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Aligned Venture Design for Community Builders (Twitter Space)
26th September 2022 • Everyday Innovation Convos • Jordan Divecha
00:00:00 01:00:52

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Twitter Space with Amine Hammou

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Jordan:

Good morning, Twitter and community friends.

Jordan:

Welcome to aligned venture design for community builders.

Jordan:

Just give us a second, a quick, quick, second to set up.

Jordan:

I'm going to go ahead and share a thread to this space so that

Jordan:

you can drop your community link.

Jordan:

We can share some resources with you while we're speaking with you.

Jordan:

I think Amine has joined.

Jordan:

Hello.

Jordan:

Let me go ahead and make him our co-host for today.

Jordan:

Perfect.

Jordan:

Okay.

Jordan:

If it's all right with you, I mean, I'm going to go ahead and introduce myself

Jordan:

and then you can intro yourself as well.

Jordan:

I'll give a little background on the creator innovation process and venture

Jordan:

design, and then we can just get into it.

Jordan:

I can ask you some questions about your community and yeah.

Jordan:

Just have a party, right?

Jordan:

. Amine: Sure let's do it.

Jordan:

Thank you so much for having me Jordan.

Jordan:

Of course, of course.

Jordan:

So if you have not met me before and whether you're here,

Jordan:

you're listening to the replay.

Jordan:

My name is Jordan dacha and I'm a tech founder venture advisor.

Jordan:

And just overall multi-passionate creator with a platform every

Jordan:

day, innovation, which is made to connect creator entrepreneurs that

Jordan:

value high signal venture and self development, resources, connection, and

Jordan:

strategy mixed in with a little fun.

Jordan:

My background.

Jordan:

Was in the music industry.

Jordan:

When I first started out in marketing, um, I've been in a lot of creative

Jordan:

fields, then moved into the tech space, going back to school and learning,

Jordan:

coding, um, becoming the tech founder of my own venture, um, jumping in on

Jordan:

other new ventures and sustainability.

Jordan:

And in several other industries, I tend to be kind of, um, an industry jumper because

Jordan:

I love solving, uh, similar problems in different industries, especially around.

Jordan:

Creative and tech coming together and the community experience.

Jordan:

And what I love to do now is to advise other ventures that are starting up,

Jordan:

whether they're started by a creator or another type of founder, um, I love to

Jordan:

create content under everyday innovation.

Jordan:

So through my newsletter, on my socials, all about innovation itself

Jordan:

and how it applies to not only your venture, but also in your life.

Jordan:

And I also just launched one to one advisory called sessions, um, where

Jordan:

I take a lot of this and pull it into small bite size sessions to work with

Jordan:

fellow founders or creator printers.

Jordan:

And I just launched my community everyday innovation.

Jordan:

Um, it's in beta on circle and would love for you to join those

Jordan:

links are in my bio, but let me go ahead and pass it off to Amin.

Jordan:

And of course, while we're entering, if you want to drop your community link,

Jordan:

Um, at any point or your newsletter in, um, in the thread we'd love to

Jordan:

hear from you and get to know you.

Jordan:

So am mean I'd love to hear from you a little bit about yourself and

Jordan:

a little bit about your community.

Amine:

Ooh, thank you so much.

Amine:

I'm not sure if I will keep up with defense, the intro as yours.

Amine:

I'm not that good at giving my seven introduction, but here we go.

Amine:

Uh, my name is I'm from Algeria.

Amine:

I am 24 years old and I am actually a founder of a brand orchestrate community

Amine:

where we help misfits rare breeds and rebels find their voice and in a way, give

Amine:

them a place to fit in and eventually to create a word where every voice is heard.

Amine:

So technically I am more about, I'm more of a people pleaser.

Amine:

I'm more of a person who likes to like get energetic from helping other people.

Amine:

So maybe that's why I'm not good at introduction as I should be.

Amine:

But yeah, that's who I am right now.

Amine:

And our community is literally one week from being a full one year of launch.

Amine:

And it's a membership based community.

Amine:

And you can find all about that under the Brent orchestra.com.

Amine:

I would drop the link somewhere into Twitter later, but yeah.

Amine:

Thank you so much, Jordan, for having me and I'm so excited.

Amine:

For this conversation and where this goes.

Jordan:

Of course.

Jordan:

And honestly, it's taken a while for me to even create an intro

Jordan:

because I'm so multi passionate I'm like, Hey, do you wanna see?

Jordan:

like, what part of this am I going to share here?

Jordan:

Because sometimes it sounds a little crazy.

Jordan:

So I've, that's something that I've just worked on over time

Jordan:

and I'm still working on it's.

Jordan:

Uh, it's a work in progress that's for sure.

Jordan:

Um, so yeah, I, like, I mean said we've both, you know, have started communities.

Jordan:

I'm certainly not a community expert, but it is something that I've been a part of,

Jordan:

or I've noticed that I've created around.

Jordan:

Um, a lot of times when I've worked either with brands or I have

Jordan:

been working on any sort of these projects, community is so essential

Jordan:

to being able to innovate, right.

Jordan:

It's not just a solo project.

Jordan:

So when we're innovating in a community, this is.

Jordan:

The that's really kind of the meat of how all of this happens.

Jordan:

We're individuals, we work on our own process, but then collectively

Jordan:

we can create more impact.

Jordan:

So, um, when we're talking about, so I put align venture

Jordan:

design for community builders.

Jordan:

So what does that mean?

Jordan:

I'm kind of coming in from this space of, I love to be able to help shift a

Jordan:

perspective, come from the strategic angle and allow people who are creator printers.

Jordan:

So whether you're a community builder for yourself for a brand, whether you're

Jordan:

consulting others in this space, I just wanna give, um, you know, some.

Jordan:

Different perspectives on how you can approach that.

Jordan:

And I'm gonna bring one in today that I've been working on for a while that applies

Jordan:

to some, I call them creator printer spaces so that, um, you know, it kind of

Jordan:

blends and melds that idea of innovation in your personal creative process, as

Jordan:

well as in the venture design process.

Jordan:

So.

Jordan:

What do I mean by venture design?

Jordan:

Um, there actually is a framework out there called the venture design process.

Jordan:

Um, that's not exactly what I'm referring to, cuz that's really

Jordan:

a lot more specific it's related.

Jordan:

So that's very, you know, lean ventures or you're iterating and

Jordan:

it's, it's, uh, related to the design, like design thinking frameworks.

Jordan:

But, um, when I talk about venture design, I think about more of a

Jordan:

multidisciplinary study of how do you create a venture or approach a venture

Jordan:

in a way that not only takes your customer mind takes you in mind, takes

Jordan:

the context of the environment we're working in the market in mind and using

Jordan:

multidisciplinary approach to do that.

Jordan:

So whether it's utilizing multiple frameworks or looking into new types of

Jordan:

platforms, just being aware and informed and taking that all into a space where

Jordan:

you can organize that and, and think about that in a very meaningful way.

Jordan:

So, um, ventures, I also think are often businesses, but I've also found

Jordan:

that community projects, product offerings, creative endeavors, or

Jordan:

even pivotal personal goals will fit the bill of what a venture is.

Jordan:

So in this age, kind of, of the creator sole printer economy, we wanna have a

Jordan:

model that's inclusive for innovation that takes into account the synergy,

Jordan:

the process of the individual, um, collectively as we work together

Jordan:

and just in our larger community and how we show up in these ventures.

Jordan:

And especially because we're working in a space where we wanna be socially

Jordan:

conscious, ethically conscious, but then we also have to monetize, right.

