The Tech-Driven Hotel of the Future with Glenn Hasek
Episode 6116th November 2022 • Construction Disruption • Isaiah Industries
00:00:00 00:36:12

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“I was probably the first journalist in the hotel industry to write about the environment consistently. I grew up in nature, so in some way, I like to advocate for it in my work. Nowadays, I find a sense of urgency among hotel companies about the climate and the state of the world in general.”

 

-       Glenn Hasek, Green Lodging News

 

Hotels occupy a unique spot in the building and construction world. They enjoy an economy of scale with millions of rooms and hundreds of millions of guests. But, hotels are driven by profit, so can green alternatives improve quality of life and lower costs too?

 

As the rest of the world figures out a more sustainable way to live, hotels are a perfect test bed for technological advancements ranging from energy management systems to dissolvable soap containers.

 

While tech thrusts hotels forward into a brighter, energy-efficient future, will they lead construction in the charge or trail behind?

 

Topics discussed in this interview:

-      Todd’s trip to METALCON

-      Glenn’s start in journalism

-      Hotels and their early attitude toward the environment

-      New developments in hotel design

-      Projections for future advancements

-      Solar and hotels

-      Smoking vs. nonsmoking and the battle for air quality

-      Rapid-fire questions


To learn more visit https://greenlodgingnews.com/ or connect with Glenn via email at greenlodgingnews@gmail.com



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This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

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Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Transcripts

Glen Hasek:

:

Overall, there's just a very heightened sense of, Hey, we've got to do something to reduce our energy or water impact, improve indoor air quality, and stop food waste, stop all kinds of waste to the landfill. And one of the big topics in the hotel industry in recent years is is reducing plastic use.

Todd Miller:

:

Welcome to the Construction Disruption podcast, where we uncover the future of building and remodeling. I'm Todd Miller of Isaiah Industries, manufacturer of specialty metal roofing and other building materials. And today, my co-host is Ryan Bell. How are you doing today, Ryan?

Ryan Bell:

:

Hi, Todd, I am doing great. I know you were at Metalcon last week. How how was that? How'd everything go there?

Todd Miller:

:

You know, it was a fun week. So Metalcon, of course, is sort of the major annual trade show for our industry where they talk about all things metal roof and wall panels and metal construction. And it was over in Indianapolis this year, which I believe was the first time I'd ever been in Indianapolis. Very convenient for us because we got to drive there, so that was nice. But it was a great show. It was well attended because of being in Indianapolis. It was kind of cool, we had a lot of Amish folks attending the show just because it was within easy distance for so many of them here in Ohio and Indiana and surrounding states. I was able to do a couple of presentations as part of their educational seminars, and one of them I was pretty excited to do. I put together a presentation called Taking Your Metal Roofing Contracting Business from Good to Great and basically outlined the things that over the years I've seen really sort of hallmark the most successful contractors in the metal roofing industry and had probably about 60 people for that seminar.

Ryan Bell:

:

Awesome.

Todd Miller:

:

Felt like it was well-received. Yeah, I went through a lot of good information and one of the things that I don't know, I hadn't really intended to touch on this, but I ended up talking a lot about how do you prepare your business for economic ups and downs? And, you know, one of the things I think everyone always likes to say as well, tough times never last, bad times never last. But in reality, that's true. But good times never last either. And and so a wise business person's going to be prepared for those cycles and those ups and downs. And so that was something I actually inadvertently ended up talking a lot about. And one of the major trade mags came and asked me if I'd be willing to write an article on how to prepare your business for economic downturns. So I'm going to be working on that now. But yeah, it was a good show. I'm already looking forward to next year. Next year's going to be out in Las Vegas for Metalcon.

Ryan Bell:

:

Awesome.

Todd Miller:

:

As you know, Ryan, we had David McCreary in the booth. David is a...

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

Ohio-based magician, entertainer, inspirational speaker and we had him in our booth doing some card tricks and that was pretty cool at times. We had 30, probably upwards of 30, maybe even a few more people lined up in the booth watching him. So we had never packed them into the booth quite like that before.

Ryan Bell:

:

Oh, I'm sure. I'm sure he was a hit.

