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109. Beyond Sustainability: Creating a Regenerative Supply Chain with Janessa Leone
Episode 10916th September 2022 • The Good Dirt: Sustainability Explained • Lady Farmer
00:00:00 01:11:54

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Our guests today are Janessa Leone, founder of the sustainable luxury brand Janessa Leoné, and Rachel Cantu, supply chain and sustainability advisor, and founder of Simplify and Grow Business Consulting. The Janessa Leone brand is bringing the healing potential of regenerative agriculture and rethinking our global textile supply chain. Janessa Leoné makes beautiful, thoughtful products with impact in mind–hats, accessories and knits. Since launching in 2013– the company has emerged as a leader in sustainability, releasing earlier this year, the first collection of carbon-negative sweaters to be made entirely in the USA 

We cover a lot of ground in this conversation, including...

  • how sustainability and luxury pair together
  • Janessa's personal journey in this space–and what has motivated her to pivot her business in this way
  •  the tensions around sustainability in the fashion industry
  •  how regenerative business can heal ecosystems
  •  how to measure impact, and how to share that impact to educate and empower customers

Topics Covered & Links:

Connect with Janessa and Rachel:

About Lady Farmer:

Lady Farmer is a sustainable apparel and lifestyle brand, with education around sustainability and sustainable living at the forefront of our mission. Lady Farmer is proud to produce The Good Dirt podcast.

Original music by John Kingsley @jkingsley1026

Statements in this podcast have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not to be considered as medical or nutritional advice. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, and should not be considered above the advice of your physician. Consult a medical professional when making dietary or lifestyle decisions that could affect your health and well being.

Transcripts

Janessa:

Every path that I went down, took me back to regenerative agriculture...

Janessa:

using ruminate animals, using agriculture that was giving the soil

Janessa:

the opportunity to heal and to work holistically in an ecosystem that can

Janessa:

heal itself and not just heal itself, but can give back in dividends....

Janessa:

This is a slow way to do things, It's such a unique way.

Janessa:

And I feel like we're paving a path forward

Emma Kingsley:

you're listening to The Good Dirt podcast.

Emma Kingsley:

This is a place where we dig into the nitty gritty of sustainable living

Emma Kingsley:

through food, fashion, and lifestyle.

Mary Kingsley:

And we are your hosts, Mary and Emma Kingsley, the mother and

Mary Kingsley:

daughter, founder, team of lady farmer.

Mary Kingsley:

We're sewing seeds of slow living through our community platform

Mary Kingsley:

events and online marketplace.

Emma Kingsley:

We started this podcast as a means to share the wealth of

Emma Kingsley:

information and quality conversations that we're having in our world.

Emma Kingsley:

As we dream up and deliver ways for each of us to live into the new paradigm.

Emma Kingsley:

One that is regenerative balanced and whole.

Mary Kingsley:

We want to put the microphone in front of the voices

Mary Kingsley:

that need to be heard the most right now, the farmers, the dreamers,

Mary Kingsley:

the designers, and the doers.

Emma Kingsley:

So come cultivate a better world with us.

Emma Kingsley:

We're so glad you're here now.

Emma Kingsley:

Let's dig in.

Emma Kingsley:

Good morning, mom.

Mary Kingsley:

Good morning, Emma.

Emma Kingsley:

I'm really missing the boat today.

Emma Kingsley:

I just got back from vacation on a boat and it was the best time of my life ever.

Mary Kingsley:

Boat!

Mary Kingsley:

You should tell him what kind of boat.

Mary Kingsley:

It's not just any boat.

Mary Kingsley:

Yes,

Emma Kingsley:

so I went sailing in Maine.

Emma Kingsley:

I wasn't doing the sailing.

Emma Kingsley:

I was a passenger on a sailing vessel, an old hundred and 20 year

Emma Kingsley:

old wooden schooner built by hand

Emma Kingsley:

and it is still sailing today in Maine.

Emma Kingsley:

It was actually made here in the Chesapeake bay, which is fascinating,

Emma Kingsley:

and it's had a long industrious life and now it takes passengers

Emma Kingsley:

around the Penobscot bay in Maine.

Emma Kingsley:

On something called wind jamming cruises, which I'd never heard of.

Emma Kingsley:

I think main people know what this is and maybe new England people, but

Emma Kingsley:

I've never heard of wind jamming.

Emma Kingsley:

Had you ever heard of wind jamming mom?

Emma Kingsley:

I had not at all.

Emma Kingsley:

It's literally what it sounds like pleasure cruises for people to go

Emma Kingsley:

out on these old wooden boats that aren't used anymore to haul cargo.

Emma Kingsley:

But in the forties and fifties, there were certain people that understood

Emma Kingsley:

that these vessels were important, historical artifacts, and to preserve

Emma Kingsley:

them, they wanted to offer this experience for people to both see the

Emma Kingsley:

coastline and have time out on sea.

Emma Kingsley:

And it's very common to do little like day cruises, but wind jam.

Emma Kingsley:

Is generally an overnight thing.

Emma Kingsley:

So you sleep on the boat and they cook all your meals.

Emma Kingsley:

It's just, it is heaven.

Emma Kingsley:

And it is very, in my opinion, slow travel.

Emma Kingsley:

There's no motors.

Emma Kingsley:

You use the wind when there's no wind, there is a little tiny

Emma Kingsley:

motorboat that sort of pushes the boat, but the day is dictated.

Emma Kingsley:

Literally wherever the wind blows you, they don't really make a plan

Emma Kingsley:

for, I love that where you're going.

Mary Kingsley:

it sounds like truly sustainable travel.

Mary Kingsley:

It really

Emma Kingsley:

is.

Emma Kingsley:

I think so.

Emma Kingsley:

And all the food on board was so good and fresh and we didn't make much trash.

Emma Kingsley:

All the plates are real plates and for it's isn't it funny?

Emma Kingsley:

How that's a novelty?

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah, it's a luxury really, but yeah, I definitely wanna shout

Emma Kingsley:

out wind jamming in general.

Emma Kingsley:

And also this vessel, the victory chimes, which varied bittersweet.

Emma Kingsley:

We learned yesterday, the press release went out that this will be its last

Emma Kingsley:

season for that particular boat.

Emma Kingsley:

So, oh no.

Emma Kingsley:

I here bring this dear listeners.

Emma Kingsley:

You might be able to jump on the last cruise ever that it

Emma Kingsley:

will take I recommend it.

Emma Kingsley:

If not, there are other boats that do similar sailing trips.

Emma Kingsley:

I know in Maine and I'm sure in other parts of the world too, it's something

Emma Kingsley:

that I wanna be doing every year.

Emma Kingsley:

If I can,

Mary Kingsley:

it would be fun to highlight this.

Mary Kingsley:

This type of travel is what you say, like a, a slow living experience,

Mary Kingsley:

because there's really, truly is not much to do on the boat.

Mary Kingsley:

Is there you just, you can read or relax or play music or walk around.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah, it's so funny because yeah, there's quote unquote.

Emma Kingsley:

Not much to do, but really it's all of the best things to do.

Emma Kingsley:

Cam my partner and travel buddy wrote a really good review on Google.

Emma Kingsley:

He sums it up really well.

Emma Kingsley:

He says

Emma Kingsley:

Things to do on board include, and this is what you're saying, mom, seal and purpose

Emma Kingsley:

spotting, helping with the operation of the ship, which you can do some heaving.

Emma Kingsley:

And hoing, if you want to stargazing storytelling, eating.

Emma Kingsley:

Island appreciating swimming and refreshingly frigid waters, friend, making

Emma Kingsley:

rowing boats with those new friends, sleeping on deck, listening to live music,

Emma Kingsley:

dancing and or singing to said music.

Emma Kingsley:

Your experience will ultimately be different from mine.

Emma Kingsley:

This is a handmade vacation.

Emma Kingsley:

It's not perfect.

Emma Kingsley:

It's better.

Emma Kingsley:

Oh

Mary Kingsley:

I love that.

Mary Kingsley:

It's not perfect.

Mary Kingsley:

It's better.

Emma Kingsley:

I know.

Emma Kingsley:

And the idea of being that because it's handmade.

Emma Kingsley:

Literally the, the ship, the experience, what you do during the

Emma Kingsley:

day, it's all just the good stuff.

Emma Kingsley:

And for us, the best thing was there's no decisions to make.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

Except do you wanna jump in or do you wanna sit here and talk?

Emma Kingsley:

It's so great.

Emma Kingsley:

So all that to say, I really got a taste of my own medicine on this

Emma Kingsley:

slow living travel experience, where less is truly more.

Mary Kingsley:

It's really something to think about.

Mary Kingsley:

When travel and trips and going different places, there's a lot to

Mary Kingsley:

do, figure out what you're going to eat, figure out what you're gonna

Mary Kingsley:

do, how to spend the time you have.

Mary Kingsley:

And as you say in this instance, there's only so much you can do and you don't

Mary Kingsley:

have so many of those decisions to make.

Mary Kingsley:

So yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

What a great idea.

Mary Kingsley:

I wanna do one.

Mary Kingsley:

I wanna go on a wind jam cruise.

Emma Kingsley:

Maybe we'll do a good dirt cruise.

Mary Kingsley:

Oh wow.

Mary Kingsley:

So what a great idea.

Mary Kingsley:

How many of you out there would come join us?

Mary Kingsley:

Let us

Emma Kingsley:

know.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

Let us know.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

Wind jamming.

Emma Kingsley:

Oh my gosh.

Emma Kingsley:

Heaven, wind

Emma Kingsley:

jamming.

Emma Kingsley:

Okay.

Emma Kingsley:

So as

Emma Kingsley:

the summer season is coming to a close.

Emma Kingsley:

Not too much time for when jamming left, but that's okay.

Emma Kingsley:

Fall Equinox is the next week

Mary Kingsley:

fall Equinox.

Mary Kingsley:

Yes, actually next Thursday, September 22nd.

Mary Kingsley:

And it happens at 9:04 PM.

Mary Kingsley:

Eastern daylight time in the Northern hemisphere.

