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How We Hatched: Emilie Schario, Co-Founder & CEO of Turbine
23rd January 2024 • The Pair Program • hatch I.T.
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How We Hatched: Emilie Schario, Co-Founder & CEO of Turbine

Welcome to another enlightening episode of "How We Hatched." In this edition, our host, Tim Winkler, sits down with Emilie Schario, the CEO and Co-Founder of Turbine, for an engaging discussion on her remarkable startup journey.

They Discuss:

  • Emilie’s career journey, from entering the startup world in a technical role to climbing the leadership ladder and eventually founding Turbine.
  • The role of college and alternative paths like boot camps in preparing for success in the tech startup realm.
  • Her transformative experience with Venture for America and its impact on her career path.
  • The inspiration behind her decision to start her own business.
  • The invaluable lessons she learned while working at startups and her passion for the dynamic startup environment.
  • The exciting problems that Turbine is addressing and their promising future direction.

About today’s guest: Emilie is CEO & Co-Founder at Turbine, financial software for companies that manage physical inventories. She also writes a semi-regular Substack on the intersection of work, life, and working parenthood. She was previously Data-Strategist-in-Residence at Amplify Partners, Director of Data at Netlify, and in multiple roles at GitLab.

Sign-Up for the Weekly hatchpad Newsletter: https://www.myhatchpad.com/newsletter/

Transcripts

Tim Winkler:

Welcome to The Pair Program from hatchpad, the podcast that gives you

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a front row seat to candid conversations

with tech leaders from the startup world.

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I'm your host, Tim Winkler,

the creator of hatchpad.

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And I'm your other host, Mike Gruen.

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Join us each episode as we bring

together two guests to dissect topics

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at the intersection of technology,

startups, and career growth.

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Emily, thanks for joining

us on The Pair Program.

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Uh, this is a, another bonus episode of a

mini series that we call how we hatched.

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Uh, and so today we've got Emily

Schario, uh, she's spending time with

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us and was the founder and visionary

behind Turbine, um, a startup that's

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bridging the gap in supply chain

visibility for consumer brands.

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She's also a military spouse, uh, and

a parent of two toddlers and a dog.

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Um, all while juggling this task of

building an early stage startup, which.

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I just can't wait to, to dig into on

how you find balance in your life.

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Um, but, uh, Emily, I'm excited

to have you with us today.

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Thank you for joining us on the podcast.

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Thanks for having me.

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Cool.

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Cool.

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All right, let's jump in.

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Um, you know, I always like to start

every one of these episodes with like

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a real thought provoking question.

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So.

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What did Emily Schario have

for breakfast this morning?

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Emilie Schario: So I start every

day with two cups of coffee.

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Uh, I usually have two cups

of coffee, um, before 7 a.

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m.

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and then no more coffee

for the rest of the day.

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Tim Winkler: Wow.

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Cream and sugar?

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What do you, what, oat milk?

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What

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Emilie Schario: do you No sugar.

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Um Usually black, sometimes special treat

of condensed milk, but only if I'm at

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home, if I go out and I'm having a cup

of coffee, it's black, like myself, I was

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Tim Winkler: gonna say, you really learn

a lot about somebody's coffee order.

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It's like, oh,

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Emilie Schario: nice.

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A lot of people out there drink

creamer with a splash of coffee.

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And that is my judgmental

take on, on morning

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Tim Winkler: coffee.

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I've always had, um, this will be really

embarrassing, uh, for everybody that's

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listening, but I've always had like some,

you know, some issues with dairy and, um,

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it doesn't do the best with my stomach.

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And so I felt like it was, my wife's like

a dietician and she's like, why don't

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you just try like oat milk for just once?

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And I was like, yeah, that sounds

like it's going to be terrible.

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And I love it.

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I think it actually adds a

pretty interesting flavor to it.

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Emilie Schario: I did not drink coffee

at all until after I had my first kid.

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Yeah.

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I, I like to say I grew up

inside of a Dunkin Donuts.

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My mom started working at Dunkin

Donuts in:

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at Dunkin Donuts till this day.

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So growing up, I, I learned

everything inside of a Dunkin Donuts,

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how to do, how to make change.

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I learned from working the cash

registers with my mom, um, how

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to show up to work on time.

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I learned as a 14 year old.

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Uh, when I was working my, um, weekly

shifts, you know, I really learned

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a lot inside that Dunkin Donuts.

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And one thing that I would see is you'd

have these regular people who came

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every day, two or three times a day,

spending 20, 30 on coffee every day.

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And that puts such a sour

taste in my mouth of like, Wow.

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This is a real drug that people need.

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Um, you know, you'd see people, people

love to joke, like, don't talk to

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me before my morning cup of coffee,

but I have seen what people are like

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before their morning cup of coffee.

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Uh, and so I took that

experience to really be adamant.

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I wasn't going to do coffee.

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I wasn't going to do caffeine.

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I don't drink soda.

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Did the whole college experience

with like maybe the occasional

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Red Bull, but not really.

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Um, And it wasn't until I had

my first kid where I was like,

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I just am not making it anymore.

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And so started drinking, uh,

my husband is an avid coffee

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drinker, enjoys it, loves it.

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Probably his blood is half coffee.

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And, uh, I did not start drinking

coffee until after I had my first kid.

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And now I find joy in the

ritual of just starting my day.

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With two cups of coffee before my kids

are awake before anyone needs anything

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from me, it's like my chance to take a

couple moments to start the day, right?

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Tim Winkler: Yeah, I've got

so many questions right now.

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Like the torture of growing up and a

Dunkin Donuts and never drinking coffee.

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Um, your mom, I mean, it's just

constantly surrounded by, it just seems

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like now knowing how much you like,

love coffee, I guess you're right.

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It's kind of like the routine of

it, but I'd love to have your mom on

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this podcast and just kind of hear

the the Dunkin Donuts story as well.

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That's impressive.

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Yeah, seriously.

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And don't get me wrong.

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Like I had Dunkin Donuts

flagged in my notes.

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I saw I appreciate that.

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It's still on your LinkedIn profile.

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And I was like, I'm totally

gonna bring up Dunkin Donuts

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and see how that experience was.

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So thank you for checking that

box off of my, my notes here.

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Um, cool.

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Well, let's, um Let's get

into the thick of it, right?

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Um, I always like to roll back the clock

a little bit and, uh, hear a little bit

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more about you and, and, and your journey

and where you, where you grew up and what

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kind of led you down this path and attack.

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Well, obviously.

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Get into turbine and the

problems that you're solving.

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But, uh, let's start from the roots.

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What, you know, where'd you grow up

and, and, uh, tell us a little bit about

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Emilie Schario: that story.

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So, I am originally from New Jersey,

and we were talking about this earlier

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have slowly migrated further south.

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So, currently live in Columbus, Georgia.

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I've been running away from

the snow for the past 25 years.

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Originally from New Jersey, uh, grew

up in Newark, went to high school

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in Elizabeth for folks who are

familiar and took what I would call

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a very conventional or safe path.

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I saw myself and still, in a lot of ways,

do as pretty risk averse, pretty, uh,

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high achieving, um, ambitious person.

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Um, and so very focused on

school, very focused on sports.

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Um.

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Was, you know, that 3 sport

varsity athlete who did all the

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AP classes in high school, uh, was

lucky enough to go to college for

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basically free and went to Princeton.

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That really opened a lot of doors for me.

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Um, I was the 1st person in my family

to go and graduate from college and.

