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Marine Life Documentary Filmmaker Terry Lilley IS Everything Wild
Episode 15420th December 2021 • Your Positive Imprint • Catherine Praiswater
00:00:00 00:28:17

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Terry Lilley IS everything wild. As a biologist, endangered species manager, cinematographer, diver, activist, and wildlife advocate, Terry reflects philosophically about the interconnections of humans, animals, and nature.

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What's YOUR P.I.?.

Catherine:

Today's guest is biologist, endangered species

Catherine:

manager, cinematographer, diver activist, and advocate.

Catherine:

Terry is able to educate and bring awareness to the changes to the

Catherine:

coral reefs, wildlife populations, landscapes, and so much more.

Catherine:

Terry's legacy is to bring not only awareness to the preservation of our

Catherine:

natural world, but the active engagement by humans to save the environment.

Catherine:

Terry welcome to the show.

Catherine:

It's so good to see your smiling face over there in Hawaii.

Terry Lilly:

Aloha from Hawaii.

Terry Lilly:

Thank you for having me.

Terry Lilly:

It's nice to get up out of the water and dry out for a little while.

Catherine:

Well, I'm glad you're drying out here at your positive imprint and

Catherine:

sharing, and you've already shared so much in the many, many years

Catherine:

that you have worked with wildlife.

Catherine:

And so I'm just thrilled to have you share with what is happening today

Catherine:

and some of it certainly can be devastating news, but there's always hope.

Catherine:

We always want to look for the positive and look for hope.

Terry Lilly:

Oh absolutely.

Terry Lilly:

You know, Catherine, I was very blessed as a little kid and I look

Terry Lilly:

back at it now and wow, why did I get such good parents that had me?

Terry Lilly:

When I was two years old, my father taught me to surf

Terry Lilly:

and I've been surfing ever since.

Terry Lilly:

When I was four years old, my father literally picked me up at

Terry Lilly:

the beach, place me in a pond with two, six foot long sharks and s...

Terry Lilly:

said,, swim around get to know 'em.

Terry Lilly:

They're your friends.

Terry Lilly:

And my mom and my dad, basically for my entire younger life

Terry Lilly:

let me live out in nature.

Terry Lilly:

And what that taught

Terry Lilly:

me, is a lot of positive things.

Terry Lilly:

And I say this a lot in my school classroom programs.

Terry Lilly:

As long as there's DNA left on earth and the earth is

Terry Lilly:

spinning, there is always hope.

Terry Lilly:

Mother nature will find a way and I live by that and really believe it.

Terry Lilly:

And my motto is very much oriented to firsthand observation.

Terry Lilly:

Yeah, it's one of the reasons why I like living in Hawaii because Hawaiian

Terry Lilly:

culture was built on firsthand observation for the last 1800 years.

Terry Lilly:

So I like to be in the water, be with the animals, be with the surf,

Terry Lilly:

learn from them, and then share those experiences, especially with

Terry Lilly:

the children in our local schools.

Catherine:

Well, that's so remarkable and definitely such a young

Catherine:

age, which is your legacy, which is your parents' legacy, right?

Catherine:

I don't have ocean obviously here in New Mexico, but we have the wilderness and

Catherine:

I have so much enjoyed the time that my parents brought us out into the wilderness

Catherine:

and taught us not just survival skills, but like you were saying, learning about

Catherine:

the animals, the behavior, nature, mother nature, and how it affects,

Catherine:

how it can affect us and how it does affect us in really everyday life.

Catherine:

Many guests have said, everything is connected.

Catherine:

I would hope that people take the opportunity to go out and be with nature.

Catherine:

Learn and then go enjoy.

Catherine:

Lots to be said for mother nature.

Terry Lilly:

What I like to teach everyone is looking at the earth as your own body.

Terry Lilly:

Okay.

Terry Lilly:

The earth is one big living, growing, changing organism.

Terry Lilly:

It's not a bunch of little parts like the African continent or Asian continent

Terry Lilly:

or Pacific ocean or Atlantic ocean.

