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Pierre Constantineau
Episode 1030th May 2022 • The CircuitPython Show • Paul Cutler
00:00:00 00:22:57

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Shownotes

In episode ten, Pierre and Paul have an in-depth conversation about mechanical keyboards and how CircuitPython has helped Pierre with development.

00:15 Welcome and starting with computers and electronics

2:00 Building custom keyboards

4:10 BlueMicro keyboards (get screenshot)

6:40 Developing the BlueMicro keyboard firmware

7:40 What goes into building a custom keyboard?

11:20 Microcontroller keyboard matrices

13:55 Changing from Arduino to CircuitPython for keyboard development

17:35 How has CircuitPython helped with troubleshooting?

20:15 Turn the tables

21:30 Which microcontroller?

Transcripts

Paul Cutler:

Welcome to The Circuit Python Show. I'm your

Paul Cutler:

host, Paul Cutler. This episode, I'm joined by Pierre

Paul Cutler:

Constantineau. who owns Blue Micro, which creates and sells

Paul Cutler:

custom mechanical keyboards, macro pads and more. Pierre,

Paul Cutler:

welcome to the show.

Pierre Constantineau:

Hi, Paul. Thanks for having me.

Paul Cutler:

Glad to have you. Let's start at the beginning.

Paul Cutler:

When did you first get into computers or coding?

Pierre Constantineau:

Well, that was actually quite a while ago,

Pierre Constantineau:

my parents, my dad mostly bought me like a ColecoVision Adam. So

Pierre Constantineau:

that was like, early 80s. And then that was a very short lived

Pierre Constantineau:

computer, but it was a computer that I started, like, just basic

Pierre Constantineau:

programming and and then after that, I kind of like abandon it

Pierre Constantineau:

and just got a PC and just started using it and went to

Pierre Constantineau:

like high school, university. And then but I was always the

Pierre Constantineau:

RadioShack catalogs and like, kind of like almost like lusting

Pierre Constantineau:

over like resistors, and so on. But then when I got into

Pierre Constantineau:

college, I actually first got into a course of electronics,

Pierre Constantineau:

and it was probably the first Makerspace and that was like in

Pierre Constantineau:

early 90s. It was kind of like the maker space of a time where

Pierre Constantineau:

you can like learn about just basic electronics and digital

Pierre Constantineau:

chips. And then during that same year, I also did like a Turbo

Pierre Constantineau:

Pascal course, then went on into university. And then at that

Pierre Constantineau:

point, I thought I'd wanted to go like the high school I wanted

Pierre Constantineau:

to be Oh, chemical engineer, and then college. Oh, I want to be

Pierre Constantineau:

electrical engineer then first got into, like, really my

Pierre Constantineau:

engineering degree. And then oh, no, okay, there's this material

Pierre Constantineau:

science course that I think I like even more. I went into

Pierre Constantineau:

material science as a career and wasn't really material science

Pierre Constantineau:

was like metallurgy really. And then it kept on going and doing

Pierre Constantineau:

more studies and went into more like chemical engineering and

Pierre Constantineau:

when you can look back all of the different studies and

Pierre Constantineau:

interests well now going today, what I do for electronics is

Pierre Constantineau:

really the marriage of a bunch of different things.

Paul Cutler:

Let's talk keyboards, you have a tindy shop

Paul Cutler:

where you sell a few different kinds of keyboards. How did you

Paul Cutler:

get into that?

Pierre Constantineau:

Well, it started maybe about four or five

Pierre Constantineau:

years ago, when I first started with like, just I wanted to know

Pierre Constantineau:

about keyboards and mechanical keyboards. And I first started

Pierre Constantineau:

with like just a plain 60% keyboard probably from

Pierre Constantineau:

Aliexpress then moved on into building a split keyboard and at

Pierre Constantineau:

the time, it was like a like split so essentially, a smaller

Pierre Constantineau:

keyboard that's literally split can be a little bit more

Pierre Constantineau:

economic and effect cannot go in it runs on two different

Pierre Constantineau:

controllers. So if you can look inside right here, there pro

Pierre Constantineau:

micros so pro micros really there were there, oh, they're

Pierre Constantineau:

probably still the one of the most common chip for making

Pierre Constantineau:

keyboards, they're getting harder to get because of a

Pierre Constantineau:

shortage these days. But and that's how I got into keyboards.