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Really, that transformed a lot of

opportunities went on to take a post

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grad fellowship called venture for

America venture for America takes recent

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college grads and puts them in startups.

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So, I moved to Baltimore where

I worked for an amazing company

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called all of you for a, a.

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An incredible founder by the name

of just Gartner and, um, the chief

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product officer, Jason Becker, and

it was such an incredible learning

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experience, really fell in love with

startups, really learn to code and

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become more technical in that role.

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Um, and then have taken on a

couple of other roles since.

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Moving across verticals, but primarily

thinking about how companies use data.

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So it was the 1st day to hire at smile

direct club, the straight teeth company.

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I was the 1st data analyst at get lab

had a bunch of roles there in the time.

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I was there and then, um, went on

to be director of data at Netlify.

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Before eventually taking the

path that led me to turbine.

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So, um, it's interesting because

if you had asked me at any point in

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the previous 20 years, like, do you

see yourself starting a company?

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I wouldn't have said yes.

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I think, like, when you grow up.

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Uh, in the environment I was in, so

financial precarity and Children of

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immigrants, you're looking for the

safest route all the time, right?

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Like, what, what is the most secure bet

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here

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Tim Winkler: stable, right?

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What's the

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Emilie Schario: stability and.

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Entrepreneurship doesn't

fit that criteria.

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Yeah.

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And so, um, with I, I've always been

focused 1st and foremost on, like,

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driving business impact and doing

the thing that needs to be done.

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Um, and so it's, it's

interesting how that despite.

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My background and, and being a little

bit more risk averse, how I still ended

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up in this kind of entrepreneurial

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Tim Winkler: place.

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Yeah, it's an interesting, uh, journey.

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And I always, you know, I talked to

a lot of entrepreneurs and one of

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the questions I usually will, will

open with or, or, or, you know, pry

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into is, you know, where your parents

entrepreneurs, you know, is that something

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that's just kind of deep root in the

DNA, which is oftentimes a journey.

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I think for you, you know, it's,

you're, you're kind of a product of

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your experiences and I, and I, I, I

was studying your background, you know,

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you're straight out the off the break.

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That venture for America, I think is

what an awesome experience, right?

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Because it kind of immediately

kind of gave you some exposure

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into the startup ecosystem.

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Which most folks, you know, they

are either, they either stumble

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into it or, you know, they.

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I don't know if it's always just

like, I'm going to join a startup.

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Like, that's my thing.

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I think you just, everybody's got a

different, unique pathway into how

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they get fall into the startup world.

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Um, so venture for America, I thought

was like, you know, highlighted with,

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you know, a big, a big yellow pin

here of like, okay, this is starting

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to add up paired with, you know, your

experience in smaller companies, seeing

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them kind of grow that, that excitement.

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And then, um.

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Amplify partners, which

we'll talk about as well.

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Um, you know, leading you to, you

know, your, your own, uh, uh, business.

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But I do have a quick question.

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So what did you study, um, at Princeton?

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American

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Emilie Schario: politics,

which is totally unrelated.

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So my, I, I graduated college

for those who aren't looking

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that I graduated college in 2015.

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And as an American politics major, my

like sketched out plan was that I was

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going to pick the right presidential

campaign, ride that to the white house and

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work in the white house for eight years.

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Then go do whatever DC people do.

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That was like the, the tentative plan.

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Um, but you know, the thing about

work and professional ambitions

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is that, um, they can't exist in a

vacuum from our personal lifestyles.

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And so, um, I was lucky enough to

meet my now husband back in college.

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So we started dating seriously.

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Um, junior year of college, and I wanted

to figure out how to make my professional

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ambitions happen while also having, um,

this relationship that I really valued

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and saw a future with, but didn't know

what that would look like and wasn't

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willing to give up my professional

ambitions to make that happen.

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And so part of the reroute into

Venture for America was that, um.

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I didn't want to go be a cog

in someone's big machine.

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Um, so I didn't want to

go work for a big company.

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I wanted a job that was going to

give me a remote flexibility or

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like a path to that in the future.

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This is 2015 where nobody hires

recent college grads to work remotely.

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This isn't, you know, post

COVID totally different world.

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Um, and so venture for America

gave me the opportunity to both

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be impactful and have a path to.

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Flexible, remote future,

um, in all of you.

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And so the way to connect the dots

between what I studied in school and

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my professional career is that, um,

within that politics major, I was

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very focused on quantitative analysis.

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So I focused on.

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Um, political methodologies,

which some other schools

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would call political science.

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So, thinking of it as a true social

science, how do you run experiments?

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How do you change behaviors?

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How do you quantify impact?

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Um, and so learned how to build some

statistical forecasting and analysis

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in undergrad that I then went on

to use in my professional work.

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Um, so the skills are there.

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It's just, instead of applying it

to political domains, I'm applying

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it to conversion rates and, um, the

others, the other domains that I

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interact with on a regular basis.

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Tim Winkler: Which I think is, you

know, becoming more and more common.

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Um, you know, folks don't just, you know,

it's not just computer science or math.

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It's, it's, you know, it's

especially with AI, right?

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Like you're seeing, um, how AI is

impacting and so many different.

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Verticals.

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And so, you know, this is actually a, an

episode we ran not too long ago, which is,

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you know, going a depth of breath right

within, within, you know, the, your tech,

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um, experience, especially for, you know,

in, in school, like how much do you have

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to, do you really be like the algorithmic,

you know, guru versus, you know, having

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enough of a skill set, if it's in

healthcare, it's in politics, whatever it

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is, and then pairing that with, um, Data,

uh, product, you know, uh, engineering.

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Emilie Schario: I think part of

what we're seeing right now is

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this, um, society wide question

around what is the role of college?

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What is the role of higher

education in general?

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Like is college a different kind

of technical training school

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where we're giving you these

very specific hard skills around.

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That are that you're going to use in

your next job, or is college some sort

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of different academic pursuit that

you're going to spend time reading the

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great canon and classic literature.

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Like, I had a mentor in college who,

um, where I, I did my undergrad,

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you had a language requirement.

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I think you had to take,

like, 2 years of language.

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And, uh, he took that opportunity to take.

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Greek and Latin.

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I remember turning him like, Charlie, why?

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And he said to me, when

else am I going to?

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Right?

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Like he looked at school as this

academic pursuit opportunity.

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That's incredible.

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But that's really different from people

who see it as like, this is the box that

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I need to check in order to get the job.

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Yeah.

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Yeah, I actually think we would

probably be much better served as a

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society if we stopped thinking of,

um, college as a prerequisite to most

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jobs, like some of the best engineers,

data engineers, software engineers,

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data analysts that I've ever hired.

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Never went to school, uh, or

never went to college, right?

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Like, I don't, I don't know the

right answer, but I think that's

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part of the open conversation right

now is like, what is the role of

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college in preparing people for work?

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Or do we actually need something else?

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Is there a boot camp or a

technical training or something

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else that prepares those skills?

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I don't know.

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And I'm, I'm no expert, but I think

that's an open question that we're going

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to see really change in the next decade.

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Tim Winkler: Yeah.

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And I, you know, a couple of things

on that note too, is like one, I think

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bootcamps are fantastic and I think

they're becoming more and more popular.

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Um, you know, for folks that just

kind of went through school, like

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most did and they're like, well,

shit, what am I doing in this?

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Yeah, this degree.

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I don't, you know, and getting into

tech right and using a boot camp.