Todd Miller:

:

He was, it was just goodwill, it was fun for everybody, I think so. Well, on with the show. Today's guest here on Construction Disruption is Glen Hasek, located in Tampa, Florida. Glen is the owner of Hasek Communications, as well as the publisher and editor of Green Lodging News. As I've watched Glen over the years, I feel that he's almost singlehandedly gotten the lodging industry to think more about the environmental impact of their businesses. Green Lodging News is the lodging industry's leading environmental news source, and as that industry of the whole lodging industry becomes more developed in terms of their green efforts, I think that we're going to see their efforts copied and moved over to other types and uses of buildings as well. So, Glen, thanks so much for joining us today. I've been looking forward to this conversation.

Glen Hasek:

:

Well, thank you for having me, Todd, and it's great to see you after so many years since we went to Bluffton College together.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, you and I have known each other for a while, that's for sure. In fact, you were probably about the first person I met at college because you were my, I guess we called them R.A.. Did that stand for resident advisor I think?

Glen Hasek:

:

Exactly, yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

So you were kind of the one in charge of, I guess it was my floor. And then we had someone in charge of the whole dorm, didn't we?

Glen Hasek:

:

Yes.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, anyway, that goes back a bit and yeah, good times, good times. Well, I remember you as a communications and a religion major. What about the lodging industry later caught your interest and caused you to develop Green Lodging News and go where you've gone with your career?

Glen Hasek:

:

Well, by chance, I was living close to a publishing company while I was living in Cleveland at the time, and the publishing company was called Advanced Star Communications, and they had an opening for an editor at a publication called Hotel and Motel Management. And I interviewed and they hired me as a freelancer at first. And I worked my way up to managing editor over the years, and that was around 1990 to 1996. And it was around 1991 that I started a regular column in Motel Management called Eco Views, and I was probably the first journalist in the hotel industry to write about the environment on a consistent basis. And that came from my personal interest in the environment, you know, probably having to do with going to Bluffton College, but also having to do with the way I was brought up. I grew up right next to a Metropark in Cleveland and just had a great appreciation for protecting Mother Nature and having the least impact on it.

Todd Miller:

:

Very interesting. So you founded Green Lodging News back in 2006, and I think I learned about it shortly thereafter. I know you and I had had some connection maybe through Facebook or LinkedIn or something, but back in the early days of Green Lodging News, what were some of the most focused on products or areas of opportunity that some folks were pursuing to make lodging more environmentally friendly?

Glen Hasek:

:

Well, you had mentioned a trade show earlier, and I attended many trade shows back in the 1990 and early 2000s. And there really was little emphasis on the environment. But what you did see frequently was folks selling guestroom energy management systems, which include sensors that turn heating and cooling down in the guestroom when the guest leaves the room. So those types of systems were saving hoteliers up to 40 to 60% on their energy bills. And then you also saw a lot of attention on recycling and some attention on indoor air quality and also towel and linen reuse programs. I am sure any one of your listeners has stayed at a hotel or has encountered this where you've been asked to forego laundry to help the environment a little bit. But that was kind of a hot topic back then. But compared to today, there really wasn't much attention on the environment and hospitality. It was just kind of in its early years and it kind of follows the rest of other industries as well.

Todd Miller:

:

You know, that's interesting. And I remember I mean, back in those days, I was traveling a lot more on business than I have to today, which is nice, but nice that I don't have to travel as much. But yeah, you reminded me of some of those things back, you know, when they would suddenly have lower-flow showerheads and things to save water, plus the whole towel and linen programs and things. You're right, those seemed like low-hanging fruit back during those days, but I think things have developed and gone a lot beyond that. What are some of the new areas where you've started seeing strides being made in this area?

Glen Hasek:

:

Well, if you look at a hotel, it's kind of like a large house, you know? Well, what do you do in your house to save energy? Elevate that to a hotel that's open 24 hours a day and has 100 to many thousand guest rooms? And it's all about reducing energy, reducing water consumption, enhancing indoor air quality, and reducing waste. And on the energy side, maturing of the LED lighting industry certainly had a huge impact on the hotel industry. And now studies have shown that more than 90% of hotels use LED lighting, which are dramatically different than the old incandescents or fluorescent bulbs that we used to see. And also guestroom energy management systems have become much more common. Low-flow water fixtures, dual-flush toilets, and then on the waste side, we're even seeing food waste decomposition machines where restaurateurs can throw their food waste into these machines that turn the waste into a liquid that can then be released into the sewage system. And so it's almost a zero-waste proposition. So there's just been overall a lot of emphasis reducing the hotel's entire environmental impact, but also making it much safer and healthy and cleaner space for hotel guests and business travelers, especially. And COVID, the pandemic, had a big impact on what attention was paid to indoor air quality as well as cleaning and maintaining spaces in hotels.