Pierre Constantineau:

But then a little bit later, there was a like a fellow on

Pierre Constantineau:

Reddit on one of the check mark on one of the mechanical

Pierre Constantineau:

keyboard Reddit that can like say, Oh, here's my split

Pierre Constantineau:

keyboard that uses two feathers and our F 32. Like the original

Pierre Constantineau:

feather. And they made himself a split keyboard, all wireless and

Pierre Constantineau:

like feather like this is actually pretty neat. And I

Pierre Constantineau:

thought, Oh, wow, well, I've got this whole keyboard like that,

Pierre Constantineau:

that let's split that I talked about. And that uses the pro

Pierre Constantineau:

micro. And I thought I gotta make myself something to fit on

Pierre Constantineau:

there. Because like a feather wasn't really used for pretty,

Pierre Constantineau:

like I'd say 99% If you build your own keyboard, it was very

Pierre Constantineau:

likely going to be using a pro micro so I thought, Okay, I

Pierre Constantineau:

gotta build myself something. And that's where I can like

Pierre Constantineau:

first started the blue micro blue for blue suit and micro for

Pierre Constantineau:

for micro size. So that's where the name comes from. And I

Pierre Constantineau:

created literally this, this blue micro here and I just kind

Pierre Constantineau:

of go back into here, literally to make them fit just as a one

Pierre Constantineau:

for one replacement. Obviously, they're bigger because the

Pierre Constantineau:

modules are not very small. And then they're smaller than the

Pierre Constantineau:

like the ESP 32. But they're definitely larger than the pro

Pierre Constantineau:

micro. And then that's when I first really started okay, I'm

Pierre Constantineau:

going to build my own firmware for this because the existing

Pierre Constantineau:

firmware for the AVR boards like the the Arduino based boards,

Pierre Constantineau:

they don't really fit because this is an ARM processor. And

Pierre Constantineau:

even if you look at some of the current firmware that QM K, they

Pierre Constantineau:

might have a branch or an area where all Yeah, we support arm

Pierre Constantineau:

as well but it's very specific chip and if you go outside of

Pierre Constantineau:

that, it's not supported. And then the complicating factor of

Pierre Constantineau:

with these is there's a Bluetooth stack commonage That's

Pierre Constantineau:

a Nordic firmware. It's a bit like a bias for computer Well,

Pierre Constantineau:

there's essentially a bias that is takes care of all the

Pierre Constantineau:

Bluetooth things. So that gets flashed to the chip and the

Pierre Constantineau:

interface to it the saw the software and dev kit, the

Pierre Constantineau:

licensing isn't quite compatible for QM K and lovely library. So

Pierre Constantineau:

there's been more like legal reasons and technical reasons

Pierre Constantineau:

for people saying that I don't want to go in there because

Pierre Constantineau:

it's, it's one of those can of worms that okay, let's not touch

Pierre Constantineau:

it, because it just might be a mess. Or if somebody comes back

Pierre Constantineau:

in, okay, it's not going to be there. So we had to look at

Pierre Constantineau:

okay, what do I do? So I first looked into, okay, let's get

Pierre Constantineau:

like just a plain SDK from Nordic and just try to see if I

Pierre Constantineau:

can build something and it was just impossible is like after

Pierre Constantineau:

like hours of just trying to get a blinky light is like, Ah,

Pierre Constantineau:

okay, that's just too complicated. And, and this kind

Pierre Constantineau:

of looking back on, there's that feather. It's like, it's on

Pierre Constantineau:

Arduino. Within minutes, I had it's running pretty well. Yeah,

Pierre Constantineau:

minutes, I had it running on here. So so that made it like,

Pierre Constantineau:

Okay, going for hours or work with no success two minutes

Pierre Constantineau:

with, okay, something that flashed on here, I can make a

Pierre Constantineau:

light blink, I can build a whole lot board

Paul Cutler:

on this. There's nothing better than that, that

Paul Cutler:

first feeling of seeing that blinking light, no matter which

Paul Cutler:

programming language you're using, or what board you're

Paul Cutler:

using that that sense of accomplishment always feels so

Paul Cutler:

good.

