Speaker:

Not bad idea

Speaker:

because.

Speaker:

You know, it's a fox.

Speaker:

For now.

Speaker:

Yes. I will be your model.

Speaker:

I'll be your Instagram model.

Speaker:

Perfect. Love it.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Yeah. So.

Speaker:

So it's.

Speaker:

Exhausting. And so every time I was

Speaker:

kind of like, you know, I

Speaker:

want to let my standby know.

Speaker:

I want them to feel appreciated.

Speaker:

I want to feel like that they're not

Speaker:

like the second fiddle.

Speaker:

Like, this is a team thing.

Speaker:

Like we.

Speaker:

Especially.

Speaker:

With a role like Elphaba, the

Speaker:

standby is so important, I.

Speaker:

Think. Yes.

Speaker:

Because if you if there's not

Speaker:

like a cover that can help you

Speaker:

out, you feel so much

Speaker:

pressure anyway.

Speaker:

It just goes through

Speaker:

the roof. If you're like, well, I

Speaker:

now I have to do this no matter

Speaker:

what. And it's exhausting.

Speaker:

And so it does feel kind of like

Speaker:

a team. At least that's what it felt

Speaker:

like in my experience,

Speaker:

depending on who the.

Speaker:

I was very lucky to stand by for

Speaker:

some really wonderful girls.

Speaker:

Nobody ever treated me like trash,

Speaker:

you know?

Speaker:

But I know that it happens.

Speaker:

I know that it happens.

Speaker:

I know that people get scared of

Speaker:

their cover, you know,

Speaker:

you know, territorial or whatever.

Speaker:

But I always had a wonderful,

Speaker:

wonderful experience with the girls

Speaker:

I understudied or stood by

Speaker:

for. And that kind of showed me to

Speaker:

how to live

Speaker:

as the lead with

Speaker:

other standbys and.

Speaker:

Comes your first time.

Speaker:

But I feel like we should know this.

Speaker:

I think it was Mary Kate Morrissey.

Speaker:

It was either Mary.

Speaker:

Kate Morrissey or Emily Cook.

Speaker:

I don't remember which came first.

Speaker:

Terrific.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

And they were lovely, you know, and

Speaker:

and so it always to

Speaker:

me, it felt I wanted it to feel

Speaker:

more like we're on the same team

Speaker:

kind of thing.

Speaker:

Yeah, right. That's such a good

Speaker:

attitude.

Speaker:

It's like such an it takes a village

Speaker:

attitude as opposed to.

Speaker:

The whole show, too.

Speaker:

It's not just Elphaba show, it's not

Speaker:

just Glinda show.

Speaker:

Like there's.

Speaker:

A whole.

Speaker:

Cast of literally a.

Speaker:

Cast of people and

Speaker:

and.

Speaker:

The people backstage, you know, that

Speaker:

are making the magic happen

Speaker:

like this is an.

Speaker:

Ensemble.

Speaker:

Has a lot to do, especially

Speaker:

when you compare Wicked to like

Speaker:

contemporary Broadway musicals.

Speaker:

The ensemble has so much to do in

Speaker:

Wicked. It is to like what's

Speaker:

currently playing on Broadway, you

Speaker:

know, in the new seasons.

Speaker:

Yeah, it's like every time I go back

Speaker:

to work and I'm shocked by how much

Speaker:

they do. They make.

Speaker:

The story come to life.

Speaker:

And.

Speaker:

Along with the rest of the

Speaker:

characters, but without the without

Speaker:

the ensemble, like, it would be

Speaker:

alphabetized.

Speaker:

It's like, I need to see some dance.

Speaker:

Yeah, like, yeah.

Speaker:

Broadway. Come on.

Speaker:

Yeah. So. So for everything, I.

Speaker:

Like to feel like it's more of like

Speaker:

we're all on a team.

Speaker:

Not like I'm the lead of this, but

Speaker:

it's just like, wow, what a

Speaker:

privilege to get to be

Speaker:

with these people on stage,

Speaker:

all making this story happen and

Speaker:

sharing it with everyone.

Speaker:

Yeah. So talk us through

Speaker:

that first time you got asked

Speaker:

to come stand by on Broadway,

Speaker:

because I imagine that was like a

Speaker:

big moment for you.

Speaker:

It was a big moment.

Speaker:

I obviously had never been on

Speaker:

Broadway before.

Speaker:

I this would be my

Speaker:

Broadway debut and it would be doing

Speaker:

this role that I really loved very

Speaker:

much and and are.

Speaker:

Committed to for so long.

Speaker:

Yeah, for.

Speaker:

Already at that point.

Speaker:

Very long time.

Speaker:

That was 2000 1516.

Speaker:

Something like that.

Speaker:

16.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Yeah. That's what I know.

Speaker:

You know. No, I think you're right.

Speaker:

I think that's I think your notes

Speaker:

are correct.

Speaker:

So I moved from

Speaker:

the tour to Broadway and that's kind

Speaker:

of, you know, that's what I wanted.

