Artwork for podcast In & Around Podcasting
Behind the Music with Catherine Rannus
Bonus Episode4th March 2024 • In & Around Podcasting • Mark Asquith, Danny Brown & Friends
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Want to sing along to the intro? We made you some lyric sheets! Download them here: https://www.inandaroundpodcasting.com/lyrics (no email required).

It was essential to get the music of In & Around Podcasting right in order to create a brand that is lighthearted yet authoritative; a brand focused on making subjects that can be quite dry, accessible to anyone interested in the podcasting space.

Having gone through the designer brief to create the various cover art (yes, we have more than one!) we started the process of finding a musician and producer that could capture the brand in audio form and elevate it to a high level.

Our guest, Catherine Rannus, did just that and crafted an audio brand that stands out in the podcasting industry and creates an unforgettable "earworm" experience and a range of useful segment drops that embody the vibe of the hosts and the segments themselves.

About our guest, Catherine Rannus

With an extensive repertoire from pop to jazz and classical to traditional, Catherine has been providing live music for weddings and functions for over 20 years. Whether playing piano solo, or singing as well Catherine creates a lovely backdrop to conversations in sophisticated and romantic settings, quietly creating a sense of occasion unique to your special requirements.

Catherine can be found online at Catherine's Website; her Instagram is @catherinerannus on Instagram and her X (Twitter) is @catherinerannus on Twitter.

--

In & Around Podcasting is a podcast industry podcast brought to you by Mark Asquith and Danny Brown.

If you enjoy the show, we'd love for you to leave us a rating or review on your favourite podcast app!

If you're an independent creator who would like to co-host with us, please let us know via Twitter and we'll get you booked!

Please tell your friends that the show is available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and YouTube, plus wherever else they may listen to their podcasts.

If you'd like your podcast trailer featuring in our "Wave File" segment, submit it via this quick contact form, please.

The podcast is also available at In & Around Podcasting.



This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

OP3 - https://op3.dev/privacy

Transcripts

Speaker:

Hello there and welcome to this very

special bonus episode of In and Around

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Podcasting.

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My name is Mark Asquith and I'm joined

today by the wonderfully talented

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Katherine Ranis from Be Lightful Music.

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And I wanted to do this bonus episode to

talk about the music for the show, because

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music is a massive part of my life.

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And if you've seen the visuals for In and

Around Podcasting, whether that's in and

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around podcasting .com, whether you've

seen the podcast cover art in Spotify,

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Apple, Global Player,

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wherever you get your podcasts or indeed

the cover art over on YouTube, you will

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know that it's got quite a specific

aesthetic with the visuals.

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We wanted something very specific from and

of course the music had to match.

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This is not a podcast industry show that

is dry and that is going to leave you

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thinking, what did I just listen to?

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This is something a little different.

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So the music really had to stand up to

that.

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So I'm going to talk about what I asked

for and then the wonderful Catherine.

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is going to tell us exactly how she came

up with the wonderful, not only the theme

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tune, which is probably the biggest

earworm you're likely to hear this week,

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but also some of the little segment

pieces, some of the little switcheroo's

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that we're going to be using throughout

the show.

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And as the show matures, we'll introduce

more and more of them.

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So it's really quite interesting.

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So let's get to it.

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It's a really interesting concept.

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It's something that I'm excited to talk

about.

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So, Catherine.

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Welcome to the show, thank you for doing

this and thank you for this amazing music.

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Oh, you're welcome.

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It was my pleasure.

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I loved it.

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I still love it.

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It is a fun one, isn't it?

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And we're pretty local to each other.

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So we're both from Barnsley.

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When I wanted to do this, I wanted to use

someone that was local, someone that was

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highly talented.

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You actually came recommended through a

friend, Kevin Steele, down at the business

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village, I think, down in Barnsley, where

I used to have an office back in the day.

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And it was a weird one.

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I sort of knew what I wanted.

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And when I came across Be Lightful Music,

it was a no brainer.

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I mean, you're a multidisciplined

musician, highly talented, highly

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accomplished.

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So before we get to the brief, before we

get to what you came up with, just tell us

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a little bit about you.

