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96. Lessons from Life in Spain: Slow Food, Slow Living and Seasonal Eating with Chef Marti Buckley
Episode 9617th June 2022 • The Good Dirt: Sustainable Living Explained • Lady Farmer
00:00:00 01:10:15

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Marti Buckley captivates us as she portrays the rich culinary traditions of the Basque country of Spain, where slow living and seasonal eating are key ingredients to community life. Marti fell in love with Basque culture when she studied abroad in college, and has now lived in San Sebastian, Spain, for over ten years, where she has written two cookbooks about Basque cuisine. She hopes to give visibility to the little-known food, history, and culture of Basque country.

Marti takes us on a journey through the way to eat in Basque country - from pintxos (similar to tapas) to dining societies, Basque traditions around eating provide inspiration and creativity to those of us looking for ways to slow down, eat closer to home, and delve deeply into community life.

Topics Covered:

  • Basque Culture and Cuisine
  • The American Food Industry and the Myth of Convenience
  • Slow Living and Long Lunches in Basque Country
  • The Art of the Pintxo
  • Connecting With Friends Through Traditional Basque DIning Societies
  • Relearning Seasonal Eating
  • Slow Living To Boost Nutrition and Well-Being

Resources Mentioned: 

Connect with Marti Buckley:

About Lady Farmer:

  • Our Website
  • @weareladyfarmer on Instagram
  • Join The Lady Farmer ALMANAC
  • Leave us a voicemail! Call 443-459-1950 and ask a question or share a shoutout. Submissions throughout the month of June will be entered to win a Slow Living Consult with Mary and Emma! 
  • Email us at thegooddirtpodcast@gmail.com

Original music by John Kingsley @jkingsley1026

Statements in this podcast have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not to be considered as medical or nutritional advice. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, and should not be considered above the advice of your physician. Consult a medical professional when making dietary or lifestyle decisions that could affect your health and well being.

Mentioned in this episode:

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Transcripts

Marti Buckley:

of course we all know we're not supposed

Marti Buckley:

to look so much at our phones.

Marti Buckley:

And we all know that our lifestyle is bad for us, but much like with dieting

Marti Buckley:

or eating, it's about seeking enjoyment from the act, rather than thinking

Marti Buckley:

about it as a restriction, you know?

Marti Buckley:

The more attention you pay to whether it's food or whether it's what

Marti Buckley:

you're doing, the more you can kind of enjoy it rather than being on a

Marti Buckley:

constant quest to optimize your life.

Emma Kingsley:

You're listening to The Good Dirt podcast.

Emma Kingsley:

This is a place where we dig into the nitty gritty of sustainable

Emma Kingsley:

living through food, fashion, and

Mary Kingsley:

lifestyle.

Mary Kingsley:

And we are your host, Mary and Emma Kingsley, the mother and daughter,

Mary Kingsley:

founder, team of lady farmer.

Mary Kingsley:

We are sewing seeds of slow living through our community platform

Mary Kingsley:

events and online marketplace.

Mary Kingsley:

We started

Emma Kingsley:

this podcast as a means to share the wealth of

Emma Kingsley:

information and quality conversations that we're having in our world.

Emma Kingsley:

As we dream up and deliver ways for each of us to live into the new paradigm.

Emma Kingsley:

One that is regenerative balanced

Mary Kingsley:

and whole.

Mary Kingsley:

We want to put the microphone in front of the voices that need to be heard

Mary Kingsley:

the most right now, the farmers, the dreamers, the designers, and the doers.

Mary Kingsley:

So

Emma Kingsley:

come cultivate a better world with us.

Emma Kingsley:

We're so glad you're here now.

Emma Kingsley:

Let's dig in.

Emma Kingsley:

Yay.

Emma Kingsley:

Summer solstice.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

Summer solstice is Tuesday, June 21st.

Mary Kingsley:

It's gonna be precisely at 5:14 AM.

Mary Kingsley:

Eastern daylight time.

Mary Kingsley:

You know, there's a legend that if you sleep under an elder Bush

Mary Kingsley:

on Midsummers Eve, which is the night before the solstice, you'll

Mary Kingsley:

be able to see the garden fairies.

Mary Kingsley:

Mm.

Emma Kingsley:

Are you going to

Mary Kingsley:

do that?

Mary Kingsley:

Well, I'm thinking about it.

Mary Kingsley:

Or maybe I'll just sit out in the yard and watch the fireflies and this

Mary Kingsley:

time of year's their mating season.

Mary Kingsley:

And they gather in the trees and they make this amazing light show.

Mary Kingsley:

Like you wouldn't believe that it, it looks like garden fairies.

Mary Kingsley:

why don't you come join me.

Mary Kingsley:

Maybe I will.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah, we'll sit out and

Emma Kingsley:

watch the, the fireflies.

Emma Kingsley:

I remember the summers that I spent at camp in Alabama in

Emma Kingsley:

particular in north Georgia also.

Emma Kingsley:

Gosh, those fireflies at night in the summer.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

So we're starting a new theme for summer in the Almanac,

Emma Kingsley:

which is our online community.

Emma Kingsley:

We have a different theme every season and well, we have a, a

Emma Kingsley:

word to sort of encompass a theme and this season it's embrace.

Emma Kingsley:

So I don't know about you, but I'm really excited about embracing all of

Emma Kingsley:

the goodness of summer because yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

As we all know, summer can just fly by sometimes.

Emma Kingsley:

And for those of you who are joining us or have been with us,

Emma Kingsley:

get ready because we're gonna have a really fun time embracing summer.

Emma Kingsley:

We have lots of fun things in store.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

And so let's tell them about our new voicemail system,

Emma Kingsley:

right?

Emma Kingsley:

So our voicemail system, we just set it up.

Emma Kingsley:

You'll call in, leave a voicemail.

Emma Kingsley:

And we wanna hear from all of you listeners, you can

Emma Kingsley:

call in and ask a question.

Emma Kingsley:

You can tell us how your slow living journey is going.

Emma Kingsley:

you can tell us what the good dirt means to you.

Emma Kingsley:

We'd love to hear from you.

Emma Kingsley:

And we're doing a fun thing after the month of June, all the way up to our

Emma Kingsley:

hundredth episode, which is in just a few weeks, we will be picking one person

Emma Kingsley:

who left us a voicemail to come back with us and we'll have a slow living consult.

Emma Kingsley:

So we'll reach out to you if you're the winner.

Emma Kingsley:

So

Mary Kingsley:

why don't you tell us more about the slow living consult?

Mary Kingsley:

What is

Emma Kingsley:

that?

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

So slow living consult is a conversation with us.

Emma Kingsley:

It's really what it sounds like.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

The conversation with us about slow living.

Emma Kingsley:

So what is slow living?

Emma Kingsley:

How are you slow living?

Emma Kingsley:

How are you not slow living?

Emma Kingsley:

um, what areas of your life does it feel inaccessible to you?

Emma Kingsley:

What sort of things have you been struggling with and slowing down?

Emma Kingsley:

What is baffling to you?

Emma Kingsley:

What is exciting to you and inspiring to you?

Emma Kingsley:

And, um, It's just, it's super fun.

Emma Kingsley:

It it's a conversation with us about slow living.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

So if you call in and leave a voicemail at 443-459-1950.

Emma Kingsley:

You have the opportunity to win a slow living consult with us.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

And you might be one of these people out there that listens to these conversations

Mary Kingsley:

and you think that's not for me.

Mary Kingsley:

My life is too hectic.

Mary Kingsley:

I can't do that.

Mary Kingsley:

That's inaccessible to me.

Mary Kingsley:

Um, you might be the very person that would benefit from this and hint as so

Mary Kingsley:

many of our recent guests have pointed out, um, slow living isn't about

Mary Kingsley:

speed really, or how busy you are.

Mary Kingsley:

It's more about.

Mary Kingsley:

Um, the quality of your daily life and the decisions you're making and things

Mary Kingsley:

that feel nurturing to you or not.

Mary Kingsley:

So these are all things worth TA talking about, and we'd

Mary Kingsley:

love to talk to you personally.

Mary Kingsley:

So call in and leave us a voicemail.

Mary Kingsley:

Maybe you'll get picked for this slow living consult giveaway.

Emma Kingsley:

The number can also be found in the show notes of this podcast.

Emma Kingsley:

And it is 4, 4, 3 4 5 9 1 9 5.

Emma Kingsley:

Oh

Emma Kingsley:

. Mary Kingsley: Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

And in the meantime, we hope you are embracing early summer eating some

Emma Kingsley:

delicious summer bounty and enjoying the long evenings and enjoying the sunshine

Emma Kingsley:

and getting your hands in the dirt and going to the farmer's market and all this.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

So

Emma Kingsley:

this is all reminding me of our guests that we have today.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

So today our guest is Marti Buckley.

Mary Kingsley:

She's an American Alabama born writer and a cook who's found her way to living

Mary Kingsley:

a life she loves in San Sebastian, Spain, her first book, Basque country,

Mary Kingsley:

a culinary journey through food lovers.

Mary Kingsley:

Paradise came out in September, 2018.

Emma Kingsley:

She's currently working on her second book as

Emma Kingsley:

you'll hear in the interview.

Emma Kingsley:

It's all about pintxos.

Emma Kingsley:

If you don't know what pintxos are, if you've never heard of

Emma Kingsley:

Basque country or San Sebastian, you are certainly in for a treat.

Emma Kingsley:

And as you'll hear in this episode, actually as a family,

Emma Kingsley:

we have the opportunity to visit this amazing part of the world.

Emma Kingsley:

Oh gosh.

Emma Kingsley:

It's been 12, 13 years now.

Mary Kingsley:

It was 2009.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

I wanna go back time to go back, mom.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

So Basque country is a region in Southern France and Northern Spain.

Emma Kingsley:

And they'll have, is you'll hear her explain in the episode, super specific

Emma Kingsley:

culture and language that has this really sort of mysterious history to it.

Emma Kingsley:

And of course, this also means that they have a very specific way of eating

Emma Kingsley:

and sourcing their food and it's all inextricably tied to slow living.

Emma Kingsley:

And it's just so beautiful.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

And, you know, We've talked to several people.

Mary Kingsley:

Who've ended up living this slow European lifestyle.

Mary Kingsley:

And it's really fun to talk about that and to see what things we can learn from

Mary Kingsley:

people that live in other countries and apply them here or wherever we live that

Mary Kingsley:

can help all of us reach our slow living goals or the life that we wanna lead.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

I think part of the life that I wanna lead is to find one of these

Emma Kingsley:

cooking clubs that she talks about.

Emma Kingsley:

Oh yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

The dining societies.

Emma Kingsley:

yes.

Emma Kingsley:

I wanna find a dining society.

Emma Kingsley:

It sounds like the most fun thing and I won't ruin it.

Emma Kingsley:

I'll let her tell it to you in the

Mary Kingsley:

interview.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

So as always, we hope you enjoy.

Mary Kingsley:

We think that this episode is best enjoyed on a sunny patio.

Mary Kingsley:

Oh, overlooking a beautiful view.

Mary Kingsley:

If you can, with some wine or cider and uh, yeah, maybe one of these pintxos,

Mary Kingsley:

what's that listen up and you'll find out

Emma Kingsley:

enjoy.