Terry Lilly:

Those are simply parts to one single body.

Terry Lilly:

If you want to stay healthy as a human and you've cut off your

Terry Lilly:

finger, well, you might bleed so that may affect your heart.

Terry Lilly:

Okay.

Terry Lilly:

If you take drugs that ruin your brain, well, that's going to

Terry Lilly:

affect your bloodstream and your skin and your limb your ability

Terry Lilly:

to move and so forth and so on.

Terry Lilly:

Same with the earth.

Terry Lilly:

All of the oceans are interconnected with this flowing energy.

Terry Lilly:

This energy is interconnected with the energy on land and all the

Terry Lilly:

animals from the bumblebee to the hummingbird are directly connected to

Terry Lilly:

the dolphin, whale and sea turtles.

Terry Lilly:

And on earth, all of these energies are shared as one living single.

Terry Lilly:

And if you don't take care of heart of your body, the rest

Terry Lilly:

of your body's going to suffer.

Terry Lilly:

In the past 300, 400, 500 years in the human race they tried to look

Terry Lilly:

at the earth as little teeny parts.

Terry Lilly:

Okay.

Terry Lilly:

What are we doing in Africa?

Terry Lilly:

What are we doing in south America?

Terry Lilly:

What are we doing in the Himalayas?

Terry Lilly:

And what are we doing in the bottom of the ocean in the Pacific?

Terry Lilly:

But it doesn't work that way because everything's interrelated.

Terry Lilly:

Even in Kaua'i where I have my school classes, I have a class of

Terry Lilly:

12 year old kids in the class and I teach us interspecies communication.

Terry Lilly:

How do you get the phone number of a shark of a sea turtle and how you can be on

Terry Lilly:

land and call the animals and communicate and talk with them whenever you want to.

Terry Lilly:

Just like you could with your cell phone, talking to your friends

Terry Lilly:

on the other side of the country.

Terry Lilly:

And so being out and living with animals then in my storytelling and what I like

Terry Lilly:

to do more than anything is share how the animals behave, how they think, how they

Terry Lilly:

move, how they eat, how they reproduce and how that energy is connected with

Terry Lilly:

the rest of the energy on the planet.

Terry Lilly:

And I'm doing incredibly detailed studies.

Terry Lilly:

I just thought.

Terry Lilly:

From the sea of Cortez, the Gulf of California and Mexico doing

Terry Lilly:

a Marine life steady there.

Terry Lilly:

And the very same species of Marine life in the sea of Cortez

Terry Lilly:

also lives on the Galapagos islands, 3000 miles to the south.

Terry Lilly:

And we've now discovered that on surface currents all around the

Terry Lilly:

world, those same surface currents.

Terry Lilly:

The Hawaiian Sanders did to be able to take their baka sailing canoes

Terry Lilly:

and go from Tahiti to Hawaii.

Terry Lilly:

On these surface, currents are little slicks of water, fresh water, and they

Terry Lilly:

blow around the surface of the ocean.

Terry Lilly:

And in these slicks are eggs and larvae and babies of Marine life.

Terry Lilly:

So you may have a pollution problem in the sea of Cortez where they're

Terry Lilly:

killing certain species of dolphin

Terry Lilly:

and distinguishing other types of fish species, but what a lot of people don't

Terry Lilly:

realize that these animals reproduce and their babies may not hatch, or settle down

Terry Lilly:

to the seafloor until they get to Ecuador.

Terry Lilly:

There's currents across Northern California and Northern Pacific

Terry Lilly:

are going from north to south.

Terry Lilly:

Then we went down to Peru and there a humble current in Peru,

Terry Lilly:

that's going from south to north.

Terry Lilly:

And then we went to Indonesia and there a current in Indonesia

Terry Lilly:

going all the way across the Pacific to the Galapagos islands.