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But the other piece of that conversation

is the ridiculousness that is student

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debt and the cost of education.

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Because oftentimes to what that does

is put this burden and this anxiety on

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students that graduate and they say.

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Well, I have to make X amount, right?

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So then they're pursuing something

just for the money to pay off.

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You know, how am I going to

pay off these student debts?

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I mean, med medical school too.

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I mean, that's ridiculous.

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Like we, we obviously need

more of that talent yet.

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It costs an arm and a

leg to pursue that path.

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And so.

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You know, it's just a, it's an

interesting, uh, area at large, but all,

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all into, I would say that, you know,

from a tech perspective, I do enjoy

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seeing that it's no longer, it's just

not like computer science is the way,

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um, because that can be a deterrent.

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And a lot of folks, you know, aren't going

to get into tech if that's all there is.

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Um, we're seeing a much more diverse

like pathway to get into technology.

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I think roles of like product management

are, are ones that are really opening

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up the, the doors for folks as well.

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And data, right.

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Data being so.

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Every so everywhere right now.

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Um, you know, it can be applied

in so many different ways.

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Um, which is a good segue for you too.

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So, you know, you, you, you kind of

gave a little bit of context into how,

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you know, your pol, your political

cop PoliSci, um, uh, studies kind

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of led you down this path into data.

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So you, you, you jump into all of you.

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Um.

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And then, uh, through that you

made, you know, you made the

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connections with Venture for America.

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How did you find out

about Venture for America?

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How did you, who told you about them?

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Oh,

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Emilie Schario: you know what?

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I worked.

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I'm smiling because I haven't thought

about this in a while, and I should

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probably send her a note, but Emily

saying, uh, is someone I worked

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with in the dining hall on campus.

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She was in the year above me

and she did venture for America.

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Oh, cool.

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And she posted something

about it on LinkedIn.

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And I actually think, yeah,

she like posted applications

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are due tomorrow or something.

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And I was like, well, I don't have a job.

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So this seems like a good thing to

apply to you know, mostly on a whim.

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And now I'm thinking about it.

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I should probably reach out to her

and tell her how much that mattered.

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But yeah, Emily sang posted about it on

LinkedIn and I knew her because I worked

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with her in the dining hall in college.

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Tim Winkler: Wow.

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Yeah, that's fantastic.

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It's funny how those little Those

little paths can, can create

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so, so much, uh, in your life.

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Um, so, so that was,

uh, a good experience.

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And then obviously you, you, you begin

getting some really, really interesting

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experience in the corporate space, working

with some really heavy hitting, you know,

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names, uh, within the world of tech, um,

talk to us a little bit about some of

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those, some of those, uh, experiences and.

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How they really kind of strengthen your

exposure to the world of data and and how

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it kind of groomed you into, um, your,

you know, your expertise at this point.

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Emilie Schario: Yeah, so 1 thing I

really appreciated about my time at view,

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um, was just how impactful I could be.

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You know, I didn't think this at

the time, but now I can look back

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and see that I was a young, dumb

22 year old with no experience.

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I didn't know anything, but I still

had to say, like, when I said things,

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people listened in part because I

was employee number nine, right?

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Still a single digit person

in this organization where it

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made such a huge difference.

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Every voice mattered.

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Um, yeah.

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Until this day, like, I still

consider the folks who hired me.

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They're people.

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I send my regular turbine

updates to because I feel

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like they're part of my team.

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And I think what I've really come

to appreciate as I, like, look back

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:

over the different roles that I've

had is that I have always enjoyed

358

:

being in places where I could feel

like I was making a difference.

359

:

And, um, like, I mentioned,

I worked at GitLab.

360

:

So I joined get lab as employee

number 282 at that point.

361

:

It was the biggest organization

where I had ever worked.

362

:

Um, and I remember being

worried, like, oh, it's 282 big.

363

:

Is this is this company a

place that I'm going to thrive?

364

:

Um, in the two and a half years

that I was there, we grew all

365

:

the way to over 1, 200 people.

366

:

Um, GitLab was the largest

all remote company in the

367

:

world prior to the pandemic.

368

:

And so the GitLab that I joined

and the GitLab that I left were

369

:

completely different GitLabs.

370

:

Like, we added a thousand

people in two and a half years.

371

:

Wow.

372

:

That is insane.

373

:

But the moment that I was like, okay, I,

I think I'm ready to move on now was, um,

374

:

I was working as interim chief of staff

to the CEO working on a pricing project.

375

:

And, you know, related to some

pricing changes we were exploring,

376

:

we're going to have to send an

email out sitting on this meeting.

377

:

I'm laughing because it's sad to me, but

I know that this is how companies operate.

378

:

Um, I'm sitting on this meeting

about sending this email.

379

:

It's myself.

380

:

It's, um.

381

:

Someone who wrote the copy for the email.

382

:

It's someone who's responsible

to pull the list for the email.

383

:

It's someone who's responsible

for putting it into the system.

384

:

It's someone who's responsible

for signing off for it.

385

:

There's like eight people in this meeting.

386

:

It's a serious email.

387

:

About sending one email.

388

:

And I remember getting off this meeting

and just saying like, okay, I'm done here.

389

:

Tim Winkler: This is not

what I The email audit team.

390

:

Emilie Schario: Yeah, and, you know,

there are very large companies out there

391

:

where people get to drive incredible

impact and make a difference and wonderful

392

:

technologies coming out of there.

393

:

And, and there is a time and place.

394

:

But I think 1 thing that I've really

come to appreciate about myself is

395

:

that I don't want to work in a place

where the feedback loops are that long.

396

:

Sure.

397

:

Where.

398

:

You know, you're making a plan

that you're not going to see

399

:

the results of for 2 or 3 years.

400

:

Like, I love when we get feedback

from a customer in the morning.

401

:

And by the afternoon, we have

shipped a change to the app or,

402

:

you know, something like that.

403

:

Those are phenomenal experiences,

and I don't think we, um, I don't

404

:

think we get the opportunity.

405

:

To do that in a lot of things.

406

:

So I think part of, for me, the appeal

of startups has been this opportunity

407

:

to really feel that I could drive change

in the business in different roles

408

:

and see the results of that change,

not just in a theoretical on paper.

409

:

Here's how numbers should shift.

410

:

But, uh, an actual, here's

what we did to the business.

411

:

I mean, that's part of why

I enjoy experimentation.

412

:

Um, is that experimentation is we're

going to make this change and let's see

413

:

what happens over the next 60, 90, 180

414

:

Tim Winkler: days.

415

:

Sure.

416

:

Yeah.

417

:

Yeah.

418

:

You wonder if that.

419

:

Reaction would have been the same

had you not had that exposure at all

420

:

of you in those early days, right?

421

:

Where it's like you, you got to see

what it was like firsthand and then to

422

:

take that step in that other direction.

423

:

Don't get me wrong, right?

424

:

Because I did something similar in my

career where it's like, you know, went,

425

:

went in a big, a big organization,

got pulled into a small organization,

426

:

saw how quickly things were moving.

427

:

It's almost like, you You can, you know,

when you have first hand interactions

428

:

with founders and the C, the C suite,

it's like this, this level of power.

429

:

It's like, wow, I can truly, truly see

how this business is running and then

430

:

go to start my own thing, fail in that,

come back, work for a large organization.

431

:

And I was just scratching at

the walls to get out of there.

432

:

It's like, I can't be in here.

