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78. Slow Food, Living Bread: Heritage Grains and 18th Century Food Ways with Justin Cherry of Half Crown Bakehouse
Episode 7811th February 2022 • The Good Dirt: Sustainable Living Explained • Lady Farmer
00:00:00 01:01:27

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Step back in time with living history fellow and historical baker, Justin Cherry, founder and owner of Half Crown Bakehouse, as he shares his love for nutrient rich ancient grains and 18th century bread baking methods. With his 18th century reproduction clay oven in tow, Justin travels to historic sites along the east coast of North America sharing his expertise on period correct methods and flavors, as well as, educating his patrons on the history and evolution of ancient grains and their uses in hopes of keeping this part of our history alive. 

A maker deeply committed to his craft, Justin seeks to restore the baker and the hearth to a central part of our homes and lives. He started Half Crown Bakehouse out of a deep love for heritage grains and landrace grains and an awe and respect for this naturally slow process. For Justin, baking bread using historic methods is a way to return to tradition and to a way of life dependent upon community - a rekindling of a beautifully slow practice with a deep sense of place.  

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Podchaser, Podtail, or on your favorite podcast platform.

Topics Covered:

  • Heritage Grains
  • LandRace Grains - often referred to as heritage or heirloom grains, are ancient, pre-hybridized varieties of wheat, barley, oats, rye and other grains that flourished naturally for centuries throughout the world where they adapted to local environmental conditions. Source here 
  • Living History 
  • Potassium Bromate 
  • Bromated Flour
  • Local Grain
  • Windmills
  • Waterwheel
  • Gristmills
  • Barley
  • Wheat
  • Spelt
  • Einkorn 
  • Haudenosaunee People 
  • Seneca 
  • Iroquios White Corn 
  • Amaranth 
  • Pink Lady’s Thumb 
  • Red May Flour

Resources Mentioned: 

Connect with Justin:

Follow Us:

Original music by John Kingsley @jkingsley1026

Statements in this podcast have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not to be considered as medical or nutritional advice. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, and should not be considered above the advice of your physician. Consult a medical professional when making dietary or lifestyle decisions that could affect your health and well being.

Mentioned in this episode:

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Transcripts

[:

[00:00:16] Mary: And we are your hosts, Mary and Emma Kingsley, the mother and daughter, founder team, lady farmer. We are sowing seeds of slow living through our community platform events and online marketplace. 


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[00:00:44] Mary: we want to put the microphone in front of the voices that need to be heard the most right now, the farmers, the dreamers, the designers, and the doers. 


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[00:01:05] Mary: hello, everyone. Welcome to the good dirt podcast. We're so happy to have you here joining us for another episode, but first we want to catch everyone up a little bit as we've had so much going on at lady farmer over the last couple of 


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[00:01:18] Emma: Yes. We're almost halfway through our four week slow living challenge. 


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[00:01:38] Mary: It was a fun one. Some of the words that came up as people described, just the anticipation of this exercise, like before they even did it were hard, challenging, terrifying, anxious. 


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[00:02:02] Emma: Yeah. It's really crazy how we do that. So here's some reactions from our community members on this one exercise. So this person had just finished. 


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[00:02:31] And then she kind of laughs and it's like, we kind of build it up to this thing and it's hard. And then you notice sounds, which is another one of our prompts from the slow living challenge, which is an amazing thing. Yeah. Do you want to read the next one? 


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[00:03:21] Emma: I love this one so much because I can relate so much and I'm sure a lot of you can too about you don't have to make a big thing out of it. 


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[00:03:29] Mary: Yeah. 


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[00:03:35] Emma: I have to do nothing really well. 


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[00:03:41] Emma: And then that kind of leads into this next one, which I love, I love this community member so much. Always has such insightful things to say. She says, "I think it is hard for many people to do nothing because we live in a culture that is telling us that our self-worth is connected to our productivity. Taking the time to do nothing can help us see just [00:04:00] how oppressive this patriarchal culture is. 


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[00:04:22] When we do nothing, we are saying, no, my attention already has a home and it's right here." 


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[00:04:44] You can sign up at www.lady-farmer.com/slowlivingchallenge or at the link in the show notes of this episode. And you'll get immediate access to the prompts for the first two weeks, and then you'll get next week's prompt 


[:

[00:05:00] Emma: And of course, keep sharing your experiences with us. And with one another, with things like this, it's so easy to feel like we are the only ones who are having these thoughts, feelings, and even struggling with slowing down, but working together through this as a community has really been powerful and so insightful. 


