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The View From The Summitt, with Joan Cronan (Teams, Athletics, Basketball, Women's Leadership)
Episode 4113rd January 2023 • The Action Catalyst • Southwestern Family of Companies
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Joan Cronan, University of Tennessee Women's Athletic Director Emeritus and Pat Summitt Leadership Group Advisory Board Chairman, talks about being a tennis champion and a pioneer in women’s athletics, repeating the mantra of “left foot, right foot, breathe”, discusses her friendship with Pat Summitt, the inception of the “Definite Dozen”, the ongoing work of the Pat Summitt Leadership Group and Foundation, and the true meaning of legacy, plus shares Jerry Jones’ definition of a leader, and asks the question “Is Title IX still working 50 years later?”

Mentioned in this episode:

This episode is brought to you by Pat Summitt Leadership Group.

Pat Summitt Leadership Group

Transcripts

Joan Cronan:

On today's episode, we speak with Joan Cronan, speaker, author, and University of Tennessee Women's Athletic Director Emeritus, who led alongside the legendary Coach Pat Summit with 10 NCAA titles and 24 S E C tournament championships during her tenure.

Joan Cronan:

She is now the board chairman of the Pat Summit Leadership Group where she works to carry on Pat's mission and legacy and pave the way for a new generation of female athletes.

Joan Cronan:

We hope you enjoy.

Joan Cronan:

How are

Adam Outland:

you?

Adam Outland:

I'm wonderful.

Adam Outland:

How about yourself?

Adam Outland:

I'm great.

Adam Outland:

Yeah.

Adam Outland:

You know, it's funny, we'll start off.

Adam Outland:

Both my parents are, are UT graduates actually.

Adam Outland:

Oh,

Joan Cronan:

great.

Joan Cronan:

Yeah.

Joan Cronan:

I love people with orange.

Adam Outland:

That's right.

Adam Outland:

Yeah.

Adam Outland:

Yeah.

Adam Outland:

I love it.

Adam Outland:

I, I know we've got such a, a story career.

Adam Outland:

We'll, we'll talk a little bit about your relationship with Pat Summit as well, but I really do enjoy talking a little bit about the foundation that helped you pursue the career and the path in life that you did.

Adam Outland:

And I know you actually started in athletics yourself as a tennis player.

Adam Outland:

Is

Joan Cronan:

that.

Joan Cronan:

Tennis would be my sport of choice.

Joan Cronan:

Uh, but my, my career in wanting to make a difference in women's athletics actually started when I was 12.

Joan Cronan:

I grew up in Opelousas, Louisiana, Cajun country all the way.

Joan Cronan:

And I, you know, Barbara Mandrell song that she was country before, it was cool to be country.

Joan Cronan:

Well, I was the tomboy before it was cool for women to be in sports and I tried out for little league.

Joan Cronan:

I was excited.

Joan Cronan:

I put my pat on my bat and man at City Park wouldn't let me play.

Joan Cronan:

And he offered to let me be a manager.

Joan Cronan:

He offered to let me be a scorekeeper, a cheerleader, but he wouldn't let me play.

Joan Cronan:

And you know, Adam, I knew I was as good as little boys on the field and I thought, that's not fair.

Joan Cronan:

and at that time I knew I wanted to be in a business that helped women learn to compete.

Adam Outland:

Hmm.

Adam Outland:

Was it then that just naturally out of all the sports that you could play, tennis is what grew out of your

Joan Cronan:

time there?

Joan Cronan:

Well, in, in high school we didn't have any sports.

Joan Cronan:

We only had basketball and volleyball.

Joan Cronan:

I played those.

Joan Cronan:

I was a pretty good basketball.

Joan Cronan:

I'm an awful volleyball player, but my home connected to City Park where the tennis sports were and I always won the city championship, so it was, I like to win.

Joan Cronan:

So tennis was the sport that I, I picked, you know, I'm fortunate enough to be in the Hall of Champions at LSU Hall of Fame and people say, well, Joan, you're in the Hall of Fame at lsu.

Joan Cronan:

What sports did you play?

Joan Cronan:

Well, they didn't have sports for women.

Joan Cronan:

I was intermural ping pong and tennis championship, and that's where we.

Joan Cronan:

My mom and dad were absolutely wonderful.

Joan Cronan:

They, they were not athletic.

Joan Cronan:

They didn't understand sports, but they knew I loved it, and they always told me I could do anything I wanted to do.

Joan Cronan:

And then as I progressed, I was a.