Todd Miller:

:

Boy, I'll have to second that. I, as I have started to travel a little bit more since COVID, everything is just spotless, it seems like in most hotels compared to where it used to be. And so that's kind of a good feeling. You mentioned something that always confuses me. Dual-flush toilets, I can never figure out based upon the imagery on those which what I'm supposed to flush. So I usually just flush them both. I just don't know what to do. So I'm going to have to get up to speed and figure that one out. One thing I do know, Glen and Ryan, I owe you guys an apology. I did it once again and forgot to tell our audience about our challenge words. So I'm going to throw that in now. So for our listeners out there, just so you know, once again, in this episode, we have challenge words. So we've given each a word, each other a word to try to work into the conversation at some point. And you can be listening to see if you figure out what the challenge words are. And at the end, we will kind of divulge whether we were successful or not and so we'll see. So my apologies for the late notice on that. Well, Glenn, back to our interview here. Any projections in your crystal ball? I mean, we talked a little bit about the strides that have been made. What projections do you have as far as what the future may bring?

Glen Hasek:

:

Well, certainly the hotel industry is evolving toward a net-zero impact environment. Green building certifications such as LEED has pushed the industry toward that goal, and certainly other organizations as well have led the push for that. And it's driven significantly by government and by industry leaders in other industries who have a good handle on, you know, climate change and the impact that buildings have on climate change. Most hotel companies have set specific targets. For example, I was just preparing for an interview with the Sustainability Director at Marriott and they have a list of 2025 goals that are very ambitious. Where Marriott, the largest hotel company in the world, is setting targets for reductions in energy by 30%, reductions in food waste by 50%, reductions in water similarly, and so this is very common throughout the industry. There's a sense of urgency among hotel companies about the state of the climate and the state of the world in general. And I just read that according to the World Wildlife Fund, we've lost 69% of the species, animal species already. And that's just to me, it's alarming. And, you know, the hotel industry does have an impact on that because where they decide to build has an impact on the natural environment. And hotels, through their foundations, can support causes that help to protect lands where native species still roam and grow. So overall, there's just a very heightened sense of, hey, we've got to do something to reduce our energy impact, our water impact, improve indoor air quality, and stop food waste, stop all kinds of waste to the landfill. And one of the big topics in the hotel industry in recent years is is reducing plastic use and those little plastic amentity bottles you find in the guestroom bathroom. Hotels are transitioning to dispensers or one company approached me recently, and they have it's like holding a little bubble of shampoo. It's shampoo enclosed in a film where, you know, you go in the shower and water hits this film and dissolves the film. So then you've just got the shampoo remaining. Like there's no waste involved at all. So there's just a lot of innovation taking place that's making it easier for hotels to reduce their impact.

Todd Miller:

:

That's very cool. Almost sounds like a tide pod with shampoo.

Ryan Bell:

:

Exactly what I was thinking, or dishwasher, the things you put in your dishwasher, they have for that too.

Todd Miller:

:

Think about how many things actually could be dispensed that way and do away with, you know, packaging, at least packaging that has to be disposed of.

Ryan Bell:

:

Possibilities are endless. Maybe they can put Barbies, start putting Barbies or baby dolls. And I don't know, you've probably never opened one of those, Todd, but they make them a real pain to get out of the packaging.

Todd Miller:

:

So instead, it just kind of makes everything like it comes in a little egg or something. Yeah, that's kind of cool. So Glen, you know, as I think about it, I mean, I figure that investors in the lodging industry probably take more of a financially-focused look at their activities than even a typical homeowner would. Have you found that this movement toward green is something that the lodging industry has quickly and willingly and wants to embrace and pursue? Or has it been more like a kicking and screaming thing for some of them? I'm just curious.