Emma Kingsley:

Thank you so much for being here.

Emma Kingsley:

We'll be back next Friday.

Emma Kingsley:

And

Mary Kingsley:

here's Marti Buckley.

Marti Buckley:

I'm Marti Buckley.

Marti Buckley:

I am from Alabama, but I live in San Sebastian, Spain, where I have been for

Marti Buckley:

the last, over a decade, about 11 years.

Marti Buckley:

Now I'm an author and I'm a cook and a journal.

Marti Buckley:

And I published a book of Basque country.

Marti Buckley:

It's a cookbook, but it's also sort of like an anthropological

Marti Buckley:

study of the Basque people, which is the people group that inhabit

Marti Buckley:

the north of Spain, where I live.

Marti Buckley:

And I'm currently working on my second book, which is another cookbook about

Marti Buckley:

pintxos, which are like the small bites that Basque people are so famous for.

Marti Buckley:

So how did you

Emma Kingsley:

end up in San Sebastian?

Emma Kingsley:

So you're from Alabama.

Emma Kingsley:

How'd you end up in San Sebastian.

Emma Kingsley:

And how did you end up cooking and writing about cooking?

Marti Buckley:

I don't know.

Marti Buckley:

I feel like a lot of what has happened to me has been luck or

Marti Buckley:

fate or whatever you wanna call it.

Marti Buckley:

I did the thing where you study Spanish and you wanna go study abroad

Marti Buckley:

and get the language down better.

Marti Buckley:

And so in my mind, I wanted to be in Europe, studying Spanish.

Marti Buckley:

I wanted to be in Madrid, Madrid, Madrid, Madrid, that's all I wanted.

Marti Buckley:

Mm-hmm but the program that I signed up for decided to put me in Pamplona,

Marti Buckley:

which is a much smaller little city.

Marti Buckley:

It's about an hour from San Sebastian, where I am right now.

Marti Buckley:

and I had no idea like what it was.

Marti Buckley:

And so I landed there.

Marti Buckley:

My first trip out of the United States in the tiny airport, it's like one room.

Marti Buckley:

And I was like, where am I?

Marti Buckley:

And that's kind of kicked off this journey of learning about Europe,

Marti Buckley:

learning about Spain and learning about this people group in the north of Spain.

Marti Buckley:

That's like very different.

Marti Buckley:

And at that moment I just fell in love, you know?

Marti Buckley:

So even after I finished my six months abroad and went back home,

Marti Buckley:

I was just kind of obsessed with the Basque country in Spain.

Marti Buckley:

But of course you have to then.

Marti Buckley:

Live your life.

Marti Buckley:

And so I finished my college degree in English and I started working in

Marti Buckley:

the magazine industry and then took a year off to give birth to my daughter.

Marti Buckley:

And when it was time to kind of reincorporate myself in the workforce,

Marti Buckley:

or when I got pretty antsy from being at home for like a year, I

Marti Buckley:

decided that I wanted to try my hand at cooking professionally or I did.

Marti Buckley:

I, I just wanted to see what it was like.

Marti Buckley:

So I went one night to the best restaurant in Birmingham, Alabama, where I'm from.

Marti Buckley:

And I did, I guess you could say a stage and, um, it was like

Marti Buckley:

the worst experience of my life.

Marti Buckley:

horrible.

Marti Buckley:

I was the only girl I, you know, I thought I was like an avid cook,

Marti Buckley:

but of course, when you go to a professional kitchen, you realize

Marti Buckley:

you have no idea what you're doing.

Marti Buckley:

It was just really scary.

Marti Buckley:

And I probably never would've gone back except for like the chef de cuisine

Marti Buckley:

followed me out that night and he was like, thank you so much for coming.

Marti Buckley:

I was like, yeah, whatever.

Marti Buckley:

And he was like, come back anytime.

Marti Buckley:

And I was like, ha, whatever.

Marti Buckley:

. And then he was like, like tomorrow and I was like, oh, okay.

Marti Buckley:

Cuz you know, I was so nervous and flustering.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

So then the whole way home, I was like, why did you say, you'd go back.

Marti Buckley:

Why did you say you'd go back.

Marti Buckley:

But you know, I had given my word and so I went back the next day

Marti Buckley:

and I pretty much went back every day for like the next two years.

Marti Buckley:

wow.

Marti Buckley:

That's such a good story.

Mary Kingsley:

What you described is the stage.

Mary Kingsley:

Tell us about that.

Mary Kingsley:

What was that?

Mary Kingsley:

Where you gave a demonstration or something?

Marti Buckley:

No, that's like the French, the old school, French term that people

Marti Buckley:

use in the industry for like internship.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Apprenticeship.

Marti Buckley:

Oh, I.

Marti Buckley:

And it can be anywhere from one night to, you know, several months, but

Marti Buckley:

it's basically unpaid, um, where you are kind of learning and in exchange

Marti Buckley:

they're getting like your labor.

Marti Buckley:

So yeah, I ended up working at that restaurant Bottega under the chef

Marti Buckley:

Frank Stitt, who is like the godfather cuisine and learned everything that

Marti Buckley:

I know about cooking, you know, and, and it was a life changing.

Marti Buckley:

Moment for me.

Marti Buckley:

But of course this whole time in the back of my head, I'm thinking about Spain.

Marti Buckley:

I'm being obsessed with Spain, listening to Spanish music, you know,

Marti Buckley:

drinking Spanish wine all the time.

Marti Buckley:

And I'm also like in parallel working with my freelance journalism career.

Marti Buckley:

And so I'm writing all the time.

Marti Buckley:

So this other really huge coincidence happened to me where every day before

Marti Buckley:

I went into worked in the kitchen, I would stop at a coffee shop

Marti Buckley:

and write for like an hour or so.

Marti Buckley:

And this girl from high school came in.

Marti Buckley:

I hadn't seen her in like six years.

Marti Buckley:

And she was like, I was like, oh, Hey Lauren, how are you?

Marti Buckley:

She goes, she was like, horrible.

Marti Buckley:

I'm horrible.

Marti Buckley:

I was like, oh, I'm sorry.

Marti Buckley:

. And, and she told me, she was like, I just got back from Spain yesterday.

Marti Buckley:

I've been there living for a year.

Marti Buckley:

I'm, you know, I loved it.

Marti Buckley:

And I, I was like, tell me everything.

Marti Buckley:

How did you do that?

Marti Buckley:

And so through that random meeting, I found out about this program that would

Marti Buckley:

enable me and my family to go to Spain for what I thought would be a year.

Marti Buckley:

And so we ended up doing it and never coming back.

Marti Buckley:

oh my

Emma Kingsley:

gosh.

Emma Kingsley:

I'm gonna cry.

Emma Kingsley:

I wanna move to France

Marti Buckley:

so bad.

Marti Buckley:

This is it, mom.

Emma Kingsley:

okay.

Emma Kingsley:

Thanks

Marti Buckley:

everyone.

Marti Buckley:

This is Emma's.

Marti Buckley:

Aha moment.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah, I'm having a

Emma Kingsley:

first of all, I wanna say I've spent some time in Birmingham, too.

Emma Kingsley:

I lived there for a few summers and Bottega amazing restaurant.

Emma Kingsley:

What's his other one?

Marti Buckley:

He's a few Highlands.

Marti Buckley:

Highlands is shape.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah, shave on fun.

Emma Kingsley:

Oh my gosh.

Emma Kingsley:

That's so

Marti Buckley:

cool.

Marti Buckley:

I

Mary Kingsley:

wanna hear more about your first experience that night.

Mary Kingsley:

Like how you thought it was a disaster and you know, all the, all the things

Mary Kingsley:

your brain was telling you that this isn't going well, then it turned out to

Mary Kingsley:

be like, just absolutely pivotal for you.

Mary Kingsley:

So.

Mary Kingsley:

Talk about that first

Marti Buckley:

night.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

That first night in the kitchen.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, it was like everything, you know, I had to borrow shoes cause

Marti Buckley:

I didn't have any shoes to wear.

Marti Buckley:

I had to borrow a knife from a friend.

Marti Buckley:

So, and I had never used like, you know, that kind of like high

Marti Buckley:

grade cooking restaurant knife.

Marti Buckley:

I had to borrow some chef's whites, you know, it just felt like I was

Marti Buckley:

a total imposter in every way.

Marti Buckley:

yeah.

Marti Buckley:

And you get there and they're.

Marti Buckley:

Chop an onion.

Marti Buckley:

And actually, I don't think they even trusted me in the fir the beginning

Marti Buckley:

of the night to chop an onion.

Marti Buckley:

You know, it was like pick parsley leaves, like wipe these plates clean, um, and

Marti Buckley:

just watching, you know, the kitchen full of these guys, working hard, putting

Marti Buckley:

out a ton of covers and you just like not wanting to be in the way and yeah.

Marti Buckley:

You know, back, I think the, the whole culinary world is changing

Marti Buckley:

in over the past decade and it's becoming more professional and

Marti Buckley:

more gender balanced, but this.

Marti Buckley:

Still like 15 years ago.

Marti Buckley:

And it was still very much like a man's thing and people who, you know,

Marti Buckley:

had never done anything but cook.

Marti Buckley:

And so they were like in this world that I wasn't very much not a part of.

Marti Buckley:

And another funny thing, like, I don't think I've ever talked about this to

Marti Buckley:

people in public, but I actually didn't really used to eat seafood and, and

Marti Buckley:

that night as a reward for my hard work, they pulled me over and served

Marti Buckley:

me a huge bowl of boullabaise and wow.

Marti Buckley:

Like for someone who doesn't like seafood, it's pretty much the

Marti Buckley:

worst dish you could ever imagine.

Marti Buckley:

It like mussels fish, like all the in a bowl with a bunch of liquid.

Marti Buckley:

And I.

Marti Buckley:

You know, but of course you can't be like, I'm sorry, I don't really like

Marti Buckley:

seafood so I just kind of forced down as, as much of it as I could.

Marti Buckley:

That's so funny.

Marti Buckley:

So that's great.

Marti Buckley:

And of course

Emma Kingsley:

now, and now you live in San Sebastian, which is

Emma Kingsley:

like, oh my God, the best seafood.

Emma Kingsley:

And

Marti Buckley:

All of that, I've grown to, I've grown to like it, of course, like you

Marti Buckley:

get here, everything is totally different.

Marti Buckley:

The quality and the freshness, I feel like calamari and octopus

Marti Buckley:

are like, kind of gateway seafood.

Marti Buckley:

And so like I've gotten seafood.

Marti Buckley:

So yeah, I'm a reformed seafood hater.

Marti Buckley:

Well,

Emma Kingsley:

okay.

Emma Kingsley:

I'm like you in that coffee shop talking to Lauren.

Emma Kingsley:

So what was it that like, what was the program that you thought you were doing?

Emma Kingsley:

Like, let's move you to Spain and , what was that like?

Emma Kingsley:

And then I also wanna hear more about Basque country.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Okay.

Marti Buckley:

Sure.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

So when I ran into Lauren, she told me about the Auxiliares program,

Marti Buckley:

which is a government funded program.

Marti Buckley:

That's actually like so great, I think for this country, but it brings English

Marti Buckley:

speaking people in to do about 10 to 12 hours of English teaching a week.