Speaker:

I wanted to move to Broadway after

Speaker:

that. And I think, again,

Speaker:

it was my agents who were like, Hey,

Speaker:

they would like to move you to

Speaker:

Broadway. And I was like, Okay.

Speaker:

Yeah, sure.

Speaker:

And so I.

Speaker:

Went and I was transferring with

Speaker:

other people that were moving to

Speaker:

Broadway, too. And this has

Speaker:

been a pattern in my life.

Speaker:

But I would go in and they

Speaker:

would because I'm the standby, they

Speaker:

would want to rehearse the leads,

Speaker:

which make sense to me.

Speaker:

So I would like watch a lot.

Speaker:

And this happened with that was in

Speaker:

Frozen as well and standing

Speaker:

by.

Speaker:

For oh we know how we.

Speaker:

Know which we want to talk about.

Speaker:

Later. So I

Speaker:

came in.

Speaker:

And it was my Broadway debut

Speaker:

and I had not really had

Speaker:

a rehearsal, definitely not a put

Speaker:

in.

Speaker:

On Broadway, but the show is

Speaker:

different on Broadway than it is on

Speaker:

tour.

Speaker:

Yeah, sure is.

Speaker:

And I was terrified.

Speaker:

Terrified.

Speaker:

And so I was.

Speaker:

You know, I was very nervous

Speaker:

and and people were like, well,

Speaker:

you've done this before.

Speaker:

I'm like, it's not the same.

Speaker:

Also, it's my Broadway debut.

Speaker:

Terrifying doing that without

Speaker:

a rehearsal and without.

Speaker:

A put in on the biggest stage

Speaker:

in the world.

Speaker:

Way more.

Speaker:

Stairs.

Speaker:

There's so many stairs.

Speaker:

Why are there so many?

Speaker:

Oh, so.

Speaker:

Kevin, referring to the Gershwin as

Speaker:

the biggest stage in the world.

Speaker:

I mean, like physically that stages

Speaker:

the humongous.

Speaker:

It is huge and it's

Speaker:

running.

Speaker:

There's lots of screaming, it's

Speaker:

raked.

Speaker:

So we're on. All of our bodies are

Speaker:

sideways.

Speaker:

You know. Yeah it's and.

Speaker:

Just the like different.

Speaker:

You come through a trap door and

Speaker:

stuff. The difference is so

Speaker:

different. I would feel like

Speaker:

Warren's.

Speaker:

But in rehearsal we.

Speaker:

Had done like some of the technical

Speaker:

elements, like I went up into

Speaker:

operator, not while singing

Speaker:

or anything, just like a technical.

Speaker:

Thing.

Speaker:

And then you.

Speaker:

Do exactly the safety things you're

Speaker:

going to do this run up, run down.

Speaker:

But I never had done it like all

Speaker:

consecutively as a show.

Speaker:

Had never done the full show

Speaker:

on the Gershwin stage until

Speaker:

I had my Broadway debut and

Speaker:

basically blacked out the whole

Speaker:

time because I was just like, This

Speaker:

is the craziest thing ever.

Speaker:

Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker:

So that's how.

Speaker:

That's how I made my Broadway.

Speaker:

Debut.

Speaker:

And I did not enjoy it.

Speaker:

I didn't I wish that I had,

Speaker:

but I did not enjoy it.

Speaker:

I think I freaked myself out.

Speaker:

Mm hmm. And luckily, you've had a

Speaker:

lot of time since then.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Yes, yes.

Speaker:

We've come back around and now I'm

Speaker:

okay.

Speaker:

Yeah, now I definitely don't need

Speaker:

rehearsal.

Speaker:

Yeah. You want me to come when

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I'm.

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When you need of me.

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Have a rehearsal now.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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We had a listener ask,

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what is your difference

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between Elphaba and the way that you

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play? Elphaba pre-pandemic

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and post-pandemic has not informed

Speaker:

anything in this most recent era

Speaker:

of you playing Elphaba because it

Speaker:

does feel like different time

Speaker:

periods.

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And I feel like I'm a different

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person also.

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Mm hmm.

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Right.

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You know, it's so different.

Speaker:

I think I've come to I

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feel like during the pandemic,

Speaker:

I had no choice but to look

Speaker:

internally at my own self

Speaker:

and learning things about myself and

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kind of looking at these characters

Speaker:

that I've played, both Elphaba and

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Elsa, and how they've kind

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of all their lives felt

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a certain way and trying to cover

Speaker:

up this power that they have.

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And I feel like during the pandemic,

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I kind of looked internally and I

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was like, What is holding me back?

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You know, how can I

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go on this same journey?

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What can I learn from these roles

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I've already played?

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Mm hmm. And then can I play them

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again? But with a different

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context as the actor.

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But then

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we talk us through the al-Muqrin

Speaker:

style, because we were a little

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confused of like, how everything

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lined up with all the Avengers squad

Speaker:

that they brought in. Right.