Terry Lilly:

So what we're even understanding now because of DNA studies that when you

Terry Lilly:

look at the Pacific ocean, all of these animals are intermixed and they all share

Terry Lilly:

energy and they all share the same DNA.

Terry Lilly:

And so as a populace on earth, we need to look at somewhere like the

Terry Lilly:

Pacific ocean as an entire body.

Terry Lilly:

What happens in one part of the Pacific is directly going to affect what happens

Terry Lilly:

in the rest of the Pacific ocean and through DNA, modern cameras, satellite

Terry Lilly:

imagery, underwater 4k movie cameras

Terry Lilly:

we now can make it really fun to teach all of this information to the school kids.

Terry Lilly:

They're not just going to the beach because uncle Terry wants them

Terry Lilly:

to learn about the reef below, where they surf that out here at

Terry Lilly:

Pipeline on the north shore of Oahu.

Terry Lilly:

They get to go to the beach and grab a drone helicopter and an underwater

Terry Lilly:

drone submarine and a movie camera

Terry Lilly:

and they get to go out with me and live with the animals and for themselves,

Terry Lilly:

see how interconnected we all are.

Terry Lilly:

And get to know these animals in a very personal way.

Terry Lilly:

Like you would, the dogs and cats in the neighborhood.

Terry Lilly:

So it's really fun.

Terry Lilly:

And the whole idea here is to teach kids to have fun, and then to

Terry Lilly:

have this very detailed learning.

Catherine:

Absolutely.

Catherine:

I think if we can teach the interconnectedness then as children

Catherine:

grow older, they look at the world around them with more mature eyes, an

Catherine:

understanding that everything they do as well, and everything that humans do

Catherine:

will connect to whatever is happening in the world, or can be the cause of

Catherine:

whatever is happening in the world.

Catherine:

I think your words of teaching your words of wisdom are certainly spot

Catherine:

for what we want to help provide as far as wisdom for the future in

Terry Lilly:

preservation.

Terry Lilly:

, when we were kids growing.

Terry Lilly:

And my dad was one of the surfers in California we didn't know what

Terry Lilly:

the surf was going to be like until we walked down the beach that day.

Terry Lilly:

There was no surf line, no forecasts, no weather forecast.

Terry Lilly:

So we really didn't know.

Terry Lilly:

Now, if you go in and watch professional surfing contest, anywhere in the world,

Terry Lilly:

they're monitoring the weather on the other side of the ocean and they're

Terry Lilly:

tracking storms off Japan or Tahiti or way on the other side of the Pacific to know

Terry Lilly:

when the surf is going to hit Hawai'i.

Terry Lilly:

So the young surfers right now and divers and younger kids are really realizing

Terry Lilly:

that, wow, our surf here in Hawaii is interconnected with the weather in Japan

Terry Lilly:

and the weather in the Philippines.

Terry Lilly:

And so they're starting to look at their earth through their eyes of

Terry Lilly:

surfing as being totally interconnected.

Terry Lilly:

So all of a sudden , if I want to go out and have some good waves and have

Terry Lilly:

a healthy beach just sit on in a pretty ocean in a coral reef, then I need to

Terry Lilly:

care about what's going on in Japan or the Pacific Northwest or Ecuador.

Terry Lilly:

And so this is the kind of learning right now that I've got 16,000

Terry Lilly:

hours with national geographic

Terry Lilly:

under water studying Marine life.

Terry Lilly:

Then going to 23 different countries around the world and studying marine life,

Terry Lilly:

talking with the animals that live under water in Indonesia and the Galapagos and

Terry Lilly:

The Bahamas, they all know each other.

Terry Lilly:

These animals around the world

Terry Lilly:

they know what the other one's doing, what the ocean is doing all around the planet,

Terry Lilly:

because their survival on earth that spins and weather changes and currents change,

Terry Lilly:

everything's changing all the time.

Terry Lilly:

Their survival is being able to connect with the other

Terry Lilly:

animals all around the world.

Terry Lilly:

Now it's not so strange.

