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Ask The Experts: What Drives You And Why Did You Choose This Business?-Ep.108
Episode 10828th August 2022 • She Coaches Coaches • Candy Motzek
00:00:00 00:30:25

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Join me and nine experts as we collectively respond to the question. What drives you and why did you choose this business?

This group of experts each comes with a wealth of experience and a history of success in business, and I know you will find their insight and experience valuable.

 

Featured on This Show:

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My Guests:

Lorraine Ellen Scott: is a Reiki Master Teacher, intuitive healer, and inspirational mentor who helps introverted entrepreneurs, coaches, and healers step into their power to thrive in business. With over twenty years of experience with vibrational energy healing, Lorraine developed her signature C.A.L.M. process that helps people live life on their terms for growth and sustainable success.

 

Website: www.simplehealingarts.com

Social: https://www.facebook.com/empathsandintroverts

 

Marie Mack: Marie is a business system and customer journey expert and business mentor for talented coaches and consultants with a passion for growing and scaling their businesses!

 

Website: https://firstcuptoclose.com/

Social: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marie-mack/

 

Siobhan Gass As a clinical social worker and US Air Force Veteran, Siobhan teaches women who served in the military and other badass leaders the proven action steps for crafting a story that establishes credibility and builds a profitable legacy brand that attracts your next favorite client.

Social: https://www.linkedin.com/in/siobhandeann/

 

Stephanie Moram: Green Living Expert, the CEO and Founder of Good Girl Gone Green, and host of the podcast Green Junkie, where she simplifies green living so you can waste less, have more, and save money.

Website: https://www.goodgirlgonegreen.com/

Social: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephaniemoram/

 

Diana Lidstone: After almost four decades in business and working globally with coaches, consultants, and other service-based experts, Diana has gathered rock-solid wisdom and advice that has helped thousands of entrepreneurs and professionals accelerate growth and explode profits. Her work embodies #worklessearnmore!

Website: https://dianalidstone.com/

Social: https://www.facebook.com/TheEntrepreneursGPS

 

Jeff Klein: Guides people to the right words for each situation. As a Speaker, Speaker Mentor, Trainer, and Author, he has received rave reviews for speaking over 800 times, to trade associations, sales organizations, national conventions, and business groups, impacting tens of thousands of business professionals.

Website: https://speakercoop.com/

Social: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffkleinspeaker/

 

Jen Ingram: a Confidence Catalyst and Business Mentor saving hustling female solopreneurs from the chains of corporate America.

Website: www.herlifeunchained.com

Social: https://www.facebook.com/jenelleingram/

 

Jannette Anderson

Website: https://www.bodacity.ca/

Social: https://www.facebook.com/groups/BodacitysActionHeroes/

 

Sally Reid: is a Quantum Alignment Coach who helps people heal emotionally and physically when other methods of healing have failed them.

Website: Https:/www.sallyreid.com

Social: https://www.facebook.com/groups/blissfullifeacademy/

Transcripts

Candy Motzek:

Hey welcome to sheet coaches, coaches, I'm your host, Candy Motzek. And I'm going to help you find the clarity, confidence and courage to become the coach that you were meant to be. If you're a new coach, or if you've always wanted to be a life coach, then this is the place for you. We're going to talk all about mindset and strategies and how to, because step by step only works when you have the clarity, courage and confidence to take action. Let's get started. Hi there, and welcome to she coaches, coaches. So glad you're here. I have brought together a group of nine experts. Each of them has a slightly different business, but they have a wealth of experience. And I asked all nine people the same question. And here's the question, why do you do what you do? Really, like? Why this business? Why did they choose this business? So we had a great conversation, you're going to hear all kinds of different perspectives, and you're going to want to listen carefully. There is something here for everyone. Enjoy. Stephanie, tell me, why do you do what you do? Like why this business? So many coaches that I work with, they feel that coaching is like a real calling for them? You know, it's like, it's been talking to them for ages. And they're finally answering that calling. So what about you? Why do you do your business? It was