Pierre Constantineau:

And then after this, it's just really

Pierre Constantineau:

where the blue micro firmware really came. Because I

Pierre Constantineau:

essentially took the I got inspired from QM Kay and it's

Pierre Constantineau:

okay, I do, I want to build something that's flexible enough

Pierre Constantineau:

for other people who want to build their own keyboard to be

Pierre Constantineau:

able to just say, I want to just drop in that blue micro and then

Pierre Constantineau:

just go on and have my own keyboard. So I kind of built on

Pierre Constantineau:

firmware. And then like, at a fair bit of functionality

Pierre Constantineau:

started

Paul Cutler:

with our journals, what actually goes into making

Paul Cutler:

your own keyboard, look at some of the kits, there's firmware

Paul Cutler:

for this. And then there's, there's like the overlay

Paul Cutler:

software to help program some of the kids requires soldering,

Paul Cutler:

like

Pierre Constantineau:

that first code that dad to read it again,

Pierre Constantineau:

and read it had. And it was like, completely different from

Pierre Constantineau:

what it looks like today. But then after that, obviously, the

Pierre Constantineau:

the age 40 came along, which kind of brought in USB, so

Pierre Constantineau:

nowadays, it's like it's like a full keyboard and it's actually

Pierre Constantineau:

pretty neat.

Pierre Constantineau:

So let's just say this is one of the probably my first keyboard

Pierre Constantineau:

that I've actually built with blue micro so it's essentially a

Pierre Constantineau:

60% as well. And for those that like don't quite understand 60%

Pierre Constantineau:

So you've got an just like, like my wife's keyboard here. So

Pierre Constantineau:

you've got a standard size, which like 110 Key, well remove

Pierre Constantineau:

the numpad and you've got what's called 10 keyless but then

Pierre Constantineau:

remove the function key in the navigation then you get 60% So

Pierre Constantineau:

it's like close enough like 60 keys over 110 Close enough to

Pierre Constantineau:

60% and then so my first keyboard was literally a 60%

Pierre Constantineau:

that actually plugged in a blue micro underneath and obviously

Pierre Constantineau:

you need a battery because it's wireless. So what this actually

Pierre Constantineau:

this PC board is essentially not even my design it was somebody I

Pierre Constantineau:

don't even know his name but it's like 40% club on the

Pierre Constantineau:

internet so if you just go 40% dot club you'll have a whole

Pierre Constantineau:

blog of somebody who builds just keyboards one off and just

Pierre Constantineau:

documents at all but the actually makes those his design

Pierre Constantineau:

open source and I got myself the keyboard and then soldered in

Pierre Constantineau:

all the diodes and then and then you can see here this is the the

Pierre Constantineau:

format of the pro micro, but how do you go from like a pro micro

Pierre Constantineau:

which that is on here to essentially well 61 keys because

Pierre Constantineau:

if you look carefully pro micro only has eight input output pins

Pierre Constantineau:

means. So going from eight input output pins. This is where the

Pierre Constantineau:

firmware and the hardware, the design of the keyboard really

Pierre Constantineau:

kind of comes in. So the firmware must know, okay, one,

Pierre Constantineau:

which pins are connected where, and then also which in what

Pierre Constantineau:

organization. Let's just take the example of the the Adafruit

Pierre Constantineau:

macro pad, I think a lot of people will recognize this.

Pierre Constantineau:

Well, this is probably the simplest, if you just disregard

Pierre Constantineau:

the discrete NT. And the rotary encoder, this is probably the

Pierre Constantineau:

simplest because literally what you have is 12 different buttons

Pierre Constantineau:

connected to a controller. So it's a one for one a pin to a

Pierre Constantineau:

key and a keys is a button, it's a switch. And it's probably the

Pierre Constantineau:

simplest, because you only have like one to one, it's 12. And

Pierre Constantineau:

then you've got enough pins. How do you go from 12 to 60, or 87,

Pierre Constantineau:

or even 100. While this is where you need to want to have a

Pierre Constantineau:

matrix. And in a matrix, what you do is you essentially have

Pierre Constantineau:

rows and columns. So here's a keyboard with 75 keys, and

Pierre Constantineau:

you've got columns and rows. So each row will be assigned a pin

Pierre Constantineau:

or an input, and then each column will be assigned another

Pierre Constantineau:

pin or another input. Now, typically, the way it works is

Pierre Constantineau:

the matrix, either the rows that are column are going to be an

Pierre Constantineau:

input, the other one's going to be an output. So that this way,

Pierre Constantineau:

you can scan one row at a time, and read the entire set of

Pierre Constantineau:

columns. And then you just say, if I turn on this row, read up

Pierre Constantineau:

columns, and then there's a match up. That's because you

Pierre Constantineau:

have a key here. So what you need to do is to scan over all

Pierre Constantineau:

the rows and all the columns to say, Am I on I'm on my own. And

Pierre Constantineau:

then you have your entire matrix of keys of 100 or 80, or 60. All

Pierre Constantineau:

depending, that's what powerful controllers microcontrollers do

Pierre Constantineau:

is really do all the scanning its contents constantly

Pierre Constantineau:

scanning. And that's the the first part that the firmware

Pierre Constantineau:

must do is to understand what that mapping between how to

Pierre Constantineau:

scan. So is it? Am I slowly scanning just pins or a matrix?