Jordan:

We have to make money.

Jordan:

We have to create a great, um, we have to create a great experience for our members.

Jordan:

So this kind of where I'm going today is the creator innovation

Jordan:

framework, which I think.

Jordan:

We'll address a lot of that for you, and I've actually linked it in the thread.

Jordan:

So if you look at the thread, that's pinned on my profile.

Jordan:

Um, I also believe I've shared it to the space itself.

Jordan:

You can take a little peek.

Jordan:

Um, I made a little infographic gift of kind of outlining it.

Jordan:

Um, I will be releasing some really cool, um, canvases soon so that you can use

Jordan:

it more in real time, but this is just as a visual representation of it now.

Jordan:

Um, but basically it's laying the foundation for what I call innovator OS,

Jordan:

which is a broad framework within which you and your team can design strategy,

Jordan:

take an honest assessment or reflect, which is so important in innovation.

Jordan:

You wanna reflect on how you're doing, what's gone, right?

Jordan:

What's not gone so right.

Jordan:

Um, all while working the pieces together.

Jordan:

So just as a summary, whether you're designing your community for your brand.

Jordan:

Another brand a cause cultivating your own community, taking into the account, the

Jordan:

experience of your ideal community member.

Jordan:

So if you're thinking of personas, if you're a designer or, um, brand

Jordan:

strategist or advising others as a community consultant, this approach

Jordan:

can give you, you know, just the working model to play around with and

Jordan:

experiment with to see, um, if you can take that innovation into your space.

Jordan:

So, um, I'm gonna be kind of walking.

Jordan:

I mean, if that's good with you, uh, through some of this kind of picking

Jordan:

your brain, if that works for you.

Jordan:

So it's kind of workshop style.

Jordan:

Um, anyone who joins us, you're welcome to raise your hand or if you have a

Jordan:

question, um, there will be more content coming from me on the specifics of a lot

Jordan:

of these little sections, but I'm just gonna jump into it with a mean and ask

Jordan:

them a few things if that works for you.

Amine:

Yeah, please do.

Amine:

I'm curious to know, to learn.

Jordan:

Awesome.

Jordan:

Yeah.

Jordan:

Yeah.

Jordan:

So, um, again, if you wanna reference kind of what we're, um, talking about,

Jordan:

there is a little graphic that's in, um, that's connected to the, uh, thread

Jordan:

on Twitter, that's on this space.

Jordan:

Um, so I'm gonna kind of walk him through it, but it's very, uh, high level detail.

Jordan:

So, um, you know, when you kind of follow along or you're listening,

Jordan:

um, or later on, um, there'll be a reference to more of the details of this.

Jordan:

So I'm just gonna walk you through.

Jordan:

Um, so I mean, So there at the top of this, there is this kind of

Jordan:

context and influence for, um, you know, for this whole experience.

Jordan:

There's the creation, the experience, the impact when you have a venture, right.

Jordan:

And there's the context and influence.

Jordan:

So I'm really curious for brand orchestrate, what was kind of the

Jordan:

context in which you created it?

Jordan:

Like, what was the environment that you were seeing?

Jordan:

I know you're talking about misfits and kind of these rebellious, um,

Jordan:

identities that are coming together.

Jordan:

Um, probably looking to do some of that identity development.

Jordan:

I'm curious to see, like, what was the context when, in

Jordan:

which you were creating this?

Amine:

Yeah, for sure.

Amine:

Um, so our community specifically during the whole year kinda

Amine:

changed, it changed the context of what is it for and who is it for?

Amine:

Uh, but basically how we started the context was to.

Amine:

Make it really common sense where it's around branding and marketing people.

Amine:

And we are trying to have them like learn skills around business

Amine:

development, pricing, project management, um, running branding workshops,

Amine:

and really hand on hard skills.

Amine:

And eventually after short period of time, I realized that that's

Amine:

very well, let's say common.

Amine:

And a lot of people are already doing that.

Amine:

And that's, that's not the thing that I want to be known for.

Amine:

So eventually I shifted that quickly to be more around soft skills and

Amine:

how we make decisions and how to think differently, how to develop

Amine:

like unique, thoughtful ideas.

Amine:

So we went and transitioned from hard skills into soft skills,

Amine:

but we still serve the same code and code branding industry.

Amine:

So hopefully that answers the, the.

Jordan:

Oh, yeah, absolutely.

Jordan:

Absolutely.

Jordan:

Um, so really you brought up a great point.

Jordan:

A lot of this is always going to be evolving, right?

Jordan:

So a lot of the time when we are doing kind of getting into the later piece

Jordan:

of it, like the impact when you're doing measurement and analysis, a lot

Jordan:

of this is looking at feedback and seeing how can I feed this back into the

Jordan:

context and influence what's changed?

Jordan:

Has, you know, the political environment changed has my identity

Jordan:

changed because that's a huge thing.

Jordan:

A huge piece of, uh, innovation is, has your identity, the brand identity,

Jordan:

the company identity changed over time.

Jordan:

And how can I implement that into the next actions that I take?

Jordan:

uh, when you were going kind of into this soft skills, hard skills,

Jordan:

um, you know, and, and now that the context is more like that.

Jordan:

How do, how have you started to, I'm gonna bring this into kind of the first stage

Jordan:

of it, which is the, um, kind of more the creation stage there's pieces under that.

Jordan:

Um, how did you start kind of ideating, um, into this new space?

Jordan:

So looking into the, kind of more of the soft skills, because since that

Jordan:

hasn't been touched on as much, how did you start, um, coming up with some

Jordan:

new ideas to serve your community?

Amine:

Yeah, well, um, I actually started to look into more of my own journey

Amine:

and like, I started to get into more of what's my purpose and why should

Amine:

they even bother helping other people?

Amine:

Because I dunno if you noticed this Jordan and, and Zach, Zach says you're here.

Amine:

Thanks again for joining.

Amine:

Um, but it's around.

Amine:

Us as community builders, we tend to have that spirit and like thing in us where we

Amine:

are more of a Generos kind of being where we like to build a culture of generosity.

Amine:

We try to help other people as much as we can.

Amine:

And we stop thinking about why, why we are.

Amine:

Trying to help other people.

Amine:

And for me, it was because I lacked that specific environment in my own growth,

Amine:

in my own like environment and, and house and, and like career in a way.

Amine:

So eventually I started like picking up on the things that I learned personally.

Amine:

So at that stage, I was like, okay, since I don't have a growth

Amine:

environment, what should I learn?

Amine:

What, how can I fix this problem?

Amine:

So I started really gaining and watching a lot of like scary

Amine:

V videos, motivation mindset.

Amine:

And I started applying those into my day to day job into my day to day living.

Amine:

And eventually that shaped me as a person that shaped my beliefs

Amine:

and my, in a way, my habits.

Amine:

So during that journey, I acquired so much skills and knowledge.

Amine:

In order to go out there and chase a career and try to do things like design

Amine:

and marketing and, and branding for, for clients, but all that journey.

Amine:

I, I, for some reason I took a blank eye on it and I started like creating

Amine:

a community just on the last step, just on this serving client side.

Amine:

And that was not helpful because I was able to do that only when

Amine:

I had those skills that I built in through, through the years.

Amine:

So eventually I took a step back.

Amine:

I observed how I developed myself and my own thinking and,

Amine:

and how I grow as a person.

Amine:

And I was like, these are the things.

Amine:

Um, make me a better branding person or better service provider.

Amine:

And it was a, a lot around values around, um, identity building.

Amine:

Like these are the things that built my agency and I was like, interesting.