[:

[00:05:18] Mary: Yeah. Don't we have people weighing in on Instagram as well. 


[:

[00:05:36] The difference is that how we choose to spend it." That's from the lady farmer guide to slow living, which is available in our marketplace. And through the Wildwood says, "one of my goals this year is to become a better steward of my time so that I am spending it wisely and intentionally, instead of letting it fall through the cracks of busy or lazy days, this doesn't mean that I have to always fill my time with something, but rather that I [00:06:00] am more deliberate about how I am resting, working ,and playing" then she asks, "how are you spending your time, this winter?" And this caption really spoke to me because it made me think we have agency with our time. It's so easy to feel like we are a victim to time, that it's running us over or that we can't keep up or something like that. But yeah, it's like we have agency here. 


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[00:06:23] Mary: even though it's easy to think. I don't have time. That's almost a mantra of our culture. 


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[00:06:29] Emma: Yeah. That's pretty much all we have, right? 


[:

[00:06:41] We have this beautiful post from farmhouse mama, and it also featured a loaf of bread. So she says, "my house was built in 1911. There are bits here and there. Vintage wallpaper, bright teal walls, nails that wiggle their way out and ornate door knobs. It's cold. It's drafty. It's [00:07:00] loving. It's my dream. Every time I stand here, against my picture window kneading bread, I wonder how many mothers before me did the same. I wonder if the trees had ever held together a clothesline in the summer. How many babies were breastfed, how many were rocked to sleep, listening to our own sticky toes, touching the hardwood beneath us. I always think about the lives that were given in this house and the ones that were taken away. 


[:

[00:07:47] Just so beautiful. 


[:

[00:08:08] So please continue to share. And the best part about these two is that they both featured bread. Well, they were about more than bread, but the photos are these beautiful pictures of bread and or bread baking. And today our podcast episode is all about bread. So funny how that works out and we definitely didn't plan it that way. 


[:

[00:08:34] Emma: Yeah. And before we jump into that, I did want to mention last week's episode with Lynn Cassells of Lynbreck Croft. If you haven't listened yet, definitely go back and listen to it. It's so worth it. And we want to remind you that you can, pre-order their upcoming book, "our wild farming life" on the lady farmer marketplace. 


[:

[00:09:13] So that's a really fun lady farmer thing that you can do. 


[:

[00:09:31] He's a living history fellow who is passionate about the history of grains and 18th century bread baking. His name is Justin. He's a historical reenactor and baker, founder, and owner as half crown Bakehouse, which is based in Charleston, South Carolina, but Justin travels all around to living history events with his 18th century reproduction clay oven, baking breads with heritage and often rare grain varieties 


[:

[00:10:01] Emma: We were fascinated by Justin's in-depth knowledge of the history and evolution of grains and their uses and his passion for keeping this part of our history alive for all of us to experience and appreciate firsthand. It's quite delicious as I can say. 


[:

[00:10:21] And since then we've caught up with him at two other historical events to stock up on several loaves of his amazing bread. You can only get it from him in person, which is another slow living aspect of his business. So we buy several loaves at once, slice them and freeze them to enjoy until the next time we can get to them. 


[:

[00:10:47] As you'll see in this interview, Justin represents the kind of intention. Back for a tradition that we consider to be a really important aspect of slow living. He sums up the purpose of his business with this [00:11:00] quote from his website, "in the 18th century, the Bakehouse and hearth were the central part of the home. 


[:

[00:11:14] Mary: Justin is so full of knowledge and has so much to share. Now we'll let him take over here to tell you his story. So ,Here's Justin Cherry. 


[:

[00:12:01] Landrace are grains that have adapted regionally over time. It's so interesting to work with them now because these seeds have been saved over time. And then geneticists have looked at them and see if they're the same structure as they were, you know, back in the 18th century or even earlier. And now I kind of took that my love of grain 


[:

[00:12:47] Cause it's just following a trail of, you know, a certain grain 


[:

[00:12:55] Justin: who were the bakers, who were the bakers American revolution, who were the bakers [00:13:00] of these, uh, you know, giant Southern plantations and even into indigenous and enslaved peoples, like who was doing the baking? How are they doing the baking? 


[:

[00:13:35] Mary: I just love that. Brings slow living into it. It brings the traditional food and traditional knowledge and all this stuff just sort of comes together. And I, I love the way you combined your love of history and your curiosity with the grains and the baking. And it just sounds like you've come up with such an awesome model to carry on and just demonstrate to people what you're doing and to talk about the history of the food. 