Mary Kingsley:

And what happens during the fall Equinox?

Mary Kingsley:

Do you know Emma?

Mary Kingsley:

Exactly.

Mary Kingsley:

What happens?

Mary Kingsley:

Is

Emma Kingsley:

this the one where if you put egg on the

Emma Kingsley:

table, it'll stand up straight.

Mary Kingsley:

Ah, yes.

Mary Kingsley:

Remember we used to try that in the mornings before you went to school

Mary Kingsley:

on the day of the fall Equinox, we would try to balance the egg.

Mary Kingsley:

I think sometimes it worked, but I actually looked into that and

Mary Kingsley:

the truth is that you can balance an egg on its end on any day.

Mary Kingsley:

Oh, actually, but anyway, I don't know how that got started about

Mary Kingsley:

that story, about balancing the egg.

Mary Kingsley:

But what does happen during the fall Equinox is that it's a moment in time when

Mary Kingsley:

the sun is directly above the equator.

Mary Kingsley:

So the Northern and Southern hemispheres get the same amount of sun.

Mary Kingsley:

So that's what's happening there in that little couple of minutes when it shifts.

Mary Kingsley:

One season to

Mary Kingsley:

another

Emma Kingsley:

and mythologically when pers has come out for, she

Emma Kingsley:

came out during spring, right?

Mary Kingsley:

The summer.

Mary Kingsley:

Yes.

Mary Kingsley:

Yes.

Mary Kingsley:

Persephone had joined her mother in the spring and spent a beautiful summer.

Mary Kingsley:

And then on the day of the fall, Equinox is time for her to go back to

Mary Kingsley:

her husband, Hades to the underworld.

Emma Kingsley:

Ooh.

Emma Kingsley:

So as you all know, if you've been listening in the Almanac, which is

Emma Kingsley:

our online slow living community, we of course have a new theme for fall.

Emma Kingsley:

And this theme is SHIFT as we shift into the new season in so many different ways.

Emma Kingsley:

And we'd love to have you join us if you're interested in slow living in

Emma Kingsley:

anything that we talk about here on the good dirt, your membership in the Almanac

Emma Kingsley:

is really what keeps this podcast going.

Emma Kingsley:

And also there's a beautiful community in there with lots of engaged.

Emma Kingsley:

Conversation.

Emma Kingsley:

And we have a book club and we share recipes and photos and ideas.

Emma Kingsley:

And just this morning, we chatted about all of the beautiful things that we'll

Emma Kingsley:

be publishing this fall in the Almanac.

Emma Kingsley:

And it's really amazing.

Emma Kingsley:

It's like it's own little quarterly magazine that we do in there.

Emma Kingsley:

I hope that you'll join us to join.

Emma Kingsley:

You can go to the link in our show notes, you can go to lady

Emma Kingsley:

farmer.com/community, and you can become a monthly or an annual member.

Emma Kingsley:

And we just know you're gonna love it.

Emma Kingsley:

Thank you so much for supporting the show and supporting what we do here.

Mary Kingsley:

So please do join us for all the wonderful

Mary Kingsley:

things we have going on in there.

Mary Kingsley:

And we know that the people that listen to this podcast are gonna love the

Mary Kingsley:

Alman egg, because it's just all of the topics we all love talking about so much

Mary Kingsley:

and discussing and thinking about and dreaming about, and this is where it's at.

Mary Kingsley:

So come join our community and help us shift the paradigm.

Mary Kingsley:

Ooh, good one.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

Good one.

Mary Kingsley:

So moving on to today's episode.

Mary Kingsley:

This is a really interesting one and great conversation.

Mary Kingsley:

Our guests today are Janessa Leone who is the founder of the sustainable luxury

Mary Kingsley:

brand, Janessa Leone and Rachel Cantu.

Mary Kingsley:

She's the supply chain and sustainability advisor for the company.

Mary Kingsley:

And she's also founder of Simplify + Grow business consulting.

Emma Kingsley:

Janessa Leone makes beautiful thoughtful

Emma Kingsley:

products with impact in mind.

Emma Kingsley:

So she mostly makes hats and accessories and knit.

Emma Kingsley:

And I actually wore my Janessa Leone sweater on the boat.

Emma Kingsley:

It was the perfect thing in Maine and I've worn it a lot this summer.

Emma Kingsley:

I think I mentioned in this interview too, I have found out this summer

Emma Kingsley:

that you can wear wool in the summer.

Emma Kingsley:

If it's a little chilly inside, or sometimes there's some cooler mornings.

Emma Kingsley:

And wool is just extremely insulating in it and temperature regulating.

Emma Kingsley:

So it's really beautiful.

Mary Kingsley:

And that sweater is part of the first collection of carbon negative

Mary Kingsley:

sweaters to be made entirely in the USA.

Emma Kingsley:

Yes, it is amazing.

Emma Kingsley:

So Janessa and Rachel have been working together.

Emma Kingsley:

Rachel is the former senior vice president of the global supply chain at Patagonia.

Emma Kingsley:

So she comes to Janessa Leone with a lot of expertise in bringing the

Emma Kingsley:

healing potential of regenerative agriculture back to create a climate

Emma Kingsley:

beneficial textile supply chain.

Mary Kingsley:

And we cover a lot of ground in this conversation, including how

Mary Kingsley:

sustainability and luxury pair together.

Mary Kingsley:

That's an interesting concept.

Mary Kingsley:

Janessa's personal journey in this space, and what's motivated her

Mary Kingsley:

to pivot her business in this way.

Emma Kingsley:

We talk about the tensions around sustainability in the

Emma Kingsley:

fashion industry, how regenerative business can heal ecosystems and how

Emma Kingsley:

to measure, impact, and share that impact to educate and empower customers.

Mary Kingsley:

One of the things we love so much about the good dirt is meeting

Mary Kingsley:

all of the creative and forward thinking business leaders that are using their

Mary Kingsley:

talents and their expertise to create real and lasting change in these industries.

Mary Kingsley:

And Janes and Rachel are so inspiring in their dedication to creating a better way.

Mary Kingsley:

They're literally forging a new path in an industry that makes doing

Mary Kingsley:

things in a way that is not harmful to the land and other humans extremely

Mary Kingsley:

challenging, but when faced with, "that's not how it's done" their responses,

Mary Kingsley:

that this is how it should be done.

Mary Kingsley:

So that's what we're doing.

Emma Kingsley:

So settle back and get ready to listen to these two

Emma Kingsley:

women who have set out to prove that there's another way, a better way.

Emma Kingsley:

And they are succeeding.

Emma Kingsley:

Here's

Mary Kingsley:

Janessa Leone and Rachel Cantu talking about the paradigm

Mary Kingsley:

shifting goals and practices of the sustainable luxury brand Janessa Leone.

Janessa:

I'm Janessa Leone.

Janessa:

I have a fashion brand that is also named Janessa Leone we're based in Los Angeles.

Janessa:

I personally live between LA and Paris.

Janessa:

I've been doing this business for about eight years.

Janessa:

And in the last couple years, I've had a bit of a Renaissance of understanding what

Janessa:

our really our goal and our mission was.

Janessa:

And I was introduced to Rachel probably four years ago at this point.

Janessa:

I think Rachel might wanna correct me if I'm wrong, but we connected

Janessa:

and immediately hit it off.

Janessa:

And she was able to come in and help some immediate supply chain issues

Janessa:

that we were having that just come in tandem with scaling a business.

Janessa:

And then we really started to get a little bit more philosophical about our

Janessa:

purposes on the planet and what we're doing life about and business for,

Janessa:

and really started to join forces to.

Janessa:

Create a really important impact goal, which is creating a luxury

Janessa:

brand utilizing regenerative inputs and having a quantifiable fashion

Janessa:

brand that can actually quantify our carbon measure, not just our

Janessa:

carbon measure, our overall measure.

Janessa:

When Rachel and I connected.

Janessa:

We really aligned on our impact goals of what we wanted to create in terms of the

Janessa:

opportunity to create a luxury brand using regenerative inputs that we could actually

Janessa:

quantify the benefit to the soil and the soil health in the entire ecosystem.

Janessa:

And still will furthermore actually create a better quality product because

Janessa:

the inputs and the raw materials were so luxury that being able to create any sort

Janessa:

of finished good with such extraordinarily quality materials just made so much sense.

Janessa:

So we connected and we've been creating a supply chain.

Janessa:

Almost from scratch.

Janessa:

A lot of partners are doing this and we're seeking them out and coming

Janessa:

together, but this is not necessarily the typical way to do business.

Janessa:

So we're creating a completely transparent supply chain.

Janessa:

And our goal is by 2030 to have a full 90% of our raw materials be

Janessa:

sourced from regenerative inputs.

Emma Kingsley:

Wow.

Emma Kingsley:

So cool.

Emma Kingsley:

And rachel, how about you?

Rachel:

My name's Rachel Cantu.

Rachel:

I am in Washington state right now.

Rachel:

I actually live between Washington state and Baja, Mexico.

Rachel:

I founded my consulting company simplifying grow in 2017, met Janessa,

Rachel:

not too long after that, but when I found it, my business that was after spending

Rachel:

about 20 years working for some familiar brands like Nike and Patagonia with those

Rachel:

brands, I had a chance to really learn and lead and innovate around ways to grow and

Rachel:

scale a business and make great products.

Rachel:

And over time, obviously in a more sustainable way, I've had a passion

Rachel:

for textiles and apparels my entire life for as long as I can remember.

Rachel:

And as I learned more and more firsthand working with raw material

Rachel:

suppliers, working with supply chain partners all around the world, I just

Rachel:

realized more and more how much this industry can have a really negative

Rachel:

impact on people on the environment.

Rachel:

But then I'm someone who looks at those things and sees it as an opportunity.

Rachel:

And I realize that I really wanted to spend my time, my talent, my efforts,

Rachel:

working on ways to be a part of the solution and using that innovation,

Rachel:

using contacts that I have to really form my energy into being of the

Rachel:

solution and a part of the change.

Rachel:

So that's how.

Rachel:

I'm here and really enjoying the work that Janessa and I are getting to do together.