Terry Lilly:

I'm connecting with you and you're in New Mexico and I'm in Hawaii.

Terry Lilly:

We don't even have the same time on our watch.

Terry Lilly:

But we're learning from each other.

Terry Lilly:

We're teaching each other.

Terry Lilly:

And we're understanding the world in a little bit better

Terry Lilly:

way by doing this podcast.

Terry Lilly:

So what I hope to through my movie series is to teach kids all

Terry Lilly:

around the world that they have that interconnection with nature.

Terry Lilly:

You're born with it.

Terry Lilly:

The kids understand computers.

Terry Lilly:

I say that everybody has their own password to the

Terry Lilly:

internet, infinite knowledge.

Terry Lilly:

You and me and every yeah, you and me and everybody on earth has their

Terry Lilly:

own internal password to know what the rest of the planet is doing.

Terry Lilly:

You can know what the whales are doing in the Pacific Northwest.

Terry Lilly:

You can know what the octopus is doing in Maui.

Terry Lilly:

You can know all about the intricacies of animals around the world, because you

Terry Lilly:

have an internal password to connect with that ultimate knowledge on this planet.

Terry Lilly:

And so teaching older people how to reconnect with nature and to redefine that

Terry Lilly:

internal password so they can do a better job at interconnecting with the planet.

Terry Lilly:

Kids automatically have that interconnection.

Terry Lilly:

So showing how to build on it, then we can turn the planet back into one functioning

Terry Lilly:

living system instead of a bunch of little parts that are being operated differently.

Terry Lilly:

That's going to be the future of saving our planet.

Terry Lilly:

You can't have the Chinese military practicing underwater microwave weaponry.

Terry Lilly:

And then the United States being off the Philippines and practicing

Terry Lilly:

underwater, laser torpedoes, these are all conflicting energy.

Terry Lilly:

That throws the earth out of balance, the dolphins and whales and sea turtles.

Terry Lilly:

And all the sharks are trying to tell people right now and show people we

Terry Lilly:

need to get back in balance with them.

Terry Lilly:

And we get that into this interconnection and start doing away with these man-made

Terry Lilly:

energies because they're very destructive.

Terry Lilly:

And so we have to get back into being taught by wildlife and the marine life

Terry Lilly:

on how to be better stewards of this planet.

Terry Lilly:

And when we do, I think we're going to find that everyone's

Terry Lilly:

going to be healthier.

Terry Lilly:

Everyone's going to be happier.

Terry Lilly:

We're being bombarded by 50,000 impulses, a second.

Terry Lilly:

Radio waves, microwave sound waves.

Terry Lilly:

All these transmissions humans are making.

Terry Lilly:

People are finding it harder and harder to meditate these days because of that.

Terry Lilly:

They're being bombarded by so many unnatural energies that breaks that

Terry Lilly:

connection between you, the earth, you and nature, you the ocean and

Terry Lilly:

you to the dolphin or the whale.

Terry Lilly:

It breaks the natural bonds and the natural communication

Terry Lilly:

between all living systems.

Catherine:

I had a guest on Andrew Bracken who works with farmers in

Catherine:

Africa, and these farmers are having to figure out what types of seeds to plant.

Catherine:

Well, my gosh, you've been planting seeds for hundreds of years.

Catherine:

So what's the problem.

Catherine:

The problem is climate change.

Catherine:

The seeds that they've been planting don't work anymore.

Catherine:

Climate change is causing this, yet those farmers have

Catherine:

a minute carbon footprint.

Catherine:

Right.

Catherine:

And so, like you say that connectedness is breaking.

Terry Lilly:

The only way you're going to understand change

Terry Lilly:

is if you get immersed in it and become part of it.

Terry Lilly:

We did a study with Scripps Institute in Kauai, out at Tunnels

Terry Lilly:

a place I know you like to go to.

Terry Lilly:

It's called the acoustical footprint of the reef.

Terry Lilly:

we put this high-tech equipment out on the reef that recorded every

Terry Lilly:

sound on the reef for two weeks.