Stephanie Moram:

totally accidental. I'm gonna be honest, I didn't. I was a social worker before I started working at home. So it wasn't ever something on my radar that I'm going to coach people to do anything. I was into sports. As a kid, I thought maybe I'd be a sports coach, like a figure skating coach, or a rugby coach. But I never thought I'd be actually coaching or consulting with people. So it kind of just happen. And when I say that, I just mean that I was so passionate about sustainability, that it started sustainability and how I learned about sustainability was on an individual level. So it was, you know, changing my home, getting toxins out of my house, being mindful of the things I was bringing into my home, being mindful of the clothing, we were buying, being mindful of our trash, you know, questioning things. So that passion kind of flipped to a business. So I watched two really powerful documentaries, one being Food Inc, which led me really deep down the rabbit hole of questioning why, like a kindergarten kid? Why, why why, why this, why this food? Why is this better. And then about a year later, after my daughter, my daughter was about three months old. And I watched another documentary called Who Killed the Electric car. And that one just really opened up my eyes. And I had a friend that started a blog, and she said, You really need to share your information. I said, No, never, I'm never going to do that. And after watching that documentary, I just remember saying to myself, I love what I do. As a social worker, I know I'm changing lives, I know that I'm helping children. But I feel like if I don't do something in this environmental area, sustainability, green living, whatever you want to call it, that I'm going to kick myself in 10 years. And here we are, like 11 years later, and I'm so grateful that I did something. And even if it wouldn't have turned into a business, I just wanted to make a difference somehow, was it helping my community banned plastic bags at grocery stores? Was it I don't know, something along those lines. But this ended up turning into business. And I'm so grateful that it did. So it really taking my passion and flipping it into profit. I'm having a purpose behind it. I'm just so passionate about sustainability, that it just makes it so easy to build this as a business and help individuals live more green. But then now I'm starting to help businesses implement how they can be greener as well.

Candy Motzek:

Right. So as your talk, I hear the passion in your voice. And you started by saying it was kind of an accident. But I think that there's a couple of things that you mentioned that are really powerful here. And one is that so often, it's that thing that just gets you in the gut. And sometimes it's the thing that you're so passionate about on the like I want to be part of this and sometimes it's the thing that makes you so angry that something needs to change, right like that means that it's up to me to help change it right. And so passion takes both of these forms. And so even though you said by accident, you know when you there's no accident that you saw those movies, there's no accident that You know, life presented itself to you. I mean, look at the state of the world that we've got right now. And then you connected with that passion, like, I'm going to make a difference. And hear you though, right? So just I love that I just love that there's that, you know, sometimes it's the thing that just just like, this just stops with me. This is not anymore on my watch. Shavon let me ask you this question. Why do you do what you do? Like, why is this business?

Siobhan Gass:

Social Worker, I want to help. But when I was in the military, I was doing therapy with people who were telling me they were going through the same things that I was going through, while I was active duty. And I was like, this is really tough for me there, there are a lot of therapists who are active duty, who are awesome at their role as an active duty therapists officer, I, that's just not a good fit for how I like to function in the world. So when I got out, and I was like, Okay, how can I help continue to help this population. So I went into work with women went into work with veterans period. And I realized that the women who were not sharing as much and in therapy group sessions, as they would in individual sessions with me, and I realized there is still that culture of military that follows even in treatment when you're in treatment with other military folks. And that is a male dominated situation. And so I realized that this is my calling, I need to help women feel comfortable finding the right connections with the right people, and working through their stories so that they too can feel that lifting of the burden of having to be falling in line and fitting in or not even saying that they're a veteran, because they don't even want to deal with it.

Candy Motzek:

Wow, that's an incredible mission, I'm just thinking of, you know, how that will ripple out for the rest of their lives, to be heard, and to actually be in a safe space where they can share their experience and start to heal, and start to shift again, and ultimately, to come back into alignment with who they are now, who have they grown into being? That's amazing. Wonderful, thank you. And there's no sorry, there's just one other thing here is just this, you know, the thing that you mentioned about, you know, in the group settings that many of the women were not sharing at the same level that they were sharing with, you know, with you in a one on one session. And I think that, you know, it speaks heavily to the military culture. But it also speaks heavily to our society. And I think that this is really common. And so I just, I didn't want to let that pass by. That is an important point. And for any of the women listening to this, just know that if you're not feeling as comfortable in a mixed setting, then maybe it is time for you to be looking for some one on one help, so that you are getting the support that you need. Definitely. Sally, so question number two, tell me more about why you do what you do. Like I read your bio, and I see that through line that moved you to this place. But there is something more lots of people would have had near death experiences, and then done something else. Why this?