433

:

And it's like, if you don't get that

experience or that visibility, Yeah.

434

:

You know, you never kind of know

what it's like on the other side.

435

:

It's something that's immediately

go into the big corporate, you

436

:

know, big bigger companies and

there's nothing wrong with it.

437

:

But I will say too, it's like.

438

:

That was also a strategic play.

439

:

Um, just because, you know, there is

a level of like, Hey, like, you know,

440

:

you're building your resume to, to have

that on your, your profile opens doors

441

:

and gives you really like experience,

uh, that led you down to your next path.

442

:

Right?

443

:

So it's like.

444

:

And, and, and it sounds like this

next role too, was like, this was

445

:

like kind of more of like in a

leadership role, like you were a

446

:

director, um, is it Netlify, right?

447

:

So what, what was, uh, what

was your, your, your big kind

448

:

of takeaways from that, that

449

:

Emilie Schario: experience?

450

:

It's funny as you're talking,

because, um, the thought that

451

:

popped into my head was like.

452

:

Some people, their drug

of choice is caffeine.

453

:

Mine is driving business impact.

454

:

Apparently,

455

:

Tim Winkler: Hey, that's

a healthy drug though.

456

:

Emilie Schario: Absolutely.

457

:

Um, yeah.

458

:

So when I joined Netlify, I joined,

um, to lead the data organization.

459

:

So the company had made a couple

of decisions around how they

460

:

wanted to invest in data, how.

461

:

Data was actually going to feed into

the product that we were selling to

462

:

customers, not just like a true analytics

purpose, but things like our billing

463

:

process that we build customers on our.

464

:

Analytics product, like, how

the data team was going to play

465

:

very closely with all of that.

466

:

Um, so it was a really

compelling opportunity.

467

:

I joined, um, got to, uh, the,

the team had just done almost a

468

:

completely, a complete turnover.

469

:

So there was very little prior experience,

came in with relatively clean slate, hired

470

:

a bunch of people, and really, I think,

changed the way a lot of people in the

471

:

company had used or interacted with data.

472

:

It was a really incredible, Yeah.

473

:

Opportunity to change people's

minds and drive impact.

474

:

We brought in experimentation

and a culture around that.

475

:

Um, we brought, we added a company

added value to the company,

476

:

not only in typical analytics.

477

:

What are our revenues, what

are the levers, but also just a

478

:

better understanding of what are

the parts of the business that

479

:

can be adjusted to drive change.

480

:

Like, I think, um, something that

I'll be saw asylum talks about a lot.

481

:

That's 1 of my favorite frameworks

around a business is that, like,

482

:

when it comes to a company.

483

:

Almost always the number 1

metric is revenue, right?

484

:

There's or really profitability,

especially in the current

485

:

macro climate, right?

486

:

For profitability, there's

2 levers you can pull.

487

:

You can increase revenue.

488

:

You can improve efficiency.

489

:

And then, if you keep thinking about

it that way, you can decompose it

490

:

for new or for increasing revenue.

491

:

You can bring on new revenue.

492

:

You can expand existing revenue and

you can continue to break it down

493

:

and break it down and break it down.

494

:

And what that metric tree approach

does is it helps you understand

495

:

how an organization, how a team

in a company can drive an impact.

496

:

Right?

497

:

So if the, um, if you're rolling out an

experiment around, let's say, conversion

498

:

rates or around product activation, um.

499

:

You're basically trying to say,

we think this experiment is going

500

:

to drive this lever, which should

hopefully add to that revenue number.

501

:

Right?

502

:

But you can draw those dots.

503

:

And, um, too many people,

I think, especially.

504

:

As orgs become bigger, if you're

not intentional about it, people

505

:

become so separated from the

final goal and I see it a lot.

506

:

Actually, um, in my work now is

that I think a lot of people,

507

:

whether or not they want to admit

it, like, kind of poo poo sales.

508

:

People think like sales is slimy.

509

:

It gets this like used

car salesman reputation.

510

:

But the thing about sales, if

you're doing it correctly, it's all

511

:

about like, how do I create as much

value as possible for my customer?

512

:

And there's a lot of ways you can do

that, but just kind of being really

513

:

clear on what you're trying to move.

514

:

Mm-Hmm.

515

:

, like what does value mean for you

or what you're trying to, how you're

516

:

trying to drive business impact.

517

:

Whether that's through sales, whether

that's through a new initiative,

518

:

whether that's through an experiment

completely depends on the context,

519

:

but just like, what is the problem

we're trying to solve here?

520

:

Being really clear on that

unlocks a lot for you.

521

:

I think Netlify was the first time

that I was in a leadership role where

522

:

I didn't have, um, I was responsible

for advocating that message.

523

:

There wasn't, I wasn't

an executive to be clear.

524

:

I reported it into an executive, but

I was in this leadership role where

525

:

I had my department, I had my team,

I had, you know, dozen, 8 percent of

526

:

the company headcount reported into

me and being able to say, These, these

527

:

are the folks in here is how we make

a difference to the company and being

528

:

responsible for sharing that message.

529

:

Um, really changed how I thought

about communicating value in

530

:

addition to just delivering value.

531

:

Tim Winkler: Yeah, it's a really

fascinating way of explaining it too,

532

:

cause it's like, it's almost like the

light bulb goes off and it's like,

533

:

Oh my gosh, I see the value here.

534

:

It's like, now here, let me arm you

sales team with how to go out and

535

:

communicate this and really, and

that's the difference between a good

536

:

salesperson and a bad salesperson.

537

:

It's like the people that get it

and they're like, Oh yeah, I see it.

538

:

Like they can, they can talk with passion

and they can go on the front lines.

539

:

That's why I think one of the most

impactful roles or like Sales engineers

540

:

like solutions architects, the folks that

have the tech know how and can really talk

541

:

to the pain points of a customer like that

is one of the most valuable skill sets.

542

:

And, um, because sometimes there is that

lost that you lose that in translation

543

:

of the technical teams communicating

with the sales teams and like, you

544

:

know, making sure that they get it.

545

:

Um, but that's really interesting.

546

:

Uh, the way that you explain that.

547

:

And I just think that your mind

is just like, it's constantly,

548

:

it's like, uh, really fascinating

what's going on in there.

549

:

I was even doing some digging on

your, on, on, on your, uh, blogs

550

:

and, um, your swim class checklist.

551

:

And, and just, just the, the, the fact

of like, you know, yeah, obviously it's

552

:

like, you know, automation, like, how

can I make this more efficient here?

553

:

Um, these are obviously all like

little cogs that build up, you know,

554

:

how you're becoming an entrepreneur

and you wanting to build something

555

:

that can help solve these problems.

556

:

Um, but before we jump to turbine,

uh, I I'm really, uh, really intrigued

557

:

with the Amplify partners experience

because what you are doing at Netlify,

558

:

um, you know, for your customers.

559

:

It sounds to me like Amplify is like, can

you just do this for our portfolio too?

560

:

You know, like really help our

portfolio thrive as if each one

561

:

of those were your customer.

562

:

I just really think that that role

and, and, um, expand on it for

563

:

me, but was such a, uh, a really

interesting experience for you.

564

:

What was it like for you?

565

:

Emilie Schario: Yeah,

I, um, you nailed it.

566

:

That is exactly what I did

is the way to think about it.

567

:

Um, it was, we've got a bunch of companies

that need this kind of expertise,

568

:

but they don't need it full time.

569

:

And does it make sense to

bring this into the build team?