Rachel:

Thank

Mary Kingsley:

you so much.

Mary Kingsley:

I wanna say that, given the, say the fashion industry, what you both have

Mary Kingsley:

described is something of a revolution.

Mary Kingsley:

When you say your product actually benefits the environment,

Mary Kingsley:

it benefits the climate.

Mary Kingsley:

We know that term sustainability implies that you're just not harming.

Mary Kingsley:

You're keeping things on an even keel, but when you go one step forward

Mary Kingsley:

into regeneration, you're healing and you're actually benefiting.

Mary Kingsley:

Talk to us about that and how your production is doing that.

Mary Kingsley:

What are the ways?

Janessa:

Yeah, it's such an important distinction.

Janessa:

It's something that has really picked at me over the last couple years,

Janessa:

because we're a slow fashion brand.

Janessa:

We've always been very intentional with our materials and our partners.

Janessa:

We have a wholesale business as well.

Janessa:

And when you see different criteria for them to be able to put the sustainable

Janessa:

stamp on you, the baseline standard, it's almost laughable at what is considered

Janessa:

sustainable and it's become such a buzzword that it's really harmful.

Janessa:

I think, I think that the intent is good.

Janessa:

The industry wants something that is going to do no harm when

Janessa:

we talk about sustainability as it is now, it's a moot point.

Janessa:

It's not necessarily helping.

Janessa:

I'm gonna back up a little bit and give a little bit more background on what

Janessa:

got me into regenerative, because it gives more context of why I decided

Janessa:

to do this with the supply chain.

Janessa:

I've had some significant chronic health issues over the last couple

Janessa:

years, really my whole life that really came to a head in the last five years

Janessa:

that was in tandem with some grief after I lost my dad very suddenly.

Janessa:

And I realized that there was a point in the, what the Western

Janessa:

medicine world could provide for me.

Janessa:

And it really was sustaining health or emergency health.

Janessa:

And there was nothing about restoring health or giving my body

Janessa:

the raw materials to heal itself.

Janessa:

So I had to go onto a journey into figuring out my body is a

Janessa:

very well designed machine that has the potential to heal itself.

Janessa:

How do I give it all of the nutrients and saturate it with everything

Janessa:

that it is to be able to give it the components for it to do such things.

Janessa:

And it led me down the track to regenerative agriculture.

Janessa:

So I started to find the most nutrient dense foods that I could find.

Janessa:

And every single every path that I went down, took me back

Janessa:

to regenerative agriculture.

Janessa:

So I realized a, my impetus for that was for my own.

Janessa:

But then I started to realize, wow, using ruminate animals, using agriculture in

Janessa:

a way that was designed to do really giving the soil the opportunity to heal

Janessa:

and to work holistically in an ecosystem that can heal itself and not just heal

Janessa:

itself, but can give back in dividends.

Janessa:

It's like putting something in a savings account versus investing, giving

Janessa:

yourself the ability for this to grow exponentially in compounding dividends.

Janessa:

And once I saw that it was just like a click I've always been, I've had this gift

Janessa:

for design and aesthetic, but I've had to justify how do I utilize this gift to the

Janessa:

best of my ability, but also not cause harm and not participate in the problem.

Janessa:

I make products like it's very hard to make products and feel good about

Janessa:

that when you're putting more things into the world and utilizing resources.

Janessa:

So there was this aha moment that when I was going through my health

Janessa:

struggles and I was like, this way that we can do food is the solution.

Janessa:

We can heal the soil.

Janessa:

The soil will long after we're gone.

Janessa:

If we set it up, it's going to continue to heal and heal.

Janessa:

It's gonna be compounding interest of what it's doing for the planet.

Janessa:

What I'm using, what I'm designing with are organic materials.

Janessa:

We use leathers and we use animal products and everything is really,

Janessa:

I just tend to like things that are a lot more simplistic in nature.

Janessa:

My design aesthetic is minimalistic.

Janessa:

So I was able to really see the through line from using materials

Janessa:

such as wool and leather.

Janessa:

And potentially cotton and these different things that we could go

Janessa:

down and be like, wow, we can use what the earth has already given us.

Janessa:

Utilize ruminate animals, organic growing practices, regenerative growing practices.

Janessa:

And we could create a completely transparent supply chain and get a

Janessa:

quality product, a better quality product.

Janessa:

What, right now, how we utilize that in our supply chain, we have a line of

Janessa:

regenerative wool sweaters that we created in tandem with a co-op particularly

Janessa:

one group called the wool company, Jeanie Carver, who is the brilliant

Janessa:

mind behind this has created this co-op of farmers that they're, they've

Janessa:

been doing this work for 20, 30 years.

Janessa:

How long has it been Rachel?

Rachel:

A long time,

Janessa:

but have just recently.

Janessa:

That they have the ability to quantify this by using some soil samples.

Janessa:

So they have scientists that are coming out that are taking soil

Janessa:

samples before the sheep graze lands.

Janessa:

And before they move them and they let it sit and they can see a whole year

Janessa:

cycle and they're monitoring carbon, they're monitoring organic matter.

Janessa:

They're watering water attention, they're monitor all these different

Janessa:

things and they can see, and they're already like their baseline standard is

Janessa:

already, they're 30 years ahead of this.

Janessa:

They haven't been doing conventional farming on this land.

Janessa:

They've been regenerating it for a very long time and that Delta

Janessa:

that they can impact in one year.

Janessa:

Is significant.

Janessa:

They sent us some numbers.

Janessa:

I should pull them up.

Janessa:

So just from last year and Jeanie presented these at the textile

Janessa:

exchange conference, that it was a textile exchange conference, right?

Janessa:

Rachel?

Janessa:

Yes, mm-hmm in Ireland.

Janessa:

And in one year they've had a combined annual increase of 3.9 tons per acre of

Janessa:

carbon across 32,000 acres for a total of 127,360 tons of carbon that's sequestered.

Janessa:

So that's equivalent of removing 27,687 cars off the road in one year.

Janessa:

Wow.

Janessa:

And that's just by the baseline standard.

Janessa:

It's hard to measure what the baseline standard is compared to

Janessa:

a conventional farm, but you know that if it's 27,000 cars worth

Janessa:

in one year, that's an aggregate they've been doing that year after.

Janessa:

So really the potential here is powerful and we really have an opportunity

Janessa:

to do something that's monumental and you both have got the sweaters,

Janessa:

like the quality of the fiber.

Janessa:

And these are a hundred percent wool with Rachel's help and genius.

Janessa:

We've had a completely localized supply chain.

Janessa:

So we're not shipping this to China to get carbonized and shipping it

Janessa:

back and everything from cleaning the wool to spinning it, to actually

Janessa:

putting it into a finished garment is all done locally in America.

Janessa:

So we can really quantify the carbon impact.

Janessa:

We have the good that it's doing.

Janessa:

We have what it takes to make the carbon.

Janessa:

And then we're also creating a product that is a hundred percent wool.

Janessa:

That's so high quality that at the end of its life is biodegradable.

Janessa:

Cause we're not adding anything to it.

Janessa:

So end to end.

Janessa:

It's just, it's a no brainer.

Janessa:

And when you put this sweater on you, even if you're not

Janessa:

interested in the good that it's.

Janessa:

It's extraordinary, luxurious, and for ability of the fineness

Janessa:

of the micron that we're able to get, it feels like a cashmere hand

Janessa:

in it's wool and it's not itchy.

Janessa:

And it's just, it really, to me just feels as someone that is so focused on

Janessa:

luxury and is so driven by luxury and design, that alone is a good enough

Janessa:

reason for me to go down this path.

Janessa:

And it's just a win-win that it gets to be extraordinarily beneficial for the planet.

Janessa:

And in my view, and I don't mean to be red reductive, but in my view is the solution

Janessa:

to the climate problem that we're in.

Janessa:

So exciting,

Rachel:

I think to the point that was making on quality.

Rachel:

It's so interesting because for so many years that apparel industry has said,

Rachel:

sure, we would love to be able to source more locally, but you just can't get

Rachel:

the quality of wool in the United States that you need to make luxury products.

Rachel:

And so for me, it's really fun to be able to say we did it the piece together, the

Rachel:

puzzle of all of the partners who are like-minded through us and every partner

Rachel:

in this chain plays a critical role in our ability as a brand and the gen genes

Rachel:

thei brand to bring this beautiful product to the market, the rancher who's working

Rachel:

and has been committed to regenerative practices for all of these years.

Rachel:

And then the supplier who can clean and comb the wool for

Rachel:

us within the United States.

Rachel:

And then the supplier who can spin the yarn for us in the United

Rachel:

States, and then where we can get the sweaters knitted in the us.

Rachel:

And all of those steps are all really critical talents and

Rachel:

abilities that have been developed individually over the years.

Rachel:

And then when we can bring this amazing quality fiber through that

Rachel:

whole chain and in the end, it's this beautiful product that like Janessa

Rachel:

said, Our customers would wanna buy that just by touching it without even

Rachel:

knowing the whole story behind it.

Rachel:

So for us to be able to bring a luxurious product like that to market that we

Rachel:

know is contributing to healing and contributing to healthy ecosystems

Rachel:

and really giving back to people who have been committed to doing things,

Rachel:

using these practices and doing the right thing for so many years.

Rachel:

It's just incredibly satisfying.

Rachel:

After all of these years, having spent this time working in this industry,

Rachel:

it makes me excited for what else we're going to be able to do too.

Emma Kingsley:

You guys are living the dream.

Emma Kingsley:

, Rachel: that's so exciting.

Emma Kingsley:

We're having a lot of sun.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Janessa:

We're also very stressed.

Janessa:

Hard

Emma Kingsley:

to hear you.

Emma Kingsley:

We know Janessa.

Emma Kingsley:

I love hearing about all of this and I am particularly curious.

Emma Kingsley:

I wanna go back.

Emma Kingsley:

Again, a little bit to you are starting this line, this you're a designer.

Emma Kingsley:

You have a brand.

Emma Kingsley:

My understanding is that it didn't start out this way.

