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Ep 074: Success is Progress with Marcos Mendosa
Episode 7424th May 2022 • Dissecting Success • Theresa Lambert and Blair Kaplan Venables
00:00:00 00:54:27

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On this week’s episode of Dissecting Success we had a lit up and highly activating conversation with Marcos Mendosa, on success, on healing trauma, on manifestation, on persistence, on healthy obsessions, on failure, on legacy work…This episode is pure GOLD, filled with depth and wisdom and literally leaving you wanting more “Marcos” in your life. Get ready…

About the Guest

As a high-ticket sales trainer and poet, Marcos Mendosa has built a reputation as the go-to-source for learning how to use communication as a superpower.

As the co-founder of Coachable, a coaches business development agency, Marcos has built a service model that helps optimize businesses by helping coaches focus on their genius while he and his team take care of their sales, branding, copy, and social media marketing. With his background as the Head Trainer of the Think and Grow Rich Institute, Marcos led the organization through a series of training programs that influenced thousands of people on how to integrate the principles of Napoleon Hill’s books into their lives.  

Marcos is originally from Toronto, Canada and has recently moved he and his family to Nosara, Costa Rica.

Send a Text 👉 +1 (647) 455-3306

IG: @_marcosmendosa

@profitandworth

Video Dolores Cannon: https://www.lifemanagementtribe.com/videos/320/2653/dolores-cannon-on-life-after-death

Transcripts

Blair Kaplan Venables:

You ever wonder what success actually means? How do you get it? And how do you keep it?

Theresa Lambert:

We all want it yet sometimes it feels only some of us get to have it.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Hi, Teresa and Blair here we are to badass entrepreneurs, best selling authors, coaches and business mentors who have had success, built success, questioned our own success and reclaimed it. Let's be real for a hot minute. 2020 has been a roller coaster ride, and many of us a start to wonder if the loser things that made them successful. So we got curious, Ron real about what success is truly about?

Theresa Lambert:

Can you put it in a box?

Blair Kaplan Venables:

How can you get it?

Theresa Lambert:

Can people take it away? Or are you the one with the power?

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Does it mean the same to all of us? Or are we the ones that create it?

Theresa Lambert:

From PGA golf pros to doctors, CEOs, entrepreneurs and spiritual mentors. We get together to meet with successful people from around the globe to dissect success for vibrant conversations and interviews. Make sure you click the subscribe button on the app store because each week we will drop a new episode to bust through the myths around success and dissect its true meaning.

Theresa Lambert:

Hello, hello and welcome back to a another amazing episode of dissecting success. I am your co host Teresa Lambert and I am here with the one and only Blair Kaplan Venables and we're having another amazing, amazing, amazing guest with us today and I cannot wait to dive into what I believe is going to be such a juicy conversation. So let me introduce him to you as a high ticket sales trainer and poet Marcos Mendosa has built a reputation as the go to source for learning how to use communication as a superpower. As the co founder of coachable a coaches Business Development Agency, Marcos has built a service model that helps optimize businesses by helping coaches focus on that genius while he and his team take care of the sales, branding, copy and social media marketing. With his background as the head trainer of the Think and Grow Rich Institute. Marcos has led the organization through a series of training programs that influenced 1000s of people on how to integrate the principles of Napoleon Hill's book into their lives. Marcos is originally from Toronto, Canada, and has recently moved he and his family to Nosara. Costa Rica Marcos. Hello, I am so excited. We're so excited to have you here. I feel like this is gonna be a juicy, juicy, juicy conversation.

Marcos Mendosa:

I don't doubt it. I think that the exchanges that you and I have been having over the last few weeks have really sparked something special and dynamic that you and I share. So you have you have my transparency, you have my vulnerability, you have my honesty, and you have all of me really so laid on me.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Can I have some?

Marcos Mendosa:

You can definitely have all of it as well.

Theresa Lambert:

I love it. I love it. That's amazing. And I agree it's been such a joy. And I have so much gratitude for the exchange that's been happening, which is why I'm so excited about having this convo with you and having you on this podcast. And I'm so glad I reached out. I mean, you know, sometimes it's just that leap of faith that we have to take. So let's dive right in. Like I am dying to know the answer to this question. What does success mean to you?

Marcos Mendosa:

Progress says success is the ongoing achievement of progress manifested through the awareness of what brings fulfillment and contentment to the achievement of the goal. So if we look at success as the achievement of something that you said you would do, success is actually the byproduct of having integrity. So if you have integrity, and you are achieving things in a way that you can celebrate and you have enough awareness to celebrate that you are successful inside of the awareness, and the acknowledgement that you have succeeded in achieving that, which you said you are going to do or that what you said you were going to be. So success is progress, and it usually looks like small results that ended up being framed as big results that we would then call milestones. So it's the ongoing achievement of small results that look like progress. Hmm, that's good. Wait,

Blair Kaplan Venables:

you know what I'm picturing Theresa. I'm picturing like this huge jumbo like Jenga tower and the the Jenga tower that's like all like you know, like with the with the blocks, you take the block from the middle then you put it on top and and it's a If all over the place and each little Jenga brick is a success, and together that that big tower is the milestone?