Pierre Constantineau:

And how is that matrix organized? Because obviously, if

Pierre Constantineau:

I have, let's go back to that one here. So if I have 18 pin on

Pierre Constantineau:

the pro, my curl, and then I have 61 keys, okay, well,

Pierre Constantineau:

there's multiple ways you can go and divide those. So 18, it

Pierre Constantineau:

could just say, Okay, well I have 10, could I have eight rows

Pierre Constantineau:

and 10 columns, and then that gives me 80 keys. But then if

Pierre Constantineau:

you count, you've got think 14. So if you do the match, like 14

Pierre Constantineau:

that's already 14, and you've got four pin left for the rows,

Pierre Constantineau:

but you've got five, that doesn't work. So the way that

Pierre Constantineau:

this actually is organized is it only uses 16. So it's a matrix

Pierre Constantineau:

of eight by eight. And it moves some of the keys around to give

Pierre Constantineau:

you a potential of a 64 keys even leaving you with two extra

Pierre Constantineau:

P to do other things. So if you look this one, I've got a little

Pierre Constantineau:

speaker. So it does beeps. And it's got a MOSFET so it does

Pierre Constantineau:

underglow lights. So it's got all 18 pins used for something.

Paul Cutler:

Hi, it's Paul, I'll get you back to the show in just

Paul Cutler:

a moment. Thanks for listening. And if you're enjoying the show,

Paul Cutler:

please tell a friend to write a review. You can also support the

Paul Cutler:

show financially. Your support helps cover the cost of podcast

Paul Cutler:

hosting, recording services and transcriptions. For more

Paul Cutler:

information visit circuitpython show.com/support. Now back to

Paul Cutler:

the show. So you've been working with Arduino the last couple of

Paul Cutler:

years. And then last year, you launched a new keyboard that

Paul Cutler:

actually uses Python. What led you to that,

Pierre Constantineau:

essentially, last year, like it was a great

Pierre Constantineau:

chip shortage of while and we're still in it. So we can just say

Pierre Constantineau:

2020 or 2021. But last year, the RP 24 D came came about a lot of

Pierre Constantineau:

the other chips including the NRF 50 twos were getting scars.

Pierre Constantineau:

So I thought okay, I gotta do something a little bit

Pierre Constantineau:

different. And then this RP 24, D link, Raspberry Pi. These made

Pierre Constantineau:

it really, really simple to build your own PCBs and chips

Pierre Constantineau:

because they've got a really great guide on here's how to

Pierre Constantineau:

design your own device with the foot DRP 2040. They've got a

Pierre Constantineau:

essentially a hardware building guide. And they even have a chi

Pierre Constantineau:

CAD set a file that you can use as a reference. So okay, well, I

Pierre Constantineau:

got like, I know how to build keyboards. I know how to design

Pierre Constantineau:

keyboards. I've gotten quite a few. And it's like okay, well

Pierre Constantineau:

let's just take the RP 24 Where do you just like put it all in?

Pierre Constantineau:

And it all came about and like, for example, like at work, this

Pierre Constantineau:

is like I use my keyboard and it just like it runs. Okay, I don't

Pierre Constantineau:

use the RGB, but it's good RGB and hotswap sockets all the, the

Pierre Constantineau:

nice and 60 things nowadays, but I built into Okay, well, let's

Pierre Constantineau:

make it look available. And it's actually open source, but I do

Pierre Constantineau:

have quite a few available if anybody wants so but it's, it's

Pierre Constantineau:

an I actually created it. And it's like, okay, well with

Pierre Constantineau:

circuit PyCon, because just previously to that, I actually

Pierre Constantineau:

put my second controller on there, like the the blue, micro

Pierre Constantineau:

840. And it was really simple. So it was like, I really, really

Pierre Constantineau:

can't, can't just how simple Scott and the Adafruit team has

Pierre Constantineau:

really made it simple to take your own controller, take an

Pierre Constantineau:

example that already exists, and then just say, okay, the only

Pierre Constantineau:

differences are these, I push it up. And then I think the most

Pierre Constantineau:

complicated thing was actually getting all the documentation

Pierre Constantineau:

lined up to be able to get my own USB product ID for a disk,

Pierre Constantineau:

because there's open source projects that kind of use those,

Pierre Constantineau:

that was the hardest part. Because getting the keyboard or

Pierre Constantineau:

the controller in in circuit, Python was simple. So the next

Pierre Constantineau:

step would take the keyboard is like, well, I just need to do

Pierre Constantineau:

the same thing. And then that came along, I've got this

Pierre Constantineau:

keyboard running circuit Python. And it was very, very simple to

Pierre Constantineau:

get it on, on there. And then I've even had people Oh, yeah, I

Pierre Constantineau:

want a bigger keyboard. And this is how, like this one came along

Pierre Constantineau:

was somebody came last December and says, Well, are you okay? If

Pierre Constantineau:

I kind of like design like the larger SS? Yeah, sure. Like if

Pierre Constantineau:

you want to contribute it back, and I'd be like, just set up a

Pierre Constantineau:

small production run. So you can have your own and you can like

Pierre Constantineau:

we can test it out, make sure it all works fine. And so this is

Pierre Constantineau:

where the larger 87 came along. And nd boat runs circuit Python,

Pierre Constantineau:

the book, even setting up on QM KKMK was very simple, because

Pierre Constantineau:

the examples are really simple. It's just matter, you set up

Pierre Constantineau:

which pins are mapping to which rows in which columns, and then

Pierre Constantineau:

send diskeeper s whenever you detect that this key is

Pierre Constantineau:

attacked. So it's, it was very, very simple.

Paul Cutler:

Well, that's great to hear. How is circuit Python

Paul Cutler:

helped you with troubleshooting.

Pierre Constantineau:

This is where like when I went, going

Pierre Constantineau:

back to Arduino. And if I even go back to the days of QM k,

Pierre Constantineau:

when you look at QM K, let's go with like the hardest, difficult

Pierre Constantineau:

start first, if I want to create my own keyboard, or if I build

Pierre Constantineau:

my own keyboard, just even having my own PCB, you're gonna

Pierre Constantineau:

have a hardware problem. If you can just say, Oh, I have a short

Pierre Constantineau:

between these two pins. And then I've got like press a key and

Pierre Constantineau:

then like there's like three that are showing up at the same

Pierre Constantineau:

time. If you have QM K, that's like all a prepackaged firmware

Pierre Constantineau:

with no troubleshooting tools of any kind, then it's very

Pierre Constantineau:

difficult to figure out what's wrong. Didn't you go to Arduino

Pierre Constantineau:

where, okay, you've got to create a small program, compile

Pierre Constantineau:

it and flash it. And then quite a few people are not comfortable

Pierre Constantineau:

programming. I'd say in the mechanical keyboard community,

Pierre Constantineau:

there's like really two groups. There's those who like the

Pierre Constantineau:

keyboards and that's really what they're in for the keyboard

Pierre Constantineau:

field. And then those there's those leading programmers that

Pierre Constantineau:

yeah, they're not scared of diving in and going programming

Pierre Constantineau:

by selling a number of keyboards and chips like and having that

Pierre Constantineau:

firmware like having troubleshooting tools handy to

Pierre Constantineau:

be able to troubleshoot your own keyboard when something on the

Pierre Constantineau:

hardware does not work well is very useful, actually built a

Pierre Constantineau:

number of tools to be able to help people troubleshoot. Oh,

Pierre Constantineau:

well, Is this thing working? Is it shorted? Is it like just like

Pierre Constantineau:

not connected? So I've had a few tools there, but then I kind of

Pierre Constantineau:

like look at Circuit Python is like, oh my god, like you don't

Pierre Constantineau:

have to compile anything. You just copied the files. And it's

Pierre Constantineau:

like, is it working? No. Oh, just change a couple of thing.

Pierre Constantineau:

Is it working? Oh, yeah. Okay, finally found it found the

Pierre Constantineau:

problem find solution. It's so much faster to be able to

Pierre Constantineau:

iterate. Because when you troubleshoot, it's always like

Pierre Constantineau:

your mind is working. Okay, do I need a multimeter? Do I need

Pierre Constantineau:

like, try to see what's connected and not connected?