Sally Reid:

It's very funny, you should ask that I literally backed into this, I felt like I had no choice. I have my near death experience in 1999. And here we are. And I've only been doing this for 12 years. So what was I doing instead, I was attempting to avoid what I knew I was supposed to be doing. But interestingly enough, this is what I was doing. I was I started out as a writing coach for children, and they loved me and I love them. But that, you know, like, things happen, and we had to move away and you can't bring your clients with you. Then the next thing I was as a columnist for a newspaper and a feature writer, well it turns out I was doing this type of work while I was doing, you know, like, I was actually coaching people through the newspaper. And then I was like, no, no, I can't do that. And I started becoming a real estate agent. Well, Gosh, darn, I was coaching people during their real estate and it was it was a very emotional time. 2008 2009 When I spent a lot of time literally helping people coaching them emotionally. And finally I just went uncle I Okay, I hear you, I understand you want me to actually be a coach, instead of coaching through some other forms? And here's why I didn't. And I should have added this in my first answer. The first thing is you have to trust that you can actually do the thing you can trust, you can actually do the thing, even though you went through the training, or you've done all this other stuff, and you have all this experience, you just have to believe you do the thing, and I didn't. And so that's the one thing that I hope to change, and, and facilitate and others is get rid of that Gremlin noise in your head that makes you think, who am I? And how can I help?

Candy Motzek:

Yeah, and isn't it interesting, you know, like, 2020 hindsight for all of us, right? Like, isn't it interesting that you're actually already doing it? Somehow, like, it's because like, I didn't think I could do it, but I was actually already doing it. Like, sometimes you just gotta wonder. Like, if I know

Sally Reid:

those kids, you know, those writing kids, they would always want to come and hang out with misery because we'd be all in the barn. And they, they'd want to talk to me about their boyfriends, or they want to talk to me about their problems at school, and they wanted to, and like we just didn't know, we keep brushing our horses. And I'm like, Okay, let's go ride.

Candy Motzek:

Yeah, right. Yes. And then ground them in their bodies. Lorraine, question number two, why do you do what you do? Like, why this business? And the reason that I ask is that so many of the people that I work with, they feel like coaching or their business is a calling, you know, this is the thing that they are meant to be doing at this time. And even that they've always been a coach, but there wasn't kind of a word to attach to it. So what about you? Why do you do what you do?

Lorraine Ellen Scott:

Well, I've pivoted, since I first got into the business world, I was teaching Reiki and absolutely loved it. And then I had to change things around as the world started shifting and changing. I even taught online a little bit. But I was struggling to put myself out there, especially as an introvert, and I needed to address my introversion. So I created a process that would help me clear my energy. And like my calm process, it's actually an acronym for clear aura loving mind. So I created this process for myself that I realize can help other people, especially introverts who want to get into business, you know, healers, coaches, people who have to stretch themselves beyond their comfort zone. And I don't know, it actually really helped me figure out that other people need this too. And, to me, that just lights me up knowing that I can empower somebody, and give them tools that they can use on their own, and they can get their message out there. Because there's people who need their wisdom as well. That's what drives me.

Candy Motzek:

Yeah. And I like that acronym. So sure, that acronym of calm again, what is it?

Lorraine Ellen Scott:

It's clear, Aura loving mind.

Candy Motzek:

It's great. So the you know, what I hear so much is you were aligned enough to hear what the next right action was, what the next right pivot was for you. And that you wouldn't be here doing, you know, this new iteration of your business, if you hadn't gotten aligned. And if you hadn't had the prior experience, you know, like, being a Reiki Master Teacher is, you know, like, it's a whole career and profession into itself. And if you didn't have that, then you wouldn't have been poised to do the next thing. So it's neat to see how the journey evolves, right?

Lorraine Ellen Scott:

Hmm. Yeah. And Reiki is still a part of my every single day, doing self healing, sharing healing with other people. I wouldn't be where I am without Reiki, all the things it's helped me through personally. So

Candy Motzek:

I love it. Love the flow of it. Yeah, I was just thinking I did my first level Reiki, and you can see my mouth is I'm trying to figure out how many years ago it was. I'm gonna guess 30 Maybe 35 years ago. Wow. And it was a really, you know, it wasn't a well known modality at that time. And but it's still you know, like once you do it there, it's always their job question number two. Why do you do what you do? Like why this this notice why is this your thing?