Amine:

So what if I can shape the community around the same values?

Amine:

So that's from one side I'm actually giving value and from the things

Amine:

that I personally experienced.

Amine:

So I'm not trying to copy someone else out there, but from the

Amine:

other side, um, I'm not trying to hit multiple birds in one stone.

Amine:

I'm not trying to chase two or three different jobs.

Amine:

I'm really just trying to do one thing with the same skills, but

Amine:

maybe just different audiences, maybe just different projects in.

Amine:

So, yeah, that's, that's in a way how I could answer this question.

Jordan:

That's awesome.

Jordan:

And that leads me right into, um, actually along the bottom, you'll see

Jordan:

a there's the context and influence, which kind of shapes the venture design,

Jordan:

which kind of shapes the problem shapes, however, whatever you're approaching.

Jordan:

Um, there's the context.

Jordan:

So that's kind of think if you're thinking, what, how is it shaping it?

Jordan:

How is it influencing it?

Jordan:

And then the foundation really is the kind of the knowledge bank that you have

Jordan:

below that and the systems in place.

Jordan:

So these are the things that support the venture.

Jordan:

So there's the shaper kind of the context influence and then

Jordan:

the, the foundation, um, which is really kind of the support of it.

Jordan:

So when you are talking about how you're gathering a lot of these skill,

Jordan:

these kind of new skills and developing yourself and, um, looking into maybe new

Jordan:

systems or ways of approaching things, or even if it's maybe the tech systems

Jordan:

that you have, maybe finding some new things that support you, um, getting

Jordan:

into, um, You know, new communities that maybe can support your personal journey.

Jordan:

You can take some knowledge from you have support to ask questions.

Jordan:

These are all really important aspects of venture design.

Jordan:

Even if maybe it's not in the super active process, it's the thing that's feeding it.

Jordan:

It's the thing that's fueling your actual creation.

Jordan:

So, um, that was awesome that you were, you were talking about that because,

Jordan:

um, as you kind of started to shift into what are my values, what's my identity.

Jordan:

Um, all of this, the knowledge that you're gathering, the skills that

Jordan:

you're gathering, the, um, the kind of context you're putting around it

Jordan:

with what, what am I, who am I, and, and how am I shaping this venture?

Jordan:

Um, you can approach this entire process in a way that you can start

Jordan:

to make decisions from your identity, your brand, the community identity.

Jordan:

Um, so as you kind of started to.

Jordan:

You know, you're starting to ideate into this new space.

Jordan:

Um, and you're trying to architect now kind of, okay, so how am I

Jordan:

going to, you know, build out and design this, you know, let's get

Jordan:

into more of the experience side.

Jordan:

So there's design and composition too.

Jordan:

Um, that is really more so we can, I'm trying to kind of not go through every

Jordan:

single part on this, but the design and composition really are kind of how you

Jordan:

take the ideas and how you're architecting it behind the scenes, creating kind of

Jordan:

an MVP, um, pulling, pulling it into a space that people can absorb, but

Jordan:

then let's get into the experience.

Jordan:

Cuz honestly, I feel like the community is really about the touchpoint of experience.

Jordan:

So let's talk about how did you, um, how did you decide initially and maybe

Jordan:

how have you decided to expand your community, um, through implementation?

Jordan:

So implementation in this, um, space really is what platforms are you on?

Jordan:

How are you connecting.

Jordan:

With, uh, with new people, how are they finding you?

Jordan:

Um, I just wanted to ask to see what those are, because I think that might

Jordan:

be a great indicator of the values that you bring into your space.

Amine:

Yeah.

Amine:

Perfect question.

Amine:

So early on, before we actually launched the community, I was

Amine:

doing some like a bit of research because it's a healthy practice.

Amine:

You don't want to just launch a community just for the sake of launching it.

Amine:

You want to be making a community for the right people and delivering the

Amine:

right value and showing up where they.

Amine:

And eventually as a brand strategist, I was really into the strategy

Amine:

itself of where can I show up and how can I find them and how can

Amine:

I talk to them in a way that they feel like they want to be talked to?

Amine:

Um, so eventually like pre-launch we were doing, I were doing

Amine:

personally a lots of interviews.

Amine:

Um, I was trying to reach out to public influencers and, um, people in the

Amine:

branding space specifically in the niche that I was working on or am sorry.

Amine:

And I was reaching out to them and asking if they are open to a live

Amine:

interview, just because I was curious, like that was one of my values.

Amine:

I was a hell of a curious human being and I like to learn skills.

Amine:

From people are doing the thing, not from reading books, not

Amine:

from watching them talking.

Amine:

I want to be the one actually talking to them.

Amine:

So eventually I did that for, um, two or three months or something, or even,

Amine:

I, I believe even like four or five months, I don't even remember exactly

Amine:

that the period of time, but I talked to so many people and eventually

Amine:

I grow some sort of an audience.

Amine:

I started like having some followers on Instagram.

Amine:

I started having people who believe in what I'm saying on LinkedIn.

Amine:

So really a lot of Instagram, LinkedIn spaces, social media, specifically,

Amine:

and those people were like, we want to learn more about this.

Amine:

We want to hear more conversations.

Amine:

We want to have this problem, or these problems solved.

Amine:

Like, could you help us?

Amine:

And eventually I turned those conversations into a focus group.

Amine:

So I literally created an Instagram group with 30 people.

Amine:

And those 30 people are the most active ones who are joining each

Amine:

single conversation I was doing online.

Amine:

And from that.

Amine:

Created a beta version of the community we launched in last September, 2021.

Amine:

And it was a beta version of it.

Amine:

And people were so excited.

Amine:

And since we created that Instagram group on, sorry, on

Amine:

Instagram, we created the group.

Amine:

Technically we were using a lot of Instagram as a lead magnet

Amine:

for the community itself.

Amine:

But again, once we started growing the community and I started changing from

Amine:

hard skills to soft skills, I started seeing some sort of a gap and some sort

Amine:

of a difference where my conversations on LinkedIn specifically were gaining

Amine:

way more attention for that topic than what I was doing on Instagram.

Amine:

So eventually we shifted that.

Amine:

And right now, if you can all see, like on my Instagram profile,

Amine:

I barely post any contents.

Amine:

I'm not active a lot there.

Amine:

And I try to be as active as I can on LinkedIn, because

Amine:

that's where my target is.

Amine:

So a tip for everyone who's listening.

Amine:

If you want to spend efforts online on social media, you better make

Amine:

that effort on the place where your listeners are, your target clients

Amine:

are your target community members are.

Amine:

So yeah, for me, it was mainly Instagram and LinkedIn.

Amine:

And then the, maybe the next question is on like, where is the best place

Amine:

to host the community for them?

Amine:

I didn't really like try to find the best platform.

Amine:

I just asked them.

Amine:

I told them what is the best place for you guys?

Amine:

And I listed a list of tools like slack circle, um, discord, Facebook

Amine:

group, and that initial beta launch.

Amine:

They all voted for slack.

Amine:

And right now we're still, our community membership is still hosted on slack.

Amine:

So it's really that's that, that's how we tackle that.

Amine:

Finding the niche and the platform for the community members.

Jordan:

Thank you so much.

Jordan:

That's actually such an interesting.

Jordan:

Recount, because I'm dealing with the same thing.

Jordan:

I know, um, you know, Instagram has always been just BEC coming

Jordan:

from more of a creative background.

Jordan:

And then in tech, I really loved kind of the, the bridging,

Jordan:

um, on Instagram for a while.