Marcos Mendosa:

I agree. Yeah, I see that.

Theresa Lambert:

I love that that's such a powerful definition, I would love to know how you ended up here, knowing this, feeling this living this breathing this like

Marcos Mendosa:

trauma. So, trauma got me here because I believe that when what we are taught by a mainstream perspective of pretty much anything, it almost robs us, it robs us of the ability to truly think for ourselves, because we're always under the influence of other people's perceptions, experiences, or opinions. The ongoing experience of failure of meeting, the experience of matching what success look like, resulted in the having to look at how, why, what, where, and when I decided that success was relevant in my life. So based off of how I came to understand what success was, for me what felt safe to my nervous system for me what felt safe, for the way that I was experiencing fulfillment and achievement for me, not based off of the measurements of what I was taught, it was the experience of trauma that gave me a perception that I was able to then reference and then working inside of that parameter and those parameters in the container of what felt good for me, I was enabled to continue to succeed in a way that was congruent to my definition, rather than the influence of the definition that was imposed on me.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

That's beautiful. And I'm sorry, you went through trauma. And I think what's really interesting is that what I'm seeing as someone who has survived and thrive through multiple traumas is that it's becoming more of a normal thing to talk about instead of just slapping on a smile and pretending you're okay. And people really identifying in their life, what these what things happen, that are identified as trauma, or what can be defined as trauma for them. But you had to go through all that stuff to get to where you are, but what if we can bypass some of that hard stuff with having the tools that we need? Like, what advice do you have for people listening who are at the beginning of their journey, or they're just discovering they had some of this trauma? Or you know, like, what can we do? So not every journey has to be so difficult?

Marcos Mendosa:

My instincts are saying, yes, it does. Only because it is through failure that we learn what not to do. And failure is difficult, especially if you're attached to results and outcomes. So I believe, I'm going to say yes, I believe that it does have to be difficult, but difficult, not hard and impossible, but challenging and worth the trip worth the adventure. Almost like climbing to the summit, like it's gonna be cold, you may fall off the, you know, the mountain, but getting there is a celebration. So what I would suggest, there's so much I would suggest What wouldn't I suggest I would suggest self awareness, I would suggest clearly defined capacity goals, like, I would suggest nurturing the nervous system before you begin any type of successful venture or endeavor, and really honoring your worth honoring your own capacity, as well as reaching for things that are within, within the grasp of what's available just outside of your comfort zone without going, you know, way too beyond I think it's great to have ambitious dreams, goals, desires and visions, but not being attached and not attaching your identity to the result of having those outcomes. That way, you do not measure the outcome as better than you or more valued than you but rather, you are separated from the outcome. So you're not coming from a place of attachment to the outcome, rather the outcome looks, how you make it look within the capacity of awareness that you have. And then in that experience, you're constantly celebrating and acknowledging yourself within the journey that you're now fully aware of that you're experiencing, and nobody can take that away from you unless you let them to unless you allow them to. So I would say that practicing a way of being that feels like it's something that is embodied by what feels safe and comfortable while also a little dangerous. I believe that dancing between those experiences will give you the courage. inch and the clarity to continue creating your life on a decision decision basis. So that's what I would start with. Wow.

Theresa Lambert:

Like, I, there's so many things about what you just said that like, I use a better word, activate me to move. But one thing that really landed for me was that we can look at trauma as a more like in a more compassionate way to lift us up, rather than drag us down. And that really hits deeply for me, and we've had some deep conversations. So you're aware of some of my drama by now. And that, like, it just is this fine adjustment like, like fine tuning this perspective on what trauma can and can do for us. When in the past, I feel like I have let my trauma sabotage me in terms of how I've created successful myself because I did it through force, and pushing and striving and it got me to incredible places. And then my nervous system collapsed, and I burned out and I was like, Who is this person? I don't know this person anymore. So it's really cool. How we can do some of this work, but VDB like, it's almost like embracing the trauma. I don't know, like, I mean, not that we want to call trauma in our life. But I almost feel like based on what you said, we all have a certain level of trauma based on past lived experiences,

Marcos Mendosa:

and present. So there's so much trauma in the present, like how often do you feel depletion, or fatigue, or exhaustion, or burnout or lack of clarity, distraction, exhaustion, you know, the trauma is happening all the time, because the trauma is already in our cells, it's already in our muscles, it's already in our nervous systems already in our thoughts. So it's how we respond to the commitment versus the attachment inside of how the trauma is actually it's actually activating us it's it's it's trauma is a messenger symptoms are messengers. So being an entrepreneur requires a ridiculous amount of self awareness, because it is solely up to you to create your reality, to create your economy and to create your optimal health. So if we're going to do this work, then we have to take responsibility for all the areas involved in ensuring that you can operate. And when we start to neglect, avoid, ignore a lot of the things that are part of the engine that allow us to do what we do, when we ignore that, or when we force that it actually forces outcomes and forcing an outcome leads to a place where you then have to challenge a question, why the result looks the way it looks and doesn't feel as good as you thought it would feel by forcing yourself into it. And that causes us to then have to look at ourselves and question what we're doing wrong. And then having to really assess if this is what we actually want, which is where some often by forcing an outcome, do you achieve something and then it doesn't look or feel the way you thought it would feel? Even though it's exactly what you thought it would be? Or should it be, you can't even see it. Because you're already in the experience of you're, you're so in the experience of your past, and what it took you to get to the present, that you're so caught up that you can't even witness yourself in the celebration or acknowledgement of that which you have, because it doesn't feel as good as you thought you were going to make it feel. And that's because you've forced it as an outcome because, you know, there's there's pressure there's so many reasons why we do it. But I have this thing, when I don't feel like it. I don't do it. Right. Like that's it. I don't have my life story. Right. Like, I don't feel like I don't do it and I'm detached I know that my magic will flow when I'm in a flow state. But if I'm trying to make some literally like trying to spark you know that that ignition for something powerful to happen, but I physiologically ethereally emotionally, mentally and spiritually am not congruent with what I'm available for. Then I can force it, but it's not going to last and entrepreneurialism is legacy work. So it's gotta last so there's a lot I can say about that. Whoa, whoa, okay.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