Terry Lilly:

3 trillion sounds in one little part of the reef in two weeks.

Terry Lilly:

We have the sound of the coral polyps talking to each other.

Terry Lilly:

We have the sound of the lobsters talking to the crabs.

Terry Lilly:

We have the sound of the sea urchins talking to the whales.

Terry Lilly:

So earth has been built on a lot of data, a massive amount of data.

Terry Lilly:

It's not just climate change in that word itself that is causing the disconnect.

Terry Lilly:

Climate change is very simple.

Terry Lilly:

Humans are causing earth changes to accelerate.

Terry Lilly:

These are changes been going on for billions of years, but they take a

Terry Lilly:

million years to happen versus a hundred.

Terry Lilly:

So the more humans cause an accelerated climate change, the more interconnected

Terry Lilly:

humans are going to have to be with their environment to deal with these changes.

Terry Lilly:

And there is no training scientifically, that's going to

Terry Lilly:

teach me how to deal with a change in any different part of the world.

Terry Lilly:

Everything is changing.

Terry Lilly:

The great white sharks are changing.

Terry Lilly:

The nudibranchs are changing.

Terry Lilly:

The crabs are changing.

Terry Lilly:

All the animals on earth are changing.

Terry Lilly:

So the only way we're going to deal with that is to go out, be with nature

Terry Lilly:

spend time to understand the changes, to know which direction to go.

Terry Lilly:

When certain seeds don't work anymore there's other seeds that are right there

Terry Lilly:

that are just ready to be planted in the ground that are going to grow like mad.

Terry Lilly:

If the coral reefs were healthy we have a sea level rise in Hawaii

Terry Lilly:

that's about a quarter of an inch maybe to a half an inch a year.

Terry Lilly:

Now the coral reef can grow at four to five inches a year..

Terry Lilly:

So as sea levels rise, if you understand the reef and you nurture it, the coral

Terry Lilly:

reef will rise and that will offset the problems with the sea levels cause a

Terry Lilly:

coral reef is mother nature's natural underwater, seawall, same with the kelp

Terry Lilly:

forest off California, Pacific Northwest.

Terry Lilly:

But the problem is, is that humans have lost their harmony with their coral reef.

Terry Lilly:

They've lost our harmony with the kelp forests.

Terry Lilly:

If there's a change happening then you can start assimilating and feeling

Terry Lilly:

those changes and know what to do.

Terry Lilly:

So humans have to grow up here as a bottom line.

Terry Lilly:

The whales lived on earth for 20 million years.

Terry Lilly:

They started in the ocean, they gravitated to the land and

Terry Lilly:

they went back to the ocean.

Terry Lilly:

And whales and dolphins

Terry Lilly:

they don't live as a single individual.

Terry Lilly:

They live in a harmonized as a group, all together, acting as one.

Terry Lilly:

That's why dolphins can heal each other.

Terry Lilly:

That's why one dolphin, a thousand miles away from the other

Terry Lilly:

dolphin knows that it's sick.

Terry Lilly:

That's why every dolphin in the pod knows when a female dolphin becomes pregnant

Terry Lilly:

because they all live and act as one.

Terry Lilly:

So when there's a change, they can harmonize with that change and figure

Terry Lilly:

out how to change along with it.

Terry Lilly:

The earth is not dying or falling apart.

Terry Lilly:

It's not going anywhere.

Terry Lilly:

We're enclosed in an atmosphere here.

Terry Lilly:

We're not losing parts of the earth up to Pluto.

Terry Lilly:

But we are creating all of these manmade and women made energies.

Catherine:

Aside from going out and sitting in nature what

Catherine:

else can children and adults do who may not live near nature?

Catherine:

They live in urban areas.

Catherine:

What can they do to help the world to reconnect?

Terry Lilly:

That's a really, really great question.

Terry Lilly:

I've been all around the world.