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What do you do?

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What's your day to day?

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What is Be Lightful Music?

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What do you do in and around podcasting

and what else do you get up to?

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Okay.

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Well, I play piano flute and saxophone,

alto sax and tenor sax.

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And, um, delightful music was born as a

healing music because I'm really

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interested in frequencies, how they affect

our energies.

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And I've got a background in, in healing,

Reiki, um, crystal healing, all sorts of

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different magical things.

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Um, so during lockdown I was

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pushing more recording, because I lost all

my gigs.

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I'm a gigging musician.

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I'm back gigging thankfully, but I'm still

doing a lot of recording.

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I still record healing music, but I do,

I'm really passionate about audio

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branding.

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And what I can do is all the research I've

done around frequencies, how to attract

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the right energies for your business as

well as personal.

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I can use all that in a piece of music,

very, very subtle frequencies.

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It's not like just frequency noise.

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It's within the music.

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I'm very much a musician first and then

the frequency stuff is secondary to that.

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That's fascinating actually.

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Music's such a powerful thing.

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And that's why when I did the show, I

wanted to go all out with the music.

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I'm a huge music fan.

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I've got anyone that's watching this on

YouTube.

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I don't think you can quite see it

depending on how we've cut this video, but

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there's a Fender Jazz bass just behind me.

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There's an acoustic guitar.

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I'm by no stretch as accomplished or as

talented as you, but I like to play around

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and I've done it probably since I was

about 13, 14 years old.

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Started on jazz trombone, believe it or

not.

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Used to play for Durn Big Band and all

sorts of things.

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Big Band?

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Holland Hamilton was my teacher for 15, 20

years.

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Yeah.

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Good friend.

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Great friend of mine.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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Um, and he taught my mom and dad.

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I don't know.

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Did you, do you know Holland or did you

know Holland before he sadly passed?

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Yeah.

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I never played in his bands actually, but

yeah, he's renowned in this area.

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Yeah.

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Yeah, it was such a great week.

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I was so lucky at the school I went to

down in Falston because he was the music

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teacher.

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And it was all, you don't realize when

you're so young, but a lot of it was self

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-funded, a lot of very fond memories.

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And he got me, he got me into, into the

music side of things.

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And he taught, I've got a sort of family

connection.

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He taught my mom and my dad and my uncle

who my uncle's a tuba player, play for.

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Black Dyke and for Grimthorpe in

particular brass band and such.

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So it's, Holland was a huge part of that.

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So when it came to doing something like

this and even, even the last pod, or in

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fact, all the podcasts that I've ever done

has had music as intros that I've put

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together just for bands.

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So the podcast Accelerator, which was my

previous show and all the ones before it,

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they all had this kind of rock guitar

intro that was cut from a song that we did

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in...

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Um, it was in Glenn's studio down in

Barnsley.

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Um, you know, Glenn, I don't know if you

know Glenn Sutton from, but yeah, it was

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down at the, uh, uh, the skin boat

studios.

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And we cut it in there and used it as the

intro for years.

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And actually the trailer of this show

starts with that music.

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And it's a bit tongue in cheek.

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I say, look, you know, it's acted out.

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The trailer is very much a look.

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We can't use that again.

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We've got to do something better, which is

when you're beautiful, fantastic music

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comes in.

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Um, so it was, it was really important to

get someone that understood music and that

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really got it, but that we could do

something custom out of it and the lyrics

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for it.

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So when I found you, it was, it was like

this match made in heaven.

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Um, and the brief for anyone listening was

I wanted an old school TV theme song.

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I wanted something that was short, that

was sweet and that was so annoyingly

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catchy that you would not stop.

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singing it.

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And I mean, we've got two versions of the

intro.

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We've got the main one with this sort of

the sitcom -esque one.

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Then we've got the one that we call the

calamity one, which you'll hear dotted

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throughout.

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We're going to play, we'll play the intro

in just a few minutes and then we'll play

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the calamity one as well.

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But it was, it was, it was quite a weird

brief for me to write because it was so

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specific, but yet so broad.

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How did you get to approaching that?

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When, when, when you got that formula, how

do you even start something like this?