That was a lot why and I love that you just said that entrepreneurialism is legacy work, I want to talk about that, like I had another thing in my mind. But that's actually really important. Because what I see like I've been an entrepreneur, my own whole life, my business is about to be 14 Teresa and I've been working together for a while, she was an intrapreneur. And now she's an entrepreneur, but I see a lot of entrepreneurs burning out or giving up or, you know, thinking it's too hard, because they feel like they have to hustle and grind. And then they end up not always being an entrepreneur and going back to a job. How do you know, I want to talk about this concept of being, you know, building a legacy? As an entrepreneur?

Marcos Mendosa:

Let's do it. Let's talk about it. What do you got?

Blair Kaplan Venables:

What do you got? I want to know what you think about that. Because I lately have been making it I'm in a state of shift, I'm getting shift faced. And I'm in the process of like, knowing what legacy I want to leave when I'm gone, whether I'm gone next week, or in a decade or in, you know, many decades, and I've been looking before I looked at being an entrepreneur, as in like, I don't make the rules, I just break the rules. No one could tell me what to do, I'm going to do what I do to, I want to make a fucking difference. I want to leave my legacy, I want to know that when I'm gone, the things I've done, have helped people and have empowered people. But you know, not everyone's business does that or does it? Like what is what does it mean to you to leave a legacy as an entrepreneur? Or that entrepreneurialism is legacy work? Like what does that mean to you?

Marcos Mendosa:

So what it means for me, my response is not what I think it should mean for anyone else. So there's a distinction there, there's legacy work, here's my, here's my opinion on it. This is what I suggest for the world to do. And then there's my personal opinion. So my personal opinion based off of what my why has been for God knows how long has been to leave every generation with my last name, financially secure and proud of the generations before work them in a way that says they can now look at what I've left behind as something or something that I have created as something that they can lean towards being proud of, and optimizing and utilizing for their own growth. So I have this line in one of my songs. Something about like, I forget the line, but it has to do with how I'm the first one in my family to make seven figures in the entire dynasty of our entire lifetime. That's like, hundreds of people that have never reached this point. So with that, I get to then leave that for them. So that all the opportunities that my direct and immediate family missed out on, they all get to use that leverage to be able to experience their lives in a completely different way, which I'm still working towards that and I am not I haven't, I'm nowhere near achieving it, I thought I thought $3 million would have given me that kind of cloud, that kind of power. And I realize it's more like 30 million, you know, more like 300 million, and I'm just like, I can leave a legacy for them to to benefit off of and capitalize on, but I'm also not attached to it. So for me legacy work is just, it has less to do with. It's this tricky thing for me, because I've been thinking a lot, everything about it a lot, actually. So I'm downloading a lot as I'm speaking like I have a book I have. And this book is about life after death. You know, there's all these different experiences, I have all my albums, I have my music, I have my piano playing, I have my businesses, I have all these things. So it's like, there's legacy everywhere, because as long as I post it online, it's gonna live forever. So I've already left the legacy, I already have my legacy. It's just a matter of who's going to benefit off of knowing that that legacy exists. So if it matters to you, your entrepreneurialism is, you know, what matters to me is that my legacy gives anybody that is associated to me the opportunity to be able to be proud of their lineage. And that is enough for me and one of the things you know, my slogan for profit and worth, which is my program is your reputation determines your worth. So this way I value and cherish nurturing the reputation so much because in our business with a shit reputation, you don't have trust. So, without trust, it's very difficult for people to value your word. So, you know, you're gonna have to make some difficult decisions for your legacy to remain intact. And I've gone through that, you know, a few times where I've had to make some pretty difficult decisions around just like fuck, I don't want to do that. I like that's going to hurt. And that's going to set me back. But my reputation is linked to my legacy, my legacy is linked to the integrity of My Word, my word is linked to the value of my contribution. And if any of that gets shattered, I gotta find a whole new market where they don't know my name. And that's just way too fucking heart. So take the head, and, and let it land gently by touching yourself from what you're making it mean, and rather invent a new meaning, which is the lesson and the opportunity inside of this growth and make it congruent to you so that you can get off it. And just keep doing what you do.