Emma Kingsley:

Weren't you creating products and then you were woken up to this and you

Emma Kingsley:

mentioned that in your opening, but can you tell us a little bit more about that?

Emma Kingsley:

How did you first hear about it and what was it like switching over

Emma Kingsley:

and how do you make it all of work?

Janessa:

Now?

Janessa:

It's a great question.

Janessa:

When I first started the business, I knew that I had a very strong conviction

Janessa:

of doing business quite differently.

Janessa:

I self-funded this, we are still self-funded.

Janessa:

I didn't want to take on investors because I wanted to be

Janessa:

able to have the full autonomy.

Janessa:

It was almost like I had faith that this aha moment was going to come.

Janessa:

And I didn't want someone to say that's the.

Janessa:

Possible profitable way you could do it, which might be, but , I

Janessa:

had a strong conviction to really run a business differently.

Janessa:

And so we've always run things that get that point was a small business.

Janessa:

And so it's really easy to do things as sustainable as possible because

Janessa:

you're making small quantities and you're working with small artisans.

Janessa:

And so we're not necessarily talking about doing harm on a big scale.

Janessa:

Once the business started to really scale, I saw first that there was an opportunity

Janessa:

because of our client base had grown so much and we had so much more resource.

Janessa:

So this all came to a head when I was just having a personal crisis.

Janessa:

After my dad passed away, I was struggling with mental health issues was struggling

Janessa:

with severe chronic illness issues.

Janessa:

There were so many things in my life that were just this massive storm.

Janessa:

. And when I was introduced to regenerative agriculture for my health, this all

Janessa:

just came together and there was, I'm also a, a huge animal lover.

Janessa:

Like I have a connection with animals in a way that I don't know anyone else that

Janessa:

does, like I see a rat and I'm the person that's just like, oh my gosh, I love you.

Janessa:

Try not to come into my house if it's okay.

Janessa:

But like absolutely adore you.

Janessa:

I just feel so intimately connected to animal.

Janessa:

So when we started to work with leathers and I would go to traditional path

Janessa:

because we're at that point, our small brand and you don't get to create your

Janessa:

entire leather supply chain would go to whatever leather vendor that you

Janessa:

can find that with the least minimum order, quantity that you can afford.

Janessa:

And you ask them, where does this cow come from?

Janessa:

They can't tell you there's no transparency.

Janessa:

That's absolutely.

Janessa:

It's almost like they're offended by the question.

Janessa:

It's just, I don't know.

Janessa:

They don't even know these skins, these raw materials are coming

Janessa:

from so many different sources that there are people eat huge companies

Janessa:

that try very hard to trace them.

Janessa:

And can't, mm-hmm and I understand it's not necessary.

Janessa:

It's a systemic flaw in the industry.

Janessa:

And so when I was thinking about this from the, all of these issues that were

Janessa:

happening in my life, and I'm like, I have this new dedication to spirituality

Janessa:

and this new dedication to health and this new dedication to my business and

Janessa:

all these things that have this huge moment where I needed to reinvent myself.

Janessa:

But then also I'm looking at my dog whom I loves more than anything.

Janessa:

And I can't imagine that the care that I go into treating this animal.

Janessa:

I don't even know where my cows comfort, trims.

Janessa:

This is not acceptable.

Janessa:

This is not acceptable way that I wanna do my business.

Janessa:

And so that's where this all came to a head and in 2016

Janessa:

really turned things around.

Janessa:

This is a slow way to do things, because this is not the way

Janessa:

that people source fibers.

Janessa:

We have our knitwear designers and whenever anything happens with the

Janessa:

yarn, we will talk to them and.

Janessa:

I don't know, no one I ever know makes their own yard.

Janessa:

that's not a thing that people do.

Janessa:

Like no one does this in the industry.

Janessa:

It's such a unique way.

Janessa:

And I feel like we're paving a path forward, but this all turned in 2016

Janessa:

and we've really started to lean into it in the last year when we've defined

Janessa:

by 2030, these are our new impact goals that we're working towards.

Janessa:

Very

Emma Kingsley:

cool.

Emma Kingsley:

And so just to clarify for listeners who might not be familiar.

Emma Kingsley:

The brand is hats, right?

Emma Kingsley:

Leather, hats, what

Janessa:

else?

Janessa:

We started with wool hats.

Janessa:

And then we went into straw hats.

Janessa:

We have leather trims on the hats and we have expanded to

Janessa:

handbags belt sweaters, of course.

Janessa:

And we're growing the collections out into different categories as the brand scales.

Janessa:

Yes.

Janessa:

More to come

Emma Kingsley:

for the record.

Emma Kingsley:

As you mentioned, this is like the best sweater I've ever worn.

Emma Kingsley:

I'm obsessed with it.

Emma Kingsley:

Yes.

Emma Kingsley:

It's summer right now.

Emma Kingsley:

And I'm wearing it like almost every morning because I wake

Emma Kingsley:

up and thank goodness for your.

Emma Kingsley:

But it is a little chilly in the morning in my house.

Emma Kingsley:

And so I'll put the sweater on.

Emma Kingsley:

And even earlier in the spring, when it was actually cool enough

Emma Kingsley:

to be wearing it all day outside, I wore it and you all said it to me.

Emma Kingsley:

And I wore it like every day for the next, like two weeks.

Emma Kingsley:

I love it so much.

Emma Kingsley:

It's a joke.

Emma Kingsley:

Me and my boyfriend, I kept.

Emma Kingsley:

Spilling coffee on it.

Emma Kingsley:

I would like spill like every day.

Emma Kingsley:

He's like, why are you wearing that gorgeous white sweater?

Emma Kingsley:

You keep spilling stuff on it, but I don't, it comes out like,

Janessa:

yeah, it comes out, keep live out on a pasture.

Janessa:

They get dirty.

Janessa:

They don't, they can clean it.

Janessa:

yeah,

Emma Kingsley:

it really is so

Rachel:

great.

Rachel:

Thank you.

Rachel:

A lot of

Mary Kingsley:

our listeners don't realize that you can wear wool

Mary Kingsley:

in this summer summer because it's temperature regulating.

Mary Kingsley:

Everybody thinks it's just like super warm.

Mary Kingsley:

It's actually temperature regulating, and it's right.

Mary Kingsley:

It can be very comfortable according to the thickness or the style or

Mary Kingsley:

whatever, but wool is not just a winter

Janessa:

material.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

Wool.

Janessa:

Wool's a beautiful material.

Janessa:

It's hypoallergenic.

Janessa:

It's Thermo regulating it.

Janessa:

Biodegrades.

Janessa:

There's so many beautiful qualities to this just natural material

Janessa:

that we have had available to.

Janessa:

Since the beginning of America really before them.

Janessa:

So far, the beginning of America, of course.

Janessa:

But I mean like the rule is so integrally entwined with American yes.

Janessa:

Economics.

Janessa:

Yes.

Janessa:

Oh yeah.

Janessa:

So it's interesting that we have this beautiful thing right in front of

Janessa:

us and I feel like it makes sense.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

Leave it, not us that it's creating the magic.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

I think that was created far before us.

Janessa:

Imagine it's

Mary Kingsley:

also flame retardant

Janessa:

naturally.

Janessa:

Yes.

Janessa:

I just, yes, it is.

Janessa:

That's amazing.

Janessa:

You're speaking

Mary Kingsley:

about the wool and the sheep and the domestic animals.

Mary Kingsley:

What type of sheep is it?

Mary Kingsley:

Marino?

Rachel:

Yes.

Rachel:

The sheep are, I'll get a little technical here cuz I wanna play these sheep are

Rachel:

the stars of this show with our sweaters.

Rachel:

So it's a breed called rele.

Rachel:

Yes.

Rachel:

And it's a Marino breed and they're cross.

Rachel:

So they're Hardy for the type of environment that they graze on in the

Rachel:

United States and really important to match the animals with the place.

Rachel:

So they're a good combination of an animal that has a good meat and a good

Rachel:

amount of meat for the meat animal, but also they produce beautiful wool.

Rachel:

And then over time, Sanco wool company who we work with, they've actually expanded.

Rachel:

So they're working with a co-op of multiple different ranchers who are all

Rachel:

ranching the same breed of sheep, but through their breeding programs, they've

Rachel:

been able to achieve micron levels of the wool, which is the fineness of the fiber.

Rachel:

And that a lot of times equates to.

Rachel:

The softness of the fiber in addition to other things, but it definitely

Rachel:

contributes to the softness.

Rachel:

They've been able to achieve some of the finest wool fiber that's ever been

Rachel:

produced or grown in the United States.

Rachel:

Cool.

Rachel:

Which is super exciting.

Rachel:

We're able to get really beautiful wool from them and they're

Rachel:

continuing to expand, which is great because it's expanding the amount

Rachel:

of acres that are being grazed regeneratively and also expanding

Rachel:

the supply of this beautiful fiber.

Rachel:

So if we're the only brand that is consuming this fiber at the scale that

Rachel:

we are at, we can have some impact and we can certainly have a big influence

Rachel:

by talking about it and inspiring others to walk down some of the same path.

Rachel:

But ultimately we need other brands who bring more scale.

Rachel:

And so if there's more supply, then there's no excuse

Rachel:

for not tapping into that.

Rachel:

Even just from a quality perspective of the quality of the fiber

Rachel:

that's being produced, which as Janessa said is very luxurious.

Janessa:

It makes a lot of sense.

Janessa:

The soil is so nutrient dense.

Janessa:

These sheep are grazing on these grasses and they're eating all

Janessa:

of the grass from the soil.

Janessa:

They're getting, I guess, like nutrient density of sheep that I know of, and

Janessa:

that is coming through in their fibers.

Janessa:

It just, it like makes perfect sense to me.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

And we can see that in such a tangible form and it's really cool.

Janessa:

And these sheep are in California.

Rachel:

Actually.

Rachel:

There are sheep in Eastern Oregon.

Rachel:

There are some in Northern California.

Rachel:

There are some in Utah.

Rachel:

Okay.

Rachel:

I'm probably gonna miss a state here.