Joan Cronan:

Fortunate enough to marry a, uh, wonderful gentleman who thought that I could do anything I wanted to do, and he really was my rock as far as supporting me and believing in what we did.

Joan Cronan:

I, I felt like we were a team.

Joan Cronan:

He was a exercise physiologist.

Joan Cronan:

He was an athlete.

Joan Cronan:

Ran track at l.

Joan Cronan:

But loved women's sports also.

Joan Cronan:

So we, we did this journey together and I will never forget the first game that I was athletic director at the University of Tennessee.

Joan Cronan:

We had won.

Joan Cronan:

And I came home and I was all excited and Tom said, well, you know, I think you ought to tell Pat that she could do this and this and changed this play.

Joan Cronan:

And I said, honey, I'm gonna do a lot of things in my.

Joan Cronan:

But telling Pat Summit how to coach is not it.

Joan Cronan:

So,

Adam Outland:

uh, I love it.

Adam Outland:

You know, I think that a lot of what you've done has set the tone for, for sports, for women across the, the whole country.

Adam Outland:

Um, because Title IX is, is sometimes the reason we can have more of those, uh, female sports.

Joan Cronan:

I never thought we needed a law to do what was right.

Joan Cronan:

But athletics was such a male dominated area that we did need a law, and I thought Title IX came around long at a great time for me.

Joan Cronan:

I, uh, somebody said, do you remember when Title IX was signed?

Joan Cronan:

And I said, absolutely.

Joan Cronan:

I'd been to Washington meeting with senators and representatives, but the actual date, the Title nine was, My daughter was born on July the second, 1972.

Joan Cronan:

And so I was really concerned about labor rather than the signing of, of Title ix.

Joan Cronan:

So, but I think as we progressed, it was such an impact and to be able to be celebrating 50 years of Title ix, it's been so exciting and it's been such a journey and, uh, you know, Tennessee has, was been so supportive they said.

Joan Cronan:

To women before it was cool to say yes to women.

Joan Cronan:

So, uh, I am a Cajun, but I do have orange blood.

Joan Cronan:

Mm.

Adam Outland:

There's quite a bit of people skills required, I feel like in the role of being an athletic director, because almost all of what you can do is, from my understanding, through influence, not direct control, right.

Adam Outland:

Influence with the system and the school itself influence with the coaches.

Adam Outland:

So tell me if I'm wrong.

Joan Cronan:

No, that, that's a great analogy.

Joan Cronan:

You know, I always thought of.

Joan Cronan:

I thought of an athletic director as a person of influence, but a person.

Joan Cronan:

My job basically, in simple words, was to make the coach's job the best it could be to make the athletes experience the best it could be, and in doing that, teach a lot of lessons and represent the university well.

Joan Cronan:

Mm.

Joan Cronan:

Spent a lot of time raising money.

Joan Cronan:

Spent a lot of time selling the program.

Joan Cronan:

I always told the staff if they saw me sitting behind my desk three days in a row, I wasn't doing my job.

Joan Cronan:

What?

Joan Cronan:

My job was to create an influence to create people who were interested.

Joan Cronan:

In what we were doing.

Joan Cronan:

I, uh, I heard Jerry Jones say one time that, uh, the definition of a leader, and there's a lot of definitions of a leader, but he said the definition of a leader was a person with a vision and had a sphere of influence to make it happen.

Joan Cronan:

So my job as an athletic director was have that sphere of influence.

Joan Cronan:

Be sure the president cared about what we are doing.

Joan Cronan:

Be sure the governor knew what was happening to be sure that the best donors wanted to be involved with what we were doing.

Joan Cronan:

Such good advice, Adam.

Joan Cronan:

If I had been president of Westinghouse, my product would've been a washing machine, but as athletic director, my product was women that went through athletics and got that experience.

Joan Cronan:

And went on to be successful in life.

Joan Cronan:

I wrote a book that's called Sport is Life with the Volume turned up, and I think what you learn in sport is so, so important.

Adam Outland:

Yeah, you talked about fundraising and just real quick, because I know there's, there's folks on, on this podcast that a big, big part of their role is also doing that coming up through sports.

Adam Outland:

There's not a lot of just training on how to raise money.

Adam Outland:

I feel like you've gotta learn it as you go, which sounds like that'll be part of the epitaph one day that you'll have on your, you've

Adam Outland:

learned

Joan Cronan:

a lot as you went.

Joan Cronan:

Absolutely.

Joan Cronan:

You know, and there weren't, there weren't many women role.

