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#214 - Mothering with ADHD with Jodie Garth
Episode 21412th October 2022 • Happy Mama Movement with Amy Taylor-Kabbaz • Amy Taylor-Kabbaz
00:00:00 00:31:21

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I am blown away by the women who walk the journey alongside me and turn challenges into something they can share with others. Jodie McGrath does exactly that through sharing her current journey alongside light bulb moments and an adult diagnosis of ADHD. Listen as Amy and Jodie discuss:

  • Finding other ways to get things done rather than feeling like you need to do it all and making it mean something about our character, rather than about our brain.
  • The internal dialogue. How we often come up with reasons to explain our behaviours without realising we've spent a lifetime of feeling that we aren't able to meet expectations of ourselves and others.
  • Everyday tasks of organisation, cleaning and other coordinated efforts which can feel overwhelming if we let them.
  • Accepting that it is a continual process and gradually getting to the point working with our brain, rather than feeling like we're fighting it.

Jodie acknowledges she is very much still in the stage of discovery and curiosity beside her somewhat recent diagnosis. As with motherhood, some moments are definitely easier than others. Yet, the strength to parent with ADHD with the modern demands of motherhood is absolutely inspirational within this episode.

You can find out more about mothering with ADHD below as mentioned within this episode.

Follow, connect and reach out to Jodie on Instagram @jodiedemelza.

There needs to be a change in the way mothers are valued and seen in our society. We are here to spread the whispers of Matrescence together. Find out more and receive your Matrescence map here https://www.amytaylorkabbaz.com/matrescence/

Transcripts

Amy Taylor-Kabbaz:

Welcome to the Happy Mama Movement Podcast.

Amy Taylor-Kabbaz:

I'm Amy Taylor-Kabbaz.

Amy Taylor-Kabbaz:

I would like to start by acknowledging the Gadigal people of the Aura nation

Amy Taylor-Kabbaz:

on which this podcast is recorded, as the traditional custodians of this land.

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And pay my respects to the elders past, present and emerging.

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And, as this podcast is dedicated to the wisdom and knowledge of motherhood, I

Amy Taylor-Kabbaz:

would like to acknowledge the mothers of this land, the elders, their wisdom, their

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knowing and my own elders and teachers.

Amy Taylor-Kabbaz:

Welcome back Mamas.

Amy Taylor-Kabbaz:

Imagine living most of your life thinking that there was something wrong with you,

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thinking that you were lazy, that there was something wrong with the way you

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behaved, in the way that you showed up, you were late, you were disorganised,

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and then along comes motherhood.

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One of the most challenging experiences in life, but very much based on skills like

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being organised, multitasking, sticking to a plan, forward thinking, knowing what's

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coming and how to be prepared for it.

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So many of these skills of modern motherhood.

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And landing in motherhood and deeply struggling with those skills.

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Deeply struggling with what you think is being a good mum.

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And then think for a moment, imagine for a moment, discovering after three kids

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and thinking that you weren't doing a good job hearing that it wasn't your fault.

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It's because you are neurodiverse and you have ADHD.

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And suddenly all of the things that you've been telling yourself about

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you, your whole life, and also who you are as a mother, changes.

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In that moment, it makes sense.

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That's today's podcast interview.

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Jodie Garth is one of our beautiful Mama Rising coaches.

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She is very passionate about matresence and sharing it with the world.

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But she has an equal passion of talking about ADHD and neurodiversity

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in motherhood and how that experience can be very different.

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I'll let Jodie tell her story, but please, if you want any more

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information about ADHD and motherhood.

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Please check out the show notes at the end of this interview where Jodie shares some

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of the key resources that really supported her through this understanding of herself.

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00:02:58

Beautiful Jodie, welcome to the

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00:03:00

Happy Mama Movement podcast.

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I'm so glad you are here.

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I'm so glad to be here too.

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Thank you so much for giving this opportunity to talk about

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something I'm so passionate about.

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Yes.