Marti Buckley:

And they placed people in all of the public institutions.

Marti Buckley:

So it can be anywhere from like a grade school to like an

Marti Buckley:

official language school, to.

Marti Buckley:

Um, higher education and you just go to the class once a week

Marti Buckley:

and you're like, they're native.

Marti Buckley:

They get to hear you speak native English.

Marti Buckley:

And so the real value in it, I mean, the money is okay.

Marti Buckley:

The real value in it is the visa that you get to be here.

Marti Buckley:

Right.

Marti Buckley:

So as an American, it's really difficult to get to Europe because of visa issues.

Marti Buckley:

And that's the program I did.

Marti Buckley:

And I did it for a while until I was able to transition to another

Marti Buckley:

actual quote unquote real job.

Marti Buckley:

cool.

Marti Buckley:

So

Mary Kingsley:

is that similar to what you did in France?

Marti Buckley:

Yeah, I actually did that.

Marti Buckley:

yeah, I've heard they have like a come of the same thing in France or yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

And I could have stayed for two years.

Emma Kingsley:

But yeah, I was just, I guess I was younger.

Emma Kingsley:

Still pretty fresh out of college.

Emma Kingsley:

And I was just kind of like bouncing around, but maybe I

Emma Kingsley:

can go back and do it again.

Emma Kingsley:

It was super fun.

Emma Kingsley:

So when you were teaching, where was that?

Emma Kingsley:

Initially?

Emma Kingsley:

Since,

Marti Buckley:

since Sebastian, because I, okay.

Marti Buckley:

So they placed you there.

Marti Buckley:

That point.

Marti Buckley:

I was obsessed with cooking.

Marti Buckley:

I was obsessed with Basque country.

Marti Buckley:

So I knew like this was the place to be.

Marti Buckley:

Cuz San Sebastian has an outsized valley culinary reputation for the size of

Marti Buckley:

city that is, it's like 180,000 people.

Marti Buckley:

And it buys always with Tokyo for the most Michelin stars per person.

Marti Buckley:

Wow.

Marti Buckley:

It's got not only Michelin stars, but also this phenomenon of eating

Marti Buckley:

known as pintxos it's just got all of these culinary riches.

Marti Buckley:

And I just knew that it was like the center of the food universe

Marti Buckley:

and that I wanted to be there.

Marti Buckley:

So I wrote a sneaky email and was like, please put me in San Sebastian yeah.

Marti Buckley:

And tell us

Emma Kingsley:

about Basque country and what that means.

Emma Kingsley:

Okay.

Emma Kingsley:

Well, Basque

Marti Buckley:

country, is a region in the Northeast of Spain

Marti Buckley:

and the Southwest of France.

Marti Buckley:

It's a people group that is one of the oldest in Europe and nobody

Marti Buckley:

knows exactly who they came from.

Marti Buckley:

The language is not similar to.

Marti Buckley:

Any other language in the world, nobody is still to this day, nobody

Marti Buckley:

is sure where the language has come from and it just dates back

Marti Buckley:

thousands and thousands of years.

Marti Buckley:

And so now, even to this day in 2022, they are still like a super

Marti Buckley:

outspoken, super culturally cohesive and just a super different culture.

Marti Buckley:

They have, you know, different genetics.

Marti Buckley:

It's like all still very intact mm-hmm . And so their cultural,

Marti Buckley:

you know, it's defined by a lot of different things that makes them

Marti Buckley:

really special and they're spread out basically over like four Spanish

Marti Buckley:

provinces and three French provinces.

Marti Buckley:

And.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah, there's a lot of political kind of controversy about what is Basque

Marti Buckley:

country, but at its most simple, that is probably the best answer.

Marti Buckley:

that's a great

Mary Kingsley:

explanation.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

What are some of the distinguishing characteristic of the culture

Mary Kingsley:

you you've described the food a little bit and some of the, I guess

Mary Kingsley:

personality, characteristics, but anything else you can say about that?

Mary Kingsley:

What distinguishes it from France or Spain?

Mary Kingsley:

The things we typically think

Marti Buckley:

about.

Marti Buckley:

So we can start with the fact that it rains like 220 days here a year wow.

Marti Buckley:

And so all these images that you have of like sunny, Spain, that's

Marti Buckley:

not here, here is a land of.

Marti Buckley:

Dark green lush mountains and beautiful, but cold and dark blue crashing ocean.

Marti Buckley:

Like it's really far from the Mediterranean that you can

Marti Buckley:

imagine when you think of Spain.

Marti Buckley:

And so then you have like the people group, you know, apart from their

Marti Buckley:

physical appearance and their genetics, they themselves in part and function

Marti Buckley:

of where they are in their history are kind of like very closed off.

Marti Buckley:

So like, if you imagine Spain is like going out and doing like flamenco

Marti Buckley:

with people in the bars and you know, this lively part here, it's like

Marti Buckley:

a lot more contained, a lot more.

Marti Buckley:

Quote, unquote, Northern kind of cold attitude, but then they say once you break

Marti Buckley:

through that, you're friends for life.

Marti Buckley:

So that's kind of like their reputation among the Spanish people as well.

Marti Buckley:

And yeah, and then the cuisine in and of itself, Spain is such

Marti Buckley:

an interesting country because it's not very cohesive at all.

Marti Buckley:

There's tons of minority languages.

Marti Buckley:

Each region was sort of like its own kingdom until, you

Marti Buckley:

know, a few hundred years ago.

Marti Buckley:

And they still cling really tightly to these small cultures across the peninsula.

Marti Buckley:

And so Basque country is definitely part of, one of the most outspoken, one of

Marti Buckley:

the most different, and one of the most kind of mysterious as well, like many

Marti Buckley:

subcultures of Spain of, or of Europe.

Marti Buckley:

So for me, like I've specialized obviously in the food here and that's kind of like

Marti Buckley:

a whole nother thing of what, what makes Basque food different from Spanish food?

Marti Buckley:

I mean, here in the north of, of Spain, it surprises people

Marti Buckley:

a lot because they don't do.

Marti Buckley:

Anything to the food.

Marti Buckley:

They don't do anything to the food.

Marti Buckley:

They don't add anything when they're cooking except for salt

Marti Buckley:

and garlic and maybe like on a crazy day, some parsley . Wow.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

But yeah, like if you crack a little black pepper on some

Marti Buckley:

food here, they're like woo.

Marti Buckley:

Spicy . Oh, wow.

Mary Kingsley:

I guess that really speaks to the flavor of the ingredients.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

And the freshness

Marti Buckley:

and yeah, 100%.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

That's 100%.

Marti Buckley:

If you look, you know, at cultures that add a lot of spices, it's often places

Marti Buckley:

that are hot, where the food would go bad and you know, in spite here.

Marti Buckley:

They're right next to the ocean right next to the mountains every day, pulling out

Marti Buckley:

amazing fresh fish in this beautiful land.

Marti Buckley:

That's still pretty pristine, not at all like sprawl urban sprawl or anything.

Marti Buckley:

So yeah, everything just tastes amazing and the produce is

Marti Buckley:

still in this day, you know?

Marti Buckley:

Amazing.

Marti Buckley:

So, yeah, it's definitely to do with that.

Marti Buckley:

What about that PI

Emma Kingsley:

isn't there a Basque pimento

Marti Buckley:

PI this spill.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah, that's on, yes.

Marti Buckley:

On the French side that's made in this beautiful little

Marti Buckley:

village called this spillt.

Marti Buckley:

And if you go there now, it's more for show, but previously

Marti Buckley:

they would grow these.

Marti Buckley:

Peppers red peppers, then they would string them up and they would

Marti Buckley:

tie them to the outside of their huge farmhouse to dry in the sun.

Marti Buckley:

And once they dry them, they blend them up into a powder.

Marti Buckley:

And that's PI on this split.

Marti Buckley:

It's not super spicy.

Marti Buckley:

No, it's not super spicy.

Marti Buckley:

It's like a milder cayenne pepper maybe.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

But it's also got a delicious kind of smokey sun dried flavor, but

Marti Buckley:

it's definitely more, you know, used on the French side of the border.

Marti Buckley:

There are, you know, there's like, um, some different influences.

Marti Buckley:

If you look at French Basques versus Spanish, Oh, that's so

Emma Kingsley:

fascinating.

Emma Kingsley:

So

Mary Kingsley:

this sounds at least one of the slow food capitals of the world.

Marti Buckley:

yes, I think it definitely is.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, one of the things that I first kind of realized in first just was in, in

Marti Buckley:

awe of, is like how much people here are still rooted in the temporality and the

Marti Buckley:

seasonality of the food that they eat.

Marti Buckley:

Like when I was growing up, you know, like I grew up with my mom, you know,

Marti Buckley:

she's of the generation, you know, kind of like still like house wise, canned

Marti Buckley:

goods, you know, ready, made meals.

Marti Buckley:

And I never even growing up in Alabama where there's great summer produce.

Marti Buckley:

I never really like process that, like, this is only for summer.

Marti Buckley:

This is only for fall.

Marti Buckley:

This is only for winter, but here people.

Marti Buckley:

Not only know that their whole lives and never lost that.

Marti Buckley:

They also kind of love it.

Marti Buckley:

And they love like eating mushrooms every day for two months and never eating

Marti Buckley:

them again for like 10 more months.

Marti Buckley:

And for them, it's like a cause of celebration.

Marti Buckley:

It's like, oh, you know, it's the first it's time for the cider.

Marti Buckley:

Oh, it's the first G the first peppers they're like, you know,

Marti Buckley:

ready to eat now, you know?

Marti Buckley:

They really celebrate that and they have it like in their head at all

Marti Buckley:

times and have not forgotten it.

Marti Buckley:

And that's really cool to see that unbroken mm-hmm

Mary Kingsley:

oh, that's amazing.

Mary Kingsley:

Like, as you say, they never, they never lost it.

Mary Kingsley:

It's been a continuation all the way through.

Mary Kingsley:

And you know, we talk about slow living through the seasons and seasonal eating

Mary Kingsley:

is such a big part of that and something that we're having to reevaluate or re

Mary Kingsley:

reexperience, relearn, relearn, relearn.

Mary Kingsley:

That's the word something we're having to relearn?

Mary Kingsley:

Because when I grew up, I tell this story a lot.

Mary Kingsley:

I feel like I kind of experienced that transition.

Mary Kingsley:

When I was younger, it was more about eating outta

Mary Kingsley:

gardens and that sort of thing.

Mary Kingsley:

And then as I came up through the seventies and all these convenience food

Mary Kingsley:

started popping up and people started being really enamored with saving

Mary Kingsley:

time and, and just the ease of it.

Mary Kingsley:

And people kind of fell in love with stuff and fell in love

Mary Kingsley:

with things like box cakes.

Mary Kingsley:

Right.

Mary Kingsley:

And one example I love to give as we, we were just all went berserk over Tang.

Mary Kingsley:

Because you could have orange juice instantly and, and

Mary Kingsley:

the astronauts drank it.

Mary Kingsley:

So therefore it must be like really good so, anyway, so I sort of experienced

Mary Kingsley:

that and then, you know, raising my kids in the nineties convenience

Mary Kingsley:

was king, as I like to say, and now we, um, we grow a lot of food.