Joan Cronan:

I used to tell Coach Dickey, Doug Dickey, who was our men's athletic director, and I told him, you raise money out of the seat of your pants.

Joan Cronan:

If you wanna sit here.

Joan Cronan:

This is what you pay.

Joan Cronan:

When you think about big time college athletics.

Joan Cronan:

A lot of their financing comes from incentives to have good seats.

Joan Cronan:

In our case, I had to raise money out of the horn.

Joan Cronan:

You know, I, we had plenty of seats, so I wanted to, I wanted people to really underst.

Joan Cronan:

Who we were.

Joan Cronan:

But you know, to be successful, you have to surround yourself with really good people.

Joan Cronan:

And some of the administrators that I was able to surround myself with were really good.

Joan Cronan:

And I tried to just guide them and get out of their way and say, let, let's do it.

Joan Cronan:

But I always felt like I wanted to be an asset.

Joan Cronan:

I wanted women's athletics to be an asset to the university.

Joan Cronan:

Not somebody that always had their hand out and said, you have to do.

Adam Outland:

Mm.

Adam Outland:

You know, you, you did raise a tremendous amount, which then helped support a lot of the facilities for, for the women at UT and from the outside end.

Adam Outland:

You know, when we talk about you, we talk about Pat Summit and that winning track that, that you had for all of those years from the outside end.

Adam Outland:

It, it could just look like, oh, they, they never had any, uh, roadblocks or challenges.

Adam Outland:

It was just sailing all those years.

Adam Outland:

I always wanna know from, from your perspective, what were some of those moments?

Adam Outland:

A little bit of doubt creeped in.

Adam Outland:

What were some of those moments that you had during your tenure where you really encountered some roadblocks or

Joan Cronan:

some challenges?

Joan Cronan:

You know, one of, uh, pat Stephan a dozen, which I absolutely loved, was left foot, right foot, breathe.

Joan Cronan:

And sometimes, and as we got to these hurdles, I had to say, left foot, right foot, breathe.

Joan Cronan:

We're gonna get through.

Joan Cronan:

But, you know, we had such a great product and, uh, we had people were that were interested.

Joan Cronan:

The other one of definite a dozen is that you have gotta work hard.

Joan Cronan:

You know, I'm gonna try to outwork you and be, be the one that's there.

Joan Cronan:

And, uh, you know, we would go places and people would say, I, you know, I can't believe y'all are average in 16,000 people at a women's basketball.

Joan Cronan:

I said, you don't know how many chicken dinners Pat and I have spoke at to promote what we're doing.

Joan Cronan:

Never turned down an opportunity to sell our product.

Joan Cronan:

And that was what one of the things that I loved being, having a partnership with Pat, is she was willing to do that.

Joan Cronan:

You have some coaches that think the only thing they're supposed to do is be on the basketball court, but Pat understood the big picture.

Joan Cronan:

I understood the big picture.

Joan Cronan:

We were doing more than just playing basketball.

Joan Cronan:

Yeah.

Adam Outland:

For everyone that, that isn't as familiar with the whole history on that side.

Adam Outland:

When you came over from, it was at Charleston, that when you transferred back over to University of Tennessee?

Adam Outland:

Absolutely.

Adam Outland:

Prior to Charleston, you were the basketball coach at University of Tennessee Brief for, for a few years, is that

Joan Cronan:

right?

Joan Cronan:

Absolutely.

Joan Cronan:

Yeah.

Joan Cronan:

The, it was really at the beginning of time and, uh, and we, I was a basketball coach and we had been, they had been a club team before and played two games the season before, so.

Joan Cronan:

Got to start their program.

Joan Cronan:

But you know, I, I always knew that my strengths were not in coaching, but they were in the bigger picture.

Joan Cronan:

I like the bigger picture, but at that time, most athletic directors had had experience coaching.

Joan Cronan:

Let me tell you a little story about the College of Charleston, which is unique.

Joan Cronan:

I told you my daughter was born in 1972 and we signed title.

Joan Cronan:

We also moved to Charleston two weeks later for my husband.

Joan Cronan:

Time to take a job at the Citadel, and I had a two week old and a 19 month old.

Joan Cronan:

So life was pretty crazy and busy, but I still had this passion that I wanted to have women's athletics.

Joan Cronan:

So I made a cold call to the President of the College of Charleston and I said, sir, you need to have women's athletics.

Joan Cronan:

They just passed a law.

Joan Cronan:

It's time that we do something.