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So I think we, the best way to have this conversation is to say right

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from the beginning that this is an exploration of something that

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you are still exploring as well.

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That this has come through your work with Mama Rising, but also your own

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personal experience of discovering things about yourself and how this has,

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in a way, given you a lot of answers.

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But also given you a lot of new questions as well.

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Is that the best way to describe it?

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Yes.

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Yes,

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So, why don't you take us through

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your experience of both matresence and discovering the Neurodiverse way that

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you beautifully think in this world.

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Okay, so I have three children.

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They're five, seven, and nine.

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It was on my eldest child's seventh birthday was when I

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first heard about matresence.

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And like, like so many mothers, it was amazing.

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It was this light bulb moment of feeling like, oh, this explains so many

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things about why I'm struggling as a mum and the challenges that I have.

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And yeah, I felt like this, this is the answer.

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Things are gonna get so much easier from now.

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And a lot of things did change from then, but I still have a sense as

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I've watched other mothers and how they just went about their lives and,

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um, particularly mothers in different situations to me, like if they had more

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children than me or if they're working as well as looking after the kids.

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I'd see them.

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It just seemed like they were managing so much better than what I was.

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And it was then at the end of:

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ADHD and realised, uh, that I have it.

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like officially in February,:

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And that was an even bigger light bulb moment.

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It was amazing of, um, really understanding who I

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am and how my mind works.

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And it wasn't just about my years as a mother, but it explained my whole life.

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And I could see points throughout my life where I'd struggled with different things

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and, and I now had an explanation for it.

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And so what, what did it start

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to explain about your motherhood experience in particular?

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When you started to look into what this ADHD diagnosis meant for your daily life?

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What did you start to see was explainable now that you

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understood that you have ADHD?

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Um, I think some of the, the big things

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that I struggle with is household management is a huge thing, and I, I

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know that the way that I have viewed myself as a mother is because I've, I've

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had this very blurred idea of household management and like being a good mum

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is having an organised home or being on top of all the life admin tasks.

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And because I wasn't good at that, I then equated that as

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being, I'm not a good mother.

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But at the same time I could see that there were so many aspects of, you know,

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nurturing my kids and playing with them.

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And, um, the relational side of being a mother, I could

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see that I am good at that.

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But it was so clouded because all the practical day to day stuff, it

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just, it can become so overwhelming and all consuming and especially

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with, you know, babies like all day.

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It's just multitasking with, um, with all the practical things.

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And so once I realised that I have a ADHD, it made, made that distinction

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a lot clearer of here's how my brain works and why I have difficulties

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with organisational type tasks and prioritising and multitasking

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and all of that sort of thing.

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And then I could see that the relational, you know, other, other sides of

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parenting was very separate to that.

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And yeah, I, I was able to recognise my own strengths a lot clearer and just

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be a lot kinder to myself and see the areas that I could get extra help in to

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achieve my goals and, and do the task.

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You know, things still need to get done.

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So finding other ways to get that done rather than feeling like I need to do

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it all and I'm not good at it, and then making that mean something about my

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character rather than about my brain.

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Oh, that's the gold there.

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Instead of making it about your character or your, your good enough

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as a mum or, or not good enough, or as a person, you can now see it.

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It's a completely different shift.

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And I remember when we, we've had some conversations, the two of us, about this.

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Just that level of daily judgment and overwhelm when you looked around your

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house before you understood this.

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You know, I, I remember the and I hope this is okay to share the tears that

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you were shedding in conversations around how badly you used to view

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the spaces around you as a reflection of who you were as a person.

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Can you share a little bit, because so many of the women listening to this will

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either be recognising themselves and knowing that they also have ADHD or some

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form of neurodiversity, or perhaps have never considered this and are hearing

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themselves in this story, which is why it's so powerful you're sharing this.

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So can you share with us those times and what it was like and what that internal

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dialogue, that inner mean Mama was like in those moments when you'd look

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around and see a mess, disorganised,

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Um, I actually think it's easier to

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talk about, about my current situation.