Mary Kingsley:

We get farm, fresh food from the CSA and it's just now all my children

Mary Kingsley:

are grown it outta the house.

Mary Kingsley:

my husband and I have made a 180 on what we eat.

Mary Kingsley:

Mm.

Mary Kingsley:

Hopefully it's rubbing.

Mary Kingsley:

And hopefully through what we do with Lady farmer, you know, we're sort

Mary Kingsley:

of talking about it more and getting people more aware of this issue.

Mary Kingsley:

That's why we love talking to people in Europe that are

Mary Kingsley:

still living this lifestyle.

Mary Kingsley:

And

Emma Kingsley:

yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

And so would you say your family has adapted and, and

Emma Kingsley:

you guys live that way too?

Emma Kingsley:

Cause you're well, well,

Marti Buckley:

yeah, I mean, definitely my daughter, we came here when my

Marti Buckley:

daughter was two and a half and she is really considers herself kind

Marti Buckley:

of just equally Basque as American.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

She's used to it.

Marti Buckley:

She has never known anything different.

Marti Buckley:

And that's like kind of the really interesting part because

Marti Buckley:

yes, in America, I agree.

Marti Buckley:

We're like relearning this and we're kind of re adapting to this

Marti Buckley:

lifestyle, but there's something.

Marti Buckley:

So in like, I envy them so much of never even reflecting on it and just having

Marti Buckley:

it like internalized and, you know, they don't make a big deal about it, but it,

Marti Buckley:

for them, it's just how things should be.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

And that it's like, they're not like Instagramming it,

Marti Buckley:

like it's yeah, it's happening.

Marti Buckley:

And it's just life.

Marti Buckley:

And, and, and I love that.

Marti Buckley:

And they're also like a lot more willing here to spend money on good

Marti Buckley:

food food for the best people is like the most important thing ever.

Marti Buckley:

They're talking about it all day long.

Marti Buckley:

When they go to have lunch, they're talking about what is for dinner,

Marti Buckley:

they're asking, you know, like which fish monger do you go to?

Marti Buckley:

Oh, I don't, you know, he's not the best, the best ones over here, you know?

Marti Buckley:

And it's like all these kind of competition conversations around food.

Marti Buckley:

And I think that's part of what has kept the culinary culture here.

Marti Buckley:

Like so strong from it's like everybody, it's not one demographic.

Marti Buckley:

Like kids all the way to grandparents.

Marti Buckley:

Oh, that's so wonderful.

Mary Kingsley:

We've been through something over here where the

Mary Kingsley:

process, convenience food became the most affordable at a certain point.

Mary Kingsley:

And this was definitely an evolution from when people just had

Mary Kingsley:

their gardens in their backyard.

Mary Kingsley:

And a lot of the food, they didn't pay anything for, but we've been

Mary Kingsley:

through this time when, you know, people stopped having gardens.

Mary Kingsley:

So they bought these convenience quick foods and everything.

Mary Kingsley:

So now that people are trying to eat fresher food, better produce more organic.

Mary Kingsley:

It's more expensive.

Mary Kingsley:

Mm-hmm so over there, is it so fresh and so close to the source that they've

Mary Kingsley:

never gone through this thing where it got more expensive to eat real food

Marti Buckley:

or basically, I mean, I, I don't wanna like sugarcoat things cuz

Marti Buckley:

there's definitely like supermarkets here and you know, there's like in

Marti Buckley:

food industry as well, that exists.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

But definitely the cost of eating good here is a lot.

Marti Buckley:

Lower.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, it's a lot lower.

Marti Buckley:

The cost of food.

Marti Buckley:

Also the earning power of people is lower, so it all kinds of matches up.

Marti Buckley:

But I get like a reverse culture shock.

Marti Buckley:

Every time I go back to the states at how expensive things are and

Marti Buckley:

you know, how expensive things are to eat good here, it truly is.

Marti Buckley:

Like cheaper to get the item that is from closer, cheaper to get the item.

Marti Buckley:

That's just the potato and not a potato powder or potato caster already made.

Marti Buckley:

It's still kind of intuitive here.

Marti Buckley:

And it's true that kind of that whole good food becoming a status symbol or, um,

Marti Buckley:

only for a certain demographic that yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Had relearned it, that's not, it's not happening here.

Marti Buckley:

Food can be a status symbol.

Marti Buckley:

As in like, I went to the most expensive market in town and got like a wild

Marti Buckley:

turbo and I'm gonna serve it for dinner.

Marti Buckley:

Like in that way.

Marti Buckley:

You know, mm-hmm, people appreciate it.

Marti Buckley:

And they like to kind of show that off a little bit.

Marti Buckley:

Mm-hmm but yeah, it's, it's a, it's definitely a different vibe

Marti Buckley:

than, than what's happening.

Marti Buckley:

I think in the states what's a turbo.

Marti Buckley:

Is that a fish?

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

in Spanish.

Marti Buckley:

awesome.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

So

Emma Kingsley:

what is a pintxo?

Marti Buckley:

What is a pintxo?

Marti Buckley:

Well, what, well, that is, uh, probably one of the most complicated

Marti Buckley:

forward questions you could ever ask.

Marti Buckley:

however, to try to like talk about it in a more simple way.A pintxoo is.

Marti Buckley:

If, you know, a tapa, the words are often used like interchangeably.

Marti Buckley:

There are like some differences.

Marti Buckley:

So it's a small bite of food or, you know, some, a bite that is like

Marti Buckley:

two or three mouthfuls of food.

Marti Buckley:

The way that it's different than a tapa is that it's usually like

Marti Buckley:

a little bit more elaborate.

Marti Buckley:

Like it can be kind of like a.

Marti Buckley:

Really tiny dish or it can also be the word pintxo comes from the

Marti Buckley:

Spanish word to PCHA, which means to like Pierce with something.

Marti Buckley:

And so the original pintxos were like maybe olives peppers and anchovies

Marti Buckley:

stuck on a toothpick or a piece of bread with a piece of cheese

Marti Buckley:

on top, stuck with a toothpick.

Marti Buckley:

And those kind of started to show up around the early 20th century,

Marti Buckley:

but they quickly, as Spain got better off economically people, you

Marti Buckley:

know, started to go out and eat.

Marti Buckley:

They really kind of evolved into works of art.

Marti Buckley:

And so by the end of the 20th century, you're seeing like ho cuisine, pintxos

Marti Buckley:

of like, with like foam and like, you know, smoke coming out of them.

Marti Buckley:

Um, but basically let's just say it's a small bite of food that

Marti Buckley:

you eat in the Basque country.

Emma Kingsley:

okay.

Emma Kingsley:

And it's a lot of like anchovies, right?

Emma Kingsley:

Like canned fish type.

Marti Buckley:

Things.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Well, the, the, so I'm like deep in the thick of all this, as I mentioned,

Marti Buckley:

I'm writing the pintxo book, right?

Marti Buckley:

I'm about like a, a week out from turning it in.

Marti Buckley:

So yeah, there's cured, like cured fish, like tuna and cured.

Marti Buckley:

Anchovies are definitely a backbone of like the traditional pintxo, you

Marti Buckley:

know, cured pickles, cured onions.

Marti Buckley:

Like all those things get stuck on a little toothpick and made

Marti Buckley:

into these Illa, which is like the most simple kind of pintxo.

Marti Buckley:

But there's also, if you go to the old town of San Sebastian,

Marti Buckley:

you walk into a pintxo bar.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, it's just like, for those of you, who've never been if you've been,

Marti Buckley:

you know, if you know, you know, but for those of you, who've never been,

Marti Buckley:

just imagine like walking into a bar.

Marti Buckley:

but the bar top is just stack with beautiful, amazing looking food.

Marti Buckley:

Well, this is pre COVID as well, but anyway, yeah, you just walk in

Marti Buckley:

and you grab one and you eat it.

Marti Buckley:

And when you can, you get the attention of the waiter and they hand you a

Marti Buckley:

amazing glass of like lightly fizzy white wine made about 10 miles away.

Marti Buckley:

And you just stand there and talk to your friends.

Marti Buckley:

And if you're hungry, you grab another one.

Marti Buckley:

And then when you're finished, you just tell 'em what you had

Marti Buckley:

and you pay probably about $6.

Marti Buckley:

oh my gosh.

Marti Buckley:

So that's pintxos . I was too young

Emma Kingsley:

to do that when we went last time, but let's go back, mom.

Emma Kingsley:

That sounds so fun.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

I have vague memory of being in a restaurant and, um, you picked, and

Mary Kingsley:

then you told them what you had.

Mary Kingsley:

I do remember something about that, but we were sitting down.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

It's, it's kinda an intimidating way to eat as a tourist coming in.

Marti Buckley:

Like yeah.

Marti Buckley:

We, if you don't, we weren't sure what to do.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

It's uh, it can be intimidating for sure.

Marti Buckley:

And you know, like the waiters here are on a salary.

Marti Buckley:

They have no motivation to smile or to be yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Really nice.

Marti Buckley:

So they, they're not, they're just gonna kind of laugh at you.

Marti Buckley:

yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

But then the waiters, like it's a real living for them, right?

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

They make yeah.

Marti Buckley:

An honorable wage.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

Oh, that's interesting.

Mary Kingsley:

Mm-hmm so tell us about your cookbook.

Mary Kingsley:

You already wrote.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

And about your

Marti Buckley:

new one, too.

Marti Buckley:

Sure.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

So Basque country came out in 2018 and you know, when I moved here in 2010, I

Marti Buckley:

had consumed every piece of literature in English about the Basque country.

Marti Buckley:

there was not very much.

Marti Buckley:

And I was just like, man, like, why is there nothing

Marti Buckley:

about Basque people in English?

Marti Buckley:

So I knew like when I moved here, I was like, man, somebody needs

Marti Buckley:

to write a cookbook about all.

Marti Buckley:

This is amazing.

Marti Buckley:

And I was like, I wanna do it.

Marti Buckley:

But then after three, four months, I started to realize.

Marti Buckley:

At first, it's kind of like a up and down curve.

Marti Buckley:

Like I thought I knew everything after like two months.

Marti Buckley:

And then after like three or four months, I realized, you know, there's

Marti Buckley:

one of my friends from here invited me to his village and he took me and it was

Marti Buckley:

like a festival devoted to this bean.

Marti Buckley:

And we went to his dining society, which is like a secret food club.

Marti Buckley:

And after that day, and that experience, I remember thinking.

Marti Buckley:

Oh, my God.

Marti Buckley:

There's so much to this that I don't know.

Marti Buckley:

And so that was for me a moment where I was like, okay, this

Marti Buckley:

cookbook needs to be written.

Marti Buckley:

I wanna write it, but I am not ready.

Marti Buckley:

and so I was kind of like shelved to the idea and, and

Marti Buckley:

just kind of immersed myself.

Marti Buckley:

And I was also like writing a blog and trying to write, you know, articles

Marti Buckley:

about Basque country, but I kind of like shelved the cookbook idea for a few years.

Marti Buckley:

And when I picked it back up, you know, I, I worked on the proposal

Marti Buckley:

and chopped it around and too much to my surprise that actually worked.

Marti Buckley:

So I knew when I began to work on writing the book that I wanted it

Marti Buckley:

to be really focused on like the Basque cuisine, like traditional

Marti Buckley:

Basque cuisine in the tra the Basque tradition, because here, you know, yeah.