Joan Cronan:

And I was either a really good negotiator or really bad one, I'm not sure, but I walked out of his office.

Joan Cronan:

Volleyball coach, basketball coach, tennis coach and ad.

Joan Cronan:

And fast forward 10 years, fortunately I was able to surround myself with some great people and we were, um, named the number one program in America at that level by Women's Sports Foundation.

Joan Cronan:

So that was, that was pretty special.

Joan Cronan:

That's extraordinary.

Joan Cronan:

And then Tennessee came knocking on our door and said, would you come back as athletic director?

Joan Cronan:

And of course that's what we did.

Joan Cronan:

I love it.

Joan Cronan:

And Pat and I's partnership went back to, we were at both recruiting the same girl in Charleston at the time, and she came in town to recruit her.

Joan Cronan:

We went to lunch and she said, Joan, the ad's job at Tennessee is coming open.

Joan Cronan:

Would you consider applying?

Joan Cronan:

And so she actually recruited me to go back to Tennessee.

Joan Cronan:

So that's, that's.

Joan Cronan:

Where our partnership in trying to build an athletic program at Tennessee, and she helped me so much, not only in doing what she did in basketball, but she, she was such a good person with all the other sports.

Joan Cronan:

She took the time to meet with other coaches.

Joan Cronan:

She took the time.

Joan Cronan:

Many of our fans on, on the podcast for, remember Monica Abbott, one of the best pitchers ever in softball.

Joan Cronan:

Well, I can remember Pat meeting with Monica.

Joan Cronan:

Convincing her that she needed to come and help us start a softball team.

Joan Cronan:

So Pat was instrumental in that partnership in so many ways.

Adam Outland:

It reminds me so much of, you know, when you, when you read these books, like some of the ones Phil Jackson wrote it almost always in a, in a championship series.

Adam Outland:

Right?

Adam Outland:

Not just a one off victory.

Adam Outland:

Seems like the, the team aspect goes all the way up through administration.

Adam Outland:

Absolutely.

Adam Outland:

It, it just seems like it's not always so common to have it go all the way through administration.

Joan Cronan:

Well it, you know, I think part of it was we all worked together and we had a dream.

Joan Cronan:

ESPN walked in my office one day and said, why are the lady balls so successful?

Joan Cronan:

We have the right people to make it happen.

Joan Cronan:

Never took it for granted.

Joan Cronan:

Hard work was there.

Joan Cronan:

But we needed everybody support to go forward.

Joan Cronan:

When

Adam Outland:

did, in the work with Pat, when did that definite dozen come about?

Adam Outland:

When was that articulated?

Joan Cronan:

Probably about Midway.

Joan Cronan:

Uh, Sally Jenkins, who is a wonderful sports columnist and a good friend, wanted to write a book about Pat, and we had been preaching those things, but she said, let's sit down and write what, what is your philosophy and why?

Joan Cronan:

And that's what, uh, how we.

Joan Cronan:

And Pat and Sally worked really hard on that definite dozen, and it, and it's been a, a cornerstone.

Joan Cronan:

It's so well done.

Joan Cronan:

And you know, my, my goal is that Pat's definite dozen and John Wood's pyramid are the Bible of people in sports.

Joan Cronan:

That these are the things that good coaches, good athletic directors, great athletes need to know.

Joan Cronan:

And.

Adam Outland:

We talk about what motivates people quite often and for a lot of people out.

Adam Outland:

Motivations can be quite simple and maybe surface level what they can buy or have by the end of the year.

Adam Outland:

But some of the folks who really seem to make the biggest change, that motivator tends to be legacy and something that's what they're gonna be, uh, leaving behind.

Adam Outland:

Uh, even when they complete their time.

Adam Outland:

And I know Pat Summit, uh, isn't with us today, but you think of the legacy that the two of you and, and really that that.

Adam Outland:

That you all put together, created and we now have the PAT Summit Leadership Group and a, a foundation.

Adam Outland:

Is that right?

Joan Cronan:

That's exactly right.

Joan Cronan:

The Pat Summit Leadership Group is so special because our job is to promote that legacy of PAT and, and just like I said, I want the definite dozen and the pyramid to be the cornerstone of what, what we're doing.

Joan Cronan:

The Pat Summit Foundation, which I'm chairman.

Joan Cronan:

Is, uh, designed to when Pat was diagnosed with Alzheimer's, she walked into my office and we thought, we knew she was struggling, but we all thought it was from the medication for arthritis.