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I've actually just had a really hard week.

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I've just moved house and have had to go back to, to clean the previous house.

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And I wasn't able to leave it in the state that it needed to be in.

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So I was contacted by the real estate agent and honestly, the,

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the shame that I felt this week.

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So it, you know, as you said at the start, I'm still on a journey with this.

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I'm not a, at a point of being so confident in myself and understanding

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my identity, that, that this sort of stuff, I can just kind of let it roll.

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I'm still, I very much get affected by this still.

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Um, and yeah, this week I, I've again just been filled with shame about my,

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uh, lack of skills and cleaning and organising and all of that sort of thing.

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And, yeah, just feeling awful about myself.

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And, and again, thinking it's about who I am as a person, and it has taken

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time this week to remind myself of my strengths and, and what I can do

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and the things that I value in life.

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Um, I was telling, telling some friends the other day that I'm happy for my

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kids to write on a Mother's Day card.

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I love my mum because she loves me and she plays with it rather than I love my

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mum because she's good at cleaning grout.

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So just to, um, yeah, it, it's hard to know when to tell people that I have ADHD

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and when to, like, how to advocate for myself, because I feel like in a lot of

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situations it could seem like I'm making excuses or if they don't understand what

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it is and how, how all encompassing it is.

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Like it affects every part of my life.

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And, um, a lot of my symptoms, I do describe them as debilitating.

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Like they, they have such an effect on, on my daily living.

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And so if other people don't understand that, it can seem like I'm making excuses.

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You know, you're still just lazy and disorganised and all

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these really negative labels.

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But then other times it, it could be helpful to explain it.

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And so that's still something that I'm exploring and, and I guess needing to

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experiment with and see how different people respond or the best way for

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me to explain things in a way that others can understand and relate to

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and realise the separation between kind of brain function and skills and

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yeah, the external stuff versus the internal and not blurring at all into

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one thing of you're a good or a bad person based on what we can see of you.

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Yes.

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And how much our world does this to everybody.

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I bet you're seeing this through everything, through every lens now

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in every space, how there is a good version, which is a very neurotypical

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good girl A type personality follows the rules does, everything she

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says she's going to do all of that.

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And then there is the bad person who everybody else falls into that

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category and how much that must be.

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Well, what is that experience now to start really seeing how much the

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world, not just in motherhood, but in life, because you said this has also

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changed how you viewed your whole life.

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Yeah, I see all around me now.

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Just, how much our society values high executive functioning.

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So, that's very much affected by ADHD.

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There's, you know, the front part of your brain, it's like a control center and it

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controls things like, you know, planning, organising, setting goals, working

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towards goals and achieving them, time management, all of these sort of things

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that our society put such a high value on.

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And, again, like I, I feel like if I turn up late somewhere, regardless of what

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has happened before that, like all the effort that I've put in to get to this

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place on time, and it hasn't happened.

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It's seen as I'm disrespectful or I don't value the other person's time.

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I don't value the event or whatever it is that I'm coming to.

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And when that happens over and over and over throughout your life, it's

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so hard to not feel that how I'm being described or how I feel that other

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people are describing or judging me, and

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I don't know where I'm going with all that Now, , I don't even remember what the

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No.

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question was, but um,

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No, it's beautiful.

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And I was thinking as you were answering how important this is.

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I mean, every single one of us needs to listen to this interview, this

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conversation, and that's why I'm so bloody grateful that you are here doing this.

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Because one of my children has ADHD.

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And the process of me learning, and I still am, and I'm learning again,

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listening to you speak today of just how much, even cleaning her room.

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Staying on top of things with school.

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You know, she gets support in the classroom with her learning, but it's

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the life of skills around her that on a daily basis, she finds difficult

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to complete, to stay on top of.

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She literally forgets, and for a long time we didn't understand why.

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And it's only when we now put it through this lens of understanding,

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we can see it isn't laziness.

