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Episode #300: Edwin Kwan: SMTP Smuggling ByPasses Email Security Controls; Hillary Coover: Researchers Seek to Unmask Hackers Through Code Analysis and AI; Marcel Brown: This Day in Tech History; Katy Craig: CISO Accountability: Framework for Compliance; Trac Bannon: CISO Accountability: The buck stops… where?; Olimpiu Pop: CISO Accountability: Compliance is not Security
Episode 30022nd December 2023 • It's 5:05! Daily cybersecurity and open source briefing • Contributors from Around the World
00:00:00 00:16:48

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The stories we’re covering today.

Marcel Brown: December 22nd, 1882. Edward Johnson, an associate of Thomas Edison, has walnut sized bulbs made specifically for him to wire his Christmas tree with electric light. The eighty red, white, and blue bulbs formed the first set of electric Christmas tree lights in history.

Edwin Kwan: A recently discovered SMTP smuggling technique is allowing cyber attackers to sidestep email security protocols, posing a significant threat to organizations. The techniques exploit zero-day flaws in messaging servers, allowing attackers to send malicious emails with fake sender addresses.

Hillary Coover: In an effort to combat cybercrime, U. S. government researchers are embarking on a 30 month project to investigate whether computer code used in cyberattacks can reveal clues about the hackers behind them.

Katy Craig: The SEC's legal action against the former CISO of SolarWinds is a justified step towards greater accountability in corporate cybersecurity. It highlights the need for individuals in charge to diligently comply with federal safeguards and rules and to report incidents.

Trac Bannon: The charges against Joe Sullivan and Timothy Brown have dramatic ramifications for industry. There is the increased scrutiny of CSOs and CISOs. The precedent is set for personal accountability for both cybersecurity practices and disclosures. This means corporate security officers face scrutiny and legal responsibilities similar to CFOs and their responsibility for financial disclosures.

Olimpiu Pop: Whether we like it or not, we are at war. The CISO should stop preaching, and transform their slides into actions . Actions, translatable into automated tools that cannot be circumvented or ignored. More than that, as CISO, you should be the north star in terms of ethical conduct.