Speaker:

It was it was like the perfect storm

Speaker:

of, like,

Speaker:

sick people getting sick, people

Speaker:

getting injured.

Speaker:

Just everything was a crazy time.

Speaker:

Covered, like ripping through these

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companies.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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Like, I think I came in five

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different times during

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that period before I got on this

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contract for Stand By.

Speaker:

And was it always a last minute ask?

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Yeah.

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Yeah. And so they'd be like,

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I'd be sitting on my.

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Couch here where I'm sitting right

Speaker:

now, and I'd be like, you know, I

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like to embroider. I was

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embroidering and like watching

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television.

Speaker:

And Mary Beth, the stage

Speaker:

manager, well, just she'd just call

Speaker:

me and she'd be like, Hey, are you

Speaker:

in town? I'd be like, Yeah,

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what's going on?

Speaker:

She's like, Um, could you possibly,

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like, come in to cover,

Speaker:

to stand by?

Speaker:

And I was like, Oh, oh, yeah.

Speaker:

When do you when do you TV come in?

Speaker:

She was like, Now.

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Oh, my God.

Speaker:

That's what happened, like, numerous

Speaker:

times.

Speaker:

And by the.

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Time, are you just like Mary Beth's

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calling, like, now to get my

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shoes on like.

Speaker:

I told her to.

Speaker:

And I was like, Look, I'm unemployed

Speaker:

right now. I love doing this.

Speaker:

I love these people in this

Speaker:

building. If you need me, please

Speaker:

call me because I love

Speaker:

to do it. It's not.

Speaker:

You're not. I'm not. I don't feel

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like put out by that.

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I was happy.

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Yeah.

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Good.

Speaker:

It was exciting.

Speaker:

Was easy.

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To do.

Speaker:

Or because you're like, Oh, you've

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been doing it for so long.

Speaker:

I imagine it's still hard.

Speaker:

To jump right into, but.

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Exactly. Because I had left in 2017,

Speaker:

I left Wicked in 2017 to

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Open Frozen, and so

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I hadn't done it since 2017.

Speaker:

And then when I got called back

Speaker:

after the pandemic.

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Or.

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After the shutdown, you know, I

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it had been five years since I had

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done Elphaba and I was like.

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I don't need funding for this.

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No.

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Oh, no.

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I didn't put it for Frozen either.

Speaker:

It was it was during previews was

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like, oh my God, that's just a

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history.

Speaker:

There was footage like, all right, I

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guess. Yeah.

Speaker:

So for other people.

Speaker:

Alyssa Fox, she doesn't need to put

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in.

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I mean, I probably should have one

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just for safety reasons,

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but.

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But I did it. But I did not.

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And and when we got

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into the rehearsal, I had like, you

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know, they rehearsed me for maybe

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three days or something like that

Speaker:

because they were like, how much you

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need? And I was like, I actually

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don't know. So let's get in the room

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and see how much I remember.

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Yeah.

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Yeah. And so we went into, like, the

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rehearsal hall that's of the

Speaker:

Gershwin and there and I was like,

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okay, if why?

Speaker:

I don't know how much I know

Speaker:

of this. And she was like, okay,

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we'll just take it.

Speaker:

And I did the whole show

Speaker:

and I was just it just like my body

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started to move.

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I started to, like, speak and

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sing the words.

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And I was like, got something and

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it's in there.

Speaker:

It like stayed in there.

Speaker:

And then I'm just like, what else is

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in there that I.

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Remember. So, like, I

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remember all kinds of stuff from

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school. I just don't know how to tap

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into it.

Speaker:

So it's kind of like it just came.

Speaker:

Out of me. So I guess after

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all those years and then hearing

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it eight times a week, it's going to

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stay with you in some sort of way.

Speaker:

Plus, emotionally, it's important

Speaker:

to me. And so I think I it just

Speaker:

was stored away for safekeeping for

Speaker:

later back there.

Speaker:

Yeah.

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Do you feel like all

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of your experience,

Speaker:

like standing by and on principle,

Speaker:

allowed you to kind of find like

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a reliable alpha within

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yourself, like what

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your show is and how

Speaker:

the show you can do at the drop

Speaker:

of a hat like that.

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Yeah, cause I say I saw you, like, a

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month ago, and you are so

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comfortable in this role.

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Yeah, I feel still.

Speaker:

Exciting and exhilarating, but you

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can tell that you are just kind of

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chilling through it, which is nice

Speaker:

to see living in it.

Speaker:

Trying to.

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I'm glad I'm glad that it came out

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that way.

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Yeah, I think I.

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Think it is like I've done it so

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long that it feels comfortable.

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Like I'm not nervous before the

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show.

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Of course you get nervous if you

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have like a, like a cold or

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something that's so hard to do.

Speaker:

This particular show and this

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particular role feeling any

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little bit under the weather.