Glen Hasek:

:

You know, it really depends on the company. Companies like Marriott Hilton, IHG, Wyndham have been leading in this movement for years now and have really set the standard for other companies who are behind. And sure, if you talk to a hotelier, the first thing that comes to their mind is how much is this going to cost me? You know, what's the impact on the bottom line? But what I've discovered is that there are a lot of hotel developers and owners who see this as kind of a religion almost and paying additional for a solar installation, for example. It's not going to bother them because they're looking 10 to 20 years down the road and it's going to improve the value of their hotel asset. And, you know, because at that point down the road, I mean, they're going to be paying almost nothing for electricity, you know, once the solar system is paid off. And it's also true for geothermal systems, wind technology. But for the most part, it's solar that you see in any industry. But having said that, you're always going to get a group of hotel owners who are going to be less willing to invest in technologies and innovations that are going to help improve the environment and their bottom line. But it's interesting that all the different things that I come across do result in greater profitability for a hotelier. So it's almost foolish to not consider like LEDs or other technologies that I've talked about.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah. So it's a matter of, similar to what we do in our homes, sometimes there's that initial upfront, but long term the ROI is there. And you know, it's interesting when you talk about hotels using, utilizing solar, and I've certainly heard that a lot. Just trying to think in my mind, if I've ever been in a hotel that seemed to have solar, is it usually on the roof probably? So maybe I don't even see it.

Glen Hasek:

:

It's interesting. That seems to be less often on the roof and more so on other parts of the property. For example, on top of a carport I've seen multiple times. In the case of Las Vegas, it's very much a rooftop situation. In fact, the largest solar installations in the hotel industry are out in Las Vegas, multiple megawatt systems. And if you think about a convention center and the available space on a rooftop for solar, it's immense. And if you've got an environment where the sun's shining, you know, almost 100% of the time, I mean, it's kind of a no-brainer. And in one case, a hotel company partnered with a utility company where the the solar installation is actually off property, but they benefit from the electricity, from the solar installation, and the savings. So you don't necessarily have to have the solar installation on your own property. In an urban environment, like a downtown environment it's much more difficult to benefit from solar because the the available space is so minimal. But a downtown property can benefit more from solar for water heating than electricity generation.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Plus, you know, you're dealing with shadows and things and urban areas as well. So I'm curious, do you think that the lodging industry does a good job of pointing out their green efforts and investments to their potential clients? You know, as a positive thing, I mean, something that, hey, we're doing the right thing? It seems to me that a lot of clients going to hotels would care about this. Are people booking conventions and meetings would care about this? Or do hotels kind of think their clients don't really care?

Glen Hasek:

:

I think there have been a number of studies that have shown that meeting planners who are responsible for hundreds of millions of dollars of business to the hotel industry every year do care very much about what the hotel is doing to save energy, reduce waste, etc. And they actually require it in their requests for a proposal that they submit to the hotel. So on that side, it's become very common for meeting planners to require that. But having said that, I recently saw a study. Pointing out that hotels are not doing enough to publicize the fact that they're utilizing all these different technologies and innovations and practices, especially on their websites. It's a good benchmark. Go to a hotel's website or a hotel company's website. Look for what story they're telling about their sustainability efforts. And this recent study found that hotels are not doing enough or not enough. Hotel companies are talking about what they're doing.

Todd Miller:

:

Hmm. Well, that's interesting because I definitely think that increasingly and we see even in our industry, just the normal consumer out there is caring more and more about sustainability and the environment and things. So over your years in this industry, especially as you've, you know, followed and a journalist in this area, green consciousness, in the lodging industry, anything come along that's really surprised you? Things that you never really would have thought of on your own or just things that have surprised you?