Jordan:

But then I started to see that really my traction was starting

Jordan:

to come a lot more from LinkedIn.

Jordan:

And I used to joke a while back that LinkedIn was like the least fun place

Jordan:

to make content, but that's really kind of where, um, you know, where

Jordan:

I was moving into in the future, that's really where the community

Jordan:

building was happening around this particular space and innovation.

Jordan:

Um, even though I wanted to kind of bring it to a more democratized

Jordan:

level where people could speak more freely about it and use it in, in

Jordan:

a lot of their personal processes.

Jordan:

Um, I noticed that, you know, sometimes we have to kind of get out of that weird

Jordan:

identity space of, oh, I, you know, I I've been on Instagram forever, or I

Jordan:

like expressing myself in a certain way.

Jordan:

Sometimes that's not always aligned with the community.

Jordan:

Sometimes it is.

Jordan:

But sometimes you haven't even really given yourself the chance to do that yet.

Jordan:

So thank you for that because, um, I'm actually going through kind of

Jordan:

a similar, um, A similar shift where I'm moving a bit more to LinkedIn.

Jordan:

I moved, uh, part of my newsletter to LinkedIn as well.

Jordan:

And I got, um, a ton of subscribers right away.

Jordan:

And I was like, wait, I haven't even been that active on here, but this really

Jordan:

kind of was resonating the, this, the things that I had put out there, um,

Jordan:

were really getting a lot more traction.

Jordan:

So you have to just be open.

Jordan:

Open to that thing.

Amine:

Oh yeah.

Amine:

Well, more, more thing to that is like, don't try to

Amine:

overcomplicate the execution part.

Amine:

Like I, I didn't know that the ideal member were on LinkedIn at the

Amine:

beginning, but after I put it out there after I started like ideating

Amine:

and testing things out and seeing what works and what doesn't, because

Amine:

a lot of people, especially when we're trying to launch that big dream

Amine:

project, big launch of the community, big da da, this da, da, da, whatever.

Amine:

We try to overcomplicate simple things.

Amine:

Sometimes it's better to just try it out, out there and test it out.

Amine:

So if you're active on, on Instagram, test the community on Instagram, maybe you

Amine:

will have more response, but if it doesn't quickly adjust and try another thing, but

Amine:

what you don't want to do is you don't want to be like trying all the things

Amine:

to make just one that from work, because that's just TDS work and that's just not

Amine:

where you will find the most results.

Amine:

But anyways, Rob, let me know if we can, maybe through the,

Amine:

the people who are listening ne Zach, like I know you guys are.

Amine:

For community builders.

Amine:

So I'm really curious about what you think and how you found your target audiences

Amine:

for maybe your communities as well.

Jordan:

Yes, absolutely.

Jordan:

I actually was gonna invite them up, um, up to speak as well.

Jordan:

So I totally agree with you.

Jordan:

I'm all about experimentation.

Jordan:

So that's what, um, if you join after we were talking about this, I do have.

Jordan:

I'm coming in more from a framework perspective and strategy perspective.

Jordan:

Um, so I'm not personally a expert in community strategy,

Jordan:

but I am working on, um, creator innovation, um, venture design.

Jordan:

So they have the little model.

Jordan:

That's the cute little thing that's attached to the thread,

Jordan:

um, that you should be able to see through here, um, where you can

Jordan:

kind of model out this process.

Jordan:

So we were just kind of exploring pieces through it and I was

Jordan:

looking into his, um, his approach.

Jordan:

But now that you all are here, I'm, I'll invite you up for speakers.

Jordan:

If you wanna come in.

Jordan:

Um, I'm really interested in the experience piece, which

Jordan:

is I say implementation.

Jordan:

So that's the launching and distributing kind of your in.

Jordan:

Particular niche the community itself, um, and finding your people

Jordan:

as well as the communication.

Jordan:

So speaking to them directly, we haven't gotten into that yet.

Jordan:

So I'm gonna let you guys come up and speak.

Jordan:

If you wanna share, um, how you actually went about looking into whether it's the

Jordan:

experimentation of it, how you figured out where you were going to be sharing

Jordan:

and meeting your ideal community member.

Jordan:

I'd love to hear from you.

Jordan:

So I'm gonna let, I'm gonna invite you both up as speakers.

Jordan:

If you'd like to jump on, please feel free to speak.

Jordan:

Um, otherwise I can get in with a mean on some of the communication aspect, but I

Jordan:

think I've invited both of you to speak.

Jordan:

So, um, if you'd like to let me know if you get that,

Zac:

I'm

Amine:

happy to jump in.

Amine:

Yes.

Zac:

Thank you.

Zac:

You know, this kind of like social media discussion.

Zac:

Resonates quite a bit for the community that I run.

Zac:

So I run a group that helps people break into tech and it was kind of accidental.

Zac:

You know, I was always thinking about community, but I, one day just woke

Zac:

up and did this, like LinkedIn post talking about my struggle and my

Zac:

story, and if other people wanted help.

Zac:

Um, and that post place really, I didn't really have many people on LinkedIn.

Zac:

And like LinkedIn now is my number one channel.

Zac:

But at the time maybe I had like 400 people and I had over a hundred people,

Zac:

message me um, and I did this like 18 one on one meetings, uh, coffee meetings, and

Zac:

I just thought, okay, well, there's all these people with this similar struggle.

Zac:

Let's get them together.

Zac:

And over a couple months we finally did that and we started on slack,

Zac:

um, which was a new experience to me.

Zac:

And then just kind of went from there.

Zac:

It took us.

Zac:

We had just this Google form that was all our community had.

Zac:

It was just this Google form that people would fill out.

Zac:

Um, and then we would onboard them into slack.

Zac:

And then we started thinking about what we stood for and building out kind of actual

Zac:

marketing and landing pages and emails.

Zac:

But for the longest time, it was just me kind of posting on LinkedIn

Zac:

and a Google form and a slack channel is how we went about it.

Zac:

Um, and we've been doing it for about a year and a half.

Zac:

And we're about, there's about 700 people in that slack, but I'm

Zac:

about to shut the slack down and we're moving into circle actually.

Zac:

So, um, yeah, LinkedIn has been between LinkedIn and being, and

Zac:

posting on a continuous basis.

Zac:

Um, particularly things about my struggle and how it relates.

Zac:

Um, and then.

Zac:

Actually building up the communities, LinkedIn.

Zac:

So that's been also a really strong outlet, um, as well, which we

Zac:

started only like six months ago.

Zac:

Um, but I think it's helpful to have both the community having

Zac:

content going in yourself.

Zac:

I.

Jordan:

Thank you so much.

Jordan:

Thank you so much for sharing.

Jordan:

And that's so true.

Jordan:

That was kind of the inspiration behind, uh, creating this sort of framework

Jordan:

as well, because truthfully we're the we're blending in between kind of our

Jordan:

personal process and how we create and the actual venture design process.

Jordan:

So venture design doesn't have to be complicated either.

Jordan:

So like Amin was saying, you don't have to overthink it.

Jordan:

The fact that kind of your creation process in the beginning was kind

Jordan:

of ideating putting something out there, composing it quickly, um, in

Jordan:

this whole space where you're just putting it into a Google form, that

Jordan:

kind of MVP sort of experience.

Jordan:

Um, that's really kind of the, the crux of how we innovate.

Jordan:

We start at these spaces where you can get, um, into the core of.

Jordan:

What, uh, what is actually working?

Jordan:

What are people responding to?

Jordan:

Um, and a lot of times I love that you said that it's kind of this

Jordan:

accidental, um, this accidental launch or this accidental, um, discovery.