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So I think after doing it so many

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times, I kind of learned how to

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navigate both my voice

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and got to know the character

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so well, being like, What can I

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play with, you know, with

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this new actor or with this new

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actor or what?

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What are the new things that I'm

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getting out of this?

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I will say I used to be in no

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good deed, Elphaba and.

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Now you're jumping the gun.

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I love it.

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Oh, man, I love it.

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That's right. That's right.

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I was so sorry.

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I just this was like a very like pre

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it was okay.

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Yeah.

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Pre-pandemic felt very good.

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Did Elphaba like balls all

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pissed off whatever that's like

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I like lived in that and now

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after, after we came back

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I was finding so many new

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things and defying gravity that

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I.

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I don't think you're.

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Quintessential defying gravity

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Elphaba.

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I mean. Oh I love that.

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Okay. Well good, because I identify

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with that now and I did

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it before, but now I do.

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Yeah. Talk a little bit more about

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that. I think the.

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Way I have kind of

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adjusted myself

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pre and post ish

Speaker:

pandemic is very

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it's a lot about is about

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presence and being fully present

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wherever you are and not being like

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in in your head or having some

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sort of like ego experience of like,

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this is my show.

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I'm just going to impress everyone

Speaker:

with my voice, you know, I'm

Speaker:

going to riff as much as possible

Speaker:

and then blow everyone away and

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they'll never forget me.

Speaker:

It was more like, Let's be

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present and let's figure out

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what we can learn from this

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personally or what I can learn from

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this personally by doing it and

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learning from the people around me,

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whoever that those people may be.

Speaker:

So it's very much like I was finding

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so many new things and defying

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gravity because that is the song

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where she finds her power or she

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owns her power.

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So this song where she fights her

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power, it's a song where she owns

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her power. And it's

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if you think about it in terms of

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me as the actress getting to

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play that as Elphaba

Speaker:

outside of Eliza Fox teaches

Speaker:

teaches Eliza Fox how to do it for

Speaker:

herself.

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Right? So it's like a lesson

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every time I feel like now

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something is much deeper there

Speaker:

within myself with the character.

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So I'm glad that, I'm glad that it

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comes off grounded because.

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Yeah, it.

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Feels.

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It does.

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It feels grounded.

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Yeah, it was. I was just like, she

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is so comfy right now.

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I just love.

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It. I think that's really what

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guides it. I just.

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I just love it, you know?

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Right. Which I think is coming

Speaker:

through and just talking to you.

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I'm really I think you are the most

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enthusiastic actress we have had.

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Really played out for.

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Well, I'm kind of.

Speaker:

An enthusiastic person in.

Speaker:

General.

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So that tracks.

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That tracks.

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Okay. So I remember from your Two

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Truths and a Lie that Idina menzel

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has seen your performance

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as Elphaba, which I think is

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something very few people can

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say, right?

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Yeah.

Speaker:

And I didn't really believe it.

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My mother was there that night and I

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had a few friends and I because I

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think they were plan performances.

Speaker:

I think they were playing

Speaker:

performances.

Speaker:

And I was just backstage

Speaker:

and I came back to the dressing room

Speaker:

for intermission.

Speaker:

I checked my phone. My mom was like,

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Idina menzel is here.

Speaker:

And I was like, That's funny.

Speaker:

You.

Speaker:

Know, my mom knows, like, what she

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looks like, but she, I was

Speaker:

like, okay, cool.

Speaker:

Mm. Sir.

Speaker:

And then my friend Maddie texted

Speaker:

me. I was like, I

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Deena's here with her son, and

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I was like.

Speaker:

A stage manager.

Speaker:

Didn't tell you ahead of time?

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No, nobody told me.

Speaker:

It was.

Speaker:

Like. It was like they what?

Speaker:

It was like they wanted to keep it a

Speaker:

secret, you know?

Speaker:

And so there was never any like,

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absolutely, she's here.

Speaker:

You're going to see her after, you

Speaker:

know, like, whatever, like.

Speaker:

And I had never met her before.

Speaker:

Cool.

Speaker:

And so when.

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We came offstage, like she

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was just standing there backstage,

Speaker:

like we got off from bowels and here

Speaker:

is Xena with her

Speaker:

son, who's like asleep.

Speaker:

And she was just.

Speaker:

And she was so kind and she was

Speaker:

like, that was it was the first

Speaker:

time since I've been here that I've

Speaker:

watched the whole show.

Speaker:

Right. Well, there was another

Speaker:

instance, I think, where she went,

Speaker:

where she left at intermission.

Speaker:

I don't think it was you, though.

Speaker:

She did not leave because she was

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there. At the end of the show, I had

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a picture cruise with Carolyn.

Speaker:

We need to have the receipts,

Speaker:

you know.

Speaker:

Have you posted that picture online?

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Like a long time ago?

Speaker:

I'm not very good at social media.

Speaker:

But maybe.

Speaker:

I'll have to bring that one back.

Speaker:

Yeah, yeah.

Speaker:

Or send it to us and we'll post it

Speaker:

with this episode you got.

