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146. How One Stone Empowers Students to Become Better Leaders
Episode 14616th May 2022 • Learning Unboxed • Annalies Corbin
00:00:00 00:38:00

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When given trust and resources, students can do some incredible things. One Stone is a student-led and directed nonprofit that makes students better leaders and the world a better place. Through allowing students to pursue their passions and interests, they learn to become more confident, empowered, and self-sufficient. Jesse Ross is the director of senior partnerships at One Stone. He’s joined by two senior students, Saumya Sarin and Elani Waight, who share why they joined the program and what they get out of it.

To learn more, visit: pastfoundation.org

We unbox:

  • What One Stone is and why it’s necessary in education
  • Why students are choosing One Stone for their high school experience
  • Balancing educational requirements with new, creative ideas
  • The youth innovation challenge
  • Experiential learning opportunities

Resources:

Learning Unboxed is produced, in part, by Crate Media.

Transcripts

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Don't wait. You're ready for that now.

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You're ready to try this in a meaningful way in the real world now.

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And that is a through line through everybody's experience, thus giving the student the opportunity after opportunity to take a lead to amplify their

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can look like a lot of different things.

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Welcome to Learning Unboxed, a conversation about teaching, learning, and the future of work.

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This is Annalies Corbin, Chief Goddess of the PAST Foundation, and your host.

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hear frequently that the global education system is broken.

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In fact, we spend billions of dollars trying to fix something that's actually not broken at all, but rather irrelevant.

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It's obsolete.

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A hundred years ago, it functioned fine.

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So, let's talk about how we reimagine, rethink, and redesign our educational system.

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welcome to today's episode.

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As always I'm super excited about the conversation that we're going to have.

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And, today, we have a special treat because we have students on the line with us, which is always a wonderful thing for us and for our listeners.

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today, we're going to be talking about One Stone, which is a student-led and directed nonprofit that makes students better leaders and the world a better

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And I can't think of anything that the world needs right now than being a better place.

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So, I'm super, super excited about the conversation that we're going to have.

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joining us for this conversation today is Jesse Ross, who is the Director of Strategic Partnerships at One Stone, and two students who I believe are

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both seniors and getting ready to graduate.

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I see lots of shaking heads.

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So, joining us is Saumya Sarin, who is a senior at One Stone's Lab51, and Elani Waight, who's a

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[inaudible], a senior again at One Stone.

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So, welcome to everybody.

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Thank you so much for having us here.

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Thank you.

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Excellent. So, since we have listeners who come to us from all over the world, Jesse, I'm going to ask that you sort of set the stage for us and help us

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foremost, what is One Stone and why did the founders think this thing was so necessary or needed?

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Great. Yeah, of course.

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So, as you mentioned, One Stone is a student-led education nonprofit.

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That's an umbrella under which there's many different entities.

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And so, that umbrella of One Stone started off 13 years ago as an after school program where kids in their community

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could get involved, make a change using the design thinking process.

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So, they were looking around and seeing that there were opportunities and problems that they could have a direct impact on.

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the founders, Joel and Teresa Poppen did the thing that they've been doing ever since, which is to say, "Well, who better than you, students, to solve these

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And all we're going to do is help create space for that to happen." And over the course of 13 years, this after school program, which was known at the time

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Good, grew and grew.

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And before long, there were students coming from all over the Treasure Valley, which is around the Boise area, as an after school program to engage in

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all sorts of design thinking, problem solving opportunities from things related to mental health to specific medical and prosthetic

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solutions that they were designing.

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before long - and I say before long - or after around nine years, the students said, "Wait a minute.

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Why is this just an after school program?

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Why doesn't our education during the day look just like this, student-led, focused on real world problems, us having a voice, us having an impact?" And,

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Joel and Teresa said, "We don't have a good answer why not.

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Really, we should say yes to this and make it happen." And so, that's when what is known as Lab51 started, which is a high school experience for One

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Stone students. And it's been running now in its fifth year.

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And two of our students are here to talk about what that looks like for them.

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guess I'll just add that in addition to Lab51, One Stone continues to be an umbrella organization under which there is a student-led design studio and

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agency that works for clients around the country and around the world.

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There is a small business or idea incubator that takes student's ideas and brings them to life, such as a recording studio and a food truck, all sorts of

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Project Good still continues to be a main part of what we do, and so much more.