Marti Buckley:

There's the pintxos and there's also the haute cuisine, like the Michelin stars.

Marti Buckley:

But I really wanted to focus on that essence of Basque and I wanted

Marti Buckley:

to transmit that in the book.

Marti Buckley:

And so the book has, uh, I think 94 recipes in the end and there.

Marti Buckley:

Like the most traditional recipes of Basque country.

Marti Buckley:

And I really worked hard to like go into detail about the story behind each recipe,

Marti Buckley:

but also a company that with like the different stories about Basque culture,

Marti Buckley:

because food is so intertwined with the culture here that you cannot separate.

Marti Buckley:

'em like they're inseparable.

Marti Buckley:

And so you really need the context you need to know about the fishermen

Marti Buckley:

in the, in the Basque tradition that went out to the deep sea.

Marti Buckley:

And like, you need to know.

Marti Buckley:

That context to appreciate why people here eat a hot tuna soup in summertime.

Marti Buckley:

for example, so like really telling all those stories was important to me.

Marti Buckley:

And, um, it took me about three years to write it.

Marti Buckley:

So talking about slow

Marti Buckley:

. Mary Kingsley: Wow.

Marti Buckley:

Did you find that Basque people received your cookbook?

Marti Buckley:

Like, you know, somebody might say, oh, what's an American

Marti Buckley:

doing writing about our food.

Marti Buckley:

What was that like?

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, for, so just from the beginning, when I started working on it, like

Marti Buckley:

I had that, you know, in my head, in my whole goal while writing, this was

Marti Buckley:

like one day when it's translated to Spanish and, or Basque and or French.

Marti Buckley:

I want someone from here, not just someone from here, I want like a

Marti Buckley:

grandma to pick it up and read it and to say like, okay, this is correct.

Marti Buckley:

This is perfect.

Marti Buckley:

You got it.

Marti Buckley:

This is it.

Marti Buckley:

And so that was like a major focus for me.

Marti Buckley:

And really like the Basque people have been so closed off

Marti Buckley:

from the rest of the world for.

Marti Buckley:

At first, you know, a long time ago because of their

Marti Buckley:

geography and their language.

Marti Buckley:

And then more recently because of the political clashes they've had with

Marti Buckley:

the Spanish and the French nation.

Marti Buckley:

So they've been closed off until really the last like 20, 30 years.

Marti Buckley:

And so they are still like very happy to have people recognize

Marti Buckley:

them and to talk about them.

Marti Buckley:

And so I didn't get like a lot of blow back in that respect and, you

Marti Buckley:

know, I worked really hard to make it something that they could be proud of.

Marti Buckley:

Cuz I love them so much and I love it here, you know?

Marti Buckley:

And so, so yeah.

Marti Buckley:

And so now I've been here for so long now that they.

Marti Buckley:

At least in San Sebastian, I feel like, you know, I know

Marti Buckley:

everybody, everybody knows me.

Marti Buckley:

And so yeah, I've gotten mostly really positive comments about it.

Marti Buckley:

And also like, I actually did have somebody tell me that their grandma

Marti Buckley:

like took out a pen and paper to like find stuff that was wrong

Marti Buckley:

with it and that she didn't find anything to write down, so, oh, wow.

Emma Kingsley:

Oh man.

Emma Kingsley:

Hasn't been translated yet.

Marti Buckley:

That's the biggest comp yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Oh,

Emma Kingsley:

wonderful.

Emma Kingsley:

And do you speak Basque?

Marti Buckley:

Hmm.

Marti Buckley:

I speak a little bit like a kind of like tourist Basque, like a dumb tourist level.

Marti Buckley:

Okay.

Marti Buckley:

Um, I can say like, my name is Marty.

Marti Buckley:

I, and I live in San Sebastian would be like, Nemar nice in the BC, the BC level.

Marti Buckley:

So it's like, that's how it sounds.

Marti Buckley:

It's crazy.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

It's like not like Spanish

Marti Buckley:

at all.

Marti Buckley:

No, it's really difficult to learn.

Marti Buckley:

The verb conjugation is really difficult and it's also annuating language.

Marti Buckley:

So like any modifiers go on the end of the.

Marti Buckley:

Which is mm-hmm, not like any other romance, language or

Marti Buckley:

English, so it's, it's tough.

Marti Buckley:

It's tough.

Marti Buckley:

But my daughter is fluent and she's really cool in Basque.

Emma Kingsley:

Whoa.

Mary Kingsley:

How do you learn Basque?

Mary Kingsley:

I mean, they don't teach in school I guess,

Marti Buckley:

or do they, well, actually, yes.

Marti Buckley:

So in America, for anybody who is interested, the university

Marti Buckley:

of Nevada at Reno does or did.

Marti Buckley:

And I think they still do like distance learning classes.

Marti Buckley:

So I did one of those when I was in the states.

Marti Buckley:

That's how obsessed I was, but it's really, you know, it's

Marti Buckley:

really hard to learn Basque.

Marti Buckley:

So here, there are lots of bask like academies because there was this gap in

Marti Buckley:

like people who are middle aged now came to age when Franco the dictator was in

Marti Buckley:

power and he didn't let anybody speak it.

Marti Buckley:

So you, everyone had to speak it like, you know, privately, oh, there's

Marti Buckley:

kind of like a generational gap.

Marti Buckley:

So because of that, there's tons of Basque academies.

Marti Buckley:

And also it's like considered a dual language.

Marti Buckley:

So every official document comes in two languages, Spanish and Basque.

Marti Buckley:

It's the law and that's how it is.

Marti Buckley:

And there's almost probably 90% of the schools here are all Basque.

Mary Kingsley:

Wow.

Mary Kingsley:

Well, you say it's really different from the other romance languages.

Mary Kingsley:

Is it more related to Germanic?

Marti Buckley:

No.

Marti Buckley:

Nothing.

Marti Buckley:

Totally.

Marti Buckley:

Nothing.

Marti Buckley:

Nothing, nothing, nothing.

Marti Buckley:

It's nothing.

Marti Buckley:

It's like, nobody knows where it came from.

Marti Buckley:

That is mysterious.

Marti Buckley:

It's very mysterious.

Emma Kingsley:

Is it?

Emma Kingsley:

It's it's not Catalan.

Emma Kingsley:

Is that, is that a different language?

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Catlan is like in the area of Barcelona and Catlan is more of

Marti Buckley:

like a blend of like French and Spanish.

Marti Buckley:

Okay.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah's so fascinating.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah, it is

Mary Kingsley:

fascinating.

Mary Kingsley:

And I didn't realize even how fascinating it was when we were there.

Mary Kingsley:

I didn't realize how obscure the whole thing was, the culture

Mary Kingsley:

and the language and everything.

Mary Kingsley:

We gotta go back and get our PIOs.

Mary Kingsley:

We were in Saint John Delo in France, the France part of it.

Mary Kingsley:

And our hosts were introducing us to some of the wonderful

Mary Kingsley:

Basque foods and traditions.

Mary Kingsley:

And, but we did do a trip to San Sebastian.

Mary Kingsley:

It was like a day

Emma Kingsley:

trip.

Emma Kingsley:

Right.

Emma Kingsley:

I think, yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

We took a train and went down

Marti Buckley:

there.

Marti Buckley:

Fun.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

We go, we go to San, uh, to the French side a lot.

Marti Buckley:

And it's interesting.

Marti Buckley:

It's really different.

Marti Buckley:

Like the French Basques are quite different because they've had a different

Marti Buckley:

experience within their country.

Marti Buckley:

So, and the French Basque is in the south of France.

Marti Buckley:

It's a lot more rural.

Marti Buckley:

It's a.

Marti Buckley:

Poor to be Frank, the Northern, the Spanish basque

Marti Buckley:

countries in Northern Spain.

Marti Buckley:

It's always been very industrial.

Marti Buckley:

The Basques are hard workers.

Marti Buckley:

There's always been a lot of money.

Marti Buckley:

So they really have like, you know, an important place in the Spanish GDP.

Marti Buckley:

They have a lot of voice.

Marti Buckley:

Whereas the, on the French side, it feels like they've had, they're

Marti Buckley:

like happy to be a part of France.

Marti Buckley:

Right.

Marti Buckley:

They're like, oh, good.

Marti Buckley:

Interesting.

Marti Buckley:

Um, when the Spanish side they're always threatening to

Marti Buckley:

kind of, you know, break off.

Marti Buckley:

So that's one of the reasons, um, why the sides are so different and

Marti Buckley:

France has been a more unified country in general and throughout history.

Marti Buckley:

You know, so, so I think that's got to do a lot with kind of the different vibe.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

But yeah, San John Deus is one of, Ugh.

Marti Buckley:

I just love it so much.

Marti Buckley:

It's another much smaller than San Sebastian, but it's just like this

Marti Buckley:

lovely seaside village and yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Uh, I just love it.

Marti Buckley:

oh, it

Emma Kingsley:

was so much fun.

Emma Kingsley:

So let's talk a little bit about slow living and your own experience, like kind

Emma Kingsley:

of what your typical, I know, typical day to day is like such a weird phrase, but

Emma Kingsley:

kind of like how you live your days and if you consider it slow living or what

Emma Kingsley:

you think about the living and especially

Mary Kingsley:

since you were you're from Alabama, you're from the south.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

So I think it's an interesting juxtaposition yeah,

Marti Buckley:

yeah, yeah, yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Definitely.

Marti Buckley:

Moving here was a shock, you know?

Marti Buckley:

I mean, what do you expect?

Marti Buckley:

Right.

Marti Buckley:

Anytime you leave the states for another country, you're

Marti Buckley:

gonna get culture shock, but.

Marti Buckley:

One of the things that shocked me the most, really it has

Marti Buckley:

to do with this very topic.

Marti Buckley:

I remember like the first year I was here, I had like a somewhat

Marti Buckley:

stressful paperwork situation.

Marti Buckley:

And, you know, I was almost like afraid to even tell my boss at work

Marti Buckley:

that I needed, like to do these things for paperwork or to, you know, talk

Marti Buckley:

to her about how difficult it was.

Marti Buckley:

But it's like, when you.

Marti Buckley:

Say something, if you're stressed about something here or if you have like a

Marti Buckley:

family emergency or whatever, everyone is like, okay, like take a day if you

Marti Buckley:

need it, like, don't get stressed.

Marti Buckley:

You know, stress here is really seen as like the enemy and stress

Marti Buckley:

here is, is also given it's due as like dangerous for your help.

Marti Buckley:

Wow.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Here you can get, and I don't know how easily, it seems pretty

Marti Buckley:

easy to get a Baja from your job.

Marti Buckley:

So like medical leave for stress, my God.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

That encapsulates kind of like the different outlook and

Marti Buckley:

just a very cut and dry way.

Marti Buckley:

Yes.

Marti Buckley:

And then what it does.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, I think we're coming around to it in America.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, I think, you know, I think more and more people are

Marti Buckley:

recognizing the role that mental health plays in physical health.

Marti Buckley:

And I think it's really, I think we'll get there closer to that at some point.

Marti Buckley:

But for me, that was one of the things that people just being like slow down.