570

:

Um, so you can work with multiple

companies across the portfolio.

571

:

I think you see this a lot in, uh,

Go to market and recruiting, like,

572

:

oftentimes VC firms will have, um, a

go to market resource, uh, that they

573

:

can share across their portfolio.

574

:

Usually some sort of sales coaching

or sales leaders who can be available,

575

:

um, or recruiting is another 1 where

they'll have a team that supports that.

576

:

I think I'm grateful to amplify for

running this experiment around data

577

:

with me, where I got to be that

central resource for their portfolio.

578

:

So I worked with companies across

the portfolio on, you know, what

579

:

is the right business metric?

580

:

What are the right levers?

581

:

What, you know, all these things

that I did at Netlify, basically,

582

:

um, working with them to understand

their businesses and where it

583

:

made sense and where it didn't.

584

:

I think, um, 1 of the things that I saw

working across many companies in the

585

:

portfolio was just how companies are

more similar than they are different.

586

:

Like, there's a reason we talk

about B2B business models as

587

:

separate from B2C business models.

588

:

That's because B2B business models.

589

:

Relatively have a, a similar flow and

the metrics you care about in those

590

:

businesses are relatively the same, right?

591

:

And there are these patterns in those

businesses that we can lean into.

592

:

Um, and so I worked and there's a

couple of blog posts on the Amplify

593

:

blog around this still, um, that, like,

if you're a B2B SaaS company who is

594

:

focused on this kind of go to market

motion, like, here are the metrics you

595

:

need to report in your board meeting.

596

:

Um, and thinking about, like, you

know, maybe every 1 of those does

597

:

not apply to your specific business,

but I hate staring at a blank screen.

598

:

You know, that experience of like, I

need to put a presentation together or

599

:

I need to write a blog post or whatever.

600

:

And you're staring at this blank

screen and you're like, uh,

601

:

I don't know where to start.

602

:

My goal, I'm, I don't

have all the answers.

603

:

I'm not in your business

every day in the way you are.

604

:

You're the expert here, but my goal

was to solve the blank screen problem

605

:

and give you a starting place.

606

:

Um, and I'm really glad I got to do that

and I really enjoyed the experience.

607

:

And I learned a ton from

the founders I worked with.

608

:

Like, it wasn't like I came in early,

609

:

Tim Winkler: early stage startups, right.

610

:

Just to paint the picture here.

611

:

Like, are these like, see,

612

:

Emilie Schario: yeah.

613

:

So many, I worked with founders

that were in the seed stage.

614

:

I worked at founders that were post B.

615

:

So kind of a wide gamut based

on where the needs were in the

616

:

company, in the port across the

portfolio at that point in time.

617

:

I want to say without like, looking

it up, I probably worked with 10

618

:

companies across their portfolio

over the course of the year.

619

:

So really, like, the size

of the engagement depended

620

:

on what the business needed.

621

:

Sometimes it was like, here's Let's hop

on a call and just talk through this

622

:

problem for an hour and other times

it was, um, you know, um, uh, longer,

623

:

many months of let's work together.

624

:

So it really depended on the

business and where they needed

625

:

what problems they had where what

internal structures they had already.

626

:

Tim Winkler: I see.

627

:

Yeah, um, something that I thought was

interesting just doing some research

628

:

was that, you know, you're you coming

on kind of helped influence their

629

:

investment hypothesis in a, in a way.

630

:

Um, because I don't, you

know, I, I think it's.

631

:

It's something that, you know, within

venture, um, everybody's got a different

632

:

hypothesis and, um, you know, one of

the things that we always kind of like

633

:

come to market or, or, or come to try to

be advocates for as a, as a recruiting

634

:

slash kind of like community branding,

marketing, you know, services, firm,

635

:

wherever we partner is like, you know,

whatever we can do to add value beyond

636

:

the check that's being presented.

637

:

Um, talent, right?

638

:

Obviously is a, is a huge one, but

every, you know, one of the things that

639

:

it sounds like they really saw value

in with bringing you on is how to,

640

:

uh, more intentionally kind of study.

641

:

Um, how startups within the

portfolio use data to make

642

:

like these strategic decisions.

643

:

And, and that's something that I

haven't really seen a ton of, or I

644

:

haven't seen like, you know, too many

VCs kind of like vocalize, like, Hey,

645

:

this is what, what makes us unique.

646

:

Um, and so I do, um, I

do applaud, uh, Amplify.

647

:

I think that's a really strategic hire.

648

:

Uh, it sounds like a really cool exposure.

649

:

Emilie Schario: I'll say 1 thing about

the team there and Sarah in particular,

650

:

uh, who's the GP Sarah cat and Sarah's

the GP that I worked with the closest.

651

:

1 of the things about, um,

their current team is that a

652

:

lot of them have worked before.

653

:

Like, when you look at VCs, a lot

of times they'll be bankers who move

654

:

into PE and then maybe into venture.

655

:

Um.

656

:

And I think one of the great things

about that particular team is just

657

:

the, the experience and how, um,

how they have all worked before.

658

:

Sarah was director of data at Mattermark.

659

:

She worked at Palantir.

660

:

Like, she had those really

formative experiences in

661

:

the data space and that you.

662

:

I think she knew.

663

:

And in fact, I still go to her

like, Hey, Sarah, like how, how

664

:

should I think about this problem?

665

:

And she gets to pull on her, um, I don't

know, decade of venture where she's been

666

:

seeing across multiple companies and coach

me, um, through our, our own struggles.

667

:

So, um, I think it's, it's just a

lot of stars aligned and their team

668

:

is really incredible and phenomenal.

669

:

And I'm glad to have them

as our lead investor at

670

:

Tim Winkler: turbine.

671

:

Yeah, that's great.

672

:

And yeah, like to add to your point, I

mean, there's just a level of credibility

673

:

that comes with somebody who's sat

in the seat of that skill set where

674

:

I'm going to buy a lot more into your

advice and, and, and, you know, your,

675

:

your mentorship here versus, you know,

you came from finance and that's what

676

:

you do and that's, you know, so it's

a, it's a really cool, um, strategy.

677

:

Um, sounds like a really

interesting, Yeah.

678

:

Experience for you.

679

:

And then so when, when was it, you know,

when, when did the, uh, that itch kind of

680

:

hit you and you're like, you know what,

you know, it's time to do my own thing.

681

:

Um, talk me through that process.

682

:

Emilie Schario: So, in parallel to

all the professional on goings that

683

:

we're talking about, I also decided

to go to grad school full time.

684

:

So, um, in 2020, the

world is shutting down.

685

:

I find out I'm pregnant.

686

:

With my first kid and I looked

at my schedule and I said,

687

:

life is never going to be.

688

:

less hectic than it is right now.

689

:

If I want to go to grad

school, this is my chance.

690

:

Uh, so applied to grad school

started in October, went to, uh, I

691

:

was getting an MBA from UNC Chapel

Hill, Kenan Flagler Business School.

692

:

Um, and I did that full time

while working full time.

693

:

Tim Winkler: Wow.

694

:

You psycho.

695

:

Emilie Schario: Well, a little

bit, um, but you know, you

696

:

alluded briefly to this blog post.

697

:

That's one of my most popular online

called the swim class checklist.

698

:

And the general thesis of that blog post,

um, for anyone who hasn't read it, is

699

:

that like there are all these skills that

we apply at work kind of unthinkingly.