[:

[00:14:21] Can you talk about that a little bit? 


[:

[00:14:47] So if you kind of break it into that, then that process itself is separating from what we know is like modern bread. And even if you're grinding, you know, your own wheat nowadays, It's still a process [00:15:00] of friction between the stones and it heating up and the stones on traditional gristmills, you know, they're so large that primarily they're cold and mills are cold to be in. 


[:

[00:15:29] That's been like frozen prior. So it doesn't, you don't lose like nutrients and in today's bread, you know, some of those nutrients are lost because either it's flour that's been sifted so much. Like all the nutrients are taken out like the brans taken out and all those things are sifted. Not to say that didn't happen in the 18th century with sale of flour, because like the wider, the flour back then the higher, the price it fetched and like the lower price flour. 


[:

[00:16:15] are a lot more healthy for you. Cause I'm using everything. Even the stuff that when it does go through, like Washington's Mount Vernon Gristmill, they are sifting stuff, but all that bran I put back in to make it more of what's known back then it's like a household bread. So there's like bran folded in. 


[:

[00:16:57] So if you can get unbrominated [00:17:00] unbleached flour, that's from the store or if you can get it from somebody local or grain itself, local and mill it yourself, that's definitely going to be more healthy because all the things that are sort of added it's because they're added because when you get to the store, it's like a dead flour. 


[:

[00:17:20] Emma: That's also interesting. I also want to ask a quick question about, I've never heard of the word bromated before. Is that something that's going to be on the bag? Like you can look for what it say, non-bromated? 


[:

[00:17:46] So that's yeah, that's definitely a thing to look for because yes, it does help with elasticity, but yeah. Commercial bakeries use it because one it's cheap, you can buy probably a 25 [00:18:00] pound bag for like 10 bucks. And compared to, if you spend a little more money, you can get something that's, there's not a chemical like potassium 


[:

[00:18:36] And some of it's used to help yeast and the mixing of the bread, but it doesn't add anything over time. I mean, that's why, you know, white bread can sit there for weeks and not go moldy. 


[:

[00:18:57] And she said to me, one day, what is this bread? [00:19:00] She said, I bought it three weeks ago and it's still soft. And I said, well, you know, this was back in the nineties. This is kind of before I went on this journey of learning all this stuff. But I want to add a little something to what you were saying. I mean, there's so many people have digestive issues these days and they've totally cut out grains. 


[:

[00:19:46] So most of your industrialized grains have been blasted with glyphosate is a patented antibiotic. So most of your grains have been blasted. They don't talk about it as an antibody. It acts that way. Right. So, and then you're eating that and you're putting it in your gut and all this stuff. Now [00:20:00] that we know about the microbiome in your gut, what do you think that does in your gut to your ability to digest and fight off illness and all these things? 


[:

[00:20:24] I think in many cases, that's just the tip of the iceberg with these grains. You know, there's so much more than that. The lack of nutrients, that's what what's been changed. And even like the way you were telling us the way it's ground, I mean, there's just so much to this. 


[:

[00:20:50] You know, we switched from stones to that, but it's the fact that for a good part of the early 20th century, a lot of grains were grown for [00:21:00] horse feed and for beer. And obviously a lot of that stopped, you know, during prohibition the same way with like distilling of whiskey and spirits and that kind of stuff. 


[:

[00:21:34] you know, I talk about grains and I usually have like a grain board that has all the varieties of grains that I use in a variety of different uses. Because back then there was, you know, softer wheats to use for cookies and cakes and things like that, and harder wheats you use for bread. I mean, people don't even know what barley tastes like anymore, like real barley. 


[:

[00:22:02] Mary: I have this weed in my yard that's really, really prolific and voluntary and it's a type of knotweed and is called lady's thumb. 


[:

[00:22:34] Yeah. 


[:

[00:23:03] There's not success with what they're growing. You know, we're trying to grow wheat. They still use amaranth. That's like one of those natural things, just like rye. A lot of people don't know that they probably have an 18th or 19th century variety of rye growing in their regular grass, but they have no idea because it kept on replanting itself over and over and over. 


[:

[00:23:41] Emma: Would that be something like, would they have milled that or is that just like they would eat the seeds? 