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It isn't forgetfulness, it isn't rudeness, you know, or any of the

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other things that we would've said.

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But back in the day, Jodie, like 20, 30 years ago when you and I were kids or me

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a little bit longer than 20 years ago, um, you know that none of this was understood.

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And so you were put in the bad kid category and you were made to feel like

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you, there was something wrong with you.

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And thank God we're in a place where these conversations are started, but

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we have so much more to do, don't we?

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Yeah.

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And it's so hard for females because girls have been overlooked for so long.

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And I mean, even my own experience, like when, when I first started

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thinking about ADHD and a mother who I didn't really know that well.

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She mentioned that she'd just been diagnosed and said that we were very

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similar and I should look into it myself.

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And my idea was I've never met a female with it.

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I've never met an adult with it.

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My idea was noisy, disruptive, energetic boys bouncing around

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and that was the portrayal of ADHD.

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And yeah now, that I've learned so much more about it and at least one

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of my daughters has been diagnosed and my son has been as well.

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Seeing how it's presented in females, like, it's, it's often so different to

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boys and it's easy for girls to mask it, to pick up on social cues and social

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expectations and be able to do all the right things, be the good girl to cover

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it up and pretend that you're okay.

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But it really is like the duck on the water, that on the surface it seems

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like you're the same as everyone else and you're managing okay.

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But underneath it's like there's so much going on and so much

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effort to do the most basic things.

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Yeah, it it is exciting now to see so much more awareness of it.

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And there are so many women our age getting diagnosed because we're finally

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putting all the pieces together.

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And seeing that a) everyone else isn't struggling as much as as what I am.

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And b) it's not, yeah, it's not about my organisation skills or laziness or all

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those things that we keep talking about.

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Um, there is other stuff going on and so let's explore that and learn more

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and then continue to help other women.

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And, um, I heard crazy stat recently.

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I was gonna look into this further, but that the first study of ADHD

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that included girls was:

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Oh, that isn't that long ago.

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That's insane that they, Yeah, they only included boys in the study because it was,

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it really was seen to be only affecting boys and only affecting childhood.

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And, you know, you'll grow out of it and that's it.

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But yeah.

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Wow.

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Yes.

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Um, my daughter was diagnosed in high school and the specialist we saw said

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the most common age of girls to be diagnosed with ADHD now is year 10.

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And in boys it's in primary school.

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And so that means that these girls are going through almost their

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entire education, misunderstood, struggling, and silent.

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It's actually heartbreaking.

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But that's why I really want to also explore with you now, I know you're

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also a Mama Rising facilitator now.

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You really want to shine a light on matresence but also this

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particular version, I guess this particular understanding.

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In one of the Mama Rising conversations just this week, one of the women

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reflected that a lot of postnatal anxiety and postnatal depression even

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can be misdiagnosed in neurodiverse women because it's not seen, as a

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struggle with the act of mothering.

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There's so much, as you said, so much of mothering is that, executive

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function skill in modern motherhood, you need to be organised like hell.

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You have to know how to multitask like a ninja.

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And so if those things are difficult for you, then no wonder we have

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this rate of depression and no wonder we have this anxiety and no

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wonder we have women feeling like they're failing on a daily basis.

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So what do you want to say to women who either know that they have

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ADHD or are listening, like I said before, and thinking, Oh wow, okay.

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What do you wanna say to them?

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What's the unique experience here?

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Where do they start?

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What do you want to say to the women who are listening and thinking, Yes, exactly.

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I didn't put this together before.

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There's two parts of what I'm thinking.

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There's the internal, so you know, how you speak to yourself and, as

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as your listeners would know.

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You know, you always, you always come back to kindness.

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You start with kindness and and is so, so needed in this situation because,

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it's so hard to show compassion and grace to our children when

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we're not showing it to ourselves.

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And it's hard to show it to yourself when you've had a lifetime of never

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feeling good enough and never being able to meet expectations and always letting

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people down and letting yourself down.