Marti Buckley:

And another thing that immediately like drew my attention.

Marti Buckley:

Was that people.

Marti Buckley:

So if I woke up early, like, you know, 7:00 AM and I was on the

Marti Buckley:

street by like 8:00 AM, like, nobody is out at that time.

Marti Buckley:

It's like, the city is like waking up at 8:00 AM and on the weekends,

Marti Buckley:

I'm not even gonna tell you guys like, like not a soul until 10:00 AM.

Marti Buckley:

Wow.

Marti Buckley:

And it's such a dramatic contrast, you know, it's just like, people

Marti Buckley:

are just taking things slow.

Marti Buckley:

Another thing that I quickly adapted to was like the long lunch.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

So on the weekends here, you're not getting away with less than three hours

Marti Buckley:

at lunch and that's like, In a hurry.

Marti Buckley:

That's like being a hurry.

Marti Buckley:

That's like in and out on a Saturday.

Marti Buckley:

is

Mary Kingsley:

that in a restaurant or at someone's house or?

Marti Buckley:

Well, yeah, people here don't entertain very much in their houses.

Marti Buckley:

So it would be like in a restaurant or it could also be at a dining society,

Marti Buckley:

which is a very Basque phenomenon.

Marti Buckley:

They're like these rooms you know, locals in, in a building that have

Marti Buckley:

been outfitted with a professional kitchen and then just have like a

Marti Buckley:

big room with lots of tables, long tables, and you become a member of it.

Marti Buckley:

You go, you bring your food, all the pantry staples are there, all

Marti Buckley:

the drinks and wines are there.

Marti Buckley:

You write down if you use, you know, wine or drinks or olive oil

Marti Buckley:

or whatever, you write it down.

Marti Buckley:

And then you just invite your friends and you cook and you have lunch there.

Marti Buckley:

And you know, that kind of starts at like on a Saturday.

Marti Buckley:

You would go do some shopping at the market for the fresh stuff.

Marti Buckley:

Round 11.

Marti Buckley:

You definitely stop to have like a remove at 12 and a

Marti Buckley:

little pintxo and four I, you,

Marti Buckley:

a little pintxo to fortify

Marti Buckley:

you, cuz you're about to go cook.

Marti Buckley:

And then you go to your gastro or your dining society and you're

Marti Buckley:

cooking, you know, till two or so.

Marti Buckley:

And then you finally start eating around then, and then

Marti Buckley:

you're definitely still eating.

Marti Buckley:

Like you're finishing dessert maybe at four for 30, but you

Marti Buckley:

don't get to leave because then you have to have a digestive drink.

Marti Buckley:

So for most people here, that's like a gen and tonic.

Marti Buckley:

And so you're probably finishing lunch at like six.

Marti Buckley:

So you're like doing 11 to six our

Emma Kingsley:

listeners can't see, but my mom and I's jaws are on the

Emma Kingsley:

floor the whole, that whole time.

Mary Kingsley:

Oh, this dining society.

Mary Kingsley:

Oh, how did that get started?

Mary Kingsley:

Is that tell me about community

Marti Buckley:

kitchen or something?

Marti Buckley:

Yeah, kinda.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

It's something that dates back about.

Marti Buckley:

I think the oldest one is like 1830.

Marti Buckley:

I think that's probably the oldest one, but yeah, it's, it's really particular

Marti Buckley:

to this corner of the world and yeah, I don't know exactly why they started,

Marti Buckley:

but they definitely were up until very recently, they were a men only thing.

Marti Buckley:

And a lot of people joke around that they were like the way, because the

Marti Buckley:

Basque society is very matriarchal.

Marti Buckley:

Um, it's like women are really strong.

Marti Buckley:

A lot of the, um, lineage stuff happens are inheritance stuff

Marti Buckley:

can happen on the women's side.

Marti Buckley:

And so these were the places for the men to go like hide . It's really interesting

Marti Buckley:

cuz I think they actually have played like an important part in legitimizing.

Marti Buckley:

Cuisine.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

For something to be legitimate up until recent history, it had to pass

Marti Buckley:

through, it had to be important to men.

Marti Buckley:

Right.

Marti Buckley:

And so, you know, because they were having these spaces dedicated to

Marti Buckley:

eating and because they were cooking traditional cuisine in these spaces,

Marti Buckley:

it just retained its importance and, you know, it's spot like in society.

Marti Buckley:

And so they've been, um, really instrumental, I think

Marti Buckley:

in basket cooking tradit.

Mary Kingsley:

So the men were actually doing the cooking early

Marti Buckley:

on in the yeah.

Marti Buckley:

In the societies.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

And, um, and there's one or two where women still aren't

Marti Buckley:

allowed in the kitchen part.

Marti Buckley:

So interesting.

Marti Buckley:

So

Emma Kingsley:

you're a member and then you go and it's just one person cooks is

Emma Kingsley:

it like one person sacrifices themselves for the day isn't cooks all day?

Mary Kingsley:

How does that work?

Marti Buckley:

You you're sharing the kitchen with other

Marti Buckley:

group members of the society.

Marti Buckley:

Okay.

Marti Buckley:

Usually it's the person, who's the member of this.

Marti Buckley:

Society.

Marti Buckley:

And maybe he taps two or three of his friends that he's invited.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

So you can invite, you could be a member of the society and invite like

Marti Buckley:

eight people to have lunch with you.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

And so, everybody would come, but most people are just there to have fun,

Marti Buckley:

but maybe you can grab two or three of your friends to help you cook.

Marti Buckley:

Okay.

Marti Buckley:

And, you know, usually it's like people have different specialties, so

Marti Buckley:

like Patti will make the salt cut and you know, and YY will make the Kaari.

Marti Buckley:

And so, yeah, it's definitely a team effort for sure.

Marti Buckley:

And yeah, you, but you're sharing it and you get to know other people

Marti Buckley:

that are cooking next to you.

Marti Buckley:

It's really cool.

Marti Buckley:

Okay.

Marti Buckley:

So you

Emma Kingsley:

finish lunch at six and then when do we dinner or do eat dinner?

Marti Buckley:

Well, you do have dinner.

Marti Buckley:

You do eat dinner, but late as well.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

So on a weekend like that, what a lot of people end up doing is having like

Marti Buckley:

pintxos for dinner, because you kind of never really stop the, of eating.

Marti Buckley:

You kinda go have another drink, outside, hop around.

Marti Buckley:

And then by like 10 or 10 30, you're like, well, let's go like have some pintxos.

Marti Buckley:

So that's what usually happens.

Mary Kingsley:

Okay.

Mary Kingsley:

And one more question about the eating is societies.

Mary Kingsley:

So are you intermingling with the other parties there?

Mary Kingsley:

Are you sharing food with them?

Mary Kingsley:

Is it, does it become one big party or is it

Marti Buckley:

little separate groups?

Marti Buckley:

Yeah, not really.

Marti Buckley:

Not so much like sharing food with them.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, usually in, in my experience, like.

Marti Buckley:

I don't know about half the time I'll end up chatting maybe with other people

Marti Buckley:

that are at other tables, but it's usually more of just like a nod and a

Marti Buckley:

wave are like, you know, cuz everybody's kind of doing their own little plan.

Marti Buckley:

So, so yeah, it kind of

Emma Kingsley:

sounds like a restaurant that yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

Like you're just, you're cooking also.

Emma Kingsley:

Like you show up it's in your

Marti Buckley:

own food.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

We're Y F restaurant.

Mary Kingsley:

what an amazing concept.

Marti Buckley:

It's really cool.

Marti Buckley:

Let's do it.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Just like the pintxos it's.

Marti Buckley:

Could only happen in this form in the Basque country because it's honor system.

Marti Buckley:

They go in it's this huge pantry full of alcohol, but yet at the end of

Marti Buckley:

the month, all the accounts match up because people take it very seriously.

Marti Buckley:

Just like the pintxos are they hard to get into?

Emma Kingsley:

We have so many questions.

Emma Kingsley:

we're writing our business plan.

Mary Kingsley:

so

Marti Buckley:

how is it funded?

Marti Buckley:

The members pay a monthly fee.

Marti Buckley:

I get it.

Marti Buckley:

Okay.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

And

Emma Kingsley:

is it hard to get into

Marti Buckley:

yeah, it, it can be.

Marti Buckley:

So the center, the nexus of this whole concept is the old town of San Sebastian.

Marti Buckley:

And so the wait list for the ones that are in the old town are they're

Marti Buckley:

wait lists and you usually have to be like the son of somebody.

Marti Buckley:

Or, you know, really recommended by somebody to get in, but then if you go

Marti Buckley:

to like the other neighborhoods, or if you're in a village, I think it's a lot

Marti Buckley:

easier and you can just be like, okay, I wanna be a member and they'll let you in.

Marti Buckley:

And, and you have to, you know, attend meetings and you

Marti Buckley:

have to , follow the rules.

Mary Kingsley:

So are you in

Marti Buckley:

one?

Marti Buckley:

No, I have not taken that plunge cuz I have so many friends that are in them and

Marti Buckley:

I haven't taken that, but I'm sure you

Emma Kingsley:

get.

Emma Kingsley:

You get plenty of invites and you get, probably get to cook some too, huh?

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

When I first moved here, you know, I was, I guess I was like 25 or 26.

Marti Buckley:

And so at that point, I remember talking with some of my friends as I

Marti Buckley:

made good friends here and they're like, okay, who's gonna join this society

Marti Buckley:

cuz it's like, you have to have one.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

What a fantastic way to learn how to cook the dishes, like

Mary Kingsley:

be in the kitchen with those people.

Mary Kingsley:

And

Marti Buckley:

I mean, it was just really so inspiring to see like a

Marti Buckley:

26, 27 year old guy take like this huge aluminum pan and make , you know,

Marti Buckley:

Cod cheeks in emulsified, olive oil.

Marti Buckley:

You know, it's just, they care so much.

Marti Buckley:

And they're so skilled.

Marti Buckley:

. Mary Kingsley: So tell us about

Marti Buckley:

I mean, you're a writer and traveler, and I know you take a lot of trips and

Marti Buckley:

how do you handle that with the kids and

Marti Buckley:

all that?

Marti Buckley:

So I live like in the middle, you know, of a city San Sebastian is not that big.

Marti Buckley:

I'm looking at it at right now.

Marti Buckley:

It's got a beautiful river kind of flowing right through the middle of it.

Marti Buckley:

And we have three different beaches and are surrounded kind

Marti Buckley:

of by two different mountains.

Marti Buckley:

And then there's like a mountain right in the middle of the city.

Marti Buckley:

And so that said, it's a pretty compact city.

Marti Buckley:

So I do have a job.

Marti Buckley:

I work in marketing, but I also write on the side.

Marti Buckley:

So I do have kind of a structured weekday.

Marti Buckley:

But it's a lot different.

Marti Buckley:

I feel like than it would look if I was in the states because I'm waking up

Marti Buckley:

getting, you know, my daughter's ready.

Marti Buckley:

The older ones walks off to school, which is right on the beach, the

Marti Buckley:

younger one I take to her school.

Marti Buckley:

And when I first moved here, I just remember thinking of the movie beauty

Marti Buckley:

and the beast, cuz like we would walk down the street to school and

Marti Buckley:

it'd be like long as you the street to school and be like saying hi to

Marti Buckley:

coffee guy, hi to the computer guy.