Rachel:

Yeah, because Jeanie, Carver has been working really hard expanding,

Rachel:

and it seems like every time we talk with her, she's excited because

Rachel:

there's a new ranch that she's just certified to her standards and to the

Rachel:

responsible wool standard, which we also use that textile exchange wrote.

Rachel:

She seems to constantly be working to expand it.

Rachel:

And she's got a passion for supporting the American wool industry as well,

Rachel:

and really supporting growers in the United States with a prepay, a premium

Rachel:

for the premium fiber that they're producing, which otherwise would just

Rachel:

end up being sold on a commodity wool market versus being sold into this more

Rachel:

specialized market where we can actually recognize that regenerative work that

Rachel:

the ranchers have been committed to.

Rachel:

So they

Mary Kingsley:

need to demonstrate data that shows conclusively the increase in

Mary Kingsley:

the carbon sequestration on their land.

Mary Kingsley:

Is that how that works?

Rachel:

Eventually?

Rachel:

Yes, not a criteria for them to be able to come into the co-op actually

Rachel:

for them to come into the co-op.

Rachel:

They have to be able to be certified to the responsible Wolf standard.

Rachel:

Which covers animal welfare and a lot of other aspects.

Rachel:

In addition, they have to be able to demonstrate that they're using

Rachel:

regenerative practices and how long they've been using regenerative practices.

Rachel:

So they have a grazing plan, things like that.

Rachel:

And then they submit to having their soil sampled.

Rachel:

But as Janessa said, you wanna measure that over a period of time.

Rachel:

And we don't wanna keep ranchers out who have been using all of these practices

Rachel:

who have been complying with all of the standards, but just don't necessarily

Rachel:

have a year's worth of measurements yet.

Rachel:

So what Jeanie does is she brings them into the co-op based on them being

Rachel:

able to be certified to the responsible woo standard, which is a baseline.

Rachel:

And then in addition, the practices that she has in place for regenerative

Rachel:

braising, And then they begin measuring at that point in time, some

Rachel:

of them have already partnered with universities and things like that

Rachel:

to start those measurements their themselves before joining the co-op.

Rachel:

But this is something that they're continuing to do once

Rachel:

they join the co-op as well.

Rachel:

And eventually the goal is that there's clear carbon measurements for every

Rachel:

single ranch that's in the co-op.

Rachel:

I think the last time I got numbers for how many acres of land are

Rachel:

being grazed regeneratively within the co-op, which was maybe a couple

Rachel:

of months ago could have changed since then was over 2 million acres.

Rachel:

Oh, wow.

Rachel:

Of land in the United.

Rachel:

That because of this work is under regenerative grazing.

Rachel:

So think about the impact.

Rachel:

Yes.

Rachel:

That can have in a positive way.

Rachel:

Are these small

Mary Kingsley:

ranches and big ranches?

Mary Kingsley:

Are they all

Rachel:

sizes?

Rachel:

Yeah.

Rachel:

All sizes.

Rachel:

Wow.

Rachel:

Some smaller, some bigger.

Rachel:

It doesn't matter.

Rachel:

The size of the operation.

Rachel:

I think all are welcome.

Rachel:

As long as they're committed to these practices,

Emma Kingsley:

do you guys do any work with Fibershed?

Rachel:

We don't do any work currently directly with fiber shed, but fiber

Rachel:

shed definitely has an influence on the practices that have been used.

Rachel:

Yeah.

Rachel:

So a lot of that comes through textile exchange and textile exchange

Rachel:

is known as one of the leading organization in terms of standards,

Rachel:

development, and expertise in that area.

Rachel:

Fiber shed's a big part of that.

Rachel:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

Rachel, I'm interested in your experience

Emma Kingsley:

working with these really big brands.

Emma Kingsley:

On this stuff and then coming to the, started your own consulting, as you said.

Emma Kingsley:

So can you talk about what that's been like?

Emma Kingsley:

And I imagine I'm just assuming that you must be able to feel like you

Emma Kingsley:

could do more on a smaller scale.

Emma Kingsley:

I don't know, but can you tell us a little bit about what that's been like?

Rachel:

Yeah, I think in general, the really interesting thing is that in

Rachel:

working with some really well known and large brands that have a huge scale

Rachel:

in their supply chain, certainly the opportunity with that huge scale there's

Rachel:

opportunity to make huge mistakes and to have a huge negative impact.

Rachel:

But at the same time on the flip side of that, when you get a brand

Rachel:

with as much influence as some.

Rachel:

The huge brands that are out there have, and they commit to progressing in the

Rachel:

right direction in their supply chain and having an influence in the supply chain.

Rachel:

They can make huge impacts in a positive way too.

Rachel:

And because of their scale, sometimes in some ways it's almost easier because

Rachel:

of the scale, because you have so much influence in your overall supply chain.

Rachel:

So I think it's not good or bad in a large organization versus a small organization.

Rachel:

The way I see it is that there's opportunity for.

Rachel:

All organizations to be involved in the solution.

Rachel:

And I think the biggest thing to focus on and what I've really learned

Rachel:

myself is that it's about making progress, not about perfection.

Rachel:

Any industry has a negative impact, has some impact on the planet.

Rachel:

In some ways, doing some of the things that we are doing in our supply chain.

Rachel:

We're able to test some things out that maybe a larger brand couldn't do,

Rachel:

because they're gonna need to make, let's say a hundred thousand sweaters.

Rachel:

And if we need to make a hundred sweaters, we can do that and test out

Rachel:

this theory and test out this supply chain and prove that it can be done.

Rachel:

And then it's a matter of scaling it that other larger brands can

Rachel:

do the same thing at Patagonia.

Rachel:

We used to say, we're here to prove that it can be done.

Rachel:

And then the influence that we can have on other companies

Rachel:

is by saying, Hey, we did it.

Rachel:

And now it just needs to be scaled.

Rachel:

Yeah.

Rachel:

So I think the contrast for me is really just around, at large scale, you can

Rachel:

have a big impact by doing something that seems to be pretty small in a

Rachel:

smaller organization or a smaller brand.

Rachel:

We have other opportunities to test things out and to take some risks and.

Rachel:

All in all the most important thing to remember is whether it's small

Rachel:

or large, we wanna be moving in the right direction and make progress,

Rachel:

not be focused on perfection or a hundred percent sustainable

Rachel:

because it's just, that's a myth.

Rachel:

It's not something that's necessarily achievable.

Rachel:

And we also want to continue to challenge ourselves to raise the

Rachel:

bar and continuously improve.

Rachel:

I don't think you ever quite arrived at like a land being place where it's.

Rachel:

Okay.

Rachel:

Now we've.

Rachel:

We don't need to do anything out.

Rachel:

We need to keep working at

Janessa:

it.

Janessa:

So now

Emma Kingsley:

that I have you here, you're a representative of

Emma Kingsley:

a large brand, the inside scoop.

Emma Kingsley:

Why doesn't every brand do this?

Emma Kingsley:

Does it come down to solely profits?

Emma Kingsley:

Patagonia is different, cuz they're so globally minded that way.

Emma Kingsley:

But is that really all it is?

Emma Kingsley:

Or is it just super complex?

Emma Kingsley:

We just couldn't understand big companies.

Emma Kingsley:

Why aren't they doing the right thing?

Emma Kingsley:

I guess just that little question

Rachel:

personally and having seen behind the curtain, I call

Rachel:

it in a lot of organizations.

Rachel:

What I'll say is that I think in some companies it could be profit.

Rachel:

They see profit as being more important.

Rachel:

I don't think that's across the board though, to be honest.

Rachel:

Okay.

Rachel:

I think that the problem is very complex.

Rachel:

Problem of impact on the planet is very complex.

Rachel:

And I think it's when we try to oversimplify that problem.

Rachel:

That it can be really easy if you haven't seen behind that curtain to

Rachel:

wanna point the finger and say, Hey, how come these guys aren't doing more.

Rachel:

There are a lot of brands out there that aren't all that

Rachel:

vocal about what they are doing.

Rachel:

They're just out there doing the right thing, trying to make progress.

Rachel:

They know that they still have a ton of work to do.

Rachel:

There's still a lot of cleanup to do.

Rachel:

Mm-hmm, , there's still a lot of things that they need to work out and change.

Rachel:

So they're not maybe that vocal externally about what they're doing and then there's

Rachel:

brands out there that frankly don't care.

Rachel:

And that's the reality too, right?

Rachel:

I'm not gonna gloss over on that because there are.

Rachel:

Yeah, but I think in general it is a very complex problem and the solution

Rachel:

to it isn't any one thing, right?

Rachel:

There's a lot of different aspects to making progress at a brand level on

Rachel:

environmental impact, impact on people.

Rachel:

Things like that.

Rachel:

And so I think with Janessa, what we've chosen to focus on is this place with

Rachel:

regenerative, agriculture and regenerative grazing, where we see the opportunity to

Rachel:

align that raw material with the products that we want to make and future products.

Rachel:

We want to explore bringing those beautiful materials into,

Rachel:

and we know that we can do that.

Rachel:

Our brand is in a position to be able to do that really well.

Rachel:

And on top of it, we know that these practices are

Rachel:

healing, not just sustainable.

Rachel:

That's the reason we've chosen this particular path I've

Janessa:

seen even I've, we've been in business for eight

Janessa:

years and I've gone through the different parts of this business.

Janessa:

Being able to be agile and make a shift.

Janessa:

When we were a 5 million company is very different than being agile

Janessa:

and making a shift in a supply chain for our current revenues.

Janessa:

It's so much easier and it's still not easy.

Janessa:

Like to say, this is easy is actually laughable, but to look forward

Janessa:

into create the supply chain going forward and be like, these are

Janessa:

the products that's back into it.

Janessa:

Let's start with the raw materials and let's look ahead and we have some

Janessa:

five plus year lead times on some things that we're trying to create,

Janessa:

cuz it takes that long to produce this.

Janessa:

It would be so much more difficult for us to go back into, just turn a

Janessa:

lever on a current supply chain that you know, we need that revenue to

Janessa:

bring, to keep the business running.

Janessa:

That's fueling the change for these other categories.

Janessa:

So as businesses grow.