Joan Cronan:

She was having some trouble and she looked me straight in the eye and she said, Joan, I've just been diagnosed with dementia, Alzheimer's strand, early stages, and I had never dealt with anyone with Alzheimer's and early stages.

Joan Cronan:

I was thinking cancer and we, we can cure this.

Joan Cronan:

And so I said, well Pat, you know, that's good.

Joan Cronan:

It's early stages.

Joan Cronan:

And she said, no, early stages means I'm young and it progresses faster.

Joan Cronan:

Mm.

Joan Cronan:

And then I said, well, we're gonna say you have dementia cuz that's seems to be more acceptable.

Joan Cronan:

And we we're gonna go and, and battle this.

Joan Cronan:

And she looked at me again and she said, no, we're gonna say exactly what I have.

Joan Cronan:

I have dementia, Alzheimer's strand, early stages.

Joan Cronan:

And then she said something that's been really significant in my life to follow her death was I want to form a foundation and I want this foundation to focus on finding a cure for Alzheimer's and helping with the caregivers.

Joan Cronan:

And that's what the foundation has continued to do over the last five years.

Joan Cronan:

We have a Pat Summit Clinic at the University of Tenancy Hospital.

Joan Cronan:

Renowned for its research and its treatment of patients.

Joan Cronan:

We're getting ready to write a book that's gonna be that summit's game plan, and it's gonna be designed to help caregivers in how they have to deal with that disease.

Joan Cronan:

So it's, it's an exciting time.

Joan Cronan:

And you said it so well to develop a legacy.

Joan Cronan:

You know, I, I don't want Pat's legacy.

Joan Cronan:

To just be a disease.

Joan Cronan:

So we need the Pat Summit Leadership Group to show what a leader she was.

Joan Cronan:

She also wanted us to, to find a cure.

Joan Cronan:

So we're going about it as best we can.

Adam Outland:

It's really incredible.

Adam Outland:

I mean, many people have successful careers and lives and, uh, what I think you've accomplished and Pat is difficult to do, which is, you know, have a life of, of success, which in the sports world means, uh, winning championships, . Yeah.

Adam Outland:

Right.

Adam Outland:

But I think it's so important when people choose to play a bigger game, and, uh, I, I always like to ask guests this, but when you hear the word success, how do you define.

Joan Cronan:

That's a great question.

Joan Cronan:

Yes, we won eight national championships and that's unbelievable that we could do that.

Joan Cronan:

But what the most important factor if you talk about winning in success is we went to 18 Final Fours, coach's Dream in Ad's.

Joan Cronan:

Dream about going to one final.

Joan Cronan:

We had the privilege of going to 18 and winning eight of 'em.

Joan Cronan:

So that's, that's success cuz it's, it's not just one event, but I define success personally and, and professionally as making a difference in young people's lives.

Joan Cronan:

Luke 1248 says, to who much is given, much is required.

Joan Cronan:

I feel so blessed and, but I, and I want to give back.

Joan Cronan:

So I think that's, Is fun about doing the things we're getting to do.

Adam Outland:

Well, I think we'll have hopefully a lot of young women listening to this episode.

Adam Outland:

And what little advice might you give to a young starting athlete?

Adam Outland:

Maybe someone who's in high school, uh, earlier in their career?

Adam Outland:

What are a couple of pieces

Joan Cronan:

of wisdom?

Joan Cronan:

Uh, we just did a program, uh, for all of the female athletes at the University of Tennessee and Bonita Fitzgerald, who has been a very successful female entrepreneur, president of the Women's Sports Foundation, gold Medalist Olympian, and the hurdles, and she said something to all, all of our athletes.

Joan Cronan:

She said, you know, one day I was sitting in the middle of Tom Black Track and had a great workout.

Joan Cronan:

I was working with my coaches, Tennessee had given me an opportunity.

Joan Cronan:

Go to school my fifth year where I could get my engineering degree and the Olympics were coming up and she said, I sat there and I thought, why not me?

Joan Cronan:

Why not me?

Joan Cronan:

Why can't I be the one that wins the gold medal?

Joan Cronan:

And she did it and went on.

Joan Cronan:

So I think you have to believe in yourself, and I think you have to be prepared.

Joan Cronan:

As you go forward, you just, just can't wake up one morning and say, I'm gonna be success.

Joan Cronan:

You gotta work hard at being prepared and surround yourself with great people.

Joan Cronan:

But I think that, that, that's really important to think why not me?

Joan Cronan:

I love that.