Terry Lilly:

I've been to almost every continent on earth now and underwater

Terry Lilly:

and trying to figure that out.

Terry Lilly:

Nature is everywhere no matter where you are.

Terry Lilly:

I went to New York city.

Terry Lilly:

I did some interviews and some movies in downtown New York.

Terry Lilly:

You can sit up on the top of a apartment complex find nature very well.

Terry Lilly:

There's Paragon Falcons flying around in New York Senora.

Terry Lilly:

Uh, and nesting on top of the high rise buildings.

Terry Lilly:

So wherever you are at get outdoors and get away from electronics

Terry Lilly:

and spend some peaceful time.

Terry Lilly:

We're on electronics right now.

Terry Lilly:

It's doing something good with this podcast.

Terry Lilly:

We can't get away from electronics completely because that's

Terry Lilly:

how we communicate together.

Terry Lilly:

Okay.

Terry Lilly:

But you don't need to be calling your phone or texting your

Terry Lilly:

buddies 75,000 times a day.

Terry Lilly:

Put your phone down, go out in the ocean and say hello to a

Terry Lilly:

dolphin and a sea turtle and learn how to communicate naturally.

Terry Lilly:

We don't have to change the world.

Terry Lilly:

We do that by changing ourself.

Catherine:

Such words of wisdom.

Catherine:

I want to share something.

Catherine:

We live in a really small part of New Mexico

Catherine:

at the bottom of a huge, 10,000 foot peak.

Catherine:

Of course, being in the mountains, we have deer bear, coyote,

Catherine:

everything, and skunks.

Catherine:

We have a skunk and adorable.

Catherine:

I love him.

Catherine:

So anyway, one year, many years ago, Our dog, we were sitting on the porch

Catherine:

and we have, spindles on the porch and a doe came by with her twins.

Catherine:

And the DOE walked up.

Catherine:

Okay, honey, should we move the dog?

Catherine:

No, just let's just let the animals do their thing.

Catherine:

So the doe stuck her nose through the spindles and Maka went over and

Catherine:

stuck her nose there and they talked and they licked and they touched.

Catherine:

And then after that Maka walked down the stairs and she has twins.

Catherine:

Deer will kill your dog.

Catherine:

And she walked down the stairs and the doe left her twins with Maka.

Catherine:

And then she just went under the tree a little bit farther away where she browsed.

Catherine:

Every day that doe would come by and look for Maka.

Catherine:

We'd let Maka out.

Catherine:

And the dove would leave her, her fun.

Catherine:

It is just incredible, whatever they said to each other.

Terry Lilly:

The beautiful thing about that, Catherine, animals out

Terry Lilly:

there interconnect with each other and they try to interconnect with humans.

Terry Lilly:

And it's the human that has put up that barrier, where they

Terry Lilly:

don't want to interconnect.

Terry Lilly:

And even over, you know, for the last thousands and thousands of years.

Terry Lilly:

Indigenous cultures learned how to use their third eye.

Terry Lilly:

They, they knew how to stay open to animal energies and how to connect with animals.

Terry Lilly:

So let's start learning from the animal world and let them re-teach us

Terry Lilly:

how to be in harmony on this planet.

Terry Lilly:

They've been here a lot longer than we have, and they've been very successful.

, Catherine:

such interesting, uh, outlook, of wisdom and

, Catherine:

positivity and hope.

Terry Lilly:

People often sit there and say, Terry, how do you keep such a good

Terry Lilly:

attitude with all of these problems?

Terry Lilly:

Well, you know what?

Terry Lilly:

Nine out of 10 times, I go scuba diving

Terry Lilly:

I see some of the most amazing creatures on earth.

Terry Lilly:

So the bottom line is, that I'm out there every day.

Terry Lilly:

90% of what I see on this planet is still incredibly

Terry Lilly:

beautiful, incredibly connected.

Terry Lilly:

And , you may see events that are happening that are really bad.

Terry Lilly:

I mean, they're bad.

Terry Lilly:

We got to deal with them.