Jordan:

And I think that that's why you can't overthink it too much, either.

Jordan:

In the sense of, you just have to kind of have fun, put, um, you know, put

Jordan:

some of the content in different spaces.

Jordan:

I know am mean, you mentioned Gary V.

Jordan:

Gary is a huge proponent of doing some long form and then

Jordan:

putting it into different spaces.

Jordan:

And I feel like that's how I kind of happen upon, uh, kind of the LinkedIn

Jordan:

space, cuz I already had a newsletter and I'm like, let's see if I can put

Jordan:

some of this content on LinkedIn.

Jordan:

You know, why not?

Jordan:

it's already there.

Jordan:

Right?

Jordan:

You can repurpose it, you can put it in different spaces.

Jordan:

And it was just really, um, getting that feedback and, and implementing

Jordan:

it back into my, um, my strategy in general and just making it

Jordan:

easy to create in a new space.

Jordan:

Um, so I, I know, um, Zach, you were saying.

Jordan:

That you were, um, on slack.

Jordan:

I know am mean you're on slack too.

Jordan:

Right.

Jordan:

And then, um, Zach, you're moving to circle.

Jordan:

I'm currently on circle.

Jordan:

I was doing a lot of beta testing for them back in the day.

Jordan:

So honestly I just started it there because there was a certain

Jordan:

level of comfort that I had and I saw kind of where the company

Jordan:

was going and I really liked it.

Jordan:

Um, but I'm curious for both of you, I know am mean you were, you had asked me

Jordan:

a couple questions about circle as well.

Jordan:

Um, what prompted maybe Zach first that shift to moving to circle?

Jordan:

Is it maybe because it's gaining some more traction, is it just some feedback

Jordan:

from, um, people you're interested in?

Jordan:

Is it kind of your process and creating for a community?

Jordan:

I'm just curious as to, um, you know, why the switch from slack to circle?

Zac:

Yeah.

Zac:

So I think about a year in, as there was more people in slack, um, And

Zac:

we're, we, we might bring slack back, but treat it as like a true

Zac:

communication app, like a chat app versus trying to host our community there.

Zac:

Um, it's slack is, um, too synchronous.

Zac:

Um, meaning you have to be in the moment in the community to get

Zac:

the value from the conversation, which can be good for connection.

Zac:

Um, but very, very difficult for new members.

Zac:

To find Val the value that was already had in previous conversations and hard

Zac:

to direct them to those conversations.

Zac:

Um, you know, a as we did, we did our community was every Wednesday

Zac:

night we met, um, for a couple hours.

Zac:

Um, and we recorded all these events and I had them on this Google drive and it was

Zac:

just like so difficult, but when people onboard into the community, I'm like,

Zac:

okay, where are you at with your journey?

Zac:

Uh, and I tried to, I wanna point them to people, conversations

Zac:

and resources that'll be helpful.

Zac:

Um, and I just couldn't do that with the technology that we had.

Zac:

Um, so that's one was just, I felt like we were on this content treadmill

Zac:

and I couldn't, um, be able to, um, leverage previous content in

Zac:

order to support people, uh, two.

Zac:

Is, um, being able for people to find each other in slack.

Zac:

Like there's no real member profiles that are kind of there.

Zac:

Um, but it's difficult to, uh, profile people and people to find each other,

Zac:

particularly if you have different roles that you want to highlight.

Zac:

Uh, so that was really important to us.

Zac:

And then third is analytics.

Zac:

So I had, no, I have no, it's very difficult for me to know who's been

Zac:

engaged, who hasn't been engaged.

Zac:

Um, it's just really interesting because over the last month we've actually

Zac:

been given a free trial of slack pro.

Zac:

And now I can see the long tail in my community.

Zac:

Let's say there is like 700 people in there.

Zac:

There's like over 350 or 400 people that haven't logged in for like 60 or 90 days.

Zac:

Um, so being able to understand who's joining, who's not.

Zac:

Um, and then lastly, Probably, this is what made the community pivot is

Zac:

we're moving from a completely free community into like a subscription

Zac:

model where we have some public stuff that's free, but the actual

Zac:

intimate community experience is paid.

Zac:

Um, so having that paywall infrastructure is really important.

Zac:

So, uh, between just being like the ay nature of slack, being able

Zac:

to find people, the analytics and payments, like all those things

Zac:

leads me as a community builder to have better tools to support them.

Zac:

Um, that being said, circle is much more like form based.

Zac:

So I find the posts are better and they have more context, uh, but more difficult

Zac:

for people to connect in real time.

Zac:

So I think that's gonna be something that we're gonna have to experiment going

Zac:

forward of is this are still people can connect, um, in a more real time basis.

Jordan:

Thank you so much for that.

Jordan:

Um, actually just from a hot tip, I know that they are working on a chat feature,

Jordan:

so that's just something to keep in mind.

Jordan:

I'm hoping that they will, um, implement that in the next few months,

Jordan:

but I just saw that in kind of the beta , um, just being in the beta loop.

Jordan:

So I know courses are coming up.

Jordan:

Um, that is one aspect that I know that they're launching and they've gotten a

Jordan:

lot, a lot of requests for some sort of.

Jordan:

It to go along with the kind of asynchronous content to have something

Jordan:

where people can interact in real time.

Jordan:

That is something that they're looking to implement or they're testing, right?

Jordan:

Like it should be coming up very soon in beta.

Jordan:

So, um, yeah, so hopefully that will, will come up in time

Jordan:

to, um, serve your community.

Jordan:

But this kind of just shows how important kind of that implementation

Jordan:

is for the experience, not just meeting people where they're at, but

Jordan:

also looking at the venture itself, looking through what you're doing.

Jordan:

If, if you're getting the proper measurement or analytics coming

Jordan:

from it, that's huge piece, especially as you get into growth.

Jordan:

Growth stages.

Jordan:

And then just looking at that full onboarding process, I could totally see

Jordan:

how, when you're in slack at first, you're getting a lot of that real time value.

Jordan:

And especially as it's smaller, you can respond to threads or

Jordan:

people are asking questions.

Jordan:

You can just get that, um, immediate kind of support that you need, that

Jordan:

co-working almost support that you need.

Jordan:

But then over time, you're like, oh man, there's a whole lot of hidden value,

Jordan:

you know, up a month ago or two months ago that I wished people could access.

Jordan:

and definitely circle, um, can address that.

Jordan:

So it's so important to have like a really great relationship with

Jordan:

the tech that you're using too.

Jordan:

And to understand how you work, how your community works and kind of what space

Jordan:

is going to be the best for you to, you know, to really realize your goals.

Jordan:

So that's awesome that you've been able to look into that and I'm hoping, um,

Jordan:

that they will launch that piece soon.

Jordan:

Um, I know for, they do have lives.

Jordan:

So if you do wanna host some of those Wednesday night, um,

Jordan:

meetings in there, you can do that.

Jordan:

Um, but I'm hoping that they have the chat soon.

Jordan:

I mean, I know you're on slack right now.

Jordan:

How is that going for brand orchestrator?

Jordan:

What are you seeing right now as opportunities for you all?

Jordan:

Just because I'm curious.

Jordan:

Um, just because you've been building it for about a year,

Amine:

Yeah, well, oh my God.

Amine:

Slack is such a love and hate relationship.

Amine:

I am definitely on the same side as you guys were, I'm thinking

Amine:

of moving towards circle.

Amine:

I was planning to start with circle because I personally liked

Amine:

it at the beginning, but then the community members voted for slack.