Jen Ingram:

Yeah. So it's interesting when I experienced what I call kind of my own self awakening, which I think so many women go through at some point in their life, I want to say it hits around your late 30s or 40s. For some, it's earlier. So it's a little later, but you kind of wake up one day and you kind of go, how did I get here? I'm not even really living the life I wanted to live. I don't know, I'm even doing the job I want to do. I kind of just got shuffled into this alleged American dream of being all these things that I was told I'm supposed to be. And I don't even want to be that. Yeah. And I, once I discovered this, and I decided, it's okay, I don't have to be and do these things that I've always been told I should do. Um, I thought, I need everybody to experience this. Like, this is joy. This is happiness. You know, I kept thinking I would experience it after I got the college degree after I got the big corporate job, the big promotion, the family the things, and it wasn't there time and time. I was like, Yeah, cool. So I finally got the house. Now what? Right? And finally, one day I said, once I experienced started really living my life, and doing things that I love. I just, how can I not help other women do this?

Candy Motzek:

Yeah, yeah. So you know, so all of those things that you're saying? I'm like, if you're listening to the audio, you can't see it, obviously. But you're gonna see hear my head nodding? Yes, yes, yes. And it. It's like when we're teenagers, or children or whatever, they kind of encourage us to get onto that treadmill, you know, like, it's more like a conveyor belt, actually, you get on that conveyor belt, and the conveyor belt then takes you to, what college are you going to go to? And then what major will you do? And then what degree will you do? And then what grad degree will you do, and then you know what big firmly, you get a job in and then we'll that promotion needs to happen. And then that, and like, all this conveyor belt, but it comes with zero thought, because we think like, just like you said that the happiness is going to happen when we reach the next level. And so, you know, you said it as well, this, this sort of awakening happens at different times in people's lives. But it can be a really hard time when you go, Oh my gosh, what have I just done for the last 20 years like nothing, none of this is me, none of this makes me happy, I kept thinking the next level, the next level, the next level. So I think that the work that you're doing is desperately needed for people. And the more women that learn to look inside for themselves and their happiness, and connect with somebody like you, the better the world is going to be, the better they are going to be, the better their families, their friends will be. Because they're going to be that beacon of hope for them to write. Like, it's amazing. It's the best thing ever. That's why so important. These These things are so important. The earlier that women can hear these things, and start to make changes in their life to reflect their true, you know, their true authentic self, the better. So I just, I applaud, I applaud the work that you're doing. Question number two, Jeff, why do you do what you do? Like, why? Why this business?

Jeff Klein:

You know, as I said, when mot where I am now came about through a series of fortunate accidents. But I really firmly believe that I am doing what I've always been supposed supposed to be doing. And the truth is 10 years ago, or 20 years ago, I couldn't have done this. I wasn't where I needed to be. But now I'm really able to help people. You know, 20 years ago, I was running around film sets and doing stuff in the movie business and I loved it, and I was really good at it. And and now I'm really good at what I do now. And I help people on so many levels, and it's just what I'm supposed to be doing. So I fit right in and I'm doing what I'm supposed to be doing. And I don't I can't think of a more accurate answer than that can be

Candy Motzek:

that feeling of on purpose, right? Yeah, but I

Jeff Klein:

got here by accident, but I'm on purpose no accidents. We

Candy Motzek:

know that. A lifetime a lifetime of experiences brought you to this place right Don't worry. Why do you do what you do? Like, why this business?

Marie Mack:

Yeah, this is a great one. I, um, my past comes from being an army officer. So I used to fly back Blackhawk helicopters for the US Army. And I have a skill set where I can put things in order and find tasks and organize them very easily. Being a Blackhawk helicopter pilot was my dream from being little, I created that dream, I live that life I absolutely adored it. And taking that, and this is where it kind of comes in. Like, I didn't settle into that for years of my business. But that is what I'm good at. I'm good at organizing things. I'm good at helping people create plans and systems, really, it's checklists. And if you're a Blackhawk helicopter, pilot, you live on the checklist. So that's why I do this. That's why I do this business is because that is my zone of genius. As soon as I settled into that a little bit more and kind of just loved on it, it became a really super amazing and comfortable space that I am excited about doing every single day. So

Candy Motzek:

Hmm, that's so much fun. I love that. And I love that, you know, the how the transferable skill, right? You know, like, you wouldn't normally think of those things going together. But then as you describe it, it makes complete sense. That's great. Yeah. And so for the coaches and the people who are listening to this episode, this is a great lesson for you. Think about your life. And think about those places where it's easy, you know, that nobody else realizes how easy and you you might even feel like you're cheating a little bit because it's so easy for you. Right? And that those are the places to look to lean into your strengths as you're building your business. That's cool. Janette, tell me. Second question, why do you do what you do? I know there's a little bit in the bio there, but like, I'm a coach. Okay. Why?