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just loved the brief from the first

contact that we had.

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And I knew you were from Boundsley and you

wanted someone like that.

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But I don't sing in a Boundsley accent

now, do I?

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So you can't tell I'm from Boundsley when

I'm singing.

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sing in a Barnsley accent.

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You should see some of the karaoke.

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Like we go to conferences and there's a

karaoke party.

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And I think I'm sound, you know, like

Lenny Kravitz, but I'm not, I'm sounding

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like, you know, Barman at Wetherspoons in

Barnsley.

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I sound so Barnsley.

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You do not sound Barnsley at all.

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I am Barnsley Mourn and Bred, but yeah,

flush that out when I'm singing.

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Yeah, it was just such a fun vibe of it.

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And I really wanted lots of different

things and things going off in it.

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I wanted it to be busy.

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And obviously the main thing was this

catchy tune, the melody of it.

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So I really wanted it to be tuned, but

simple.

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So it's a simple chord structure.

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I've not done anything.

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I've not rewritten jazz harmony there or

anything.

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It's a really...

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simple harmonic structure that allows the

melody to be, like you say, catchy,

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something really catchy, really clear.

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So what I'm saying is funny, it's

important.

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I want people to know exactly what I'm

saying.

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So hopefully that comes across as well.

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And just the whole vibe, after our first

meeting with you, I kind of got the vibe

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that, you know, it's fun.

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And I just wanted that energy all over it.

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Yeah, the energy is such a big thing.

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And the main version, which we're going to

play in just a moment, is I love it.

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I love the way that you'd used, like I'm

guessing it's some sort of envelope filter

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or whatever it is on the drums to sort of

bring that eighties, that eighties real

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kind of sitcom vibe to it.

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We've heard anyone will recognize that

kind of sound effect, but it was, I didn't

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expect it.

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I didn't expect it.

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And I'm a huge fan personally.

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I come a middle of the road Bon Jovi fan.

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You know, I'm like, give me some formula

rock.

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Yeah, I need that's what I need when I'm

running or whatever to put me in a good

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mood.

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So when when I heard the chord structure

and when it was it was so simple, but it

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allowed, like you said, the melody to

become such an earworm, I thought that

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Catherine has just nailed that because I'm

a huge fan of just simple hooks that are

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really executed so very well.

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And you absolutely delivered on that one.

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But we ended up as well with this weird.

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calamity version of it, this sort of

country.

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Like, where did that come from?

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I didn't expect that.

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That was a nice little surprise.

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Yeah, I didn't expect that first either.

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So I've done the first one and I've worked

with a producer, my husband.

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So we put all those sounds together and we

just sort of said it.

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I think I suggested it to you as a joke

first.

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I said it really lend itself to, you know,

a spoof sort of thing with even more stuff

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going on and yeah, yeah.

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And it just works.

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So I said, well, we'll throw it together

and you loved it.

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It's absolutely perfect.

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And the way that I think we intend to use

that is the main shows, the main show

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theme.

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But there's a lot of weird stuff happens

in our industry.

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There's a lot of things that people

sometimes get, you know, a little bit

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awry.

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They go a little bit or a little bit off

kilter sometimes.

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And so because the show is quite a topical

show, we we will probably use that when.

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things I have gone a little bit awry when

there's a little bit of news in the

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industry where you think that's a little

bit shaky.

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And I love that.

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And I think as well personally, one of the

fascinating pieces of that surprise and

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having that, that audio to use and being

such a high level, but such a different

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version of the intro is that it keeps it

interesting as well.

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I think very often with podcasts, you can,

you, you always want that element of

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recognition.

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Of course it's the theme song.

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You want the recognition.

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It's short, it's punchy, it's an earworm.

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But it can get a little bit stale if I'm

hearing the same thing.

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So I think that the ability to shock

people about, oh, wait a second, that's

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different this week.

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Why is that different?

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So I was, wait a minute, I'm going to use

a fantastic pun here.

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I was belighted when you sent it.

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Oh, that is a terrible, terrible, terrible

pun.

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And I apologize to all concerned.

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Now, I am going to play for you the

listener.