Speaker:

Well, okay, well.

Speaker:

This is we're asking for clarity on

Speaker:

that.

Speaker:

You came to the show and she

Speaker:

saw the whole thing.

Speaker:

Her her son was asleep,

Speaker:

but she saw the whole thing.

Speaker:

I swear.

Speaker:

To you.

Speaker:

We believe you.

Speaker:

We really just.

Speaker:

Wanted on air.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

So switching gears to

Speaker:

Frozen, you were standing by

Speaker:

again. Frozen, former

Speaker:

Elphaba.

Speaker:

Something that came up to me was

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what did you notice?

Speaker:

A distinct difference between

Speaker:

standing by in Frozen and standing

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by in Wicked?

Speaker:

Well, I think character wise

Speaker:

in general or like the the

Speaker:

the difficulty, I guess.

Speaker:

Of it, right. Because Caroline

Speaker:

Bowman was on the podcast too,

Speaker:

and she told us that Elphaba

Speaker:

was definitely harder than Elsa.

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Oh, yes.

Speaker:

Absolutely harder.

Speaker:

I'll figure it down.

Speaker:

Elsa gets to leave the stage

Speaker:

and like go sip on some tea in the

Speaker:

dressing room.

Speaker:

Elphaba is a little bit of a park

Speaker:

and park role.

Speaker:

In the park and.

Speaker:

Bark and I live for it.

Speaker:

You get to wear like the most

Speaker:

gorgeous costumes

Speaker:

you like.

Speaker:

You got this moment, you.

Speaker:

Have that moment.

Speaker:

It's like very powerful and like,

Speaker:

awesome.

Speaker:

But you basically come out sometimes

Speaker:

you run a little bit, but then you,

Speaker:

like, scream, and then you go back

Speaker:

to your dressing room.

Speaker:

But there it was time to go back to

Speaker:

your dressing room.

Speaker:

And like in Wicked, you're

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basically every change is a quick

Speaker:

change except for intermission.

Speaker:

So like, everything's just like it's

Speaker:

like one after another.

Speaker:

It's like running a marathon

Speaker:

every show.

Speaker:

And so Frozen was definitely

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different in that way because even

Speaker:

though it was difficult vocally, it

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was just not near as hard

Speaker:

physically.

Speaker:

Was it nice to be doing something

Speaker:

different than wicked at this

Speaker:

point in your career? Yes.

Speaker:

Yes. And I felt and I felt the

Speaker:

calling to do that, too.

Speaker:

When I saw that bringing Frozen,

Speaker:

I told my agents, I was like, can

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you get me can me in there?

Speaker:

Can you give me an appointment?

Speaker:

Sure. So I was

Speaker:

very happy that I got to do that.

Speaker:

And, you know, because I had

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basically only done

Speaker:

Wicked up until that point, up

Speaker:

until 2017.

Speaker:

So it was like my entire career was

Speaker:

just wicked.

Speaker:

And so I really did want to like

Speaker:

branch out, but it was another

Speaker:

dino role.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

But that's okay.

Speaker:

Yeah. Look.

Speaker:

I wouldn't mind if she did other

Speaker:

things and then I'd follow her.

Speaker:

Thing, right?

Speaker:

Just keep being employed,

Speaker:

you know, to be nice.

Speaker:

That would be pretty cool.

Speaker:

It was cool.

Speaker:

Standing by for a too, because

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I knew that she kind of knew what

Speaker:

both of those were, too.

Speaker:

Did you guys have that moment

Speaker:

where like we both played Elphaba?

Speaker:

I'm always curious.

Speaker:

So she's so kind

Speaker:

and I think there was always like a

Speaker:

knowing and I had played it a lot

Speaker:

more recently than she had.

Speaker:

She's done so many things since

Speaker:

then.

Speaker:

Sure.

Speaker:

So it was definitely like

Speaker:

I felt close to her because

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we had both experienced that.

Speaker:

And and I think, you know, a

Speaker:

lot of the girls that have played

Speaker:

Elsa have played Elphaba, right?

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

It's kind of we talk about the Jenna

Speaker:

alphabet. A Jenna, but it's also

Speaker:

an alphabet also.

Speaker:

Yes, yes,

Speaker:

yes. Alyssa, Buzz.

Speaker:

We love all of us.

Speaker:

Okay, so since you answered our

Speaker:

alphabet question, let's

Speaker:

do it for Frozen.

Speaker:

Were you dangerous to dream?

Speaker:

Let it go or monster?

Speaker:

Oh, come on.

Speaker:

Like, oh.

Speaker:

I love dangerous to dream, but also

Speaker:

mind.

Speaker:

Not a question.

Speaker:

Let it go.

Speaker:

I think an argument for Monster.

Speaker:

I can see an argument for Monster.

Speaker:

I'll give you that. I'll give you

Speaker:

that because it's like, you.

Speaker:

Know, you get to like, really like

Speaker:

rock and roll sing and and

Speaker:

there are pandas involved.