700

:

Building a checklist as you're running

through a process so that someone else

701

:

can do it more easily next time as

a prime example, but we don't apply

702

:

those same skills to our home life.

703

:

So the example that I use in the blog

post is, uh, taking my kids to swim class.

704

:

We do this special kind of

swim called infant swim rescue.

705

:

It's, um, the way classes work,

it's 10 minutes a day for five

706

:

days a week for three to six weeks,

depending on the cohort you're in.

707

:

And then it's not again

for, like, 3 or 4 months.

708

:

And so that means it's very

intense and then none at all.

709

:

And, um, whether it's because you

share that responsibility across

710

:

multiple adults, or if it's because

you don't want to have to reinvent

711

:

the wheel 3 months later, when you're

starting up the class again, my.

712

:

What I did for my family, uh, was

create that checklist and make it

713

:

really easy the next time we go on.

714

:

So I lean into a lot of these

opportunities because I think that if we

715

:

bring those same skills that we use to

run an efficient workplace to the home, we

716

:

can reduce the overall kind of emotional

labor that takes is required in operating

717

:

a household, especially a household with

two professionally driven adults who don't

718

:

want to spend all their time on home.

719

:

Coordinating doctors and dentists

appointments or or figuring out

720

:

what to pack for swim class.

721

:

Um, so when I, part of what I had to

do in that time window of working full

722

:

time, having a small baby, I had my

son, um, four months into starting the

723

:

program and, um, working full time, going

to school full time and having a baby.

724

:

I had to figure out what all

of those efficiencies in where,

725

:

where the opportunity for those.

726

:

In my life

727

:

Tim Winkler: where and

everything was remote.

728

:

Is that right?

729

:

Where are you working remote?

730

:

You're pursuing the NBA remotely.

731

:

Emilie Schario: Exactly.

732

:

Um, and that a huge part of that

was just like the timing and the

733

:

state of the world at the time.

734

:

Um,

735

:

Tim Winkler: and you had had some,

some experience working remote,

736

:

which I think is another piece of, of

really important credibility to that.

737

:

Yeah,

738

:

Emilie Schario: I had five years

of full time remote experience,

739

:

so working remote was not the norm

at that point, and I didn't have

740

:

any new small Children at home.

741

:

We had my son December 2020, and he

started daycare by February:

742

:

So, um, we were really lucky

here, uh, that daycares were

743

:

open, um, from that window.

744

:

You know, then soon after vaccines

started coming around, I was there when

745

:

the Civic Center did the drive thru,

like, when it opened, got the shot.

746

:

Like, you know, we were very enthusiastic

about those sorts of Um, reopening

747

:

opportunities, but 1 of the things

that was a result of that time period

748

:

was that everything was remote.

749

:

And so I wasn't losing time to commute.

750

:

Um, it was, we were also

lucky that my husband was in a

751

:

particularly flexible time in his

career that I missed those days.

752

:

Uh, and so, um, all these things

happened at the same time.

753

:

And it was actually in business school

that I started having this inkling

754

:

that there was a specific opportunity

around supply chain, specifically

755

:

this problem called three way match.

756

:

So if you think about, like, a,

a shoe manufacturer, they cut

757

:

purchase orders to their suppliers.

758

:

They receive shoes in their

warehouse, and then they have to

759

:

pay the invoice to their supplier.

760

:

Um, this problem 3 way match is

about reconciling the purchase order,

761

:

the receipt and the invoice, making

sure that what you ordered is what

762

:

you get is what you pay for it.

763

:

So I'm in business school.

764

:

I get this, um, reading assignment.

765

:

That's like, uh, an article on how.

766

:

Blockchain is the only solution to the

three way match problem, and I'm a bit

767

:

of a, like, anti blockchain y person.

768

:

Blockchain's just a distributed database.

769

:

I consider myself a database person.

770

:

So, um, I was like, no, this is a

solution in search of a problem.

771

:

I'm going to build a prototype using

the database tools that we have.

772

:

Um, and I did.

773

:

And I was like, see, you

don't need blockchain.

774

:

You can solve this with a regular

database, like this silly.

775

:

Um, and so started

spending more time with it.

776

:

Did what all good founders or founders

or people are considering opportunities

777

:

do, which is that I went through every

person in my network who could have an

778

:

intelligent conversation on this topic.

779

:

Like, have you seen it?

780

:

What have you seen?

781

:

How does this problem solve itself?

782

:

Like, you know, the whole 9 yards.

783

:

And, um, then I finished

grad school in May:

784

:

Um, Pregnant with my second kid at

this point and decided like, cool.

785

:

I suddenly have more free time.

786

:

Um, I had my son.

787

:

I I'm thinking about it

still working full time.

788

:

I had my son in September.

789

:

Was planning on, um, taking some time

off just, you know, maternity leave

790

:

and stuff and said, cool, I'm going to

use my maternity leave to make this.

791

:

To figure out if there's something

here, and so I did exactly that.

792

:

I left amplify started working on

urbine full time in September:

793

:

Um, and then we ended up raising a

precede round in December:

794

:

launched the product in spring 2023.

795

:

And now we're working to drive

business impact for folks in, uh.

796

:

Across multiple verticals, and it's great.

797

:

And, you know, I started obsessed

with this 3 way match problem.

798

:

What we found is like,

that's a piece of the puzzle.

799

:

That's not, that's not the whole puzzle.

800

:

We actually help brands understand

their supply chain costs and

801

:

what that translates to and

landed costs for their units.

802

:

Um, we help them understand their

profitability on a per order level.

803

:

So lots of things that we help companies

do and like 3 way match was my.

804

:

Hook for spending more time, but the

problem and the product has evolved as

805

:

we've gotten feedback over time from

customers from users from mentors.

806

:

Um, and yeah, it's been a really

interesting journey, but basically,

807

:

I had to wait for things to free up.

808

:

In order to take the

plunge and now here we are.

809

:

Tim Winkler: Yeah, what a, what an

interesting, uh, timing of everything,

810

:

you know, it's just like, um, that MBA

kind of like wrapping up, you know, the,

811

:

um, going on maternity leave, you know,

uh, providing the opportunity for you to

812

:

spend a little time on this project, this.

813

:

Your, your other baby, your,

your, your, your business baby.

814

:

And, and, uh, obviously your, your baby

baby, but, um, what a, what a neat, um,

815

:

uh, timing for all that to kind of come

together and, you know, you, you know.

816

:

Again, like doing my research on you,

you, you're, you're ranking, you're

817

:

ranking, uh, quite high, uh, from an SEO

perspective on operational workflows,

818

:

data, um, you know, through a match,

you know, these things that you.

819

:

Seem to be very passionate about and

again, I think, but not losing sight

820

:

of these other experiences to your

journey about adding value, right?

821

:

Like, how can I find this thing

here to, you know, ensure that

822

:

you're not spending X here?

823

:

Or like, where can I find the

value for you and your business?

824

:

These are all the things that kind of come

back to the root cause of what you're,

825

:

what you're doing and why you're doing it.

826

:

So I think that's all

827

:

Emilie Schario: really neat.

828

:

You know, One thing that comes up,

um, kind of pretty often, I'll, I'll

829

:

actually share a, uh, anonymous, but

specific example is that, um, we were

830

:

meeting with this Atlanta based brand,

um, incredible team, wonderful product,

831

:

and they came to us with, like, a very

specific problem around forecasting.

832

:

They, they didn't have all the other

problems that we help with that are.