Theresa Lambert:

It's like my mind trying to catch up with like, everything that you just shared.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

I think it's transcribed. Yeah. That's like less.

Marcos Mendosa:

That's a really good thing. Yeah. Is this a live call?

Theresa Lambert:

No. Okay. It will be out later.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

We don't edit it. Like this is all there. Hey, world. This.

Theresa Lambert:

Yeah, we like these live conversations. They have been life. And then they they, the story gets told in hindsight, which I feel like it's a powerful way to tell a story in hindsight.

Marcos Mendosa:

Yeah, cool. Question. Appreciate it.

Theresa Lambert:

Yeah, oh, my goodness. There's, I feel like there's so much to unpack here. But one thing that stands out for me is like, how do we start doing this, like, generational rewriting of our, like, generational financial story, I don't know if I'm expressing that right? At this moment in time, but like, it's almost like, what what you shared around, like, you know, having this legacy, like, leaving every generation with your last name in this secure place, and like being proud of like, what, what this accomplishment that happened for them through you like for everybody to benefit? It's like, where do you even like, begin?

Marcos Mendosa:

I'm learning as I go, like, my scaling system is profound. And it's gonna take time. So I'm learning. I'm also learning about digital assets, you know, I'm learning about all different ways that my energy can be compounded, the result of my energies work can be compounded. But I just have a story, like my family stories, my family story. So there's a reason why that's part of what my legacy work looks like. And that's why it's my definition, right. And beyond that, like it for everybody is going to be different, right? It could be different. But for me, I have my story. So I know what I got to do. And nobody's asking me to do this. Like, before I moved to Costa Rica, like I was trying to buy, you know, to $1.4 million houses to escape the pandemic. So my family didn't get vaccinated, and I was trying to, like, save them. And you know, and I ran myself into the ground, you know, to try to help save them. And I remember when I was so sick, I got so sick in September, and it was from the move, and then, you know, COVID, and then Dengue fever back to back like I was, like, destroyed. And it was my immune system compromised the stress, I didn't reach my goals, you know, there was just so much pressure moving countries, while being angry and bitter and resentful. And there's all this stuff that I had to go through. So that I can, you know, achieve this legacy work, which was to save my parents to save my family back home in Argentina, nobody asked me to do this, I enabled them to do it, because then they relied on me to continue to make sure they were retired. And I did that, at the cost of so much of the foundational work that I put in place. So you know, my own legacy is different, I have to manage it differently. And that's why it's again, it doesn't have to be hard back to the first question doesn't have to be hard. But it often will be and if you prepare yourself to look at those difficulties as opportunities, as you know, as opportunities for you to grow. And this is so cliche, but it's like, the principles of life are fucking cliche. That's why everybody preaches the same shit because it's all cliche. The formula is there, like we just got to do it.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

It's like showing up is the hardest thing for people to do. Yeah, it's like, you know what I mean? Like they have the formula, but it's showing up.

Marcos Mendosa:

Showing up is hard, man, especially, you know, like, I had a client yesterday to tell me like, Oh, like that. You know, we have a goal to make 70,000, you know, by the end of the month, and I was just like, he started, he started this week, and he made 12,000 this week and, and he was just like, kind of complaining, like, oh, I don't want to do this, I don't wanna do that, you know, I can't find the motivation. And I'm like, well, you're about to get married in June plus, we have a baby on the way. And would you rather be consumed by having to work all the time to avoid all the magic is going to happen in those years, or would you rather be sitting back with your business kind of working for you, rather than you working for it. So you could be with your kid, you know, and your new wife, and it was just like fog, like showing up to do the stuff that we don't want to do. There's a way to look at not wanting to do something as something that can bring you joy as well. And it is in the experience of satisfaction of knowing that you do what you don't like doing actually really well. And again, you detach from it. So you just do it as a means to an end. And then you move on, you don't make it mean so much. So it just depends on your work ethic and what your your business and your your contribution to society looks like. And of course, like I advocate for a formula I created called the one hour workday, I only work an hour, you know, like, I'm not working on that. I'm creating all day, but I'm not working all day. So my work is like, I've segmented my my behavior in a way where I know certain things are going to take me 30 seconds, other things are going to take me six minutes, other things are going to take me 14 minutes, other things are going to take me 12 Other things are going to take me three. And in that one hour of work, they'll 60 minutes out of my work day, I've crushed everything I needed to crush and I don't have to feel guilty about it. And the rest of the time I'm doing whatever I want to be doing. You know, and my business is not suffering from it. Because I'm either delegating or keeping to my one things. So their systems, there's ways to do it. And there's ways to make magic, you know, to be able to build that business.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Why did you drop this at the end of the interview? We're gonna have to have you come back for part two, because I want to talk about that. More that

Marcos Mendosa:

you said, this is the end of the interview

Blair Kaplan Venables:

coming to the end.

Marcos Mendosa:

What we just started. Well,

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Teresa, what do you think Joanna make it a little bit longer?

Theresa Lambert:

Yeah, I feel like we have to keep going. Okay, jokes. I'm dying to ask a question. And I'm like,

Blair Kaplan Venables:

I take that back, people. This is not the end.