Unknown:

I'm really curious.

Jannette Anderson:

My title is actually the why whisperer, because I think this is one of the most important questions for people to answer for so many reasons, to get us out of bed in the morning to be strategically aligned to differentiate in the marketplace. So it's my favorite question to ask and answer. And I'm going to answer it by telling you a quick story. When I was five, I, you know, alluded to a tough childhood, lots of violence, lots of alcoholism, addiction issues, et cetera. And so my refuge was books. I taught myself to read early, and I would hide out in books. And so I begged my mom for the book, Heidi, over and over and over and over as only a very determined Aries child can. And finally, one day, she turned around and yelled at me, we can't afford it. It was shocking, but not because she said that I'd heard we can't afford it many, many times. But because of the look of shame, and anger and frustration and pain on her face, I still feel that to this day that that look. And I remember in that moment, deciding, I never wanted to see that love from another person's face. Not hers, not mine. Not any woman's that absolute despair around having to say no, when really what we want to do is say yes to life. And so I've determined right there that I was going to work with people to figure out like I didn't, I don't think I consciously framed it this way, because I didn't know and coaching wasn't a thing then. But that I was gonna ensure that I could live a yes life and that I would support others and living a yes life. And that became a lifelong passion for growth in personal development and supporting people in figuring out how to say yes, but especially through entrepreneurialism, because it is the way that we can create the resources and the ability to say yes, and it's also a really good way to turn what we love into what we do and to have both, you know, I'm a stand for the act, purpose and profit, not either or, and so the profits important so we can say yes, but being on purpose and living the life we want to live, getting that we matter and living like that is why we say yes. So that's why I do what I do is I want more people to get what they matter and live like they do. What a powerful answer, and I just know that the people who hear that answer, they will be impacted. You know, it will it will be that you know,

Candy Motzek:

it can be that for them. Thank you Oh, Diana, question number two. Why do you do what you do? Like, why this business?

Diane Lidstone:

Well, I have had several businesses. Okay, so I've had a retail store. I've been in network marketing. I've been back in the 19. Ready for this Aedes. I had a business that was like a virtual assistant, but wasn't virtual. So why do I do what I do? As I said, you know, I'm kind of a teacher at heart. I'm a teacher, you know, I taught kids horseback riding, I went to university to be a teacher. But the reason I love teaching is because for many years, as I was growing up, I saw my father, who's a really, really smart man, you know, he had a engineering degree, he had a good job. But he was always trying to start a side hustle. And he time after time after time, he failed. And I don't know if any of your listeners have been in this situation. But as he failed every single time, it was like he lost a piece of himself. Right? He lost his confidence. He just he wasn't the same man. And so when I started some of my first businesses, I said, you know, I, there's no freakin way I'm going to fail. I'm just going to work so hard that I've got to make sure that it's a good one. Well, what happens when you do that is you burn out, right? And I haven't burned out, but I've come really, really close to it. And when I had my retail store, I saw women entrepreneurs, building businesses in this small community, who ran up debt, starting their business, who burnt out, flew through the family savings. And I went, why is this like, to me? It just didn't make sense. Because there's lots of information out there. You know, we're talking back in the 2000, early 2000s. And so I went, there's got to be a better way. And after I sold my retail store, it was a friend of mine who said, well, Diana, you just really got to help people grow their businesses, because you've done it. And maybe they'll listen to your stories.

Candy Motzek:

Yeah, so there's so many things there, you know, just noticing some of the details of what you said. So first off, people love their businesses, right. And so to help them achieve something that they really want, that is really meaningful to them, there's so much value in that, and then to be able to do it and have a life to write. Yeah, and what

Diane Lidstone:

I love is the ripple effect. So you know, you teach one woman how to fish, she could feed a family, and then that family goes on to, you know, I mean, that's a metaphor, but really, that's what it's about. And when you can see that ripple effect happen. You know, currently, I'm working with a lawyer, and I see how her business has exploded, and she's, you know, hired, you know, originally she had eight people now she's got 10. She's on track for 12. And it just and the people that we've hired as consultants to take this business to the next level. So this ripple effect has been huge. It's been great.