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And, it's a very common thing in people with ADHD to have really low self

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esteem because of these things of the internal dialogue that we develop, in

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trying to explain our own behavior.

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If you don't even realise that ADHD is an option to explain it, then

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you have to come up with other other reasons, and they're not very positive

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reasons that we usually come up with.

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And then that just plays over and over.

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00:20:10

And so, um, yeah, realising that you have ADHD, it makes such a

-:

00:20:16

difference in yeah, just understanding yourself and showing yourself grace.

-:

00:20:20

And you know, how that plays out in daily life, like recognising which

-:

00:20:28

things can you let go because they're just not worth the effort that is

-:

00:20:32

required to put it put into it.

-:

00:20:35

And, you know, celebrating your wins and celebrating your strengths because that

-:

00:20:40

will keep you going and then help you to do the things that are a lot harder.

-:

00:20:44

Um, but then also I, I think particularly for those who are starting to question

-:

00:20:51

as a result of, of listening to this.

-:

00:20:53

And this was me, I realise that I have ADHD from listening to a podcast.

-:

00:20:58

It's really important to just find out about it as much as you can.

-:

00:21:02

And it's great that we live in a time where we have such easy access to

-:

00:21:06

videos, articles, you know, Facebook support groups, and all these resources.

-:

00:21:11

Tap into them.

-:

00:21:12

Learn as much as you can about ADHD because as you learn of other people's

-:

00:21:17

experiences more, as you relate to it and see things in yourself, it

-:

00:21:22

will help to, to confirm whether or not this is what's going on for you.

-:

00:21:28

And it's so hard to, like the, the process of being, being able to

-:

00:21:32

see GP and see a psychologist or a psychiatrist and the official diagnostic

-:

00:21:37

process is so not ADHD friendly and it's so difficult and especially,

-:

00:21:43

you know, at the moment in Australia.

-:

00:21:44

I'm in Melbourne, I'm not sure just how bad it is in other states, but yeah,

-:

00:21:48

even to see a GP now is, is so hard.

-:

00:21:53

And so yeah, to be able to tap into all these other resources and learn

-:

00:21:55

as much as you can and talk to other people, is so helpful in the meantime,

-:

00:21:59

before you can see a professional.

-:

00:22:02

Mm.

-:

00:22:03

Beautiful answer.

-:

00:22:04

Thank you.

-:

00:22:06

I remember, we'll just finish with this as well.

-:

00:22:08

I remember you saying that in Mama Rising, we use these steps to help, well not

-:

00:22:14

even help to guide and support a woman through the experience of matresence.

-:

00:22:19

Of understanding who she is now.

-:

00:22:20

And I remember

-:

00:22:22

And I remember you messaging me saying, Amy, these are the same steps

-:

00:22:26

in understanding who you are now that you understand you have ADHD.

-:

00:22:31

And even just these first three steps that is in my book and what

-:

00:22:35

we train and teach within the Mama Rising training, I can hear you

-:

00:22:39

using over and over and over again.

-:

00:22:42

It's that kindness towards yourself.

-:

00:22:45

Understanding that there's nothing wrong with you, that this isn't

-:

00:22:48

your fault, that this is just the way your brain beautifully works.

-:

00:22:52

Then focusing on your strengths on the things that you really do well.

-:

00:22:56

And then getting clear on your values.

-:

00:22:58

What's most important here?

-:

00:23:00

As you said with that card on Mother's Day, you know, what is

-:

00:23:04

really the highest value here?

-:

00:23:06

And so I just wanted to point out that I can hear you using that

-:

00:23:10

over and over and over again.

-:

00:23:12

How important has that process been for you to come to this place of acceptance

-:

00:23:20

and, and understanding yourself?

-:

00:23:22

Yeah, I mean, the way the way we

-:

00:23:24

speak to ourselves is so important because that's what, that's what we

-:

00:23:28

are listening to all day, every day.

