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Ep008 - The Past, The Present, The Future - Laura and Clement
Episode 817th March 2021 • The Spaceship Podcast • Laura Francois & Clement Hochart
00:00:00 00:03:21

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Laura: Hi! This is Laura.

Clement: And Clement,

Laura: Co-founders of the Spaceship Academy, and the hosts of the Spaceship Podcast. We are so glad you joined us for our first season. Thank you so much for listening and supporting the show. Right now, we’re recording and preparing for a huge shift for season 2. 

Clement: Big things are coming! We’re moving towards more structured and tailored episodes on topics from The Spaceship Curriculum. 

Laura: So, if you’re struggling with developing your business plan, 

Clement: Or wondering how to think about scale

Laura: Our new season will be tailored towards the important and sometimes challenging questions that come with launching an impact enterprise. 

Clement: As we look forward we are also reflecting on what we learned from our season one guests!

We talked about some cool things this season, like how to seek inspiration from those facing the problem -- 

Linh: So the more you talk to the people that you want to serve, the more ideas you have, and they actually can even tell you to do different things. And at first, as it's kind of the mother of your idea, you'll be like, "Oh, I'm not going to do that." But if you, if you ask ten people and eight of them tell you to do certain things differently, then maybe there's something you need to consider.

Laura: Or learning to take out time for play! 

Moses: And we had one objective on lazy day. If you will call it an objective, it was to do nothing. Honestly, one of the hardest things I had to do every week was just literally have no schedule and nothing to do on a Monday, but I think that's the idea of play: giving space for spontaneity and, you know, just doing nothing.

Clement: How to seek motivation when things get complicated 

Sharath: There's always what I'd call a jujitsu point in a system, right? Where there's a role. There's a kind of person in the system who is very close to tipping, right. They really want a better outcome on the motivation side. But something is conspiring against them.

Laura: how to use inspiration from the past to look to the future

Laure: We asked ourselves, before facing our waste crisis, how did we used to live? How did we used to consume products? And so we went back to this idea of the milkman, where at the time packaging was an asset for the companies. So it was in their interest to make these assets as durable as possible. Not because of the environment...because at the time in you know, late fifties, sixties, it was not yet an issue, but really because of economics. So the milk bottle had to be durable to be reused many, many times because it was simply an asset that would depreciate over time.

Clement: And especially rethinking the potential for business to do good in the world

Matt: We don't live in a world right now where governments habitually make sensible, ambitious decisions about the public goods we need to create and then efficiently go about creating them. So, if we could pass those mandates to private companies who can do good while also doing well, if you can create a business model where doing the right thing is profitable, then you've won.

Laura: We can’t wait to jump into season 2! 

Transcripts

Laura: Hi! This is Laura.

Clement: And Clement!

Laura: Co-founders of the Spaceship Academy, and the hosts of the Spaceship Podcast. We are so glad you joined us for our first season. Thank you so much for listening and supporting the show. Right now, we’re recording and preparing for a huge shift for season 2.

Clement: Big things are coming! We’re moving towards more structured and tailored episodes on topics from The Spaceship Curriculum.

Laura: So, if you’re struggling with developing your business plan,

Clement: Or wondering how to think about scale

Laura: Our new season will be tailored towards the important and sometimes challenging questions that come with launching an impact enterprise.

Clement: As we look forward we are also reflecting on what we learned from our season one guests!

We talked about some cool things this season, like how to seek inspiration from those facing the problem --

Linh: So the more you talk to the people that you want to serve, the more ideas you have, and they actually can even tell you to do different things. And at first, as it's kind of the mother of your idea, you'll be like, "Oh, I'm not going to do that." But if you, if you ask ten people and eight of them tell you to do certain things differently, then maybe there's something you need to consider.

Laura: Or learning to take out time for play!

Moses: And we had one objective on lazy day. If you will call it an objective, it was to do nothing. Honestly, one of the hardest things I had to do every week was just literally have no schedule and nothing to do on a Monday, but I think that's the idea of play: giving space for spontaneity and, you know, just doing nothing.

Clement: How to seek motivation when things get complicated

Sharath: There's always what I'd call a jujitsu point in a system, right? Where there's a role. There's a kind of person in the system who is very close to tipping, right. They really want a better outcome on the motivation side. But something is conspiring against them.

Laura: how to use inspiration from the past to look to the future

Laure: We asked ourselves, before facing our waste crisis, how did we used to live? How did we used to consume products? And so we went back to this idea of the milkman, where at the time packaging was an asset for the companies. So it was in their interest to make these assets as durable as possible. Not because of the environment...because at the time in you know, late fifties, sixties, it was not yet an issue, but really because of economics. So the milk bottle had to be durable to be reused many, many times because it was simply an asset that would depreciate over time.

Clement: And especially rethinking the potential for business to do good in the world

Matt: We don't live in a world right now where governments habitually make sensible, ambitious decisions about the public goods we need to create and then efficiently go about creating them. So, if we could pass those mandates to private companies who can do good while also doing well, if you can create a business model where doing the right thing is profitable, then you've won.

Laura: We can’t wait to jump into season 2!

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