Janessa:

It is very hard to pivot very quickly when those supply chains are set.

Janessa:

So I'm definitely one where I think that I'm in the same mind as Rachel,

Janessa:

where there's some people that are just always going to be for profit.

Janessa:

Those are the people that I'm really interested.

Janessa:

Those are the business like entrepreneurs and CEOs and executives that I'm really

Janessa:

interested in affecting with this.

Janessa:

Because if we have an opportunity to change the customer

Janessa:

profile, we drive the demand.

Janessa:

Then the market is going to change their mind.

Janessa:

Cuz they're gonna say, I don't care about that.

Janessa:

That's what the customer wants and that's where the profit's at.

Janessa:

And that's when we start getting the Amazon Google level of

Janessa:

change that I think is coming.

Janessa:

I think it has to come

Mary Kingsley:

speaking to the complexity of the supply chain and

Mary Kingsley:

all the many levels and all the many variance that go into this.

Mary Kingsley:

We often say, you can't check all the boxes.

Mary Kingsley:

You have to choose some, you have to choose some that you have

Mary Kingsley:

to compromise in some places.

Mary Kingsley:

What are the boxes that are the highest priority for you?

Mary Kingsley:

You've probably already said it, that it would be interesting to

Mary Kingsley:

hear it condensed and articulated.

Mary Kingsley:

What are your highest priority?

Mary Kingsley:

Non-negotiables yeah.

Rachel:

Goals.

Rachel:

I think Janessa feel free to jump in here, but I'll say a couple thoughts

Rachel:

first for us, it's really about choosing supply chain partners who are aligned

Rachel:

with the same values that we have as a brand, and also to Jane's point

Rachel:

who are in a position to either grow themselves, or they're already at a

Rachel:

scale that they can support the growth of the business and the growth of the

Rachel:

demand that we are seeing for the brand.

Rachel:

We could.

Rachel:

The perfect supplier or savingly perfect supplier that hits all of

Rachel:

the boxes that we have in terms of our values around environmental

Rachel:

responsibility or social responsibility and regenerative agricultural inputs.

Rachel:

But if they can only produce a very small quantity of product and our demand is much

Rachel:

higher than that, then that's difficult.

Rachel:

From a business perspective, we still need to run a healthy business to boil it down

Rachel:

the way I see it is seeking out supply chain partners who see the same vision

Rachel:

that we do, who understand what we're trying to achieve and wanna be a part of

Rachel:

achieving that we're able to get a lot of leverage with supply chain partners

Rachel:

based on alignment to those values and alignment to that goal without having.

Rachel:

The leverage of a lot of volume to start with, which has been great.

Rachel:

Yeah.

Rachel:

I

Janessa:

go back a little bit, even more like a 30,000 foot view.

Janessa:

I look at it like, like the fruit that they're bearing, how

Janessa:

do they treat their employees?

Janessa:

How do they treat my employees?

Janessa:

What are their like value system?

Janessa:

You can get a lot of how people treat their employees.

Janessa:

And if they're going to treat their employees.

Janessa:

They're most likely driven by an ethos that I support, so they can say all the

Janessa:

right things and yeah, we're regenerative and yeah, we believe in sustainability

Janessa:

and yeah, we believe in all these, but if at the end of the day, the way they

Janessa:

lead is not in alignment with that.

Janessa:

Cause it's gonna be a very difficult partnership going forward.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

Have you

Mary Kingsley:

ever fired a supply chain

Janessa:

partner?

Janessa:

Oh, hot topic.

Janessa:

Yeah, we definitely have, and one which was really big, something that

Janessa:

we really had to put our money where our mouth was and we didn't feel

Janessa:

like it was aligned and we pulled the trigger and just, I'm not gonna do it.

Janessa:

I'm not going to concede.

Janessa:

These are the reasons why.

Janessa:

I haven't taken the investments because that would not be something

Janessa:

that would be allowed right.

Janessa:

With other people's money, but we have to be convicted and we have to be like true

Janessa:

to our mission if we're trying to do this.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

That's

Rachel:

impressive.

Rachel:

Yes.

Rachel:

I think that back to your original question though, like to S's

Rachel:

point, it's really important in any business to be really clear

Rachel:

about what is it that we stand for?

Rachel:

What are our values?

Rachel:

And some people could say, oh, you sit in a conference room and you write down

Rachel:

these values and you write down your purpose and you never look at it again.

Rachel:

No.

Rachel:

The reason why you think about that and the reason why you come up with those

Rachel:

values instead of those convictions that we have as business is because

Rachel:

you are going to encounter difficult decisions that have to be made.

Rachel:

Do you fire a supply chain partner because they're no longer behaving in a way that's

Rachel:

consistent with the values that you have as a brand and that you wanna stand for

Rachel:

as a brand, that's a really tough decision to make it has impact on your business.

Rachel:

Yeah.

Rachel:

But when you ultimately come back to, okay, what is it that we're here to do?

Rachel:

What is our goal and what are the values that we want to guide

Rachel:

our decisions and our behaviors as we're building this business.

Rachel:

And as we are working towards these goals that we have, and

Rachel:

we wanna be consistent to that.

Rachel:

And I think for any business, that's a really healthy thing to focus on

Rachel:

because there's always gonna be tough times and there's always gonna be

Rachel:

hard decisions that have to be made.

Rachel:

They're not all black and white or cut and dry, but ultimately if you're

Rachel:

making them in accordance with your values, that you've pulled true as a

Rachel:

business, then that's like your compass.

Rachel:

That's telling you, are we still making progress in the right direction?

Rachel:

Does this decision take us forward?

Rachel:

Where we say we wanna go?

Rachel:

or does it take us backward?

Rachel:

Where would we like to be?

Rachel:

So

Mary Kingsley:

when Emma and I first started out, we

Mary Kingsley:

created a brand of clothing.

Mary Kingsley:

We did five pieces and we had all these goals, all these

Mary Kingsley:

sustainability goals, we wanted to be all biodegradable, no plastic.

Mary Kingsley:

We had this whole list of things and we had no idea what we were doing.

Mary Kingsley:

No idea, but we really stuck to our guns and we produced what

Mary Kingsley:

we said we were gonna produce.

Mary Kingsley:

And it cost the consumer a whole lot of money.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

they bet.

Mary Kingsley:

And we got comments like what's sustainable about a $250 dress.

Mary Kingsley:

Who is that sustainable for?

Mary Kingsley:

We got that comment and I think five years down the road, there's a little

Mary Kingsley:

more understanding about that now.

Mary Kingsley:

And we talk about it on here a lot, but what I love,

Janessa:

that's

Emma Kingsley:

cool about what you're doing and now what I feel.

Emma Kingsley:

That's really smart is you're literally in the luxury market.

Janessa:

So

Mary Kingsley:

if that's what I wanted to ask you about Janessa

Mary Kingsley:

was talk about sustainability and luxury because a lot of people might

Mary Kingsley:

see those things as conflicting.

Janessa:

I can see where those two things would be in contrast

Janessa:

historically, and you're talking about luxury yachts and luxury

Janessa:

airplanes and these sorts of things.

Janessa:

But when we really boil down, what luxury is, it is step and step

Janessa:

with exactly what we're doing.

Janessa:

It is a focus on highest quality materials.

Janessa:

It's an understanding and an expectation that it is the best

Janessa:

of the best people who buy luxury.

Janessa:

By luxury because it's limited, it's scarce.

Janessa:

It's not available to everyone and it's at a cost and it has a social, the cultural

Janessa:

moment in as much as it is an actual piece that people are buying to your point,

Janessa:

Emma, people who buy luxury might not be aware, but already shop very sustainably.

Janessa:

They're shopping.

Janessa:

Something that in by definition has to be made using the utmost quality materials

Janessa:

by the most skilled artisans in very low quantity of it being produced, because

Janessa:

you cannot have luxury that is mass produced and available for everyone in,

Janessa:

by essence, it would no longer be luxury.

Janessa:

And so I think luxury and sustainability are step in step as

Janessa:

it pertains to the essence of it.

Janessa:

And the essence of what actually historically, when we're looking at.

Janessa:

What luxury has meant in different cultures and how we've gotten here

Janessa:

and what the ethos of luxury is.

Janessa:

I think it it's absolutely synonymous.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

Oh, that's very well put,

Emma Kingsley:

it said the same way that this going in my mom's backyard

Emma Kingsley:

and picking a raspberry off the raspberry Bush, eating it for dessert is

Janessa:

luxury.

Janessa:

Yeah, exactly.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

, it's interesting because we're at a cultural moment where everything has

Janessa:

been, we've had eras of abundance and we've marketed to that.

Janessa:

Yes.

Janessa:

And we have gotten, we've become accustomed to produce more, sell more.

Janessa:

And that's the moment of how businesses have been.

Janessa:

And everyone's mindset is like more and more, and we've lost

Janessa:

track of the source of things.

Janessa:

And right now the majority of people, I'm very hyper aware and intentional

Janessa:

of everything that I consume from body products to food, to things that I

Janessa:

purchased, how my house is, curated.

Janessa:

Everything is very thought out.

Janessa:

But it's difficult to do it that way.

Janessa:

Sometimes when I'm going on a trip and I want a dress for such

Janessa:

occasion, I live in Los Angeles.

Janessa:

So I know that Beverly Hills is right there and I could go and have anything

Janessa:

that I want is just available to me.

Janessa:

And it's so easy to take away from the origin to the end product.

Janessa:

Just, we are very accustomed to being hungry and you can go get food.

Janessa:

You'd no longer, really have to think of where did this come from?

Janessa:

That requires discipline.

Janessa:

And that requires thought because it is just abundantly available for us all.

Janessa:

And it just add our fingertips.

Janessa:

And so now I think we are going into a finite we're at a cultural moment that

Janessa:

there is not just an overabundance and gonna go into a dooms day of where we're

Janessa:

heading, but things are becoming finite.

Janessa:

Resources are finite.

Janessa:

Now people are aware and they've always been somewhat finite, but people are

Janessa:

now aware of how scarce things are.