Theresa Lambert:

So I love how we how we do that. 30 minutes.

Marcos Mendosa:

was that just 30 minutes.

Theresa Lambert:

That was 30 minutes. Yeah, that felt like five minutes. Yeah.

Marcos Mendosa:

Holy cow. I'm happy to respect that I have no problem. No, no.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Question. So let's just keep going. And then we'll we'll know when it's time. And you know what, Marcos, you're just gonna have to come back for part two and probably three, four.

Marcos Mendosa:

Invited by you, Blair. I want a message in my phone, as Marcos. Get on the Zoom. Like it's happening right now.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Heck, yeah, I'll get your number from T. But I also probably will send you like a messenger pigeon with like a wrapped up handwritten note,

Marcos Mendosa:

would love that. That's a good business, we should start that. I actually have this really cool idea I'm working on right now. Top secret, I'll be the first to hear about it. So you know how there's homeless people. In big city metropolis is where they're literally sitting outside, still with a cup. Right? I don't know about you, but I don't like change, like who's got change? Right? Like, and people are stingy, that they're not getting bills. So I'm working on on a charity, which is a QR code, charity, it's a services and have, I think I'm going to call the company Sure. Which is like you see, somebody are asking for change on the street. And you're like, sure, and you just scan your phone to his code. So instead of people saying instead of homeless people holding signs that say, spare change, they're holding signs that are a QR code. Let's so Jetsons have you? Right, and then you just scan it and you send them some quick money, right? Like it's so fast and so considerate. And then if homeless people don't have the phone, I set up at the shelters, the apps application where they go they go there and then they get paid out for where it goes. You're also humanitarian

Blair Kaplan Venables:

like holy smokes this because you only work one hour a day. So the other 23 you create and you were a humanitarian as well.

Marcos Mendosa:

It's unbelievable. Like how many ideas I process. It's, it's a lot. It's a lot. I cracked the code to manifestation. So now it's just a matter of giving everything the effort it deserves, and some are going to make it some aren't. But I don't look at things as being limited. I just go

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Theresa, can you ask him your question involving how to crack the code for manifestation please, thanks.

Theresa Lambert:

No pressure at all. No, I mean You have so many layers to what makes you you. I want to, like stop by that. And like when I got introduced to you, I knew, like an like maybe like a, like a millimeter of like what makes you you. And every time I have a conversation with you, I'm like, every time I like, listen to your music, or hop onto Instagram, and then see what you've been up to, like, I'm like, dang. And like now this, you're just like adding all these layers. And I love that. And I feel your passion for your work. And I'm dying to know about the manifestation piece. But one thing that stands out is that you also are going through these tough times you shed, you are also experiencing things that aren't like, feeling amazing. And it's not always fuck yes. And everything's great. Like, like there is these times where things get tough. And like, how do you get yourself to keep motivated to keep showing up to keep coming back to this place of alignment? Because honestly, like, this is what I have found, like, this is the thing where like, when the going gets tough, like, what do you say like the rubber meets the road? Like I'm so bad with like saying, like, that's like my DJ English coming in. I'm like, whatever. But like, literally like the crowds divide, right? Like, all of a sudden, like, there's a reason that there was a, like, only like, whatever, like 4% of people 2% of people listen to something or read a book or take a course or be in a program or get coaching actually fucking do something with it. Because the second it gets hot, they're like, I'm fucking out. So how do you keep like, moving? Like, I feel like, so many of our listeners will resonate with this. So that that is like my dying burning question. And while you answer that, you can also just include how you have manifested this incredible life and crack the code to manifestation.

Marcos Mendosa:

So the the answer is coffee. That's. And it really is, it really is, because I only do my best work within the three to four hours that coffee is in me. So when I wake up, I don't want you guys. But when I wake up, it's a celebration. I wake up and it doesn't stop. And I'll tell you the real my real response. But coffee. what coffee does to me is the same thing that exercise does to us, right? It just like activates all of the the internal mechanisms in our bodies and brains that get us going. And for me that that morning experience where I wake up, I wake up on purpose. So the word the word that comes to mind for me is obsession. So you're asking how well I'm obsessed. I am fucking obsessed. And if we were to say, with obsession, like what's a healthy version of obsession, let's call it passion. Right? So again, the fucking formula is out there. Everybody talks about passion and purpose. Now many people talking about obsession, because it can get unhealthy. But when you look at passion as a

Marcos Mendosa:

as like the angel version of obsession, you know, you got to be it'll gotta be but you get to the if you choose to be obsessed with yourself with creation, you know, you get to be and that obsession, it turns into this almost locomotive energy that has you just fucking go. But if you're not obsessed about anything, especially in entrepreneurialism, if you're obsessed, that you're creating all the time, this were prospecting, like when I teach prospecting and sales, like the way that I was taught was so unethical and I'm just like, Ill I don't want to fucking sell. I don't want to talk to anybody. I don't want to force anybody. I don't want to manipulate anybody. I don't want to persuade anyone. I don't want to do that. It sells in an ethical way where it feels fantastic, where you lead with gratitude and appreciation and connection, and you disconnect from outcomes and contribution. And you're just literally flooding everybody with so much value kindness, consideration, compassion, and space to breathe. And you're not coming from this need this I need your money I need I need I need. I don't need anything from you. I just if I I didn't need something I would need you to trust me. Like, that's what I'm selling, right? So there's different ways to do things. I'm obsessed with my way of being I fucking love, who I've become and who I'm becoming like, I think that has everything to do with it, you know, and to link that to manifestation, well, I got, I got an edge, because I was, you know, I was working with thinking Grow Rich, the way that I did. And that helped me a lot, because I was already really thinking Grow Rich from 16 years old. And I was already a junkie, I'm a seminar junkie, from like, 16 you know, I was already deep into books and deep into learning from so young. So to manifest that 30 years old, the opportunity to be the right hand man of the President of the thinking Grow Rich institute that gave me a sense of presence in my life, where it was like, Holy fuck, I have first hand access to the formula behind the formula behind the formula. And then I got the privilege of like, teaching Napoleon Hill's material and getting permission to to buy the family by Napoleon Hill's family. And, you know, that gave me so much self certainty, because I was validated by a source that I had in mind as the top fucking source of manifestation. So that gave me so much fucking certainty that I went forward with that, and I modified everything that I learned from that experience in my life, and I made it my own in a way that resonates with me. And that aligns with my ways of being so the manifestation formula, like, they'll teach it as first we think then we do them, we become what we are, I teach it as first we think, then we feel, then we feel through our feelings, then we do. And then we become that which we are. So being empathetic and compassionate and having such a spiritual touch to my feelings in the way I am, it's important for me to really be checking in with myself before I do any actions. So there's a sense of self awareness that is at the forefront of manifestation. But ultimately, manifestation at the core of it is woowoo. It's very, like, oh, this thing manifested this thing happened. Yeah, great. But what happened was, you either said something, acted on something, touch something, put something in place, position yourself, caused something, created something, shifted something or moved something, you did something, you act it, you made yourself available for manifestation. And you use communication, whether it was verbal, spiritual, Audible, you move something you communicated for that manifestation to allow itself to come into your life. So when we get off the Whoo, and we go into the, the what, like, what did I actually do for this to manifest? Well, I spoke to this person who knows this person, and then that person said this, The things are happening. So manifestation is Yeah, first we think then we feel then we do, then we become what we are. And inside of that, the mechanics of that are all in action. And if you talk about getting an action, we can go into the layers of frequency resonance of vibration, which is very fucking real. Because if you are resonating at a frequency of ambition, enthusiasm, self certainty, possibility, creativity, and you're flowing through life, touching people impacting them, penetrating and permeating them with all of this energy, they're then going to be influenced by that and it's going to spark ideas and spark initiative in them. And you're literally causing all these ripple effects to happen all over you which are pulsating at a resonance of manifestation that is going to have things come to you because you are the source of what caused all that ripple to begin with. So, you know, it's fucking amazing.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

That's what happens. It seems like that's what's happening here. It's like, as you're saying things, I'm like, I'm like, we should do this, I need to do this. And like, your energy is like sparking me. I'm a manifester generator in human design. But like I manifest, like, I used to think I was a witch. I was like, Holy shit, I think something and it happens. And like, I just, there's so much power in that and I'm like, I'm new until like really learning how to Matt like focusing on doing it intentionally. And it's just like, when you're around people like you. It's just, your energy is contagious. And the vibe isn't on such a different frequency that like you're sparking or like, the key word today is activate the magic word. you're activating me. I know you're activating Theresa and like it's, I really hope everyone out there listening is being activated. Like, you know, everything that you're saying. It's like, is this a TED Talk? Am I getting firsthand access to Marcos TED Talk? Holy shit. Like this is? This is an awesome, this is awesome. This is just so good.

Marcos Mendosa:

I love it. Yeah, I'm grateful. I appreciate what you guys are validating me. I actually, I take validation very seriously, it boosts me so I'm just like, Yo, I'm, as I'm receiving that I'm like, I'm so underrated and then it that's coming up for me like I'm underrated. And it's like why? And it's

Blair Kaplan Venables:

like, What do you mean underrated like imposter syndrome? No, definitely

Marcos Mendosa:

not an impostor. I am the furthest thing from an imposter. What

Blair Kaplan Venables:

do you mean, underrated,

Marcos Mendosa:

underrated, kind of like, kind of like the Ted Ted Talk. Like, why haven't I given myself the opportunity to be on bigger stages are why Kenyans heard? And I think it's because I'm an introvert, that has a big fuck you on my forehead to needing the acceptance of everybody.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

That's because you haven't met me yet who's in publicity and PR, you just need the right person to say, Okay, it's time for you to get on a TED stage tell you how to do it. It's my goal this

Marcos Mendosa:

morning. I've always wanted that I've always wanted someone to be a representation of me, I almost feel like the artist in me like, one thing I'm so proud of is that I could be here dropping all this fucking knowledge wearing a fitted in a hoodie. Like, I don't look like the guy that maybe people would paint the picture to. And I fucking love that I strived. I've been striving for that for almost 25 years now. Like, just to be able to be myself without being stereotyped. You know, as what this version, this level of intelligence and self awareness has to look like, based off of, again, how we were introduced to what success looks like, right? Like it goes back to that. So I'm walking around with this pride, like, Yes, I'm fucking though, you know, and I just love having that awareness. Because it gives me so much self certainty. And I'm not hurting anybody with that awareness. People may be intimidated or offended by that kind of awareness, self confidence, call it arrogance. And I'm just like, you can call it arrogance. I call it self love. Let's go for a drink. Like, who gives a shit? Why does it bother you so much? Right? So