Glen Hasek:

:

Well, I think what's surprised me most about the industry and its movement toward 100% sustainability is how sometimes politics actually enter into the equation. I remember when I first started Green Lodging News, I was an advocate for, you know, eliminating smoking in hotels. And, you know, the president of the hotel association at the time was kind of a little upset that I had talked about that because, you know, a lot of hoteliers at the time still didn't want to take the step to go to 100% nonsmoking. And because at the time there were still quite a few people smoking. And today, you know, it's changed significantly. I mean, almost every hotel is 100% nonsmoking except when you go out to Las Vegas and where the casinos still allow it. And the first hand, secondhand and thirdhand smoke found in the casinos is still hurting a lot of people, including the people who work there. And every now and then, I see stories about unions protesting, you know, their work environment. But overall, I would say what's really surprising me and it's something that I come across almost every day is technological innovation that's taking place in the industry to enable hoteliers to operate their hotels in a much more green or a sustainable environment. And it has to do with everything that you would touch in a hotel from, you know, what you're involved with, the roofing, you know, all the way down to the foundation. You know, I'm seeing stories about changes in cement, you know, cement that absorbs CO2, you know, to reduce CO2 in the air, you know, things like that. It's just amazing how much innovation there is. And, you know, getting to the point of zero impact, I see as a very realistic goal in the near future.

Todd Miller:

:

You know, it's interesting where you talk about some of that research and development that's being done. And I know one of the things that we have worked with a few times over the years has been the building sciences departments at a few universities. And it's always fascinating to see the things that they're working on to help with sustainability, help also with air quality, and water quality and all those types of things. As you have looked at that, have there been any universities or schools that you have seen seem to be making some significant strides in that area in terms of providing feedback to hoteliers and other industries?

Glen Hasek:

:

Yeah, there are certain colleges and universities that have historically been ahead of others when it comes to teaching about green hotel operations or how to make a hotel more sustainable. Cornell University comes to mind because they have a sustainability roundtable every year, and I've participated in that a number of times. But I think what it all comes down to is who's telling their story the best. And I often hear from Purdue University in regard to the technological improvements, innovations that they're making that are applicable to hotels and other industries as well. And again, it comes down to that storytelling. You know, how well is a hotel school telling that story or getting the word out and that it's often, you know, the PR person at the property or company, you know, is there a PR person in place? Is there a marketing person in place to really push the story out there so other people can learn about what that school is doing?

Todd Miller:

:

Very good. Makes sense. Well, Glenn, thank you so much. This has really been interesting. And I know our listeners are going to enjoy it as well. We're kind of wrapping up here with the business end of things, as I call it, it's been a real pleasure. Is there anything we haven't covered today that you'd like to share with our listeners?

Glen Hasek:

:

Well, we haven't covered macaroni, and I don't know why we would talk about that, but that was one topic that came to mind as we were wrapping up here.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, we'll save that for the next episode. How would that work?

Glen Hasek:

:

Sounds good to me.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, here in a moment, I'm going to give you a chance to to to say how folks can get in contact with you. But before we close out, I have to ask if you're willing to participate in something we call our rapid-fire questions. So these are seven questions. They may range from serious to silly. All you got to do is give a short answer that comes to mind, and our audience needs to understand if he agrees to it, Glen has no idea what we're about to ask him. So are you feeling up to the challenge of rapid-fire?

Glen Hasek:

:

I'll give it my best shot.

Todd Miller:

:

Great. Well, I think Ryan and I may alternate questions. You want to go first, Ryan?

Ryan Bell:

:

Sure. I'd be glad to. Alright, question number one. What is your favorite hobby?

Glen Hasek:

:

Favorite hobby would certainly be watching my son play soccer.

Ryan Bell:

:

Awesome.

Todd Miller:

:

Very cool.

Ryan Bell:

:

I played soccer.

Todd Miller:

:

Well. And I remember you, Glen, as a cross-country runner. Do you still run at all?

Glen Hasek:

:

I actually don't run anymore. But it was something I did for, gosh, about 40 years of my life. And I kept track of my miles and I actually ran, I think, around 25,000 miles in my lifetime.

Ryan Bell:

:

Holy cow.

Todd Miller:

:

That's a lot of miles.

Ryan Bell:

:

So, of course, that's easy to keep track of now with smartwatches and stuff. How did you, how did you do that? Did you just log it all in a notebook or something?

Glen Hasek:

:

Yeah, I kept a diary.

Ryan Bell:

:

Awesome. That takes some commitment. Yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

Question number two. What is an early good memory from your childhood? So earliest positive childhood memory that comes to mind.

Glen Hasek:

:

Oh, I would have to say it would be spending time with my grandparents during a holiday occasion and tasting the great food that my grandmothers would make.

Todd Miller:

:

Oh, very cool. Very neat.