Marti Buckley:

Hi to the fish maker.

Marti Buckley:

that's like how the morning is we like walked on the street?

Marti Buckley:

We're like, oh no.

Marti Buckley:

Oh no, no.

Marti Buckley:

And I love that.

Marti Buckley:

I just like, I don't know for me, that's that kind of idea of having all

Marti Buckley:

these kind of acquaintances and people, you know, and just say hi to all day.

Marti Buckley:

I don't know why, but it just makes me feel good.

Marti Buckley:

It just, I feel like that's missing and, or it was missing for me in the states.

Marti Buckley:

So that's kind of like the, the cool part of living in this kind

Marti Buckley:

of pedestrian area and yeah.

Marti Buckley:

And then my day, you know, work day, but then people, the long lunch

Marti Buckley:

thing is usually on the weekends.

Marti Buckley:

So I feel like kind of, most people take a quicker lunch break during the weeks.

Marti Buckley:

Although if you do have lunch out, there's, it's a different way of eating.

Marti Buckley:

You get a first plate, a second plate, a dessert and a coffee.

Marti Buckley:

It's still very civilized.

Marti Buckley:

The idea of running in and out for a salad or taking a

Marti Buckley:

sandwich to eat at your desk.

Marti Buckley:

Like I'm the only person doing that in San Sebastian.

Marti Buckley:

yeah, but I still have that American part of me.

Marti Buckley:

That's like, okay, I need to get my work done.

Marti Buckley:

Okay.

Marti Buckley:

You know, if I eat too much at lunch, I get sleepy, you know, Yeah, but

Marti Buckley:

people here just power through it.

Marti Buckley:

Coffee, you know, wine, then coffee then back to work.

Marti Buckley:

Oh gosh.

Marti Buckley:

so, so that would be

Mary Kingsley:

so wine at lunch anyway.

Mary Kingsley:

I would be done.

Mary Kingsley:

Do love it.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

I know.

Emma Kingsley:

I remember in France when I was doing that teaching thing, the teachers at

Emma Kingsley:

school in the middle of the day would sit, we'd all have lunch together

Emma Kingsley:

and we'd crack a bottle of wine,

Marti Buckley:

whether it's is it like civilized or is it alcoholic?

Marti Buckley:

I dunno.

Marti Buckley:

but I love it so funny.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

It's just a totally different kind of viewpoint of what alcohol is

Marti Buckley:

and the part places in society.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah,

Emma Kingsley:

absolutely.

Emma Kingsley:

It literally helps your food taste better and it helps your food digest.

Emma Kingsley:

And yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

So now that, you know, you grew up in America now you've been

Mary Kingsley:

in living in Europe, Spain for a while.

Mary Kingsley:

It's not like you've just been there a year or two or whatever.

Mary Kingsley:

So, and there's so many people that maybe listening to this and say, oh,

Mary Kingsley:

I love, I love hearing about that lifestyle, but it's so unattainable here.

Mary Kingsley:

We can't do that.

Mary Kingsley:

I can't pick up and move to Europe and life is different here.

Mary Kingsley:

What can you tell people about just bringing a little bit of that

Mary Kingsley:

slow living into our culture here?

Mary Kingsley:

And because it is, it is, as, as you say is recognized there it's healthier.

Mary Kingsley:

It's makes you happy it, you have association with people and yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

So what can you say about that?

Mary Kingsley:

If anything.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah, definitely.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, as far as like tangible stuff, I remember back when I was obsessed

Marti Buckley:

with Spain, but living in Birmingham, you know, I would walk places.

Marti Buckley:

Even when there wasn't a sidewalk, I would walk, you know, to the grocery store.

Marti Buckley:

And it was so close.

Marti Buckley:

I remember our grocery store was like seven minutes walking , basically a few

Marti Buckley:

blocks away, but there was no sidewalk.

Marti Buckley:

And so I would walk along the side of the road and sometimes people

Marti Buckley:

would offer me a ride and then I'd walk back with my groceries.

Marti Buckley:

And for me that was just kind of a way to protest.

Marti Buckley:

Being forced to drive everywhere, but on a nicer note, you know,

Marti Buckley:

like on Saturdays or something, you know, we would maybe go park our

Marti Buckley:

car downtown and just spend the day.

Marti Buckley:

And I would even do funny stuff.

Marti Buckley:

So we would like go to the market and then walk to other places.

Marti Buckley:

Cuz of course in a downtown setting that's more feasible.

Marti Buckley:

And I remember I would like deliberately order small appetizers

Marti Buckley:

and like a glass of wine at one place and then go to another place.

Marti Buckley:

I would just try to kind of recreate this appreciation

Marti Buckley:

for extending the eating time.

Marti Buckley:

And I feel like that's like one huge thing.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, of course everything I do and think about has to do with food.

Marti Buckley:

So that's one of the things I guess I would focus on, just taking that moment

Marti Buckley:

if you're, if somebody is cooked for you or you're in a restaurant taking the

Marti Buckley:

time to like, think about what you're eating and look at it and appreciate

Marti Buckley:

it before you just take it all down.

Marti Buckley:

And if you're cooking at home, Like really making that act of

Marti Buckley:

cooking, you know, something fun.

Marti Buckley:

And one of the shocking, like, or the changes of mindsets that

Marti Buckley:

I went through was like, oh, but I don't have time for that.

Marti Buckley:

And I got here and I was like, what?

Marti Buckley:

, why don't I have time for that?

Marti Buckley:

What all do I actually have to do?

Marti Buckley:

And you start to kind of examine your day and it's like, well, I

Marti Buckley:

could just like, not go to target.

Marti Buckley:

And then I could , you know, have my glass of wine and cook this in like a

Marti Buckley:

really relaxing way and give it the time and attention deserves and relax myself.

Marti Buckley:

Or I could try to make a run to the mall and go and quick and grab a coffee.

Marti Buckley:

And, and another thing here that has changed a lot for me.

Marti Buckley:

And is another thing that you could maybe experiment with in the states

Marti Buckley:

is like, take your coffee for there.

Marti Buckley:

Don't walk around and drink it.

Marti Buckley:

Stop, give yourself time to like stop and sit and rest and

Marti Buckley:

think, or have a talk with your friends or just stare into space.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, sometimes when I talk about this kind of stuff, I feel like.

Marti Buckley:

Not hippie, but like annoying, you know, it's like, of course we all know we're not

Marti Buckley:

supposed to look so much at our phones.

Marti Buckley:

And we all know that like, our lifestyle's bad for us, but much like with dieting

Marti Buckley:

or eating, it's about like seeking enjoyment from the act, rather than

Marti Buckley:

thinking about it as like a restriction, you know, that the more attention you

Marti Buckley:

pay to whether it's food or whether it's what you're doing, the more you can

Marti Buckley:

kind of enjoy it rather than being on a constant quest to like optimize your life.

Marti Buckley:

you know what I mean?

Marti Buckley:

Oh,

Mary Kingsley:

so well said, I love that couple of things.

Mary Kingsley:

It's like coffee is, you know, you have coffee it's either.

Mary Kingsley:

Do you have coffee, like a noun, like you, you get your coffee and you take

Mary Kingsley:

it somewhere and you, and you're doing what you're doing, but also having

Mary Kingsley:

coffee can mean sitting and visiting with somebody and taking the time.

Mary Kingsley:

I love that.

Mary Kingsley:

I, that isn't that the most American thing running around with your go coffee.

Marti Buckley:

It totally is.

Marti Buckley:

It's like for people in Europe, if there was like an American Barbie, that

Marti Buckley:

would be the Barbie, with a to-go cup of coffee, like that's what the think.

Mary Kingsley:

So the other thing I was gonna do was tell a story and I've

Mary Kingsley:

told it on here before, but my big aha moment about slow food was I was

Mary Kingsley:

visiting a friend in Italy and well, an American friend, and we were traveling

Mary Kingsley:

together and we were invited to this Italian person's house for lunch.

Mary Kingsley:

And just as you described, the lunch started at, you know, 1230

Mary Kingsley:

and we're sitting there literally.

Mary Kingsley:

until like 5 30, 6 o'clock.

Mary Kingsley:

And the only reason we had to go was because we had dinner reservations

Marti Buckley:

oh my God.

Mary Kingsley:

During that lunch, there had been a bowl of figs on the

Mary Kingsley:

table and they ran out and the host said, oh, let me go get more figs.

Mary Kingsley:

And did he go to the kitchen refrigerator?

Mary Kingsley:

No, he went outside to the tree and he picked the pigs off the tree

Mary Kingsley:

and brought him back to the table.

Mary Kingsley:

And that just blew me away.

Mary Kingsley:

That really was a pivotal moment for me.

Mary Kingsley:

I thought this is a way of life food straight from the tree all this time.

Mary Kingsley:

Tons of wine.

Mary Kingsley:

And then going straight to dinner

Marti Buckley:

was, yeah.

Marti Buckley:

So yeah, yeah, yeah.

Marti Buckley:

And it's, it's like, it's good for you.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, living, like I'm convinced that, like, that is a big part cuz

Marti Buckley:

you know, there's all these studies about the Mediterranean diet and Sarnia

Marti Buckley:

and how they lived till a hundred.

Marti Buckley:

But we're never gonna be able to extract that to an pill essence, you know?

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Like it's the actual act of doing that.

Marti Buckley:

And it's the act of talking to people and socializing while you're doing it.

Marti Buckley:

That's the health benefit.

Marti Buckley:

It's not the vitamin or orange right.

Mary Kingsley:

Juice that you're drinking.

Emma Kingsley:

It really is the, um, and there's a lot

Emma Kingsley:

more like signs about that too.

Emma Kingsley:

It's the parasympathetic, nervous system mode that you're in.

Emma Kingsley:

When you sit down to eat, , if you're stressed while you're

Emma Kingsley:

eating, it's bad for you.

Emma Kingsley:

Mm-hmm

Marti Buckley:

yeah.

Marti Buckley:

I've read about that.

Marti Buckley:

And I read an article about how, you know, if you're thinking about the

Marti Buckley:

food that you're eating as like weight causing, or like, you know, weight

Marti Buckley:

gain, if you're thinking like, from your body's gonna like digest in a different

Marti Buckley:

way, I've heard that I've read busy.

Marti Buckley:

Oh my gosh.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

What does the good dirt mean to you?

Marti Buckley:

I love that phrase cuz I feel like, um, being a food person

Marti Buckley:

it's like super applicable.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, for me, good dirt would just means like a, like the foundation

Marti Buckley:

upon which everything, you know, in your life is built upon and which

Marti Buckley:

everything in your life comes from.

Marti Buckley:

And just like with food, like the of the wine or of even the food or the vegetables

Marti Buckley:

or the fish or whatever, you know, that has to be good, has to be healthy, has

Marti Buckley:

to be cared for, you know, and that idea of really tending to the basics

Marti Buckley:

in your life before you're trying to.

Marti Buckley:

Optimize and reap and, you know, like harvest, you know, really tending to

Marti Buckley:

the basics in your life and putting emphasis and time into what's important.