Pierre Constantineau:

Well, if you've got a microcontroller right there for

Pierre Constantineau:

all its spins already probing what you want to like, see, oh,

Pierre Constantineau:

is this connected to this? Well, you can ask these to Ben, are

Pierre Constantineau:

they connected? And then then you'll be able to tell. So it's

Pierre Constantineau:

with circuit Python, it's a whole lot easier to iterate so

Pierre Constantineau:

much faster. err on identifying the root cause of your problems

Pierre Constantineau:

and then moving on into, Okay, I gotta pick up the soldering iron

Pierre Constantineau:

and fix this little piece or that little piece.

Paul Cutler:

Well, that's great to hear. We're almost out of

Paul Cutler:

time. But before we go, I'm a vinyl record collector and I

Paul Cutler:

have a segment called turn the tables, I enjoyed the Pong. I

Paul Cutler:

don't know if everyone else does. I've been asking all the

Paul Cutler:

questions, now's an opportunity for you to ask me a question.

Paul Cutler:

Yeah,

Pierre Constantineau:

I'm gonna go a little bit different. Like

Pierre Constantineau:

at a fruit has been going retro lately, with all the floppy disk

Pierre Constantineau:

stuff. But I'm gonna go over a retro question here. If you go

Pierre Constantineau:

back maybe in your childhood, or maybe the first computer you had

Pierre Constantineau:

first computer game. And this you would pay oh, here's the one

Pierre Constantineau:

game that kind of like, okay, I played it from end to end there.

Pierre Constantineau:

It was, like the one thing that really hooked me are kind of

Pierre Constantineau:

like, okay, I've got fond memories of what what would that

Pierre Constantineau:

be?

Paul Cutler:

For me, it would be broader bonds Lode Runner on my

Paul Cutler:

apple to see. And it was a, you know, kind of a platform

Paul Cutler:

scroller, and you could drill a hole and the bad guys would fall

Paul Cutler:

in the hole, or you had to drill more holes to go get the gold

Paul Cutler:

that was there. But what I loved about it is you could design

Paul Cutler:

your own levels. And that was the first game I ever played,

Paul Cutler:

that I could design my own levels. And I remember just

Paul Cutler:

spending an entire summer just doing that over and over again

Paul Cutler:

and making it so making it near impossible to play at times. But

Paul Cutler:

it was so much fun. If I had to go back, that would probably be

Paul Cutler:

the game that I would choose. Last question, if you're gonna

Paul Cutler:

start a new project, which microcontroller Do you think

Paul Cutler:

you'll reach for,

Pierre Constantineau:

it's gonna be one of two. And I'm gonna

Pierre Constantineau:

have kind of like divided maybe even four ways. So if I just

Pierre Constantineau:

want to prototype something very quickly that I don't want to

Pierre Constantineau:

design, like my own PCB, I would either pick the key B 24. D,

Pierre Constantineau:

because I've got a handful of them. Or if I need more pins, I

Pierre Constantineau:

would probably pick a Pico. But if I need blue toots, I gotta go

Pierre Constantineau:

back to the NRF 50 to 840 it's got, obviously it's got USB as

Pierre Constantineau:

well, but it's got Bluetooth, and I've got quite a few of

Pierre Constantineau:

those of my blue micros, but I could like go for a feather or

Pierre Constantineau:

even go like the bare bone module, which I'm just gonna

Pierre Constantineau:

pull out this one because I actually if I build my own PCB,

Pierre Constantineau:

I could actually go and say, let's put the modules right on

Pierre Constantineau:

to build my own. Next keyboard. So and this is probably an

Pierre Constantineau:

adventure of kind of like started last November, probably

Pierre Constantineau:

for like a super thin keyboard, like, very, very thin. It was

Pierre Constantineau:

more of an experiment and just sell this. Let's see how low can

Pierre Constantineau:

I get, and it runs again, because it's based on by on that

Pierre Constantineau:

same chip, I was able to load circuit Python and get kmk

Pierre Constantineau:

running on a drill deep quickly. So

Paul Cutler:

that's so cool. Well, we're out of time here.

Paul Cutler:

Thanks so much for being on the show.

Pierre Constantineau:

Thanks again for having me.

Paul Cutler:

Thank you to Pierre for being on the show. You can

Paul Cutler:

find Pierre on his youtube channel at Blue micro wireless

Paul Cutler:

keyboards. You can also find here on GitHub and as Tindie

Paul Cutler:

store by searching for blue micro for shownotes transcripts

Paul Cutler:

photos and to support the show, visit circuitpython show.com.

Paul Cutler:

Until next episode, stay positive