Speaker:

Yeah, yeah.

Speaker:

But first, a lot of guys me let it

Speaker:

go.

Speaker:

It was like.

Speaker:

The.

Speaker:

Energy coming from the audience.

Speaker:

There's something about live

Speaker:

performance that really gets me.

Speaker:

And that song in particular, people

Speaker:

go nuts over and we had some

Speaker:

a pretty young audience a lot

Speaker:

of the time. And sure, a lot

Speaker:

of them was their first Broadway

Speaker:

show, but they knew that song, you

Speaker:

know, know that pretty much

Speaker:

everyone in the audience knew that

Speaker:

song. And so when that piano part at

Speaker:

the beginning of Let It Go starts.

Speaker:

Yeah, here.

Speaker:

You hear the inhale and the

Speaker:

whispers.

Speaker:

And not just from kids, but like.

Speaker:

From the gays, from the gay.

Speaker:

Very apart from the.

Speaker:

Parents trying to keep their kids

Speaker:

from singing along.

Speaker:

You know.

Speaker:

It's very.

Speaker:

Exciting. And then like the whole

Speaker:

journey of that song going, the

Speaker:

whole song is an arc, you know?

Speaker:

Like, she starts off one way and

Speaker:

then goes into another thing, kind

Speaker:

of like defying gravity, even though

Speaker:

she's a little bit further along at

Speaker:

that point.

Speaker:

Kind of like The.

Speaker:

Wiz are.

Speaker:

Very much parallels between the

Speaker:

three songs and each actually.

Speaker:

I think they like.

Speaker:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, that's true.

Speaker:

Actually, which is maybe just a

Speaker:

musical structure.

Speaker:

But it.

Speaker:

Probably is the swan.

Speaker:

Song.

Speaker:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.

Speaker:

The climax.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

And then the Wings 11:00

Speaker:

number. Yep, yep.

Speaker:

So also

Speaker:

is very cool too.

Speaker:

But it was definitely a Let it Go

Speaker:

was.

Speaker:

And you did the entire Broadway run,

Speaker:

right?

Speaker:

I did. It did.

Speaker:

Yeah. And the pre-Broadway tryout.

Speaker:

I didn't go on then, but I went

Speaker:

on in previews before Broadway

Speaker:

company opened, so.

Speaker:

Wow.

Speaker:

Oh, Alyssa, this one's so

Speaker:

fun. I love it.

Speaker:

Thank you so much for joining us.

Speaker:

Where can people find you online?

Speaker:

They can find me.

Speaker:

At pretty much just an Instagram.

Speaker:

I'm kind of a lurker on Twitter at

Speaker:

Alyssa Fox. But Instagram, I am at

Speaker:

Alyssa Joy Fox.

Speaker:

So I post more stories than

Speaker:

anything, but I'm not very good at

Speaker:

that.

Speaker:

We are mutts.

Speaker:

That's where you go. That's amazing.

Speaker:

Awesome. Well, thank you for joining

Speaker:

us, Alyssa, for our Wicked Day

Speaker:

episode. I don't know if you knew

Speaker:

this, but I didn't to do that.

Speaker:

Yes, it's wicked day.

Speaker:

Happy wicked day, Alyssa.

Speaker:

How do you like it?

Speaker:

19 years.

Speaker:

And counting.

Speaker:

Or so.

Speaker:

These are really fun promo stuff

Speaker:

for Wicked Day, but you can talk.

Speaker:

Oh, I think we're having some sort

Speaker:

of a party, but like that's

Speaker:

I am not actually sure what

Speaker:

that will be like.

Speaker:

A Well, this is the celebration.

Speaker:

This is my celebration.

Speaker:

I will celebrate it with just

Speaker:

you two.

Speaker:

On my.

Speaker:

Perfect I.

Speaker:

Kevin That was such a great

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interview. Alicia Fox is so fine.

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I'm really I'm like, buzzing still.

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I'm trying to think because there's

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another interview that I felt

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similarly to this afterwards

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where I was just kind of like on a

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high of that was so incredible.

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Oh, yeah. Who was.

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That? I can't remember.

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I mean, every interview has been

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great. Alyssa, thank you so much for

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joining honestly.

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And thank you so much for being

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so giving with your

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energy on your night off because

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honestly, we know how

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tired you are

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and how tired you must.

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Be, which I think, okay, let's just

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dove into it.

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As she talked about, she's addicted

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to playing Elphaba and I think

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and she's just a very enthusiastic

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person in real life.

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It's so, I think admirable

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is the right word. It's so exciting

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to me, I think, to talk to

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an actress who, after playing

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Elphaba for over a decade,

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is still so excited,

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so happy, still wants to go on to

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do principal on Broadway, still has

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that in her sights.

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Like, it was just so refreshing, I

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think, to talk to us.

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I do, too. And it's so funny because

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it's like for somebody who was

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not a theater kid,

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she has such theater kid energy

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about wicked.