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But I'm going to turn it over to the students for them to talk a little bit about the Idea51 experience and Lab51 for them.

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Yeah. Absolutely.

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Excellent. I'm super excited to hear that.

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So, ladies, first and foremost, before we get into the nuts and bolts of your project, which was super cool and I'm excited to talk about that, share with us

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Lab51.

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And more importantly, because it's not for most of you - I think for either one of you, as I recall - you were not there for four years.

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You actually completed part of your schooling prior to, and so you're essentially finishing school with Lab51.

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So, talk to us about your experience there and why each of you chose this option for high school.

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And either one of you can just jump right in.

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I chose it because I really love just being able to lead my educational experience.

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And I love being able to focus on anything that I was really passionate about.

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So, I took a genetics course, for example.

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And in that genetics course, we were focusing on stuff as like sex in flies, and DNA,

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and criminology.

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And I was like, "Oh, you have really cool GMOs." And I did a whole little study and survey on GMOs and I wrote a little paper about it.

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And I conducted a little survey of people and their opinions on it.

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And I just did a lot of research on it.

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I just think that was something that I wouldn't be able to do at any other school is to be able to say, "Oh.

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I would love to focus on this." I'm like, actually focused on it, you know.

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I looked at One Stone actually because I did my first two years of high school in New Zealand, because my parents chose to move there and then chose to move

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later. So, I really got a taste of how much a non-traditional high school experience can really change the way you think and

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change the way you approach learning as a whole.

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And then, when I moved back from New Zealand, when I was looking at schools that I wanted to go to here, I found One Stone.

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And I was like, "Oh, this is how my brain works.

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This is what I want to do." I want to deep dive into all of these wide ranges of interests while also trying all these new things, like Two

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Birds Creative Studio and like Hatch, where I can explore these fields of study that I've never, ever tried before.

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I ended up finding a whole bunch of other passions that I really, really liked while also doing things, like what Elani said, deep diving into my interests and

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a lot more about specific things that I was even more interested in that wouldn't have been involved in the curriculum if I'd gone to a normal public

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So, I feel like I really got to take control of my learning while also giving myself a lot more freedom to try new things and to branch out

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in what I like to do.

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So, it's really cool for that reason.

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Yeah. And I really, really love that.

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I mean, certainly for me and for the work at my own organization, this whole idea of students leading the way and being heavily involved in what's happening

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So, I love that.

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help our listeners understand, because one of the things I know they're struggling with right now is, "Oh.

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Whoa. Wait. That is so cool." But how do you manage the state or federal, depending on where you are in the world, thinking about requirements for what it

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a high school graduation diploma.

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And the fact that, you know, these kids are doing something completely different.

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How do you balance the requirements versus really leading and pushing with passion and creativity, that sort of human-centric design focus

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that comes out of One Stone?

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How do you balance these two things out?

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Yeah. Great question.

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And so, one, I've got a sad four year old behind, so as we're all working from home these days, there's this challenge there.

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That's what our life is.

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we balance these a few ways.

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So, one, before I can - I do want to answer that question and I will - is, describe what this looks like in a little bit more detail.

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So, when we say we're student-led, one, is it's in our bylaws.

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Our board of directors is two-thirds students.

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Our chair of the board of the organization as a whole is a student.

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So, my boss is a student.

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They make decisions about our budget, our hiring.

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They're very much a professional board.

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the level of Lab51, we're student-led in the sense that students are picking their learning objectives and saying,

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"Oh. I want to grow in my mathematical mindset and I want to do that in an experience that is under the umbrella of going out to a

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local proposed mining site.

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And I want to understand, dig into the numbers on what the impact of having certain chemicals in the ground in this space will long term do,

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and how long those things take to decay, and what's going to happen."

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assessed in what we call our Bold Learning Objectives or, affectionately, our BLOB, which is a competency-based transcript,

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which our students don't graduate with any sort of grades.

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They graduate with a Growth Transcript that shows their growth over time in things like mathematical mindset, but also things like grit

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or altruism or empathy, which we value just as much, if not more, than some of the specific skills that you might see in a

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traditional learning environment.

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just to kind of give that framework, we're able to do this at One Stone, and particularly in this day school, which is

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Lab51, by being an independent school.

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And so, we don't have to take any standardized tests and we don't have to have any particular requirements from the

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state in order to exist.

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There are other requirements that we balance that out, which are, for us, how do we fund this.