833

:

Those things were fine for now.

834

:

They'll have them as they

grow and that's fine.

835

:

But today they're just focused on this

very specific forecasting problem.

836

:

And I said, like, let's just schedule an

hour long working session and I'll help

837

:

you with your forecast and we can do this

together and work through it and you'll

838

:

come out of it with a better forecast.

839

:

And I don't have anything

to sell you because.

840

:

I'm not here to just take

money for you for the sake of

841

:

growing our revenue number.

842

:

Like I, you're not going

to use our solution.

843

:

I don't want your money.

844

:

And right.

845

:

And so I think so much of my job at

this stage, um, especially on those

846

:

early conversations that we have

with brands is like, do you have a

847

:

problem that I can help you solve?

848

:

And then is turbine actually going

to make a difference to your brand?

849

:

Because if the answer is no, Then I

want to help you, but like, I'm not

850

:

going to sell you a turbine if we

can't actually drive impact for you.

851

:

Tim Winkler: Yeah.

852

:

I love that perspective.

853

:

And I, you know, I

think it's just a really

854

:

top class kind of like approach to sales.

855

:

Like, you know, I there's nothing

worse than the sales person.

856

:

That's just really trying to, you know,

sell you something that you don't need.

857

:

Yeah.

858

:

You can smell it.

859

:

Right.

860

:

And so like, you know, I, I have a

similar approach in terms of sales words.

861

:

Look, I don't even want to

sell you something right now.

862

:

I just want to like, see where I can

see what your pain point is, see if

863

:

I can, where, where we can add value.

864

:

And then there's something beyond,

you know, where I can add value now.

865

:

We can have that conversation at

a later time, but I don't want to,

866

:

I'm not going to just spoon feed

you like, Hey, this is what we do.

867

:

This is what you're

going to need, you know?

868

:

So yeah, I think that's a,

uh, a really, um, intentional

869

:

and thoughtful approach to it.

870

:

So just a couple of quick hits on

turbine then, um, you know, what, um,

871

:

you're a remote company, but you know,

where, where are you headquartered?

872

:

Um, what kind of head

count are you at right now?

873

:

Emilie Schario: Yeah.

874

:

So all remote company, the team is myself

and three software engineers full time.

875

:

We have a team member in San Antonio, a

team member in Charlotte, North Carolina,

876

:

and a team member in Nairobi, Kenya.

877

:

I'm lucky enough to have former colleagues

who from Netlify who joined me to do

878

:

this turbine thing, which is great.

879

:

That's great.

880

:

Um, and I'm based in Columbus,

Georgia, two or three days a week.

881

:

I work out of the startup Columbus office.

882

:

So if anyone's passing

through, let me know.

883

:

I'm happy.

884

:

Tim Winkler: Cool.

885

:

Nice, nice shout out Columbus, Georgia.

886

:

Um, and then you did mention, uh,

you know, one of your investors, and

887

:

we were actually introduced through,

uh, Revolutions Rise of the Rest.

888

:

Yeah.

889

:

So are they also part of

the, uh, investment team?

890

:

Emilie Schario: Yes.

891

:

Um, James at Revolutions Rise of

the Rest, um, is my, or James is my

892

:

investor over there, and they're great.

893

:

And I'm so grateful to have them as

a sounding board, as a connector, um,

894

:

and I love their place based mandate.

895

:

Like, as someone here in, Uh, in Columbus,

I think there's so much opportunity and so

896

:

many great things going on here and really

excited, um, to have them on my team.

897

:

Tim Winkler: Yeah, I love their I love

their strategy that innovation can

898

:

happen outside of just the coast coastal

states, uh, coastal cities there.

899

:

So.

900

:

Um, uh, that's great.

901

:

And then, um, I, I would just kind of

ask, you know, in terms of your all's

902

:

anticipated growth, you know, what

are some things that I guess you're

903

:

really looking forward to, or excited

about turbine heading into:

904

:

Emilie Schario: Yeah, you know, Turbine,

um, by nature of how we solve problems

905

:

for our customers is a very wide product.

906

:

We do a lot of things and the scale

that I like to use when I talk about

907

:

it is like there's minimum product.

908

:

There's a workable product and then

there's a lovable product and, um,

909

:

we've spent time bringing like our

order to cash reconciliation and our

910

:

procurement process into lovable stages.

911

:

But, um, some things are still minimum

and I look forward to, like, our

912

:

revenue recognition functionality.

913

:

I would absolutely considered minimum.

914

:

And so really thinking about how we

can level that up and make that an

915

:

even better experience for our existing

users and our yet to come users.

916

:

That's something I'm really

looking forward to in the new year.

917

:

Tim Winkler: Yeah, we're

excited to track it.

918

:

And, um, obviously love, uh,

loved hearing your story.

919

:

Um, I've got a lot more questions,

but I'm trying to keep this within

920

:

a, within a reasonable timeframe.

921

:

And I do want to, uh, jump into

our, our final segment here as well,

922

:

which is the five second scramble.

923

:

And, uh, this is just kind of like a

rapid fire Q and a, um, try to, try to

924

:

keep the answers within five seconds.

925

:

If not, you know, we won't air

horn out or anything like that.

926

:

A little mix of some business, a

little mix of some fun personal stuff,

927

:

and uh, you ready to jump into it?

928

:

Let's do it.

929

:

Okay, cool.

930

:

Um.

931

:

So this might be take you back to some

of your VC pitches, uh, explain turbine

932

:

to me as if I were a five year old

933

:

Emilie Schario: in five seconds.

934

:

Wow.

935

:

That is like the hardest question

you could ever come up with.

936

:

Okay.

937

:

We'll give you 10.

938

:

Turbine is an operating platform for your.

939

:

Brands multichannel workflows and now

I just have all these questions in my

940

:

head around if a five year old could

ever understand what multichannel is,

941

:

you know, what kids these days when

they hold phones up to their ears, they.

942

:

Don't do this.

943

:

And for the, for the audio

portion of this, they don't like

944

:

put their pinky and thumbs out.

945

:

They put their hands flat and

they hold it to their ears.

946

:

Uh, and I think about that a lot because

kids have a totally under different

947

:

understanding of technology than we

948

:

Tim Winkler: do.

949

:

Yeah, I mean, you know,

Bluey can explain it to them.

950

:

I'm

951

:

Emilie Schario: sure.

952

:

You know what?

953

:

I'm looking forward to the day where

Bluey makes an episode about Turbine.

954

:

Tim Winkler: Bluey just pitch

it, pit doing VC pitches.

955

:

Yeah.

956

:

Um, Awesome.

957

:

What is the, your favorite part

about your culture at Turbine?

958

:

Emilie Schario: We have three values,

uh, ROI, results, ownership, iteration.

959

:

And I think, uh, the thing

that I'm most proud of is how

960

:

everyone works through that.

961

:

Everyone shows.

962

:

Ownership in their work, everyone knows

that we're iterating on delivering value

963

:

and the end result is that everyone

produces results, really high performance.

964

:

Tim Winkler: That gives ROI a whole

nother meaning for me as an entrepreneur.

965

:

Um, what type of technologist

would you say thrives at Turbine?

966

:

Emilie Schario: Someone who's not afraid

of rolling their sleeves up and doing.

967

:

The work, you know, sometimes what we're

doing is solving a weird edge case for a

968

:

customer with a cool technology problem.

969

:

Sometimes what we're doing is going

through a bad CSV download and finding all

970

:

the rogue quotes in the middle of text.

