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Yesterday's Sports - Sports History Network EPISODE 42, 21st September 2021
Emmitt Smith: Why Do People Diminish His Accomplishments? (Part 2)

Emmitt Smith: Why Do People Diminish His Accomplishments? (Part 2)

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EPISODE SUMMARY

The third and most overhyped and overstated reason fans contend that Smith was successful is because he ran behind a great offensive line, perhaps 'the best line.' Really? Does anyone discredit former Steelers middle linebacker Jack Lambert's achievements because he played behind arguably the best D-line ever? No! I rarely ever hear that.

Many great backs ran behind great offensive lines. So why does Emmitt get knocked for having an excellent line while others don't?

Franco Harris in Pittsburgh ran behind a great offensive line, led by Hall of Fame center Mike Webster. John Riggins (Washington) ran behind a great offensive line, led by HOF guard Russ Grimm and possible future HOF tackle Joe Jacoby. Buffalo's OJ Simpson benefited from running behind "The Electric Company" led by HOF guard Joe DeLamielleure....

You can read the full blog post here.

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YESTERDAY'S SPORTS BACKGROUND

Host Mark Morthier grew up in New Jersey just across the river from New York City during the 1970s, a great time for sports in the area. He relives great moments from this time and beyond, focusing on football, baseball, basketball, and boxing. You may even see a little Olympic Weightlifting in the mix, as Mark competed for eight years. See Mark's book below.

No Nonsense, Old School Weight Training: A Guide For People With Limited Time

Running Wild: (Growing Up In The 1970s)