[:

[00:24:08] And also like when you see early, like corn practice of like back country houses, like 18th and 19th century, if you see like a small little, almost like a grindstone or a large rock that has kind of like a mortar and pestel, look to it in the front of that. Like that was because there were probably hand and pounding corn or even wheat because they couldn't afford to like ticket to a mill. 


[:

[00:24:44] Mary: Do you think let's say I'm going to like harvest a cup of this and make some cookies or something just for fun. 


[:

[00:24:57] Justin: Yeah, I would just wait until it kind of dries out [00:25:00] naturally and then take it because that'll mean that it's probably getting more nutrients in it while it's still in the ground, rather than like taking it. 


[:

[00:25:17] Mary: I would be processing it over processing. So you wouldn't believe the amount of this plant that I have pull out because if I just left it alone, it would be all I had, it really is so prolific, but I've intentionally left some batches, so I'm going to play with it a little bit. 


[:

[00:25:34] Justin: experimentation is probably at least half of what I do because. If we're talking like 18th and 19th century cookbooks, which been through quite a lot and, you know, originals and all that kind of stuff. And I have a very firm belief that cookbooks people are getting a lot better now, but like maybe 15 years ago, 20 years ago, when you buy a tabletop cookbook, are you actually [00:26:00] cooking from it? 


[:

[00:26:27] And reading the cookbook and then dictating 


[:

[00:26:33] Justin: Yeah, definitely not. And it's also, that's a whole creative kind of process on what made American cuisine. It wasn't, there was some English influence. Sure. But a lot of it was through, you know, enslaved chefs and cooks and putting their own touches from what they know, because that's how things. 


[:

[00:27:16] But some people just cook just like, kind of go with it and we'll see what happens. And a lot of that is what I do. I like to kind of call it like culinary archeology, because you are digging up things and documents from the past, and you're applying them to what you would think happened. And with, you know, the resources that they had and kind of the know-how that they had, let's put this together because the only thing that I have to go off of, of what bread looked like in the 18th century is paintings that were most definitely owned by wealthy people. 


[:

[00:28:03] Emma: And they were baked by people who were in wealthy people's houses, baking for the wealthy people. 


[:

[00:28:14] Justin: Yeah. Because you can see very plainly like say at George Washington's Mount Vernon, like it's very straight up, like in the records that this kind of bread was made for the household. And then even like paid workers, some people were paid in bread, but it was. 


[:

[00:28:46] You're making stuff straight out of corn because corn was so widely available that, you know, a lot of the products. That indigenous and slaved and even lower class back country folk, they're eating corn because [00:29:00] corn is what's available. You're eating porridge, you're eating almost like griddle cakes made of corn. 


[:

[00:29:37] And that's like a flour that we still use today. That's a variety still growing today and it's kind of a cross, you know, between soft wheat and hard wheat kind of somewhere in the 


[:

[00:29:48] Emma: Can you tell us a little bit more about your event, the one that you're currently using and that you mentioned that you travel around? 


[:

[00:30:17] Twenty-five miles Northwest of Savannah new Ebeneezer was a settlement that was people from Salzburg, called them the Salzburgers. And they came over in the 1730s and they were sponsored by England. And basically they were Lutherans that were escaping the central Europe area, like Germany, Austria, that kind of area, that kind of region. 


[:

[00:30:55] And they set up there and they found some success with growing wheat. And it's [00:31:00] literally right across the river from like South Carolina. So it splits South Carolina and Georgia, and this settlement was so great because not only did they plant wheat, they also. The first Gristmill in Georgia, which was like 1740. 


[:

[00:31:34] so they could write back and report, you know, how is this, like, do we need to send more people there so we can make bigger settlements and all this wheat, you know, you can't sell all the wheat. So they actually influenced the bread and flour markets of Charleston, which was about an hour and a half away. 


[:

[00:32:14] And then it was packed on the bottom with wood and clay and sort of like that dobbing style that you see on like log cabins. So it was built up from wood and stone and then it had a clay oven and one of them survived into the 19th century after the town went debunked after the revolution and they wrote about it and they said, oh, Five foot deep and it's like four foot wide. 


[:

[00:32:57] Georgia ovens from the 18th [00:33:00] century. So I had a built like on a trailer and then I had a couple of other people help out with like all the woodwork, a really good friend of mine who does woodwork in Charleston? Got these awesome, like old red Oak and like hand hewed them into boards that I cover up the bottom of the oven. 