Janessa:

So I feel like we're positioned and if more people will get on board, the ethos

Janessa:

and the, the quality of things that people focus on is in the raw materials, in

Janessa:

the ability for it to last, we no longer look at like suiting as something that's

Janessa:

going to last generation to generation that you then size down for your kid and

Janessa:

keep like going down the line from dad to son, because the material's so good.

Janessa:

We don't have materials that are lasting that long and we don't

Janessa:

get the ability to do that.

Janessa:

So I think that now that we're entering into a finite world where there are

Janessa:

legitimate, scarcities that we're up against, they're gonna be forced, whether

Janessa:

they like it or not, they're going to be forced to look at things a little

Janessa:

bit differently and see the innate value of the raw materials of the food,

Janessa:

of everything that they're consuming.

Janessa:

Yes.

Mary Kingsley:

Oh, I agree with all of that so much.

Mary Kingsley:

That's so insightful.

Mary Kingsley:

It gives us so much to think about

Janessa:

this

Emma Kingsley:

conversation is so important.

Emma Kingsley:

and it's just important that we keep talking about it.

Emma Kingsley:

Yes.

Emma Kingsley:

And that it, it's not about in order to be more sustainable, you have to.

Emma Kingsley:

By luxury, because I think it's easy to say it's easy to feel

Emma Kingsley:

excluded from that category.

Emma Kingsley:

If that's not part of your reality or something that you, my thinking

Emma Kingsley:

is even just me personally, I over consume in certain things.

Emma Kingsley:

And if I looked at a line sheet and was like, oh, I spent this much on this.

Emma Kingsley:

I could afford one of these.

Emma Kingsley:

That's gonna last me longer.

Emma Kingsley:

That's another category.

Emma Kingsley:

That's another story.

Emma Kingsley:

But my point being is that like with the raspberries and the

Emma Kingsley:

caring about the people and the material, that's the luxury.

Emma Kingsley:

And however, you're able to access that.

Emma Kingsley:

Whether it's.

Emma Kingsley:

Purchasing the end product, or it's being a part of that supply chain, or if it's

Emma Kingsley:

growing something in your own backyard or knitting your own sweater from yarn

Emma Kingsley:

that you find either locally or online, there's so many ways to be a part of that.

Emma Kingsley:

I love it.

Emma Kingsley:

I've never considered myself a luxury person, but after

Emma Kingsley:

this conversation I'm like,

Janessa:

oh yes, live that luxurious life.

Janessa:

Yes, it's very true.

Janessa:

Luxury is not solely Chanel.

Janessa:

Right?

Janessa:

Luxury is time in like at the end of the day, luxury is time.

Janessa:

That's the most scarce resource we all have.

Janessa:

Yes.

Janessa:

So we're talking about scarcity and we're talking about value where

Janessa:

you spend your time and how you spend your time and your thoughts.

Janessa:

Like that's the luxury.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

I think it's a re contextualizing of what we're really talking

Janessa:

about what this really means.

Janessa:

Yes.

Mary Kingsley:

And I think it's also a rethinking of just the

Mary Kingsley:

whole idea of accessibility.

Mary Kingsley:

That as human beings, accessibility is bigger than just, what can you buy?

Mary Kingsley:

What can you buy?

Mary Kingsley:

What can you buy and how cheaply can you get it?

Mary Kingsley:

Exactly.

Mary Kingsley:

Being the high

Janessa:

value.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

It's more about information and community and a clean earth, a healthy

Emma Kingsley:

earth, which is that's on all of us.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

And

Janessa:

good dirt.

Mary Kingsley:

good dirt.

Mary Kingsley:

We do have a right to good soil because that's the fundamental thing of all life.

Mary Kingsley:

So when we're thinking about, and this is going beyond, I think probably the

Mary Kingsley:

purview of what most consumers are thinking about on a daily basis, but

Mary Kingsley:

purpose of this podcast is to try to help people think about their choices on very

Mary Kingsley:

fundamental things like good soil dirt.

Mary Kingsley:

But anyway, that's a good segue into, I think each of you tell us

Mary Kingsley:

what does slow living mean to you and how are you able to embrace.

Mary Kingsley:

That concept into your current lives.

Janessa:

For me, slow living is giving yourself the permission

Janessa:

to pause and slow down and being able to be very intentional.

Janessa:

And I think that I'm an entrepreneur, I'm a founder.

Janessa:

I have a team of people that I lead.

Janessa:

It's a constant fallacy to fill my time and to fill, be busy and

Janessa:

constantly take all these meetings.

Janessa:

And it's actually harder for me to slow down to the point that I have

Janessa:

to schedule times on my calendar of.

Janessa:

like the blocks on my calendar for breathing.

Janessa:

Like the simplicity of breath has to be put onto my calendar or else it's

Janessa:

going to get booked up with the zoom about financial reports or probably

Janessa:

with Rachel and supply chain issues and banging her head on the wall about

Janessa:

why we decided to do this in the first

Janessa:

But it's really about being intentional about what's being consumed from

Janessa:

media to relationships and what you're allowing in and understanding that

Janessa:

everything is having this like outward reverberation, nothing is without a cost.

Janessa:

And it's being really intentional about what you're choosing to

Janessa:

spend your time and how you're choosing to spend your thoughts.

Janessa:

And for me, if you just slow down.

Janessa:

You already have all the answers of what you need.

Janessa:

We just need to slow down a little bit.

Janessa:

So I take it quite literally.

Janessa:

I have a couple business mentors and they're like really

Janessa:

accomplished CEOs and leaders.

Janessa:

And they're always begging me to become like, they're just

Janessa:

like clear your schedule.

Janessa:

Like we want you to be the laziest leader or at least to look like

Janessa:

you're the laziest player, right.

Janessa:

Who should not be having these schedule, like these things.

Janessa:

And you need to slow down.

Janessa:

You can't possibly be thinking at a high level and like strategizing and doing

Janessa:

what's best for myself and therefore the business, if I'm constantly on the defense

Janessa:

and my energy is not coming from me and I'm not proactively putting that forward.

Janessa:

And so that comes with pause.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

Very

Mary Kingsley:

good.

Mary Kingsley:

Rachel, what about you?

Rachel:

I used to be a complete workaholic.

Rachel:

I still have very workaholic tendencies.

Rachel:

And so for me, slow living really comes back to.

Rachel:

As Janessa said, being intentional time is my most precious resource.

Rachel:

And there are some things in life that have taught me very specifically how

Rachel:

important time really is and how I spend my time and who I get to spend

Rachel:

my time with, whether it's time that I'm working or time that I'm with my

Rachel:

family, but just being very aware and intentional about where I'm spending

Rachel:

that most precious resource that I have.

Rachel:

It's not about getting more, attaining, more achieving more.

Rachel:

I want to be doing things and spending my time in a way that

Rachel:

is really true to my own personal purpose and my own personal values.

Rachel:

So that's also very luxurious.

Rachel:

I think it feels that way to me.

Rachel:

And I think something else is really that I have to remind

Rachel:

myself of, but that really.

Rachel:

Proactively making the decision to be inactive, to have time where I am not

Rachel:

committed to a meeting, I am not doing my time with a chore or something to achieve.

Rachel:

It's just spending some time being intentionally inactive

Rachel:

intentionally at rest.

Rachel:

And I think that's where for me, some of my most strategic and most creative

Rachel:

ideas and a lot of clarity really comes during those really still times.

Rachel:

That's slow living for me in the midst of a really busy world

Rachel:

and a lot of stuff going on.

Rachel:

yes.

Emma Kingsley:

What does the good dirt mean to you?

Emma Kingsley:

And you can take that literally or metaphorically,

Emma Kingsley:

whatever it means to you.

Janessa:

I focus a lot on making myself as robust as possible so that I can overflow

Janessa:

on to all of the things in my life.

Janessa:

So quite literally good dirt for me is my raw materials of myself.

Janessa:

My ability to fill myself up my ability to be intentional, have this slow

Janessa:

living, be able to overflow my vessel.

Janessa:

That's how I keep seeing it.

Janessa:

I'm really intentional.

Janessa:

My time and my energy.

Janessa:

I have a point system that my it's not minus my therapist, but it's genius.

Janessa:

She gives me it's actually a coin system because I have money motivated who

Janessa:

would've thought business owner be money motivated, but it's six coins a day.

Janessa:

I have I've delegated like creativity for me.

Janessa:

Yes.

Janessa:

It's an extraordinarily beautiful positive charge for my life,

Janessa:

but it takes something from me.

Janessa:

Cause I'm putting something that's inside of me, out into the world.

Janessa:

And that's two coins, a difficult conversation with a parrot three

Janessa:

coins, cuz that's difficult.

Janessa:

A really hard conversation with an employee is a coin.

Janessa:

So when I'm done with my six coins, I'm done and I have to go and then

Janessa:

I have to fill myself back up.

Janessa:

And so I have things that fill myself back up the beach, my

Janessa:

dog nature, get out into nature.

Janessa:

That's my number one resource.

Janessa:

So for me it's just the ability to be someone that.

Janessa:

Such innate value of the, what makes me like my Jenness and that's my dirt.

Janessa:

That's my good dirt.

Janessa:

That's what I can give back into the world.

Janessa:

And that's what can come out and hopefully make other people's lives

Janessa:

a little bit better and easier, happier, more joyous, and be a

Janessa:

little bit more of a light to people.

Emma Kingsley:

Okay.

Emma Kingsley:

that was the best thing I've ever heard.

Emma Kingsley:

Love the coin coin.

Emma Kingsley:

Just kidding.

Emma Kingsley:

Oh my gosh.

Emma Kingsley:

You just changed my life.

Emma Kingsley:

That it . Okay, so you

Janessa:

give your, okay.

Janessa:

Give myself coins guys, give yourself coins.

Janessa:

You get six coins a day back.

Janessa:

Good coins.

Janessa:

So you're like, oh,

Emma Kingsley:

I'm out of coins and you go on a hike and you get coin back or

Janessa:

yeah.

Janessa:

So I have to, yeah, but then I don't get to spend anymore coins.

Janessa:

It's not like I can, it's not like I can go back and make up seven

Janessa:

coins so I can spend another coin.