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You'll have heard it at the beginning.

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of the episode, but I'm going to just play

the calamity version of the intro as well.

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So you'll have heard the main theme right

at the beginning.

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You can listen to that.

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And it was probably stuck in your head

already.

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But right now I am just going to play the

calamity version so you can hear that,

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because I think it's fantastic.

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Yeah, it sounds, it almost sounds like I'm

hobbling in on a horse, you know, and I'm

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going to park up my horse at the saloon.

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Yeah, and things are just falling about,

falling off the walls.

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Yeah.

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like some old carry on sort of, you know,

real kind of big sketch.

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Like you say, everything's going wrong, a

bit of a comedy of errors.

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So, yeah, I love that.

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I love that.

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Now, I want to switch gears a little bit.

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We've got some important pieces of the

puzzle.

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So for any podcaster listening out there,

what I wanted to do with this podcast was

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I didn't want it to be an industry show

that just talked about the industry or

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talked about us.

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So that that's reflected in the fact that

we have industry guests on, but we also

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have.

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in the creators on people that aren't

industry experts so that we can hear these

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powerful podcasting perspectives.

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I think it's very important that as an

industry show, we don't just give the view

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from the top because very often people

will say, well, OK, here's this thing

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happening at the highest level of

podcasting.

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And a lot of people forget about the

creator sat in their bedroom creating

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their podcast because they love it.

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And it's those kind of people that we want

to bring to the fore as well.

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So this is very, very powerful.

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And to do that.

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We didn't just want to talk about industry

developments or industry news.

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We wanted to do another couple of things.

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So we've actually got three segments of

the podcast.

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Much of these segments will be built out

using Captivate's dynamic content engine,

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which is called Amy.

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So what that means is that we'll record

some of the audio, but we'll use Captivate

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to insert the jingles, the segment breaks

and these three segments.

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I love them because again, the brief was

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go a bit sick on me.

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Let's go a bit radio, a bit catch phrase.

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So when we, when we, I grew up, I don't

know about you, Cassie.

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I grew up watching bullseye in the UK, you

know, a Jim bowing, your bus fare home.

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Remember that I want to like that cheesy

vibe.

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I want to gladiators on a Saturday night.

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I wanted the generation game.

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I wanted all of that in a podcast mini

jingle.

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So when we did these segments, we named

them.

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suitably.

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So I'm going to play you these three

segments and I'm going to just explain

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what they are.

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And then Catherine will talk about in

particular just how you came up with these

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ideas as well, because they do have a

slightly different vibe to them.

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So the first one I'm going to play for you

now is the wonderfully whimsical

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podcasting wishlist.

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This is very much for when we as creators,

as industry thinkers, when we start to

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think about where the industry could go,

what would we like from the industry?

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It's our wish list.

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It's something that we dream of in the

industry.

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So that segment's really, really powerful.

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The next one is this is an interesting

one.

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It's again, another terrible pun.

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It's called the wave file.

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And the wave file is very much about us

highlighting other podcasts.

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So anytime you hear the wave file intro,

the segment jingle, the cut, you are going

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to be introduced to another podcast.

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We're going to be inserting trailers from

across the world of podcasting from

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independent creators up to the shows that

we love and adore on a bigger scale.

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We're going to we're going to work with

everyone on this to highlight as many new

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podcasts as we can.

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So the wave file is our way of giving a

little bit of a wave.

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to creators doing wonderful work and

helping you to discover new shows as well.

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Perhaps my favorite segment though is,

again, I just think I'm terrible at puns,

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but we rolled with it.

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This is called the Flattering Ram.

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The logic behind the flattering Ram is

that sometimes we can get a little bit

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heavy with a podcast and especially an

industry podcast.

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We can get a little negative.

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We can get a little, here's everything

that's wrong.

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We didn't want to do that.

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So instead of it being a battery Ram, we

wanted this to be the flattering Ram where

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we take someone that is in the podcasting

industry doing great work or that we just

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think is fantastic.

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And we flatter them.

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Now we might flatter their wonderful work.

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We might flatter their show.

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We might flatter something they've said,

or we might just like them.

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We might just flatter their wonderful

haircut.