Blair Kaplan Venables:

it's like you're triggering someone who doesn't have that confidence? Who has that self doubt, you know, and I think it's great. And I, you know, maybe you're saying that you maybe are you under eight, you're you. Maybe it's your underrating yourself, but you have you have this gift. So you need to go beyond dissecting success and find those stages and share your messages. Because I just met you like I literally as we're talking followed you on Instagram, I can't wait to like, learn more about you. But this is going to be one of those episodes that I probably listened to a couple of times, like I feel like this is like that pep talk that I need to do this or that. And you know, I practice meditation and journaling, and I'm on this healing journey. I'm at the beginning of a spiritual awakening. I'm about to go on a four hour drive back to my hometown, and I'm in a hotel right now. And I've downloaded a book because I've had a lot of loss recently, and I'm learning to kind of tap into, you know, just feeling and hearing energies and feelings and just getting messages from the spirit. Like it's happening, like lights are flickering, things are happening. And I'm just like learning more about it because I'm open to it. Anyways, I'm on this journey. And like, I feel like everything you're saying, I feel like you have like Theresa said, you have all these layers to you and I can't wait to start to peel them back. And you know, I don't know, there's just there's lots of things like this is one of those episodes that we're gonna You should favor it out there and come back to like, you didn't get a fortune cookie with your dinner last night. Here's a bit of Marcos.

Marcos Mendosa:

Okay, I got I got a fortune cookie for you. This morning. I'm driving to Toronto. And I always do my like random YouTube like, what am I going to kill time with two hour drive? And I came across this video Delores cannon on life after that, okay, Laura's cannon on life after death. Okay. And if fucking blew me away, because I believe her that she has seen what happens after you die. And she has done all these hypnotherapy the past regression. Like she's a legend. I went, I was I was listening to the fucking episode. I was watching it driving to a coffee shop to take my first client call this morning. And I ended up of course, at an indigo, which is a bookstore, you know. And of course, I finished my call and I go into Indigo and I I went to go buy her books. Right? So I wrote a book. It's called handpicked. And I keep stalling on finishing it. Because I'm I Not now but was prior to today terrified of continuing to write about this, because I'm such a manage any. So I'm like, I don't want to manage any of that she had into my life. So I literally she's talking about what happens after you die. And it is everything that I wrote in my book. And I did research I downloaded that book into my space. So I fictionalized the experience of life after death. And what happens when you die into this book? And the book is this rom com version of what she talked about in that episode. So All I'm like, fascinated now because I'm like after finish my book I was right all along. It's been six years I've been writing this book. So I'm here to tell you to check out Dolores. Dolores Cannon is going to assist in all that magic that you are receiving right now. Wow. Yeah.

Theresa Lambert:

I can't wait to look that up.

Marcos Mendosa:

The last time Yeah.

Theresa Lambert:

I mean, that is really cool. And I'm gonna say something to you both bland. I have published books. Oh, we publish books. We're best selling author is in fact, with Amazon,

Blair Kaplan Venables:

which is pretty cool. My next book is coming out soon.

Theresa Lambert:

I feel like one thing that I really just think is fascinating me about this whole manifest whole manifestation conversation, this whole conversation like five step I'm lit the fuck up. Like I'm so beyond activated. Like, let's just call it what it is. Second, like, I know that I manifested you into my fucking life.

Marcos Mendosa:

Like acted on that. Like,

Theresa Lambert:

what you said like, I fucking know it. Like I'm like, okay. Okay, this is how this works. Click Click, click, click like, like, it's so many, like light bulbs went off in the last, like, 45 minutes that we've been having this conversation. And like, I could just keep talking to you for hours. I'm like, can I just like, can I just have to have you on like, continuation? And I'm like, hang on. I do. Because I listen to your music all the fucking time. Like literally, literally. So oh my goodness. Like, I just want to keep talking to you for hours. And guess what I I can?

Marcos Mendosa:

You can very soon. Yes, yes.

Theresa Lambert:

So this is really, really exciting. So like, I hate to fucking wrap up this conversation because I know. But we got to wrap this up. And I just like, is your something that you want to say? Before you go out and speak to millions on a stage because I know you will. Guaranteed it's happening.

Marcos Mendosa:

I'm I'm actually really scared of that. Like I'm terrified. Have you read YouTube comments? Like people are weird.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

You don't need to read the comments. You're going out.