Ryan Bell:

:

That kind of leads into.

Todd Miller:

:

It does.

Ryan Bell:

:

Our next question very well. And this question always kind of gives me the collywobbles. But if you had to eat a crayon, what color would you choose?

Glen Hasek:

:

Hmm. I haven't looked at a crayon box in a while, but how about banana?

Todd Miller:

:

That works, that works. Okay. Question number four. At the end of your days, what would you like to be remembered for?

Glen Hasek:

:

Well, I would have to say, you know, my kind of contribution to the hotel industry as a journalist, but even more importantly, my contribution to my family and the time I spent helping them out.

Todd Miller:

:

Very nice. Well, that also leads into the next question Ryan's going to ask.

Ryan Bell:

:

So. So I feel a little weird asking this question, and maybe there's a story behind it. So Todd wrote the rapid-fire questions.

Todd Miller:

:

I don't know.

Ryan Bell:

:

Okay, alright. How did you and your wife meet?

Glen Hasek:

:

Very carefully. No, I'm just kidding. No, actually, it was something that's very common today. We actually met online.

Todd Miller:

:

Oh, awesome. Very cool.

Ryan Bell:

:

My wife and I met that way, too.

Todd Miller:

:

Online did not exist when I met my wife, so. Okay, next question. What is your favorite book or a favorite book?

Glen Hasek:

:

I mean, I would say that the book that has influenced me the most probably is the Bible, but the the book that is most favorite to read would have to be a series of books, really, The Lord of the Rings. By Tolkien.

Todd Miller:

:

I'm so embarrassed to say I've never read those. Isn't that horrible?

Glen Hasek:

:

And also, C.S. Lewis's series The Chronicles of Narnia.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah, I've read that.

Ryan Bell:

:

Have you ever read The Screwtape what's it called? Screwtape Letters?

Glen Hasek:

:

Yes, I have. It's been quite a long time ago. Yeah.

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah, we were. My wife and I have a small group thing at our church on Thursday nights, and it's come up the last two weeks. Everyone else has read it but us, the Screwtape Letters. So I think we need to get it get it ordered. Last question. What 80's song will really get you rocking out if you hear it?

Glen Hasek:

:

Oh, gosh. I would say Queen. We will rock you and let's see, maybe some Lamb songs as well. But I mean, to be honest with you, I grew up more in the seventies and was more influenced by the sixties music because of my older brother. Yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

Very good. Well, Glen, this has been a pleasure. Thank you so much. To tell everyone on our challenge wards, we were all successful. Ryan, you had the word?

Ryan Bell:

:

Collywobbles.

Todd Miller:

:

Which, yeah, that was a fun one. Sorry, I was guilty of giving you that one. Glen, very creative. You had the word?

Glen Hasek:

:

Macaroni.

Todd Miller:

:

Macaroni, and I had the word egg that I was able to work in back when we were talking about Barbie dolls and plastic packaging, which I just wasn't sure how to respond. So that was all I could come up with.

Ryan Bell:

:

It was perfect. I felt like I set that up for you, and I didn't even intend to.

Todd Miller:

:

You set me up perfect, absolutely. Glen again, thank you. For folks who want to get in touch with you and folks who would like to maybe subscribe to your e-newsletter. How do they do that?

Glen Hasek:

:

Well, they can either go to my website, greenlodgingnews.com and find a place there to subscribe. Or they can simply email me directly at greenlodgingnews@gmail.com.

Todd Miller:

:

That's fantastic. So greenlodging news.com and greenlodgingnews@gmail.com. And that way you don't have to figure out how to spell Hasek in an email address. So that's that's a positive benefit there, I guess. Well, Glen, thank you again. This has been good. I've enjoyed it.

Glen Hasek:

:

Same here. Thank you so much, Todd.

Glen Hasek:

:

Todd Miller: Well, and thank you to our audience for tuning in to this episode of Construction Disruption with Glen Hacek of Green Lodging News. We encourage you, please watch for future episodes of our podcast. We always have great guests on tap. Don't forget to leave a review on Apple Podcasts or YouTube. Until the next time, change the world for someone, make them smile, encourage them, two very simple but powerful things you can do to change the world. God bless and take care. This is Isaiah Industries signing off until the next episode of Construction Disruption.