Amine:

So I was like, ah, I need to let them make this decision right now.

Amine:

Eventually they like.

Amine:

There is a saying where you don't always like the client doesn't

Amine:

always know what they need.

Amine:

Um, so technically you don't always have to do everything they say.

Amine:

Um, but let me try to make this super analytical in a way.

Amine:

So for me, I want to take this more of a challenge.

Amine:

Like I took this, sorry, I took this more of a challenge for the last year

Amine:

was where I was like, at the beginning, we had a lot of engagement issues

Amine:

within slack, even though the number of our community members are very slow.

Amine:

So I was like, okay, what's wrong?

Amine:

Is it the actual platform?

Amine:

Or maybe there isn't enough value that lets people log in and show up because

Amine:

I've been part of other circle communities and they've seen what that looks like.

Amine:

I've seen dead circle communities where no one shows up, no

Amine:

one comments, no one engages.

Amine:

And I've seen super engaging circle communities.

Amine:

And it's really all about value.

Amine:

If there is enough value, people will show up.

Amine:

Even if the platform itself sucks.

Amine:

So that was one thing I slowly start to fix that.

Amine:

Um, another thing is you, you kind of need to do, we like current, like, I

Amine:

dunno if it's weekly or monthly, doesn't matter, but you have to do check-ins

Amine:

to the members in individually because no matter the platform, no matter how

Amine:

many members you have some people, for some reason, they might just Desi

Amine:

decide to turn off all social media, all platforms and go do something else.

Amine:

It could be because they are going to have, um, maybe a marriage or a baby,

Amine:

or maybe they are too busy with work, or maybe they want to be more productive.

Amine:

It doesn't matter.

Amine:

You have to check on them and see what's wrong because.

Amine:

And again, this also relates to the point where Z was making on

Amine:

analytics because slack definitely doesn't give you a lot of analytics

Amine:

to know who's active and who's not.

Amine:

But even then, again, since I took it as a challenge, I found ways to solve

Amine:

most of the problem problems that the platform doesn't give natively.

Amine:

So there is a tool called burb where you can automatically send

Amine:

like DMS and see who's active.

Amine:

Who's not, there is so many other tools out there to, to figure out

Amine:

the analytic part, part story.

Amine:

There is another tool called Mik, I believe, which is to do like one-on-ones

Amine:

connections between the members there's donuts, which is a slack integration.

Amine:

So anyways, there is the tech to solve most.

Amine:

Techy problems.

Amine:

Um, but yeah, I personally never liked the user experience of slack.

Amine:

Um, the payments or the pricing of it, isn't really accurate because

Amine:

they want you to pay for the whole workspace instead of like each

Amine:

member pays for it or something, or like a common plan, whatever.

Amine:

So I never like the slack pricing.

Amine:

Uh, but yeah, I am still thinking of moving to circle at some point, and I'm

Amine:

maybe even gonna partner with them for a virtual summit that I'm going to house

Amine:

at the beginning of January next year.

Amine:

So we'll see how that goes, because we might actually use circle as a

Amine:

prom for that ritual summit as a space specifically there, um, as for the chat

Amine:

feature, IM uses like more of a feed, which is which sucks because you cannot

Amine:

really track the conversations and find things that you are looking for,

Amine:

but I'm using Instagram for the chat.

Amine:

Because we still have the same community, dispatch it in, in multiple online

Amine:

platforms, we have an Instagram group.

Amine:

We also have a new LinkedIn group that we just recently created.

Amine:

I still need to figure that one out, but overall, we finally use notion for

Amine:

like content storage or content savings.

Amine:

So if you miss a conversation or you miss, um, video recording or something,

Amine:

we created the full dedicated members based on notion for everybody to quickly

Amine:

access that and search for it and find it.

Amine:

But yeah, it's a whole tech space around one community.

Amine:

And I think circle could probably just do all of that in one place.

Amine:

And yeah, I don't see why, why would you go with this or that it, it

Amine:

truly depends on where your target is and where you feel Mo mostly

Amine:

comfortable like managing the platform.

Amine:

So, yeah, that's my answer.

Amine:

A tedious one,

Jordan:

sorry.

Jordan:

No, it's a no, not tedious at all.

Jordan:

Not tedious at all.

Jordan:

Um, no, it makes a whole lot of sense and I really am loving kind of the,

Jordan:

because I know, um, I know Zach was saying that you're introducing a lot of

Jordan:

people to tech tech is a huge piece of a lot of my content too, just because

Jordan:

I came from a creative space, went into tech space and I really kind of

Jordan:

love bridging that gap between I'm like super indie hacker type of person.

Jordan:

I spend a lot of time with developers, so I have that space.

Jordan:

And then I have like the branding and marketing where I kind of came from.

Jordan:

So I love bridging those.

Jordan:

I love bridging those spaces together.

Jordan:

So I love having the tech conversations because now tech is

Jordan:

like our partner in our business.

Jordan:

It's really kind of how the whole so entrepreneurship and, uh, creator

Jordan:

economy, um, has really been able to take off because we have this amazing

Jordan:

tech, um, that can solve a lot of these issues for us and give us the analytics

Jordan:

we need and give us the experience, um, that will best suit our community.

Jordan:

And even for myself right now, my community is super beta.

Jordan:

Like not even really like lightly announced.

Jordan:

And I'm in, in circle.

Jordan:

I really was hanging out in circle to test things out.

Jordan:

Cause I just thought it was awesome.

Jordan:

Um, and again, I was doing a lot of beta stuff for them too,

Jordan:

and more from the text side.

Jordan:

So, um, circle for me, what I really loved about it was I host.

Jordan:

I, I have kind of blog slash newsletter on ghost so that I use that particular

Jordan:

platform for my newsletter and for, you know, just hosting some content.

Jordan:

So I have newsletters that are sent out through ghost, but

Jordan:

they also live on the site.

Jordan:

So members can log in and look at it.

Jordan:

Um, I have it monetize it.

Jordan:

I have it free right now.

Jordan:

Um, but what I love about circle is I could use that same content and

Jordan:

use it as posts in the community, or add maybe a little bit extra for

Jordan:

people who were in the community.

Jordan:

So that's my experience of why I wanted to start there, um, even before really

Jordan:

asking, cuz I think of when I was asking at the time, um, circle was still

Jordan:

kind of new and I just wasn't getting.

Jordan:

You know, the ability to create content the same way,

Jordan:

um, in these different spaces.

Jordan:

And I wanted to keep that long form feel.

Jordan:

Um, so that's why I personally chose circle, cuz I just was already hanging

Jordan:

out there, testing some stuff out.

Jordan:

Um, but then also I really just loved, you know, that whole process of being able to

Jordan:

have that content that was already there.

Jordan:

So the people didn't have to necessarily go over to, uh, the website to read

Jordan:

the latest, um, newsletter post.

Jordan:

They could read it in circle.

Jordan:

So I could just E easily cross post over, over there.

Jordan:

Another great solution for anyone, you know, who may be listening,

Jordan:

um, or something in between is Luma does have communities too,

Jordan:

and I've played around with theirs.

Jordan:

And it's pretty interesting.

Jordan:

So if you are hosting a lot of events, especially, and you create

Jordan:

a community on there, there are really interesting features,

Jordan:

especially with tagging and cohorts.

Jordan:

So if you want to have a pay wall, believe you can do that for, um, different aspects

Jordan:

of the community, or it may be for the community itself, but that's just another

Jordan:

in between just because I know Luma is a free, um, free option to start with.

Jordan:

So, um, I think they take a percentage, um, I believe unless

Jordan:

you're paying for the pro.