Joan Cronan:

You know, Adam, I, I do a good bit of public speaking and one of the things that I talk about is people who don't need last names and why.

Joan Cronan:

And, uh, being in Tennessee, I use Dolly Forton.

Joan Cronan:

Yeah.

Joan Cronan:

And, uh, you know, Dolly's a great actress, a great singer, but she gives back and that's why people love her.

Joan Cronan:

And, and she is so adored and she doesn't need her last.

Joan Cronan:

The other person that'll in Tennessee that we all love and doesn't need a last name is Peyton.

Joan Cronan:

You know, and Peyton was a great quarterback and a great athlete, but you know why he was successful?

Joan Cronan:

He had the most attention to detail of anybody I had ever worked with.

Joan Cronan:

Hmm.

Joan Cronan:

He what?

Joan Cronan:

Probably watched more film, but you would not believe the detail.

Joan Cronan:

Then of course we have the name Pat and you don't have to say Pat.

Joan Cronan:

You don't have to say.

Joan Cronan:

And in the sports world, if you say Pat, most people are gonna, the first thing they're gonna think of is Pat Summit.

Joan Cronan:

And we all know she won the eight championships, went to all the final fours, and very successful.

Joan Cronan:

But you know what?

Joan Cronan:

People love Pat.

Joan Cronan:

She was probably the most humble person I've ever worked with.

Joan Cronan:

The night of her celebration of life, 96% of the athletes that she had coached over four decades.

Joan Cronan:

Came back and I told them two things.

Joan Cronan:

The one things that she would be most proud of is that every young lady that she coached got a degree.

Joan Cronan:

Every young lady that she coached for four years got their degree.

Joan Cronan:

And then number two, that they needed to remember that they would never meet anybody that had won more awards, more and more success, but they also wouldn't meet anybody that was more humble.

Joan Cronan:

Pat Summit, if you think about giving back, you think about attention to detail and being prepared and you think about being humble.

Joan Cronan:

What else could we ask for?

Joan Cronan:

Oh,

Adam Outland:

such good wisdom.

Adam Outland:

You know, just as a real basic, uh, question, but what's a book that you've read and maybe it's recent on leadership or something that, where it's helped you with the, the work that you've done as an ad, as a coach, that that's had particular

Joan Cronan:

influence or.

Joan Cronan:

I'm a book on tape person.

Joan Cronan:

I'm always listening to a book on tape.

Joan Cronan:

So podcasts are wonderful for me.

Joan Cronan:

And, uh, but you know, I love all John Maxwell's books, obviously, and he's, I had him come in and, and speak to our, our, our athletes a lot.

Joan Cronan:

And I, and that was really special.

Joan Cronan:

But you know, my answer would be, uh, don't just read one.

Joan Cronan:

Mm-hmm.

Joan Cronan:

, but I think I kinda like sport is liked with the volume turned.

Adam Outland:

I could read.

Adam Outland:

This has been a really wonderful interview, Jan.

Adam Outland:

Appreciate you making time to be on with us and share your wisdom and a little

Joan Cronan:

bit Pat's wisdom too.

Joan Cronan:

Well, you know, I, I, you talked about Title ix, you know, and what, what my goals are is having opportunities for women and, and being successful.

Joan Cronan:

Being the 50 years of Title IX and, and talking about leadership in women's sports, I think about is Title IX working?

Joan Cronan:

You know, that was 50 years ago.

Joan Cronan:

Is it really working?

Joan Cronan:

And I don't, even though I majored in math at lsu, I don't have to do a statistical report and figure out all the stats.

Joan Cronan:

You know, all I have to do is get on an airplane.

Joan Cronan:

If I get on an airplane and I sit next to a couple and I say, I'm John Proton, I'm athletic director in me at University of Tennessee.

Joan Cronan:

And if they smile, the next thing outta their mouth are, I have a.

Joan Cronan:

Or I have a granddaughter who, and they go on to describe the athletic ability of their daughter or granddaughter, when moms and dads want the same opportunities for their daughters and their granddaughters as they do for their sons and grandsons, title IX is working.

Joan Cronan:

And I think that's happening.

Joan Cronan:

And I love to think that Pat and I were a part of making that.

Joan Cronan:

Well,

Adam Outland:

really appreciate the legacy that you guys are leaving.

Adam Outland:

Thank you so much, Joan.

Adam Outland:

Appreciate you

Joan Cronan:

a ton.

Joan Cronan:

I appreciate it.

Joan Cronan:

Thank you.