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We might just flatter something that we've

seen them do that was fun.

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We might just flatter something that we've

seen them wear.

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But the point is to highlight good people

in a positive way.

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So these segments, they're really, really

powerful.

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And Catherine, when I came to you with

these little mini segments, these are

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quite coral.

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These are quite, they are quite whimsical.

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I what was the approach to that?

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Because they clearly tie with the intro

music, but they are rather different as

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well.

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Talk to us a little bit about that

approach.

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Yeah.

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Well, the whimsical one, just the word

whimsical, I just, I just had to just, I

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mean, I've got a piano in front of me

here.

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That's why I'm just looking down.

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I just immediately, it just needed to be

whimsical.

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Just that word is so descriptive, isn't

it?

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And I knew that sound that had to come

across a little bit magical and yeah.

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And the flattering rams just, yeah.

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is clear.

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Like you even draw the word out.

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I love it.

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I think it's perfect.

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Yeah, yeah, which then when I went onto

the wave file, I think we had a couple of

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attempts at this, because I'd sort of

gone, the wave file, and it were a bit too

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jazz hands, I think, maybe, or slow.

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And I think we shortened it.

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So I think there's a couple of versions

floating around of that one.

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But yeah, I do tend to do things slower

than, I don't know why I do things so

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slow.

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So yeah, that were a good call.

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to be a bit more snappy, but the vocal

harmony is massive on that one.

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It's really layered up to give that

massive sound, because wave files are much

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bigger than MP3s, so.

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I love that.

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I love that.

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You're also a pun queen.

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I love this.

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This is perfect.

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That you're right as well, because a lot

of the harmonies are really close on that.

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Like I'm a huge fan of like, obviously the

layered harmonies, but I'm generally a

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fan.

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This is probably my Bon Jovi era coming

out, but just a close harmony like the Bon

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Jovi and the Sambor.

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They're always very close harmonies.

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It's never a faith.

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It's never something weird.

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It's always a very close harmony that's

following the melody.

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So I really like that.

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:

It's got airs.

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:

Again, I'm showing my age.

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:

I'm showing my education in music, which

is is dragged up by my mom and dad.

368

:

But it's it's got a bit of a queen feel, a

bit of a journey feel to it, you know,

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:

from a rock perspective, it's got that,

you know, a rock band with choral

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:

training, which is sometimes like the

journey and Queen had that sort of

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:

operatic training in there.

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:

So it is very laid.

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:

And I really like that.

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:

Was it was that always the intent with

that?

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:

Did you want that to feel like that or was

that something that was quite an

376

:

evolution?

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:

But that's my signature sound really to

build up harmonies.

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:

So from the healing music, that's all

layered up harmony.

379

:

I love to use my voice in harmony.

380

:

Cause when I started doing that type of

music, I was searching for a synth sound,

381

:

which would create that.

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:

And I was just so disappointed, literally

pressing buttons going, that's not it,

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:

that's not it, that's not it, no.

384

:

An hour later, I'll just do it myself.

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:

I'll use my voice.

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:

That's what I want.

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:

I want this layered.

388

:

And I love doing it.

389

:

And it's really labor intensive because I

triple track each harmony.

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:

So if it's four part harmony, there'll be

16 of me all in, oh, just this ethereal

391

:

sound.

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:

So that, I mean, I love to do that so that

I could get my signature sound into that

393

:

somehow, even though it's different vibe

to it, it's still the harmonic build up.

394

:

Yeah, that's what I love to do.

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:

Oh, that's fantastic.

396

:

Yeah, I think it sounds amazing.

397

:

It's everything.

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:

I wanted that full sound, but something

light, if that makes sense.

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:

And it works so well.

400

:

It's the same with the flattering ram as

well.

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:

I think that's a very similar vibe.

402

:

And it's because I wanted this show to be

very positive.

403

:

I wanted it to be very even if there's

something difficult to talk about in

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:

podcasting, my personal brand and the

brand of everything that we've ever built

405

:

is very much a fair brand.

406

:

It's very much a

407

:

The approach is an open approach.

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:

It's never trashing people.