-:

00:23:29

And then that influences how we respond to other people.

-:

00:23:34

And, how we go about different tasks.

-:

00:23:36

And so yeah, it is been a huge thing to start to accept myself more, for who I am.

-:

00:23:44

And that's a continual process.

-:

00:23:46

Like I, I'm not yet at the point of, I think, fully accepting this, like

-:

00:23:53

when I have really challenging days or, um, yeah just find things hard

-:

00:23:58

and go, Oh, if I didn't have ADHD, then I'd be able to do this like

-:

00:24:02

other people can, and just getting frustrated about the whole situation.

-:

00:24:05

I do still speak quite poorly to myself and, you know, stupid

-:

00:24:12

brain, why can't you do this thing?

-:

00:24:13

And so I'm gradually getting to the point of not having those sort of

-:

00:24:19

conversations with myself and just recognising I do find this hard.

-:

00:24:24

How can I make this easier?

-:

00:24:25

How can I break this down into smaller steps?

-:

00:24:27

How can I work with my brain rather than feel like I'm

-:

00:24:29

fighting it, um, all the time?

-:

00:24:33

And so, yeah, it's, it's so important, our internal dialogue.

-:

00:24:36

And then, yeah, just realising what's actually going on and yeah,

-:

00:24:42

knowing it's not my fault and that something can be done about it.

-:

00:24:47

Because I think at my, my lowest point a few years ago as a parent with three young

-:

00:24:54

children and just feeling so overwhelmed and, and not really knowing a way out.

-:

00:25:01

Like, just wondering, is this how it is now?

-:

00:25:04

Is, you know, and matresence comes into this as well, like,

-:

00:25:07

am I gonna find myself again?

-:

00:25:09

Or, you know, I feel like I've changed so much.

-:

00:25:11

And yeah, just knowing what, what does the future hold?

-:

00:25:13

Like how, how are things going to change?

-:

00:25:15

I think, understanding that I have ADHD opens up the whole area of

-:

00:25:23

support and how can I get help that I need with different areas of my life?

-:

00:25:28

How can I make things easier?

-:

00:25:30

And then, just having the language and having a name for what's going on.

-:

00:25:35

It gives a reason for the way I feel and the way I do things

-:

00:25:39

yeah, that I, that I haven't had.

-:

00:25:41

Um, you know, I was 38 when I started looking to ADHD and just like I've gone

-:

00:25:47

all those years of, of not knowing.

-:

00:25:50

Not understanding myself and to now have that language and that

-:

00:25:53

understanding and have so many different areas of support in my life now.

-:

00:25:58

Um, yeah, there's so many things that have changed for the better.

-:

00:26:02

Yeah, and talk about strength.

-:

00:26:06

When I hear you speak and I hear your story, Jodie, all I think is

-:

00:26:09

the strength that it has taken to mother three children with ADHD, with

-:

00:26:16

the modern demands of motherhood.

-:

00:26:19

Even when you were talking about moving house and the pressure

-:

00:26:23

then to go back and clean that old property, I mean, my goodness.

-:

00:26:27

The fact is that you were even able to do any of that is a celebration

-:

00:26:32

and, and if when we have the language and the understanding.

-:

00:26:36

We can start seeing ourselves as these warriors, these strong amazing women

-:

00:26:43

who are doing this even with ADHD.

-:

00:26:47

And now you get the support.

-:

00:26:49

Now you can get help with the parts that you find hard.

-:

00:26:51

I think that's incredibly strong, so totally celebrating you today.

-:

00:26:58

Yeah, there's, there's a really,

-:

00:27:01

uh, great piece of encouragement that a friend gave me recently.

-:

00:27:04

Um, when I, yeah, I was having a really tough day with the kids.

-:

00:27:07

And just feeling like, I failed as a mum.

-:

00:27:09

And she said, you're not doing an easy thing badly, you're

-:

00:27:12

doing a really hard thing well.