[:

[00:33:34] Emma: A lot of building ovens everywhere you go, 


[:

[00:33:41] funny looks on the highway, it weighs three ton and you can bake about a hundred loaves off of one fire before you need to restart that fire. And you're conserving heat, you know, because you're like, you're getting the loaves in there as fast as you can. And you're shutting the door. And then usually the steam from that first [00:34:00] batch of bread, kind of like preheat it for the second batch and then the second batch preheat for the last batch. 


[:

[00:34:24] You can actually make lye from it. So then you're, you can make soap, or you can also use that lye and put hominy corn in it to rent the hall of the corn off there before you cook hominy. So there's a variety of uses of all these coals, like kind of over time. And then the thing that I like to do is at the end of a event, I'm like, even after this weekend, I'll take all the coals cold or not, and I'll shove them in my oven and then I'll take all of my cast, iron or rod iron original stuff that I use to cook [00:35:00] and or display. 


[:

[00:35:05] Mary: Oh my gosh. So you'll do an oven firing for an entire weekend event or do you have to fire it every time? Once its fired does it last the whole weekend? 


[:

[00:35:22] So only have to really start at once. 


[:

[00:35:25] do you do all the mixing, do you show up to these events with your stuff? 


[:

[00:35:36] Mary: If it's cold, what do you do? 


[:

[00:35:41] Mary: Okay. And how do you keep it warm? So it can proof because that would be just like putting it in the refrigerator. 


[:

[00:36:08] And the thing with a box is, is, you know, it has a lid. So as soon as you get warm water, To combine with like your natural levain or leftover dough or barm, as soon as you add warm water, that that temperature is not going anywhere, anytime soon, especially since like dough boxes were kept usually next to the hearth or next to a fire. 


[:

[00:36:49] Emma: Yeah. This type of baking bread and just everything about the process is much slower. 


[:

[00:37:00] to you. 


[:

[00:37:22] But the way that they were cooking and baking and living as a whole, I mean, people were like, oh, well they had, you know, all this time. It's like, yeah, because you either had a trade or you didn't and you just provided for your family. So you weren't wasting time on a cell phone or you weren't there wasn't extra time to be doing things because. 


[:

[00:38:08] You know, homesteading because that's kind of a thing all of itself, but it's why I don't mill my own grain because if I mailed my grain, then what does the Miller do? Like I'm taking away a job and it's not the say, like, you know, if you're like baking at home and you're grinding your own grain, that's a little different because you're only grinding for you. 


[:

[00:38:46] But two, like you're taking up a position that it's not what you do. Like. And, you know, I know Millers and we're friends and that relationship is like part of the greater whole system of the food waste system. It's a [00:39:00] Lifeway system. And if I take away his job, then what does he do now? Or like, who's he going to pass that on to if I take his job away or there's certain amount of time, like who's doing the milling, who's doing the growing. 


[:

[00:39:31] Mary: Yeah, I'll say local too, because the limitations of geography 


[:

[00:39:38] place. 


[:

[00:40:00] That's just awesome. And you know, they're not too far away from Mount Vernon, so they came to burden and they drop off the grain. And then they saw like a traditional mill, like work. Now I feel like I've kind of connected those two places, which is awesome because now it's like, oh cool. Like they're friends now. 


[:

[00:40:42] And Mount Vernon's pretty much halfway between me and like most of my events. So it kind of works out really well. And it gives, you know, Mount Vernon a chance to, I mean, we've actually ground, most every grain that Washington lists in the mill book, 250 years later. The same [00:41:00] grain. So, you know, when we grind white wheat there, that was about a year and a half or two years ago. 


[:

[00:41:13] Mary: Oh, I love that. 


[:

[00:41:26] And I think that's part of the mission of half crown Bakehouse is to sort of connect things that were in the past before and now, you know, shift 200 plus years later. And now we're trying to rekindle those relationships between farmers and Millers and bakers and trying to re-establish that whole system of food ways, which is all very very slow. 


[:

[00:41:53] Mary: So I use the migrash flours myself. I have them delivered to my house. I [00:42:00] discovered them back at the beginning of COVID like everybody else, I wanted to be baking a lot of bread. So that's exciting connection too. And you know, we're between, I guess, Mount Vernon and Migrash. 


[:

[00:42:25] Justin: So a lot of what I work with and depend upon has to start with soil literally. 


[:

[00:42:54] I mean, I'm not a farmer, like I said, but I know that if you don't have good dirt, you don't really have [00:43:00] anything. Because you can't grow anything, which growing things depends on what I do. And thinking about it as a whole, depends on a lot of what people do is based upon dirt and what's grown over centuries, right? 