Marti Buckley:

I think that whole kind of just idea is just so important.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

My brain just immediately went to, um, what you're just saying

Emma Kingsley:

was like the time that we spend with our food and sourcing our food and thinking

Emma Kingsley:

about our food, I think we're always as a culture, at least in American

Emma Kingsley:

culture, we're always looking for ways to make that easier and more convenient.

Emma Kingsley:

And it's like what matters more than food.

Emma Kingsley:

There's nothing more important than food.

Marti Buckley:

So, um, yeah, definitely like what your mom was saying about

Marti Buckley:

the Italian aha moment for her and that like the same kind of, I had

Marti Buckley:

that the same kind of experiences.

Marti Buckley:

And at first I, I was like, man, I can't be like having these

Marti Buckley:

long lunches on the weekend.

Marti Buckley:

I, how many times.

Marti Buckley:

And I was like, well, what am I gonna really do on the weekend?

Marti Buckley:

Anyway, like, you know, like what, what else did I have to do?

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

And it's just like, yeah, that realization and the realization that the whole

Marti Buckley:

convenience thing that is the, like you said, the basis for the American way of

Marti Buckley:

eating is like, that whole thing is built.

Marti Buckley:

On fact that's not even true.

Marti Buckley:

Ah, we don't have to make up for all that lost time.

Marti Buckley:

It's

Mary Kingsley:

not lost.

Mary Kingsley:

Isn't it something to think that we've been kind of brainwashed that way.

Mary Kingsley:

We totally have that.

Mary Kingsley:

We don't have the time.

Mary Kingsley:

And which is a fundamental part of what we talk about at lady farmer.

Mary Kingsley:

We have as much time as they did a hundred years ago.

Mary Kingsley:

And our grandparents that sat around on the porch and did supposedly nothing,

Mary Kingsley:

we have the same amount of time.

Mary Kingsley:

It's just, it's really what we tell ourselves.

Emma Kingsley:

We just have a lot of other people wanting.

Emma Kingsley:

Our time because we make the money.

Emma Kingsley:

So, yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

True.

Mary Kingsley:

Emma, I have one more question for Marty.

Mary Kingsley:

So I, I imagine you have a lot of farmer's markets and

Mary Kingsley:

that's where you get your food.

Mary Kingsley:

You go straight to the fish person or the farmer's market in, is there a

Mary Kingsley:

farmer's market in the square or yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

Where do you get your food?

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah,

Marti Buckley:

definitely.

Marti Buckley:

I have actually like funny story after I.

Marti Buckley:

Talk about this I just thought of, so here in Sebastian, there's a couple

Marti Buckley:

markets and what that means, they, they, they have kind of permanent places.

Marti Buckley:

So there's one in the old part that, um, is very famous LA and then there's

Marti Buckley:

sun Martin, which is like in the center and is, looks newer, but has lots of

Marti Buckley:

roots in the city's history as well.

Marti Buckley:

And, um, basically there's just tons of stalls.

Marti Buckley:

There's like a fish section.

Marti Buckley:

There's the butchers butcher section.

Marti Buckley:

And there's, you know, the green grocers, the are the farmers actually, they

Marti Buckley:

drive in and they're beat up trucks in the morning and they drive out at,

Marti Buckley:

at midday and they're selling, you know, selling their stuff every day.

Marti Buckley:

And it's just simple as just walking up and, you know, buying this

Marti Buckley:

stuff, which I always laugh too, cuz it's like always the same stuff,

Marti Buckley:

you know, changing with the days.

Marti Buckley:

But like there's never.

Marti Buckley:

Even like a purple carrot.

Marti Buckley:

There's never anything out of the ordinary.

Marti Buckley:

It's always like leaks, onions and basic potatoes, carrots, squash.

Marti Buckley:

It's very much, always a certain thing which can be as an expat year.

Marti Buckley:

It can be slightly annoying sometimes, but then, you know, I love it in reality.

Marti Buckley:

And that actually makes me think cuz one summer we went

Marti Buckley:

out to live in the countryside.

Marti Buckley:

We spent almost three months in a small village called a town.

Marti Buckley:

Um, it's really beautiful.

Marti Buckley:

It's in some Basque, like jokey legend, um, says that it's the sight of garden

Marti Buckley:

of Eden and that when apple fell, when apple fell, it stayed in the ground and

Marti Buckley:

it fermented and it became Basque cider.

Marti Buckley:

like , it was just cause it's cuz it is paradise, especially in the summer,

Marti Buckley:

like on a sunny day, it's just gorgeous.

Marti Buckley:

And so we lived on this, uh, village and we got into the habit of being very

Marti Buckley:

Basque because they only had a small store and at the store, people from the village

Marti Buckley:

would bring extras from their garden that would then be sold at that little store.

Marti Buckley:

And so it was all the same stuff all the time.

Marti Buckley:

So we got into the habit of having this Basque simple salad, which is nothing, but

Marti Buckley:

you can't really find it anywhere else.

Marti Buckley:

It's like loose leaf green lettuce, uh, thinly sliced like spring onion and then

Marti Buckley:

apple cider vinegar and olive oil salt.

Marti Buckley:

And we had that every day.

Marti Buckley:

And so I came back to San Sebastian in September and I went to

Marti Buckley:

like the best farmer's market.

Marti Buckley:

I got the same ingredients and I made the salad.

Marti Buckley:

And it didn't taste as good and it didn't taste the same.

Marti Buckley:

whoa.

Marti Buckley:

Oh my gosh.

Marti Buckley:

Like that is so crazy because it's still good.

Marti Buckley:

It's still really good.

Marti Buckley:

Cuz I remember when I came from America to here and all, all

Marti Buckley:

the food I made tasted better.

Marti Buckley:

Mm-hmm but like the fact that I could distinguish the taste from,

Marti Buckley:

you know, this Jenny village, the greens and the onion, it was crazy.

Marti Buckley:

I was like, man, it really does matter.

Marti Buckley:

And also another thing about the bass people it's really interesting is that

Marti Buckley:

because there's Cuis so simple and because they eat the same thing all the time,

Marti Buckley:

they have really sensitive pallets and they're really good at like telling when

Marti Buckley:

a fish is, you know, fresh and they're just really, really good at tasting the

Marti Buckley:

stuff that they are trained to taste.

Mary Kingsley:

Oh, that's amazing.

Mary Kingsley:

So interesting.

Mary Kingsley:

You talked about some cultured things.

Mary Kingsley:

Kurt, is there any fermented stuff in the bask tradition besides the

Mary Kingsley:

cider and everything but vegetables

Marti Buckley:

or anything?

Marti Buckley:

Yeah, no, no.

Marti Buckley:

Really?

Marti Buckley:

Besides, besides the cider?

Marti Buckley:

No, it's not.

Marti Buckley:

That's hallmark at all of, okay.

Marti Buckley:

That's not like a flavor.

Marti Buckley:

Note really?

Marti Buckley:

No.

Marti Buckley:

And do they

Emma Kingsley:

have many grains?

Emma Kingsley:

Like, do they make bread or anything?

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

I mean, bread making is, you know, big here and has been since they brought

Marti Buckley:

wheat and propagated it, you know, a few hundred years ago, the original diet

Marti Buckley:

of the Basque, you know, 400, 500, 600 years ago would be mostly like

Marti Buckley:

millet, apples and sheeps products.

Marti Buckley:

You know, sheep are huge here.

Marti Buckley:

So they're making sheep cheese, sheep, milk, yogurt, sheep, sausage,

Marti Buckley:

like everything is made of sheep, but they make, they do grow like a

Marti Buckley:

lot of corn, but they don't, they use it for flour or to feed animals.

Marti Buckley:

They don't actually have the practice of eating like corn on the cob, like we

Marti Buckley:

do, which is pretty interesting as well.

Mary Kingsley:

Mm-hmm . And when you say cured, that means

Mary Kingsley:

like, would that be with like

Marti Buckley:

salt?

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

Fish, generally they do some vinegar, cured stuff, like especially

Marti Buckley:

olives and pickles and stuff, but when it's cured, when it's

Marti Buckley:

seafood, it's usually salt cured.

Marti Buckley:

they have anchovies that are also cured in vinegar.

Marti Buckley:

They're white and they're delicious.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

It's like a salt cur process generally with seafood.

Marti Buckley:

Ah,

Emma Kingsley:

mm-hmm well, is there anything else that you wanna touch

Emma Kingsley:

on or that you want the listeners to understand about the work that

Marti Buckley:

you're doing?

Marti Buckley:

I always talk about, um, when I'm making these recipes.

Marti Buckley:

And one of the things I learned when I did the first cookbook to appreciate cuz

Marti Buckley:

like, if you look at a Basque recipe in my cookbook, so many of them don't have

Marti Buckley:

that many ingredients, you know, they're not in and of themselves that difficult,

Marti Buckley:

but like there's this secret ingredient.

Marti Buckley:

I feel like in almost every Basque dish, which is just time, for example,

Marti Buckley:

a squid in its ink is just a puree of vegetables tinted with squid, ink,

Marti Buckley:

and served with the actual calamari.

Marti Buckley:

But what makes it so good is that these vegetables, the onion and the

Marti Buckley:

pepper they're given like 40, 50, 60 minutes to caramelize and you

Marti Buckley:

just get like a depth of flavor.

Marti Buckley:

That's so good.

Marti Buckley:

And.

Marti Buckley:

I see that across the board.

Marti Buckley:

When I look at traditional Basque cuisine, it's just like, time

Marti Buckley:

is like an essential ingredient.

Marti Buckley:

And there's even a Basque saying that is kyki, which means like little

Marti Buckley:

by little and it's used in cooking.

Marti Buckley:

It's used in life.

Marti Buckley:

Uh, it's used if you're stressed, you know, it's like just little

Marti Buckley:

by little, like take it easy.

Marti Buckley:

And it's definitely used in the kitchen as well.

Marti Buckley:

And I just feel like that's a really good phrase for you guys to know.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

That's such a wonderful,

Emma Kingsley:

like life philosophy.

Marti Buckley:

Oh,

Mary Kingsley:

that's great.

Mary Kingsley:

This has been the most fun conversation.

Marti Buckley:

I Emma, like booking a flight.

Marti Buckley:

I know.

Marti Buckley:

I'm like

Emma Kingsley:

coming.

Marti Buckley:

Well,

Emma Kingsley:

thank you so much for reaching out.

Emma Kingsley:

I'm so glad that you did.

Marti Buckley:

Yeah.

Marti Buckley:

If you tempted to come over, then you have to let me know and I will help you.

Marti Buckley:

We will have a good day.

Marti Buckley:

You see ya.

Marti Buckley:

Thank you.

Marti Buckley:

Bye-bye

Emma Kingsley:

thank you for tuning in to the good dirt podcast.

Emma Kingsley:

If you enjoyed this episode, we hope you'll share it with a

Emma Kingsley:

friend to spread the good dirt.

Mary Kingsley:

This show is produced by Lady Farmer, a slow living lifestyle

Mary Kingsley:

community, and the original music is composed and performed by John Kingsley.

Emma Kingsley:

For more from lady farmer.

Emma Kingsley:

Follow us on Instagram at @weareladyfarmer that's @wearelady armer or join

Emma Kingsley:

us online at www.Ladyfarmer.com.

Emma Kingsley:

We'll see you next time on The Good

Mary Kingsley:

Dirt!

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