-:

00:27:15

I'm still choking up because, you know, I need to keep reminding myself

-:

00:27:21

of this that, it is so challenging to, to be a parent with ADHD and

-:

00:27:27

then the added challenge of my kids having it as well, and so there's,

-:

00:27:31

Yeah, it is, It's very hard.

-:

00:27:33

So yeah, just to have that encouragement and people around

-:

00:27:36

me who are cheering me on and who understand what it's like as well.

-:

00:27:41

It's, yeah, it's, it's amazing.

-:

00:27:46

Oh, Jodie, that is a beautiful

-:

00:27:47

way of looking at it.

-:

00:27:48

Thank you so much.

-:

00:27:50

I will remember that.

-:

00:27:51

That is a really beautiful way to look at it.

-:

00:27:53

Thank you for your courage in sharing your story.

-:

00:27:58

Thank you, because just as you heard it on a podcast and then everything changed,

-:

00:28:03

you get to pay that forward now to all the women who'll be listening to this.

-:

00:28:08

How amazing.

-:

00:28:10

Yeah on that first day of listening to

-:

00:28:11

that podcast and thinking if I discovered that I do have a ADHD and just how much

-:

00:28:19

of a difference that realisation was.

-:

00:28:22

Um, I just, I just had a resolve kind of, you know, grow in me, of I

-:

00:28:27

want to go and, and share this with other people and raise awareness.

-:

00:28:31

And help other women who are in the same situation that I've been in, to

-:

00:28:35

understand themselves and to, yeah have the same experience that I've

-:

00:28:39

had in the last couple of years of, of understanding what's going on and

-:

00:28:43

be able to change and then continue to pass that on to other people.

-:

00:28:47

Um, yeah, it's exciting to, to see so many more conversations like this coming up.

-:

00:28:53

And it's important for the people who do have ADHD and then also those who live

-:

00:28:59

with us who have it, and you know, family members and just being able to understand

-:

00:29:03

each other more and support each other in the ways that, that we individually need.

-:

00:29:08

Because what one person needs in order to function in this world is gonna be

-:

00:29:13

different to what other people need.

-:

00:29:14

And so, yeah, just to keep talking and listening and understanding is, Yeah.

-:

00:29:20

Is so, important.

-:

00:29:24

And that's what you're doing.

-:

00:29:25

Amazing.

-:

00:29:26

Jodie, thank you so much.

-:

00:29:29

Thank you.

-:

00:29:29

Thank you.

-:

00:29:30

Thank you.

-:

00:29:32

You're welcome.

-:

00:29:33

It's been great to be here.

-:

00:29:35

Over and over again.

-:

00:29:37

I have moments like I did when I interviewed Jodie

-:

00:29:41

for this podcast interview.

-:

00:29:44

Moments where I am blown away by the courage of these women.

-:

00:29:50

The courage it takes to share your story publicly in the hope that

-:

00:29:53

it brings light and understanding, some peace maybe to another.

-:

00:29:59

Jodie, is one of those.

-:

00:30:01

On a daily basis I am blown away by the women who do this with me.

-:

00:30:05

Who take their own challenges and turn it into something that

-:

00:30:10

they can share with others.

-:

00:30:13

And that's exactly what Jodie wants to do with this conversation.

-:

00:30:17

As I said before we began, Jodie has shared some key resources and insights

-:

00:30:22

that helped her in this process of understanding ADHD for herself, and

-:

00:30:26

we've popped those in the show notes.

-:

00:30:29

You can also message Jodie if you'd like to on Instagram and DM her about

-:

00:30:35

how you felt about this interview and with any questions she said to me.

-:

00:30:39

She'd be very happy for anyone to reach out if they needed to in

-:

00:30:43

their own healing and understanding of neurodiversity in motherhood.

-:

00:30:49

Thank you for being here for these conversations.

-:

00:30:52

Thank you to all the amazing women that continue to share their

-:

00:30:55

story with me and with all of you.

-:

00:30:57

I love this space so much and what we are doing here.

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