Theresa Lambert:

Okay, black thing? No, like Blair said to me, when the trolls come, you've made it. And I remember having the troll come like one of my like, reels like had a lot of views. And then the trolls came and like it was mean and I send it to plan ahead.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Like, what like,

Theresa Lambert:

what was like, What do I do like? And she she said, and the trolls come you've made it and I was like, I am fucking celebrating the trolls. And now every time trolls come and say mean things, I just delete them. And then I'm like a fucking made it like so drawls, like, like, you know, and then there's also like, when I when I start to like see it and read it with other people and see the shitstorm is done. I just want to go and like crawl into like a dog with anyone ever again. So, yeah, so I get it, but

Marcos Mendosa:

I'm a work in progress in that regard. I'm sensitive. Um, so essentially, I care. So and I think that's part of my healing is like the desire to be liked and all that. So, you know, I think that's that's definitely work that I'm working on. So that yeah, that's, that's a sensitive spot for me. You know, like, in one part of me that doesn't give a fuck is when I'm on a roll. But when I'm actually wounded, I give a big fuck. Right? So I have to find a dance between those two experiences.

Theresa Lambert:

Amen. So Mark, how can people get more from you? Like, where do you want people to go? Like, I feel like like, I want more Marcus, where do I go?

Marcos Mendosa:

Just text me. Just text me everybody gives her socials and then I never hear from anybody. So just text me be like, Yo, I just really the interview. I think it's fantastic. Or whatever you got in your space, and then let's have a conversation and then I'll send you to my social, you know? So yeah,

Theresa Lambert:

like putting your phone number directly in the show notes. Is that what you're telling us? Right? Yeah. Okay.

Marcos Mendosa:

Just text me. It's me. It's fine.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Someone wants to call you

Marcos Mendosa:

call me. It's fine. I won't answer who picks up their phone these days?

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Yeah, not me. My phone's on silent. You can text me

Marcos Mendosa:

DND all

Blair Kaplan Venables:

I'm going to text Do you better respond?

Marcos Mendosa:

I well, I love getting I love getting honestly, there's this part of me that really wants to be loved and accepted. So if I see that their messages people are need me, that's important for me, it makes me feel important and makes me feel validated. Well, I'll

Blair Kaplan Venables:

make you. But I also want to feel important from you. Because I, what I'm learning is that I can't like I'm working on cracking my heart open by putting the pieces back together. Because I'm not able to feel gratitude and love. I understand it, I'm able to feel sadness and anger. And it's a whole nother conversation from like childhood trauma. And so what I'm learning is how to feel love. And when people say things, how to actually feel them and not just hear them. So I invite and invite you to respond to all of our listeners, me.

Marcos Mendosa:

Yeah. I'm curious if that's true or not the challenge rather in the context if that's true.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

whole nother conversation that we can have on text.

Marcos Mendosa:

Have you experienced gratitude for this exchange that I can tribute it to your?

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Yeah, like, I could feel it in my chest. Like I'm doing some deep medicine work with healing guides. And I've just started like meditating every day and journaling, like in the last year like my mom and my dad within a year, my father in law had a miscarriage that I love deaths. So I'm on this path of like relearning what my life is about. And part of it well,

Marcos Mendosa:

I don't watch this video I showed you. Oh my god, you're gonna love. You're gonna love where your family is right now.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Oh, I'm into it. Like, I feel like I see my mom more now. Like she, we were running out of time. My mom shows up in my dreams all the time. Like I hang out with my feel her with me more than when she was alive. But I'd rather her be alive. But my mom's with me. It's interesting. I'm on. Yeah,

Marcos Mendosa:

this just watched this video all the way to be in

Blair Kaplan Venables:

K. I'm gonna I'm gonna look for it right now, while Theresa wraps up with

Theresa Lambert:

you. And I'll send you the link Yeah, we're gonna send you a text, you're gonna send us the link, we're gonna put your number and the link to the social watch into the show notes. So it's gonna be like, so easy. Yeah, and I mean, I don't even know how the fuck to wrap this up. This was was amazing. You wrap it up, I love it. You like bow tie around it? Go.

Marcos Mendosa:

So let's acknowledge the audience. First, I want to say thank you to everyone that witnessed us in our expression in our exchanges, and our Dynamics and our authenticity. Thank you to the audience. Anyone that stuck around if you're hearing this message, we appreciate you. This was definitely done for each of us selfishly because it's fulfilling for us. But there's definitely a premise of contribution. And that contribution is because we thought of you and how we can add value to your life or your day. So thanks for giving us the space to be ourselves. Thank you to Blair and Teresa for inviting me on I appreciate the both of you looking at me as a contribution to the legacies that the both of you are building through this work, I value being cared about and to be seen. And I valued that you've taken my energy and contribution in such a way that as activated and lit the fuck up the both of you, and that you're amplifying things that were maybe dormant or things that you've been waiting to be activated. So I'm so grateful that I get to be a contribution. And thank you to myself to you know, for showing up and for fucking living the way that I've lived enough to have this level of self awareness with this communication as a superpower and the self expression that allows me to just be who I am proudly, while also striving for the legacy that I'm building as well. So thank you to all who are involved. I feel it this was like I just said grace to the podcast kings and queens. Namaste. Thank you and yeah, we'll see you next month.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Amen. Peace.

Theresa Lambert:

That's a wrap for another episode of dissecting success. enjoyed this episode. Make sure to subscribe to Blair Kaplan, Venables and Theresa Lambert's podcast dissecting success on the App Store.

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