Janessa:

Okay.

Janessa:

I get six coins a day.

Janessa:

Okay.

Janessa:

And I have to refill the coins.

Janessa:

If I get a bad night of sleep, I forgot to say this.

Janessa:

I'm already out of the gate.

Janessa:

Minus two coins.

Janessa:

If I don't sleep well, I only get four coins that day.

Janessa:

So I better like, and if I don't in order for me to sleep well, I have to

Janessa:

do all these things and I have to eat well and I have to go out and I have to

Janessa:

exercise and I have to sit on the beach.

Janessa:

I have to watch the sunset.

Janessa:

I'm someone that needs actual light on my eyeballs, who would've thought that humans

Janessa:

actually need light on their eyeballs.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

In the morning and in the night.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

I ha it's like a very structured way.

Janessa:

I send my time and I've done it the other way.

Janessa:

I've burnt out, which is no good for anyone.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

I, I can't be of any sort of resource to any person on the planet when

Janessa:

I'm just completely depleted.

Janessa:

So the coin system works for.

Janessa:

It's also a really good excuse to get out of a conversation that you

Janessa:

don't wanna have, cuz you're like a lot of coins let's do tomorrow.

Janessa:

So are they accurate?

Emma Kingsley:

Are they actual

Janessa:

coins?

Janessa:

I mean they're typically carry a little, like what's the guy in Peter

Janessa:

pan with the little thing of marbles.

Janessa:

Oh.

Janessa:

Of marbles with me ever.

Janessa:

I wake up in the morning and know I have six to spend that day

Janessa:

that's and then to intentionally decide how I wanna spend them.

Janessa:

Okay.

Janessa:

I love this.

Janessa:

All right.

Janessa:

My mom used to, when we

Emma Kingsley:

were little, it was go and cool.

Emma Kingsley:

This go, it was a picture of water and we would make her mad when

Emma Kingsley:

we'd be fighting or something.

Emma Kingsley:

She didn't wanna discipline us anymore.

Emma Kingsley:

So she'd just pour the water out into a bowl and we'd be like, oh

Emma Kingsley:

my gosh, mom's pouring water out

Rachel:

like her.

Rachel:

So

Janessa:

I.

Janessa:

You didn't tell the whole story.

Janessa:

I would

Mary Kingsley:

explain that the picture of the water was my energy.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

and they'd be over there squabbling and I would pour the water into

Mary Kingsley:

a bowl and they would see the water and they'd go, oh no, mom's

Janessa:

losing

Emma Kingsley:

it.

Mary Kingsley:

Yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

So it was super effective.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

Like a very Gente way to raise your children.

Janessa:

I did not, unfortunately, I did not get that, that lovely water metaphor.

Janessa:

It wasn't all like that.

Mary Kingsley:

that was just one good idea.

Mary Kingsley:

And I

Emma Kingsley:

think she did like a couple times, and I think we would just make

Emma Kingsley:

fun of her for it for the next 30 years.

Emma Kingsley:

40 maintaining, um, forever.

Emma Kingsley:

Yeah.

Janessa:

Anyways, I like like the like menacing visual of it though.

Janessa:

Just like she really went the corner, just like pouring water out of a ju

Janessa:

. Mary Kingsley: It was refreshing

Janessa:

To make the impression, but anyway, yeah.

Janessa:

Okay.

Emma Kingsley:

Rachel.

Emma Kingsley:

What does the good mean to you?

Rachel:

Rachel, following Jane Vanessa's definition, which is so inspiring for

Rachel:

me, I look at it literally, actually I grew up in a really agricultural area

Rachel:

when off and started working in this apparel industry away from all of that.

Rachel:

And now I'm back and I see good dirt as being really healthy soil that can

Rachel:

support really great plant life that provides good food that helps clean

Rachel:

carbon out of the air that supports biodiversity above and below the soil.

Rachel:

It's the lifeblood of our planet, right?

Rachel:

That's how we get food, clothing, shelter.

Rachel:

Like we don't have healthy soil, then that's it.

Rachel:

We can't get anything that we need.

Rachel:

So for me, I think of that immediately.

Rachel:

And I guess more figuratively, I'm always trying to learn new things.

Rachel:

I'm always interested in information and more figuratively.

Rachel:

It would be access to really great new learning opportunity or some

Rachel:

good new nugget of information or some new research that somebody

Rachel:

did that is really interesting.

Rachel:

And being able to get the good dirt on what's going on

Janessa:

really great podcast.

Rachel:

yeah, exactly.

Rachel:

A really great podcast.

Rachel:

Yeah.

Emma Kingsley:

that's awesome.

Emma Kingsley:

This has been so wonderful.

Emma Kingsley:

Is there anything else

Janessa:

that you

Emma Kingsley:

feel like you want to talk about or that you wanna leave

Emma Kingsley:

with our audience about the work that

Janessa:

you're doing?

Janessa:

A, I just feel so grateful that when I met Rachel, like she had

Janessa:

just left Patagonia and I'm like, you wanna come and work with me?

Janessa:

And you've just like, what?

Janessa:

I didn't understand it, but I just, at this point we were several years.

Janessa:

And really being able to bring our first product category to lice.

Janessa:

The sweaters are our first product category.

Janessa:

We now have leather handbags and we have another sweater line launching this fall.

Janessa:

It feels, I just am so excited about the opportunity to inspire people, mainly

Janessa:

business owners, to look at this and be like, you can do this differently.

Janessa:

We're doing it profitably.

Janessa:

We're able to actually make a business.

Janessa:

That's not, I don't, like I said, I do not have investors.

Janessa:

There's no possible way for us to do this unless it makes money.

Janessa:

Like the business has to make, it has to have an, a use case in the world

Janessa:

or else I don't have money myself.

Janessa:

That's like funneling into this.

Janessa:

This is what we're doing.

Janessa:

So I feel really excited about the opportunity.

Janessa:

I feel excited about the potential.

Janessa:

I feel excited about where this is all going.

Janessa:

And I think what I would love to just say to anyone who's interested or who's

Janessa:

listening, who feels, oh, but I don't have a fashion brand and I can't do this.

Janessa:

Or if I don't get to make that impact, you literally have three

Janessa:

meals a day that you get to vote.

Janessa:

Every single day of what you're going to put in your body.

Janessa:

And we don't need legislation to come in and we don't need the

Janessa:

government to tell us how we're going to eat and regulate agriculture.

Janessa:

I don't think so.

Janessa:

And I know it's controversial thing to say.

Janessa:

I think we, as consumers, we drive the demand.

Janessa:

We say what we're going to allow people to put on our food.

Janessa:

We're going to vote with it with our dollars.

Janessa:

And if you go locally, you don't.

Janessa:

I live in LA.

Janessa:

We have an egregious grocery store here called air one.

Janessa:

You don't have to go to air one.

Janessa:

You go directly to your farm and the way in which cost difference.

Janessa:

Yes, it's higher.

Janessa:

It's higher because it's quality.

Janessa:

It's food.

Janessa:

It is people's lives.

Janessa:

It's, people's livelihoods, it's animals.

Janessa:

It is so much more than just quantifying it down to a dollar amount.

Janessa:

And I think that's what I would love people to inspire, to slow down,

Janessa:

be a little bit more intentional.

Janessa:

Eat locally, when you, next time you buy your next thing, like for one

Janessa:

thing out of the next 10 things you buy, just consider, where was it made,

Janessa:

where who's making it, who's behind it.

Janessa:

Where did this come from?

Janessa:

How did it get here to start, keep notice, start to track

Janessa:

where everything is coming from.

Janessa:

And I think that it's really gonna be eye opening for a lot of people,

Janessa:

and they'll be able to quickly start to change some consumer habits.

Janessa:

And I think that's how this all changes.

Janessa:

Yes.

Rachel:

Amen.

Janessa:

To stop.

Janessa:

Oh yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

And where can we find you guys?

Mary Kingsley:

And yeah.

Mary Kingsley:

All of those things you want people to go

Janessa:

look for?

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

Our website is jane.com or an Instagram at Jane Leone.

Janessa:

And it's a relatively unique name.

Janessa:

Luckily, it's easy to find yeah, you could probably just type in like

Janessa:

J hats and hopefully will come up.

Janessa:

If our SEO, if our marketing did a good job, hopefully

Emma Kingsley:

just curious.

Emma Kingsley:

What sells the most?

Emma Kingsley:

What is your, what do you feel like is

Janessa:

your bread and butter right now?

Janessa:

Our hats are stilling.

Janessa:

The hats are what we started with.

Janessa:

So that's still the majority of what we're known for and what we move.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

But we have other categories sneaking in there that are growing

Janessa:

and it's a very exciting time.

Janessa:

So exciting.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

We can't wait to follow

Mary Kingsley:

along.

Mary Kingsley:

Thank you so much for spending your time with us today in

Mary Kingsley:

this amazing conversation.

Mary Kingsley:

I've love

Janessa:

this.

Janessa:

Thank you for having us.

Janessa:

Yeah.

Janessa:

Thank you for having us.

Janessa:

You both are lovely.

Janessa:

I love this mother daughter energy.

Janessa:

It's so warming.

Janessa:

it's so kind.

Janessa:

I love it.

Rachel:

Thank you so much.

Rachel:

Yeah.

Rachel:

Thank you so much.

Janessa:

Yeah, I really appreciate it, guys.

Emma Kingsley:

Thank you for tuning in to the good dirt podcast.

Emma Kingsley:

If you enjoyed this episode, we hope you'll share it with a

Emma Kingsley:

friend to spread the good dirt.

Mary Kingsley:

This show is produced by lady farmer, a slow living lifestyle

Mary Kingsley:

community, and the original music is composed and performed by John Kingsley.

Mary Kingsley:

For more

Mary Kingsley:

from

Emma Kingsley:

lady farmer.

Emma Kingsley:

Follow us on Instagram at @weareladyfarmer that's.

Emma Kingsley:

We are lady farmer or join us online@www.ladyfarmer.com.

Emma Kingsley:

We'll see you next time on the good dirt.

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