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:

It's never, it's never almost taking

sides.

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:

It's very objective and pragmatic, but

from the perspective of fairness and it

411

:

just, the music just fits that brand so

well.

412

:

And just, I think on the back of that,

there's something interesting in this one.

413

:

Cause you actually, you've done a lot more

podcasting music since we worked together.

414

:

You've done a lot more intros, a lot more

business podcast branding as it's become.

415

:

Ironically, it's become more relevant in

more local areas like a barns.

416

:

I remember when people in barns, they

thought I was crazy for getting involved

417

:

in podcasting, but now everyone's doing

it.

418

:

Everyone's still, you know, is in

podcasting.

419

:

How have you approached, for example, like

business shows where they've come to you

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:

and they said, look, Catherine, we need an

intro.

421

:

How have you managed to?

422

:

I suppose, bring your level of of talent

and skill and expertise.

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:

but keep it diverse enough and relevant

enough for each person.

424

:

Sure.

425

:

Has that been quite a challenge because

everyone is different?

426

:

Yeah, I love it actually.

427

:

I sort of do a deep dive into their

business.

428

:

So I'll look at the visual brandings and

I'll look at them as, you the face of the

429

:

business.

430

:

And also, like I said, the research, so

for example, I did little audio idents for

431

:

a financial company.

432

:

Now the chakra, the solar plexus chakra.

433

:

It has the color yellow and it's all about

prosperity and financial abundance and all

434

:

this sort of things.

435

:

And so there's a key, a tonality on the

piano, on any musical instrument that

436

:

represents that, that will put that vibe

out there.

437

:

So obviously I went with that key.

438

:

So that's my starting point.

439

:

I know what key I'm in and I can tell from

the people I'm meeting in the business.

440

:

the vibe of it and I look at all their

website and how all that flows.

441

:

And actually for this particular one, I

used their word as a percussive sound for

442

:

it.

443

:

And that was the start point then, the

percussive sound and that which not

444

:

everyone upon hearing it would go, oh yes,

that's indicative of the word.

445

:

But it was a starting point for it and it

just adds a little clever thing.

446

:

And when I explained what I'd done, they

were like, wow, we would never have

447

:

thought.

448

:

to do that.

449

:

So, so that, and that's a different, I

don't think I've ever done, used the word

450

:

of the business in the theme before.

451

:

So, so that was a total different way to

work for that one.

452

:

And another way to work was a podcast

theme tune I did for a lovely lady.

453

:

And she sang me the theme tune.

454

:

She says, I've got this tune in my, she

like, she plays a little bit and she sings

455

:

a little bit.

456

:

She says, I'm not a musician, but I've

just got this melody idea.

457

:

There was no chords behind it or anything.

458

:

So she sung it down the phone and I was, I

was dutting about, right, right.

459

:

I've got it, I've got it, I've got it,

I've got to go.

460

:

I didn't want to talk about it anymore.

461

:

I've got it, I've got it.

462

:

And I immediately put the harmonic

structure behind it and made it into, made

463

:

it into a melody.

464

:

And I padded that out again with the

vocals and a saxophone melody.

465

:

She specifically wanted a saxophone theme

tune.

466

:

And we put the whole package together.

467

:

So she had lots of little audio items to

put in throughout the podcast.

468

:

And then when we'd finished the whole

package and everything were done, signed

469

:

off, done, she run me up, she says, will

you just do me like a 10 minute version of

470

:

just piano solo, like just the backing.

471

:

And she uses it for her own sort of, her

own theme tune when she's preparing for

472

:

something and she needs to relax and get

into the zone, but she loves the whole

473

:

theme of it.

474

:

And it brings her back to business and

what she's on for that day.

475

:

So she's got her own bespoke version for

her to use for a personal life.

476

:

And yeah, it was such a brilliant package

to put together for her.

477

:

I love that.

478

:

That's tons of fun.

479

:

And what an interesting use case as well,

because she'll be able to use that across

480

:

videos and speaking gigs as well if she

wants to.

481

:

And just to bring her back into focus, I

think is fascinating.

482

:

And what you said about using the business

name as a percussive thing or a rhythmic

483

:

thing.