Jordan:

So what's really great about that is you can, um, have people pay for specific

Jordan:

events or to have access and they connect to discord if that's more your thing,

Jordan:

but I'm just throwing that out there just because I was like, oh man, I wish I knew

Jordan:

about, um, maybe Luma a little while back as far as the community aspect of it.

Jordan:

Um, but that's just another, that's another option, but I wanted to ask you

Jordan:

guys, um, cuz we're in that experience section, the communication is such a

Jordan:

big deal in not only getting people to know about your community, but

Jordan:

communicating within your community.

Jordan:

So that's something that I'm trying to learn a little bit more

Jordan:

about just because I'm of course in beta and I'm really kind of.

Jordan:

Putting up content that I'm already putting out into the newsletter, which

Jordan:

again is also a community, but it's, I'm trying to put this into a new space where

Jordan:

you're trying to engage more people.

Jordan:

So, um, I'll go to Zach first, if you're open to it, I just am curious to see how

Jordan:

your communication is out in the world to attract aligned community members.

Jordan:

And then also, how do you keep communication up within the community so

Jordan:

that, you know, there's, there's those conversations going all the time and

Jordan:

value being added to the community itself?

Zac:

Yeah, it's a, a great question.

Zac:

I think, you know, how do we interact with our members, uh,

Zac:

generally through LinkedIn?

Zac:

So we'll be boasting on the careers and tech social.

Zac:

We have our monthly, um, Newsletter that's really, uh,

Zac:

dedicated around the community.

Zac:

Um, we also do like public events, I guess.

Zac:

So that's a way to attract people into what we're doing, uh, in the community.

Zac:

Like the moderation of community is such a it's it's like more art than science.

Zac:

I find, um, the key, I don't know that I've found and it's, it's

Zac:

always so difficult is how do you get people comfortable reaching out?

Zac:

Um, I find, uh, strategies to do that is in the events itself.

Zac:

If you're in a breakout room with someone and they're asking a question, getting

Zac:

them to re-ask that, um, you know, online in the community, um, But it's

Zac:

always interesting cuz you, you, you see your own behavior in communities.

Zac:

So it's like, you can't expect everyone to be asking things all the time.

Zac:

Um, but I think, you know, recently I'm part of a community and that owner

Zac:

of the community, I posted something on social on Twitter and he said, Hey,

Zac:

you should post that in the community.

Zac:

So I think you're always trying to like facilitate bringing people

Zac:

back to the community to get value.

Zac:

And then as discussions are happening, it's just a important to give space

Zac:

to people, to discuss instead of just kind of answering everything.

Zac:

And then secondly is just tagging, uh, the right people to continue the conversation.

Zac:

Um, I think that's, it's definitely more of an arts and science

Zac:

and knowing who's gonna respond and who's gonna, um, show up.

Zac:

Um, cuz the worst thing you could do is if you're just like

Zac:

consistently posting and no one's interacting and I think as community.

Zac:

Managers and builders, we, we will tend to overpost.

Zac:

Um, and then it just seems like it's a one way stream.

Zac:

So actually creating space, uh, is really important.

Zac:

And then continuing to think about who else should be answering

Zac:

this question instead of myself.

Zac:

So I don't know if that's like even a, a really great answer, but that's

Zac:

why I found that has worked for me.

Jordan:

No, that's extremely helpful.

Jordan:

I think that you're kidding the nail in the head where you feel like you kind of

Jordan:

have to overdo and over, um, You know, produce as maybe a new community builder

Jordan:

or new community, especially when it's small, because you feel like you need to

Jordan:

fill the space that's happening in there.

Jordan:

Um, but sometimes that can backfire or maybe fill a feed that, um,

Jordan:

people will see less of the value because you're starting to kind of

Jordan:

space things out, um, especially probably in the community itself.

Jordan:

So let's say you are hosting on a platform like circle or in, um, in on Luma,

Jordan:

wherever you may have your community, um, versus maybe social where, um, you

Jordan:

can still engage with not only your community, but the larger community,

Jordan:

um, and just kind of pull people in.

Jordan:

But I love that idea of just having people re-ask in the community is great.

Jordan:

I think it also shows.

Jordan:

Um, you know, that you value that, you know, their input and their, even if it's

Jordan:

a question, um, because it means that this is helpful for other people to learn from.

Jordan:

And I totally agree with getting other people to ask questions

Jordan:

that kind of empowerment.

Jordan:

Um, that's what I'm really trying to do, especially in the betas, get people in

Jordan:

who are knowledgeable, who are experts in some of these areas that I hope to,

Jordan:

um, collaborate with them, you know, whether it's on some templates for the

Jordan:

community or, um, you know, being able to just bring their expertise to the space

Jordan:

because I've, I'm very lucky to have a, a wonderful network of people who are

Jordan:

from various backgrounds, just because I've been able to work in several spaces.

Jordan:

So leveraging that for leadership as well within.

Jordan:

That's thank you so much for your answer.

Jordan:

And I mean, um, I'm curious to, to hear how you approach the communication

Jordan:

process just out in, on the socials or out, um, trying to align with potential

Jordan:

new community members as well as kind of just in the community itself.

Amine:

Oh man, there is a lot, I, I love where Z said is more of

Amine:

an art world in there in science.

Amine:

And I tend sometimes to way over deliver way overdo the thing of

Amine:

communicating to as many people as I can.

Amine:

And yeah, I do it in so many ways.

Amine:

I have a newsletter.

Amine:

I actually have to, I have one which is specifically for the community

Amine:

where it's all about events, workshops, promotions, stuff like that.

Amine:

And I, uh, I recently just created a subst stack newsletter where

Amine:

it's more about content creation, more about my thoughts and how.

Amine:

Like, like literally just content of value for, for the community.

Amine:

So that's just one.

Amine:

I also show up a lot on LinkedIn lately, specifically, I post like once to twice a

Amine:

day, uh, I try to get into conversations and I notice that for my community

Amine:

specifically, since we're serving mostly shy creatives and introverts

Amine:

who don't like to reach out first, I tend to be the one reaching out a lot.

Amine:

So I started like developing that habit of even as myself, I am more

Amine:

of an ambivert, so I'm not, I'm not really that extroverted, but I do reach

Amine:

out to people who I think need, need my help and need a community help.

Amine:

And eventually I build that relationship with them.

Amine:

And then, and then I invite them to, to join the community.

Amine:

That's usually how, how most of our effective sales funnel work.

Amine:

Another one is, and maybe Zach already mentioned this, which is

Amine:

like during the actual events.

Amine:

So we do host a lot of virtual events.

Amine:

Um, we have public events that are based on like webinars and guest,

Amine:

speaker invites and stuff like that.

Amine:

We U we leverage the guest speakers audiences to grow our own audience.

Amine:

And we try to pick up the guest speakers who are either suggested by the

Amine:

community members or who are into the same niche where we're trying to serve.

Amine:

Um, eventually diversity is good, but diversity should be more on the

Amine:

personality of the speakers rather than topic or the niches, because you

Amine:

don't want to be showing up everywhere and trying to hit multiple audiences.

Amine:

You want to understand first, like one persona at a time.

Amine:

Anyway, anyways, um, so we do that a lot to do a lot of visual events.

Amine:

Um, and we also have, and this is the thing that I'm slowly

Amine:

struggling with because.

Amine:

From one side it's valuable from the other side, you don't have a lot of S and DS.

Amine:

So here's how, here's what I'm saying.

Amine:

So we do public events for guest speakers to gain like marketing material,

Amine:

but we also do private membership, only community member led event.