Terry Lilly:

Storms, famine, drought, fires, hurricanes, all this kind of stuff.

Terry Lilly:

Uh, and they're increasing in numbers.

Terry Lilly:

That's obvious.

Terry Lilly:

Okay.

Terry Lilly:

But.

Terry Lilly:

You got to realize it's still 90% of the earth is incredibly beautiful.

Terry Lilly:

The animals are still in harmony with each other.

Terry Lilly:

And so we don't want to get overwhelmed with all the negatives and stop

Terry Lilly:

looking at all the positives.

Terry Lilly:

So it just it's it's up to all of us, you know?

Catherine:

Yes, yes, it is.

Catherine:

It is.

Catherine:

Terry, this has been inspiring and eyeopening because over the last several

Catherine:

months I've have an eye issue and, and it's brought me down really bad.

Catherine:

So, but I, I love doing the podcast because people like you bring me back up

Catherine:

and bring the positivity and hope back.

Catherine:

And so.

Catherine:

What last inspiring words and you've been incredibly inspiring, but what last

Catherine:

inspiring words do you want to share to help engage people to become active?

Terry Lilly:

That's a great question.

Terry Lilly:

And I can only just talk briefly about myself.

Terry Lilly:

Okay.

Terry Lilly:

I never tell anybody what to do or any of that kind of stuff.

Terry Lilly:

I just go out and do it.

Terry Lilly:

And hopefully they want to follow along because they see it's positive.

Terry Lilly:

, I almost died of a heart seizure a couple of years ago.

Terry Lilly:

Was pronounced dead.

Terry Lilly:

So I got electrocuted while scuba diving under a military ship

Terry Lilly:

using electromagnetic weapons.

Terry Lilly:

Um, so I was pronounced dead twice in my life with no chance of living.

Terry Lilly:

I've had hip surgery back surgery, neck surgery, uh, and about broken

Terry Lilly:

every bone in my entire body.

Terry Lilly:

And so today I got up early, I did look at the news.

Terry Lilly:

I did do some editing and.

Terry Lilly:

We're doing electronics on the podcast, but the second we get off

Terry Lilly:

I'm going for a scuba dive, and going to spend a couple hours under water.

Terry Lilly:

And then after that, hopefully I'll probably surf for a little while and

Terry Lilly:

then go out and watch the sunset and have a glass of wine on the beach.

Terry Lilly:

And by the end of the day, I like completely forgotten

Terry Lilly:

about all my problems.

Terry Lilly:

So if I could just ask people, if they would just put down the cell phone,

Terry Lilly:

put down the computer, go outdoors, sit in your garden and talk to the

Terry Lilly:

butterflies . You'll find really, truly that many of your problems that you

Terry Lilly:

have in life and illness will go away if

Terry Lilly:

you do that.

Terry Lilly:

And the harmony you create on that is going to help harmonize the planet so

Terry Lilly:

we can all build together a little bit better future for Mother Earth.

Catherine:

Terry Lilley, it has been a joy.

Catherine:

Next week's show is going to be again, Terry Lilley, we're going

Catherine:

to talk about his professional work under water around the world

Catherine:

his cinematography and Marine life.

Catherine:

Terry Lily, I can't wait to see you in Hawaii very soon.

Terry Lilly:

And thank you very much for having me on the show.

Terry Lilly:

It's really feels good to share little bits and information about nature.

Terry Lilly:

That's why I was kept alive on this planet.

Terry Lilly:

That's why I was born.

Terry Lilly:

The animals are talking through me to remind you on

Terry Lilly:

how to behave on this planet.

Terry Lilly:

And I'm just their voice

Catherine:

well, you are

Catherine:

a great voice and you are everything wild, wild in nature that is.

Catherine:

And thank you so much for bringing awareness to the changes around

Catherine:

the world, but also engagement and getting people active and educated

Catherine:

because advocacy is education.

Catherine:

. Yes.

Catherine:

Aloha, your positive imprint.