971

:

Uh, and so every day can be

different, but it's got to be

972

:

someone who cares more about the

business impact than the technology.

973

:

Tim Winkler: Um, as a, an entrepreneur,

um, a mother spouse, you know,

974

:

in your free time, what do you

do to kind of relax or unwind?

975

:

Emilie Schario: Uh, I love weightlifting.

976

:

Um, so if I had to put it into three,

one, I love Olympic weightlifting.

977

:

It brings me so much joy.

978

:

I'm lucky enough to have

the space in my time to.

979

:

To do it to, um, I really enjoy

reading currently reading, um,

980

:

Greg Blustein's book on the recent

Georgia elections called flipped.

981

:

And it's so much fun.

982

:

And reading is like watching

a movie in your head.

983

:

And then three is just really hanging out

with my family and they bring me so much

984

:

joy, and I'm so grateful to have them.

985

:

Tim Winkler: Awesome.

986

:

Not in that order.

987

:

Yeah, we can edit that to

be the family preferred.

988

:

Uh, what is a charity or corporate

philanthropy that is near and dear to you?

989

:

Emilie Schario: So, uh, St.

990

:

Walburga Monastery in Elizabeth, New

Jersey, um, I went to a high school that's

991

:

since closed called Benedictine Academy.

992

:

It was the sister school to St.

993

:

Benedict's Prep, a well known all

boys school in Newark, New Jersey.

994

:

And I went to BA on a full scholarship,

which is incredible because I could not

995

:

have gone to BA, um, if it wasn't for

that, my family was not in a position

996

:

where we could afford private school.

997

:

Um, and so St.

998

:

Walburg Monastery, I often think

about how that scholarship changed

999

:

the whole trajectory of my life.

:

00:57:36,449 --> 00:57:37,220

Tim Winkler: Good shout out.

:

00:57:39,190 --> 00:57:44,410

Can you briefly describe your

morning routine to me briefly?

:

00:57:45,669 --> 00:57:48,010

Emilie Schario: Wake up

when my kids are howling.

:

00:57:48,449 --> 00:57:54,185

Uh, If, if I get to wake up before them,

enjoy my two cups of coffee, maybe read

:

00:57:54,185 --> 00:57:56,505

a couple of pages until they wake up.

:

00:57:56,835 --> 00:57:59,454

And then I do the morning

shift solo in my household.

:

00:57:59,454 --> 00:58:04,714

So I get my kids ready, uh, load them,

feed them breakfast, load them into the

:

00:58:04,714 --> 00:58:12,155

car, get them to daycare, come home, uh,

and work, or if it's a gym day, um, I

:

00:58:12,155 --> 00:58:14,105

might go right to the gym after daycare.

:

00:58:14,105 --> 00:58:16,705

Every day is different because

toddlers are in charge.

:

00:58:17,625 --> 00:58:17,935

Yeah,

:

00:58:18,625 --> 00:58:19,195

Tim Winkler: well said.

:

00:58:20,675 --> 00:58:25,065

If you could live abroad for one

season out of the year, where

:

00:58:25,065 --> 00:58:27,225

would you live and what season?

:

00:58:29,235 --> 00:58:33,655

Emilie Schario: Is pasta season

in Italy an appropriate answer?

:

00:58:33,754 --> 00:58:36,484

Tim Winkler: Yeah, it's like

rainy season or pasta season.

:

00:58:36,485 --> 00:58:38,074

I think it's pasta season.

:

00:58:38,155 --> 00:58:39,084

Pasta season.

:

00:58:39,654 --> 00:58:41,745

So, pasta season in Italy.

:

00:58:42,465 --> 00:58:44,215

That needs to be on a brochure somewhere.

:

00:58:44,545 --> 00:58:48,725

Um, what is the worst fashion

trend that you've ever followed?

:

00:58:51,315 --> 00:58:54,544

Emilie Schario: Bootleg jeans

and it's back now and that

:

00:58:54,544 --> 00:58:55,865

makes it that much worse.

:

00:58:57,035 --> 00:58:58,705

Tim Winkler: That's what

fashion trends do though.

:

00:58:58,714 --> 00:59:01,584

They go out of style and

they come back in style.

:

00:59:04,045 --> 00:59:07,935

What's something that you love

to do, but you're really bad at

:

00:59:10,545 --> 00:59:11,095

Emilie Schario: a lot?

:

00:59:12,835 --> 00:59:17,504

Needlepoint, so I make one ornament

per year for my family It's like

:

00:59:17,504 --> 00:59:22,465

our my Christmas thing is like a one

needlepoint ornament and I am mediocre

:

00:59:22,504 --> 00:59:27,555

to pour at it But I make one ornament

a year and that's all that matters I

:

00:59:27,555 --> 00:59:30,235

Tim Winkler: can't wait for

this Etsy shop to open up.

:

00:59:31,295 --> 00:59:31,745

Emilie Schario: Oh my God.

:

00:59:31,745 --> 00:59:32,815

They take so long.

:

00:59:32,815 --> 00:59:35,385

There's a reason I only make one a year.

:

00:59:36,395 --> 00:59:39,125

Tim Winkler: The supply chain on

the back orders would be horrendous.

:

00:59:40,044 --> 00:59:45,985

Um, what was your dream job as a kid

aside from a barista at Duncan Dennis?

:

00:59:46,755 --> 00:59:48,515

Emilie Schario: A president

of the United States.

:

00:59:48,785 --> 00:59:49,305

Tim Winkler: Cool.

:

00:59:49,535 --> 00:59:51,255

That's the first time I've

ever heard that answer.

:

00:59:51,255 --> 00:59:52,465

That's, that's, that's great.

:

00:59:53,590 --> 00:59:57,450

And in closing, favorite Disney character?

:

01:00:07,140 --> 01:00:07,650

Emilie Schario: I don't know.

:

01:00:07,670 --> 01:00:09,610

Probably the whole Inside Out crew.

:

01:00:09,630 --> 01:00:10,570

They're pretty great.

:

01:00:11,030 --> 01:00:11,420

Tim Winkler: Yeah.

:

01:00:12,040 --> 01:00:12,330

Yeah.

:

01:00:12,640 --> 01:00:14,200

That's the first time

I've heard that as well.

:

01:00:14,200 --> 01:00:16,600

So that's, that's a good answer as well.

:

01:00:17,510 --> 01:00:19,320

That is a wrap.

:

01:00:19,600 --> 01:00:23,972

So I just wanted to thank you

for spending time with us.

:

01:00:23,972 --> 01:00:29,329

I'm excited for the future of what

you all are building at Turbine.

:

01:00:29,630 --> 01:00:31,540

You are an awesome entrepreneur.

:

01:00:31,700 --> 01:00:33,210

Um, a good human.

:

01:00:33,580 --> 01:00:36,810

I'm, I'm confident you are going

to continue to have success.

:

01:00:36,810 --> 01:00:40,700

So, I'll be rooting you all on from

the sidelines and I want to thank you

:

01:00:40,700 --> 01:00:42,040

for hanging out with us on, on the

:

01:00:42,040 --> 01:00:42,360

Emilie Schario: pod.

:

01:00:43,000 --> 01:00:48,030

Yeah, thanks for having me and, uh, look

forward to, uh, sharing what I know.

:

01:00:48,080 --> 01:00:49,329

So, much appreciated.

:

01:00:49,999 --> 01:00:50,319

Cool.

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