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Like, it's so I

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mean, it's just like it's so

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charming because it's like you're

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speaking to somebody who's, like,

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actual, literal gateway

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dream came true.

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Like, like what made her

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want to do this happen.

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And that was something that I

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thought was super interesting, too,

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where she was like that first

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non-equity call I went into, I knew

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I was going to book Elphaba.

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That level of confidence I think

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is so cool and

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for that to be happening in 2010

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and for her to be the current

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Elphaba stand by in 2022 is

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just such an insane journey.

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There were a lot of parallels

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between her journey and journey to

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know his journey, which I thought

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was interesting.

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Yeah, and I think, well, what's

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interesting too is it's like the

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two of them are in such a

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class of their own in

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terms of like their relationship to

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this show, because there's

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just there are not many other

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alphabets that I can think of that

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have such a varied

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experience with the show.

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Like with so many contracts and

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so many companies and.

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Such a committed experience.

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It's such a committed experience.

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And I think Alyssa

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really hit on it when she was like,

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like to do this show, to do any

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show for that long,

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it either has to be like the most

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convenient, like

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perfectly balanced job

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or you have to.

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Love it.

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So much.

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Yeah, right, right.

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It's it's very much it is

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like a love for the show that

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carries these long running alphabet

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shows through, which is not

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to say it doesn't have ups and

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downs, of course, but like are

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like good, good parts and bad.

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I do think that mentality and that

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outlook she has on the role

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does play a factor into why she has

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been asked back so many times

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because you want to work with people

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who genuinely are excited to

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be in the room and to do the job

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that you're asking them to do, you

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know?

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Yes. And I would imagine especially

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a role that is as taxing

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on the actor as Elphaba

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is, that is like doubly

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as true because it's like when

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the work is that much harder, the

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attitude has to be that much harder.

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I did think it was very interesting

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that she was not a theater person

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growing up.

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I agree. It's always the girls

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who like her.

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And even when she was like, Oh yeah,

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like I mostly listen to like indie

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rock music. And I was like, and I

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bet that's why you can sing Elphaba

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willy nilly if you were like.

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Kevin, we're doing our gay little

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podcast, but it's like we really are

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uncovering a lot of themes and

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coming through lines between this

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role and the type of woman who

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plays this role.

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Yeah.

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I don't think we give ourselves

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enough credit.

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I don't think we do.

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We are the official investigatory

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podcast

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of Wicked, the musical.

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A job.

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If you like. Yes.

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I'd like to project your love

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sentiment of the man.

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I love, the Sunset Project.

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I do, too. Having listen to the

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Sunset Project by Broadway Bong.

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Go listen to it.

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Oh, I'm going to listen to it before

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the Kennedy Center.

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We should talk about the Kennedy

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Center. So 70 year block.

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He's doing Norma Desmond in Sunset

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Boulevard at the Kennedy Center.

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We obviously want to go.

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Here's my question, Kevin.

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Does Connor want to go as well?

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Probably because he's here because

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he's he's.

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He's like.

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Working. Tickets go on sale early

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November, so we just need to figure

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that out. I do have another group

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that wants to go.

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I'm trying to figure out like, are

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we going to combine?

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Yeah, I know you want to do like a

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caravan.

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Yeah. And you shut it down, so I

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don't need to do the caravan.

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I didn't.

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Shoot down, texted Kevin

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and I said, do.

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This to me in front of microphones.

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And microphones.

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I said, Thank you.

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I don't like as much.

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As that place is and

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it's.

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A neutral place.

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I could I texted Kevin and

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I was like, Hey, what are your

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thoughts? I feel like a lot of

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people want to go see Stephanie J,

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like in Sunset Boulevard in D.C.

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What if we, like, got together this

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big group to, like,

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party bus down to.

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We are saying the same hotel.

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We all get dinner before and then we

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all sit together for Sunset

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Boulevard.

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Kevin was not super enthusiastic

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about that idea, which I understand

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from like a logistics point where it

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is just a headache.

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And I do think if we do this,

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I think it'd be cute to like at

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least all go to the same restaurant

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before and like, yeah, even

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rent out a room and we can all just

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hang out and then go to the show

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together.

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My response was not, I

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don't want to see the show with

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anybody.

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I was I took it as.

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I just meant I want to I

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want to go to sleep in my own bed

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that night. Like, do you think.

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We will get a.

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Hotel?

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No, I don't want to stay.

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Oh, you. I want to come down and

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see the show.

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I You want to see a matinee, though?

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I'm just thinking of the logistics.

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I don't know that I can figure the

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logistics out like you.

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Wouldn't do it.

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I just did not have it in my head.

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When I.

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Wanted to do a DC.

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Weekend, I was envisioning the

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the experience.

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I did not go to multiple days

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the way you did, but also it's

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like your birthday weekend is that.

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Oh, wow.

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It's like the weekend before your

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birth.

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So if I requested you to be.