Amine:

So it's either something very inclusive just for the community members.

Amine:

Either I run it or even the community me, like we pick a community member

Amine:

who's very active to run their own sessions within the community.

Amine:

And that's good.

Amine:

Like that makes us more exclusive and more valuable.

Amine:

But we do not have a lot of people showing up to, I dunno if it's our own value or I

Amine:

dunno if it's just because we are small as a community together, but that of itself,

Amine:

like once we do that and some people show up, we really create strong relationships

Amine:

and, and conversations with the members.

Amine:

Um, so small circles for my specific target audience, which

Amine:

is like introverted people.

Amine:

They like that.

Amine:

That's where they open up.

Amine:

That's where communication really happens.

Amine:

Um, you also do casual.

Amine:

Promotional events where it's like a community open tool or a like pitching

Amine:

some sort of a service behind the community event or behind a virtual

Amine:

event from guest speaker, whatever.

Amine:

And usually that also gets us some leads.

Amine:

Um, but yeah, that's how we show up.

Amine:

We do a lot of content out they're on LinkedIn newsletter insights, slack itself

Amine:

create inclusive spaces for the members.

Amine:

Um, but even then I think if you're okay, this is very a bold

Amine:

statement, but if you're not charging enough for the membership, people

Amine:

might not see it as variable.

Amine:

Therefore they might not assist and show up for, for some of the events that

Amine:

you literally created just for them.

Amine:

So I am literally in a phase where.

Amine:

I'm thinking a lot of adding a zero to the membership.

Amine:

Like right now it's $150 a year.

Amine:

I'm thinking of making it to thousand $500 a year just to get the right

Amine:

people and to make them commit to their own growth and commit to the

Amine:

events that we host just for them.

Amine:

So, yeah, that's, that's some of the ways that we communicate with both

Amine:

our target and our community members.

Jordan:

That's awesome.

Jordan:

Thank you so much.

Jordan:

Um, for sharing that, and I think I'm an ambivert as well.

Jordan:

So, um, it makes a lot of sense.

Jordan:

A lot of that one on one reach out is so important, even on LinkedIn

Jordan:

commenting value, um, under posts that make sense, same with Twitter.

Jordan:

Of course.

Jordan:

Um, those are always great strategies.

Jordan:

And as far as the charging.

Jordan:

That's a really cool part about circle too.

Jordan:

Just, you know, kind of to keep nudging you in that direction.

Jordan:

is that you can actually have those, um, those different spaces.

Jordan:

So you could actually even experiment with having something that's at the

Jordan:

current level that you're at right now.

Jordan:

And then, um, start to have more of these higher value spaces that you can

Jordan:

even have more intimate events, um, or even more niche, intimate events.

Jordan:

So if you wanna do one, you know, really kind of, you wanna do a brand sort of, um,

Jordan:

intensive and mastermind kind of thing.

Jordan:

Um, you could probably create something like that as well.

Jordan:

So that's really exciting.

Jordan:

I hope that you can add that zero to it because that's,

Jordan:

um, you know, I think that'll.

Jordan:

Really, really fun to see kind of who shows up and the value that comes there.

Jordan:

And even with those small sessions, you can always replay them.

Jordan:

Um, and they are in that archive.

Jordan:

Um, which I think is, is great because I'm sure you're saving a lot

Jordan:

of the videos and sharing them back with your, um, with your community.

Jordan:

I know I've seen that.

Jordan:

Um, so yeah, I, that's a great, that's a great strategy.

Jordan:

To kind of wrap it up since I know we're getting close to the hour.

Jordan:

Um, really that last little impact piece is we talked a lot about it,

Jordan:

about, um, being able to correctly measure things and using the tools like

Jordan:

burb or Mitz, you know, donut, some of these other things to connect and

Jordan:

also, um, you know, receive feedback.

Jordan:

And then, um, taking that feedback and thinking about it

Jordan:

and saying, what does this mean?

Jordan:

Is this something, what can I take or leave?

Jordan:

What can I implement?

Jordan:

What can I implement now versus later?

Jordan:

Um, just knowing when you want, when and what you want to reintegrate, or is

Jordan:

it something that you're feeling that kind of gut instinct of I'm getting

Jordan:

the feedback from myself as my own community member, that this is something

Jordan:

that we need to change, or at least I need to bring it up to the group.

Jordan:

So, um, being able to approach all of this in a way that is.

Jordan:

Strategic.

Jordan:

Um, we all have different strategies of looking at it, but sometimes making it

Jordan:

a little bit more simple and connected to how we're personally creating at

Jordan:

any given moment is probably going to be a really great connection point in

Jordan:

attracting aligned community members.

Jordan:

So I'm so glad that you guys joined.

Jordan:

I want you to just, um, shout out, um, you can, Zach can go first, just

Jordan:

shout out your community, um, and where they can find you just because

Jordan:

I'm gonna keep this recording.

Jordan:

So I just wanna be able to make sure that anyone listening can uh re-listen

Jordan:

and find you, even if they're, they're not able to click on you for some reason.

Zac:

Yeah.

Zac:

Well, good.

Zac:

Um, our community is called careers and technology and innovation.

Zac:

Uh, you can find us on your website career in tech.ca or on LinkedIn by searching

Zac:

careers in technology and innovation.

Zac:

Um, yeah.

Zac:

So if you're interested, if you're in a different career and looking, get in the

Zac:

tech, uh, come and say hi, or you can just, you know, message me over social.

Zac:

Thanks.

Jordan:

Awesome.

Jordan:

And am mean, go ahead and, uh, share yours for

Amine:

everyone.

Amine:

Yeah, you can find us@brentorchestra.com or just type on Google search.

Amine:

Brent orchestra.

Amine:

You'll find me or the community over there.

Amine:

Thank thank you again, Jordan, for hosting this space.

Amine:

Thank you Zach.

Amine:

For contributing.

Amine:

You guys are awesome.

Jordan:

Yeah, both of you're awesome.

Jordan:

You can find me@everydayinnovation.io.

Jordan:

Just look everyday innovation up on, on Twitter or Instagram,

Jordan:

wherever you might be.

Jordan:

Um, but the community is galaxy dot everyday innovation.io.

Jordan:

If you wanna join, I have it open for, uh, short period of time.

Jordan:

Just sharing it in these little spaces here.

Jordan:

And then, um, going into next year, there's gonna be a whole lot more value.

Jordan:

That's added along with collaborations and probably a little bit of a cohort.

Jordan:

Um, you know, Uh, cohort venture strategy together.

Jordan:

So are people who are creating new ventures going into the new year.

Jordan:

So I'm excited to share that with you.

Jordan:

Thank you so much for coming today.

Jordan:

Both of you, there was so much value.

Jordan:

I was writing a whole down a whole bunch of notes just for

Jordan:

myself, so I really appreciate it.

Jordan:

And yeah, I look forward to connecting with you all soon.

Jordan:

Um, actually AMM and I have a Instagram live on Thursday, and I'm gonna be

Jordan:

kind of going through a lot of similar pieces of the creator innovation, um,

Jordan:

process, but we're gonna be focusing a little bit more on taking, you know,

Jordan:

your own personal innovation process and your values, all of that, um, to

Jordan:

attract people into your community and attract collaborators, um, so that

Jordan:

you can have that support as you grow.

Jordan:

So thank you so much, everyone have a great day.

Amine:

Thank you.

Amine:

All right, everybody.

Amine:

See you in traffic.

Amine:

Bye bye.

Amine:

See you.

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