[:

[00:43:20] Emma: That's great. I love that. If you don't have good dirt, you don't really have it. 


[:

[00:43:28] Emma: Is there anything that you want our audience to understand about what you do or anything else that you want to mention? 


[:

[00:43:58] So I'm [00:44:00] like throwing together what I'm making, depending on the grains that I have. So I take a look at my grains and see what I'm going to make. But, you know, I think in general with there's so much effort and work, which really lucky to have my parents who sometimes travel with me and my mom helps a lot. 


[:

[00:44:37] Chops wood. And he's kinda like best like, Hey, I need, I need some more pork butter from the cooler or whatever. And he'll go grab that, which they help out a lot in between their living history stuff. And actually some of our stuff crosses where they're living history, um, groups or reenactment, our groups are at the same events that I'm set up at, which is super cool too. 


[:

[00:45:17] But it is like a, it's a ton of work because there's so many people involved that like, nobody really sees when they show up at an event and it's like, oh, like you guys were always here. It's like setting up and having a grand opening at some place, every single event that we go to because sometimes they're very new, like Waterford. 


[:

[00:46:01] So that means I was probably up at 2:00 AM. Oh my goodness. Or maybe didn't go to sleep at all. Just baked throughout the day and the night. And until you've seen like Mount Vernon at like 1:00 AM with like the moon over top of it, like in November, it's such a cool thing to be having a business, like having a small business where you have the opportunity to like, do that is, I don't know anybody that has a job like that. 


[:

[00:46:48] And being at Mount Vernon being at like Stratford hall and like on the Potomac, baking next to an 18th century gristmill, like that's insane. I don't know anybody doing that or getting the opportunity to do [00:47:00] that. It's nuts. It's crazy. 


[:

[00:47:06] It's really awesome to hear you talk about. 


[:

[00:47:15] Emma: seriously. Yeah. I bet. Oh my gosh. So you just described a few different places where people can come find you baking, but do you have anything planned for spring 20 22 or tell us about where people can find you online, how they can learn more? 


[:

[00:47:29] Justin: they can find my crazy schedule at halfcrownbakehouse.com. I post a bunch of stuff on Instagram @halfcrownbakehouse. 


[:

[00:48:00] It's Fort Frederick state park, and they have a giant 18th century fair. And it is like 160 18th century artisans. So anything from like pottery to cast iron, to like, you know, gourds or round boxes or Firkins or 18th century clothing. Like any of that stuff, it's basically like a typical 18th century market fair, like all crowded in the one giant Fort Frederick state park, and everybody's making things and, or demonstrating and selling, but it's fantastic event for anybody that wants to see that kind of like lifestyle of like pottery and things being made, or want to get an even into the hobby. 


[:

[00:48:44] That's like the breaking out event of everybody who's been inside for like winter and then like the end of April, they're like, all right, here we go. And then that's usually followed by mount vernon's revolutionary war weekend, which is like the first weekend in [00:49:00] may. And that's like where they have 200 living history reenactors of the American revolution kind of set up throughout Mount Vernon on the bowling green. And there's also some settlers there, which some of them are like 18th century historical artists. Some of them are just 18th century settlers and sell fabric. And it's also like a miniature version of that market fair, which is great too, because then when I'm on site, they usually mill. 


[:

[00:49:53] And that's like what it should be. 


[:

[00:50:03] Emma: I want some of your bread. I can't just like buy your bread online can I? I have to come find you a person. 


[:

[00:50:10] Emma: Okay. 


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[00:50:19] Justin: I don't ship out. I kinda tried that whole thing a little bit and it's one-on-one to take the bread while it's fresh and while it's fresh and while it's hot, that's where it's best. 


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[00:50:35] Mary: Yes, I I've really loved it now. I'm now I'm going to go like bake some bread or something 


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[00:50:45] Mary: Okay, Justin, we really appreciate it. Bye-bye. 


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[00:51:16] Now that you know, the whole story 


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[00:51:36] And it's not too late to join the challenge. If you are not getting the emails yet, just sign up at our website. We have that linked in the show notes as well. And don't forget to pre-order our wild farming life from the lady from marketplace is the book by Lynn Cassells from our interview last week, if you haven't listened yet, 


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[00:52:11] And for all of you guys to meet her. Thank you so much for being here and tune in next week and every Friday morning for more awesome, good dirt interviews. 


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