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we provide all of our offerings to students free of charge.

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That's been true of our mission from the beginning.

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So, whether it's after school or during the school day, that's free of charge.

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So, we do a lot of fundraising.

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We have grants that we are working on.

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And we also are a model provider.

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And so, others around the country and around the world who want to use things, like our Growth Transcript and like our Innovative Wayfinding Program,

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we work with them to implement those to also help make sure that all our offerings are free for our students.

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Right. So, essentially, just for clarification for folks, so it's a private school environment that

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is free because you're underwriting it through all those other mechanisms you just talked about.

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So, because of that, you don't have to meet the same sort of state requirements in terms of earning a high school graduation or a diploma.

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then - because I do want to follow up and go back to the gals here in just a second - I know this is going to be just one of those pieces that folks are

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understand the full value of what the gals are going to be talking about, so I want to get this out of the way.

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But, ultimately, though, these kids are graduating from high school and applying into a whole host of things afterwards, including post-secondary for

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how are you translating the experience at Lab51 into something that colleges and universities will then say, "Oh.

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We can admit that student.

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They're ready to do that." How does that work?

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And we will turn to the students here in a moment so we can hear their experience of that transition that they're about to make.

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But what I can say is that, as your listeners probably know more than others, One Stone is certainly not the first organization to be graduating students

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And the colleges are becoming more and more used to this.

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And our students have had tremendous success, getting into over 100 college and universities in the four years that we've graduated students, earning

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millions of dollars of scholarship funds and merit-based scholarship funds, and having so many doors open to them.

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what it takes for us is conversations with these colleges and universities as we apply so that we can tell them this is what you'll be receiving.

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You'll be receiving a Growth Transcript.

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And a transcript that also lists the courses, more or less, that the students have taken.

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But nowhere on there is there a translation into grades that make sense for what we're doing.

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And the colleges aren't asking for it, especially those that have had any of our students enrolled there, they come to us the next year and say, "Do you have

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ability to talk about the skills that they are able to apply to a range of situations, and to be able to recognize that it's not

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specific knowledge that they need to carry with them, it's an understanding of their own growth mindset and ability to learn.

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So, we've had tremendous success with that each year, more and more.

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in fact, that was the number one question for parents who are thinking about enrolling their students early on.

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And, now, we've got so many people applying to Lab51 now that we have to be, unfortunately, turning a number of people away.

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So, it's been really successful.

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Yeah. It's a good problem to have and it's a problem, right?

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Ultimately, you'll get into the conversation of scale and what does that look like.

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But, for now, it's a great problem to have.

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ladies, let's dig in a little bit to this experience.

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So, the two of you partnered up and participated in a Youth Innovation Challenge, which Jesse alluded to at the very beginning of the

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interview. And sort of that work in that project consumed an awful lot of your time.

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So, I want to have you share with our listeners sort of about what that was and why you participated in that, what you got out of it, what was meaningful.

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then, we're going to turn the conversation around and sort of ask you sort of about how some of those experiences then translates the way you think about your

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So, let's start with a little bit about your Youth Innovation Challenge.

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So, I'm actually the one who found out about the innovation challenge.

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I was looking for something very interesting, those folks were either entrepreneurship or business, that's what I'm very passionate about.

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And I found the Youth Innovation Challenge and I was like, "Oh, this is really cool".

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And I asked Saumya here to join me because I just thought it would be a really fun opportunity.

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And it sounded a lot like we, Design Labs, which we have here at One Stone, where you collaborate and then solve a problem in your community.

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And it was essentially that.

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we were given numerous businesses who basically told us their problems in these little videos and we decided to pick one.

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We landed on Black Box VR, and their problem was essentially that they wanted a video game that could also be a fun and

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effective workout.

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So, we picked that problem and we came up with our game program.

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So, you were taking a video game - just to clarify - basically making exercise fun.

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Yes.

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Because, you know, there are so many of us that are like, "Oh, not today," right?

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Yeah. It was a virtual reality workout video game.

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So, it's kind of a mouthful, but it actually worked out really well.

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Because Elani is really, really into things like video games.

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And I'm kind of a little bit of a gym rat, so I am really into fitness and working out.

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So, we were able to really combine our interests, combine what we were good at in a way that really works out in the end.

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Well, share with us a little bit, so you take on this challenge and you're doing this work, but what exactly is the work?