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Right, like, I'm not going to

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Quincy. I once went all the way back

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uptown and back downtown

Speaker:

for your birthday, right?

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To get my.

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I.D.. That did make me think.

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You know what we should ask entity

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really to do for us to set

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up time with SJP

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while she's at the Kennedy Center.

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We'll interview her backstage at the

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Kennedy Center.

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And we spent the weekend there for

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my birthday.

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I never should have mentioned that

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it was the weekend.

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And that's what I'm putting out

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because.

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Now.

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I was trapped.

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Anti theater Lee please

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make that happen.

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That feels doable actually and

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would be so cute.

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Yeah. Anyway, Alyssa Fox was

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great. I loved her mentality

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of the whole company

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being a team, but like really

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specifically, I love

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when the relationship between

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the lead Elphaba and the Stand

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By Elphaba or any role is

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like that of a partnership because

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it's I think it's such a healthier

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attitude to say like this

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is my other half.

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And in taking on this

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mammoth responsibility

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as opposed to saying like, this is

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the person who saves me when I'm in

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trouble, I think that's probably a

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very special perspective that is

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informed by the fact that she has

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been a standby to so many women.

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And as she said, she had such she

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had good relationships with all of

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them. So to pass that.

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Felt yeah and I did like how she was

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making a concerted effort to be

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good to her standbys having them

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as stand by it was really I think

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spoke a lot about the type of person

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she is. I have a major crush on

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Alyssa Fox after this interview.

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I know.

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I love her. Bangs and a little

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haircut.

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I know. Oh.

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I love Melissa Joy Fox.

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I'll say it.

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Honestly.

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Thank you so much. I'm so glad this

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was our Wicked Day episode.

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It kills me.

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Too. I love talking to

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the girls when they're in the show.

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Yeah, it's like it's a really

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special perspective.

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It was also nice to just do an

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alphabet interview after so long.

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I go, Oh.

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AG Speaking

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of dusting it off and just doing

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it with no rehearsal, I feel like at

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this point you could call

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me at 645

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and say, Kevin, are you free

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to interview?

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I'm not going to say a real name.

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Are you free to interview?

Speaker:

Lindsay, Heather, Piers in 15

Speaker:

minutes. And I would say, Quincy, I

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can do it. And I mean.

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Yeah, I do feel like there is which

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I realized with this because I was a

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little bit stressed before we

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started this work and life has just

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been crazy for both of us, so we

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didn't have a ton of time to prep

Speaker:

for this. So I was a little bit

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stressed. But there is something

Speaker:

about just like doing just like

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Alyssa, Joy Fox, not getting a put

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in rehearsal, just sitting down and

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interviewing and Elphaba, it's in

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us.

Speaker:

It's in us.

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Some people are born to play

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Elphaba, some people are born to

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talk to Elphaba.

Speaker:

And neither of those groups need

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to dance.

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You know, like

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on that note, welcome to the

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new Auntie Theater Leigh

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era.

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I'm realizing now we recorded

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the next episode.

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You all are going to hear from us

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before this episode.

Speaker:

And the next episode is when we

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introduce the concept of Aunty

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Theater Leigh. So that's a

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continuation for you all, but just

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now you're going to be in this era.

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Auntie Theater Leigh is here to

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help. Auntie Theater Lee is going to

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get us backstage at the Kennedy

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Center for Sunset Boulevard.

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So I have to imagine, Auntie, for

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literally like listening to these

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episodes, like I'm going to do.

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What with the Kennedy Center?

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I'm waiting. I don't think we should

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bring it up to the powers that be

Speaker:

at Auntie Theater Leigh and

Speaker:

wait to see when they bring it up

Speaker:

to us.

Speaker:

Oh. To make sure they're listening.

Speaker:

Yeah.

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It's paying attention to.

Speaker:

Yeah. Okay.

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I think it'll probably be like the

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day after

Speaker:

but okay let's kick.

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Let's see if we catch them.

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You've been listening to Sentimental

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Men from Theater.

Speaker:

This episode was produced by Quincy

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Brown, Kevin Bianchi and the team

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at Eataly.

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Thanks to Anthony Abbot's Angelo,

Speaker:

the most swank ified podcast

Speaker:

editor in town.

Speaker:

And another thanks to Michela

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Reynolds for making us look

Speaker:

downright Osma Politan

Speaker:

in our new key art and to Julia

Speaker:

de Marzo for our logo design.

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If you want to get in touch, send us

Speaker:

an email. We love to hear from

Speaker:

you all. You can reach us at cent

Speaker:

man pod at theater Italy

Speaker:

dot com.

Speaker:

That's t h e a

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t r e l y.

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You can also connect with us across

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social media on Instagram, Twitter

Speaker:

and TikTok, Absent Men

Speaker:

Pod.

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Thanks for tuning in.

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Until next time.

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I'm Quincy.

Speaker:

And I'm Kevin.

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All right, everyone.

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Happy wicked day.

Speaker:

To all and to all a good

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