484

:

I'm a huge John Williams fan.

485

:

So, you know, I remember vividly being

stood in front of the record player when I

486

:

was about three years old.

487

:

And I still actually do this, but I don't

stand in front of the record player.

488

:

But I listened to it just as much the

Superman theme tune.

489

:

And that was that was probably the first

time that I ever came across that.

490

:

Like, wait a minute, the music just talked

to me.

491

:

What is this?

492

:

This is this is fascinating.

493

:

So to see see that logic applied to

something that let's be honest, it's

494

:

business.

495

:

A lot of people would think, well, wait a

minute, you know, how how can we do

496

:

something this good with business because

people that don't associate that.

497

:

And it just goes to show, I think that

just because.

498

:

It's business and it has to be

professional and theoretically it can be a

499

:

little bit dry.

500

:

It shows that it doesn't have to be dry.

501

:

It can be creative.

502

:

It can be as creative as anything else.

503

:

And it's just, I think that is such an

understated thought process, certainly for

504

:

business owners.

505

:

I think that's so important, really,

really important.

506

:

And we're going to stick a pin in it in

just a second, because I think this is

507

:

such an interesting deep dive.

508

:

But what I want to do is just shout out as

well.

509

:

to all you listening out there, anyone

listening, anyone that's interested in

510

:

this element of in and around podcasting,

we have put a lyric sheet together.

511

:

You don't need to give us your email

address or anything silly like that.

512

:

Just on the website, in the show notes of

this episode, whether you're listening in

513

:

Spotify, YouTube, Apple Podcasts, Global

Player, or in and around podcasting .com,

514

:

there's a lyric sheet, an old school lyric

sheet that's got the words to...

515

:

the theme tune on and you will see that

when I wrote this, the lyrics and then

516

:

Catherine so wonderfully brought it to

life.

517

:

I really wanted to just go straight at

what this brand means because it's not

518

:

just for the geeks and for the OGs.

519

:

It's for everyone that is in and around

podcasting.

520

:

So go get the lyric sheet.

521

:

You don't need to give us an email or

anything, anything crazy like that.

522

:

It's just there's a link.

523

:

It's just fun.

524

:

So Catherine, thank you so much.

525

:

Be light for music.

526

:

Is it well, you're online, you're

everywhere.

527

:

The Twitter, the LinkedIn, the Internet's

what's the?

528

:

What are all the places anyone can find

you online?

529

:

Instagram as well.

530

:

So if you search, Be Lightful Music,

Instagram is Be Lightful Underscore Music

531

:

and just search Be Lightful Music,

Facebook and then LinkedIn is just my

532

:

name, Katherine with a C, Rannis, R -A -N

-N -U -S.

533

:

And if you search that across Instagram

and Facebook as well, I've got my live

534

:

music, cause I am a gigging musician as

well.

535

:

So I manage two pages on each platform,

which is a nightmare.

536

:

Catherine really is fantastic as well.

537

:

Highly recommend you check it out.

538

:

Some of the LinkedIn posts that she puts.

539

:

Actually, I'm going to be honest with you,

I'm not a huge LinkedIn fan, but your

540

:

posts are becoming more and more frequent

in my timeline because they're the only

541

:

ones that I watch when you're playing or

when you're recording.

542

:

I think they're fascinating.

543

:

So if you are a podcaster looking for some

outstanding intro music or some theme

544

:

work, please do let Catherine know.

545

:

She really is wonderful.

546

:

And if you enjoyed this bonus episode, I'm

just getting you into the vibe of in and

547

:

around podcasting.

548

:

Danny and I...

549

:

are going to talk on another bonus episode

about why we put this show together, what

550

:

it stands for.

551

:

Of course, you can share the trailer with

all of your friends who are in and around

552

:

podcasting and you can check us out on

YouTube, Apple, Spotify, Global Player and

553

:

wherever, obviously, I'll say it, wherever

you get your podcast, but also in and

554

:

around podcasting .com slash listen.

555

:

So until the next time, enjoy yourself.

556

:

Keep enjoying your podcasting.

557

:

Take care and we'll be back very, very

soon.

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