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What's the innovation that you're proposing?

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And then, what is that interaction with that business and industry partner?

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Because that's one of those things that, quite frankly, regular schools really, really struggle with, the whole how do I partner with industry in a meaningful

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And (B), students don't often really get an opportunity to truly interact in a meaningful way, and you did.

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So, share with us about that experience.

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Yeah. So, we kind of follow Stanford's design thinking model, that is a really big part of One Stone's curriculum and what they

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do. So, Elani was very familiar with that from the beginning because she'd been here for a while.

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This is actually my first year at One Stone.

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I came in as a [inaudible], which is not usual, so I had never really had any experience with the design thinking

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process.

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So, we went, "Okay.

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Imagine we are someone who maybe doesn't like working out and likes video games or really does like working out but doesn't like video games, how can we combine

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makes it interesting to everyone?"

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have, no matter how impossible it may seem, no matter how irrelevant it may seem on a sticky note for one minute, and then you just keep churning out ideas

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And at the end, you look through all of them and go, "Oh, wait.

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Some of these are actually really, really good ideas."

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third-person game where you are watching yourself run from this mad scientist through a laboratory into the ocean,

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into a snow mountain.

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And your squat jumping to get over obstacles or jump over them.

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And you're doing all of these different exercises to help you run away from this mad scientist and get over these obstacles, which probably seemed wild when

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first were looking at the problem, but it actually really worked out.

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That's awesome. And I love the fact that, you know, we have to run from the mad scientist in this day and age.

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That's perfect. So, share with me a little bit about what happened next.

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Because you came up, you did the challenge, but this actually had legs, no pun intended, right?

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I mean, as I understand it, the company was really responsive and receptive to the ideas that you put forward.

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So, what did that sort of relationship and interaction look like beyond just the challenge itself?

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We ended up getting an email from Black Box VR.

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After we won.

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After we won.

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Just, like, congratulating us and how interested they were.

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Yeah. And they basically told us that they were interested in implementing our idea into their business and interested in

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working with us to do so.

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We have yet to do that because we've been doing a lot of college applications and things like that.

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But, hopefully, we'll actually have the time soon to go and work with them on that.

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That's very cool.

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So, Jesse, would you say that the experience that these ladies have at Lab51 is pretty typical or is this

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atypical?

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Yeah. Great.

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I mean, I realized, for your listeners, Lab51, I just want to explain real quick.

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We mentioned the design thinking process and, for us, we use this term 51 it, because we say that the first 50 ideas are the ones that everybody else has

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And once you get to that 51st idea, you push through to something pretty original.

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And that's why we have Lab51.

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So, just to clarify that.

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I love that.

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You know, what's interesting is there is nothing that is typical at One Stone because everything is personalized.

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Now, what we're hearing, though, is students who, through their time at One Stone, have been given the opportunity and

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encouragement to follow up on their interests, explore their passions, and then test those in the real world.

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That is very typical.

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that looks like is a lot of different things.

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For some students that might end up meaning that they are going to spend half their day at a local technical school getting their EMT certification,

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because they have been able to dive in and explore their passions and interests and then are saying, "Oh, I really want to do something more there." And we tell

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"Well, don't wait. You're ready for that now.

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You're ready to try this in a meaningful way in the real world now." And that is what is a through line through everybody's experience, thus giving the

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a lead, to amplify their voice.

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they can look like a lot of different things because this was an experience that you're hearing about here that was prompted by an outside of One Stone

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And for us, as an organization, we see the city, the world as our learning space.

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And that there's not any reason why we should say, "Well, that doesn't take place within our walls." Of course.

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You know, everything else we're doing, all of our design thinking challenges, which take about 40 percent of the week the students are engaged in those, are

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community partners, challenges, and opportunities that originate outside of our space.

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work as a team.

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We're not teachers. We're coaches.

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Our role is to connect students and opportunities, students and resources, and then to get out of the way.

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And so, that is something that is typical of most students' experiences.

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Yeah. I love that.

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So, ladies, if you spend about 40 percent of your time working on design challenges of some description or another, what are you doing with the other 60

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when you're there?

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So, everyday of the week kind of looks different, which is why when people ask these questions, it's kind of a long answer sometimes.

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But we do things called Experiential Learning Opportunities or Experiences, which are, I guess, the closest

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thing we have to classes, I would say, and those can look like anything.

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last semester, I did one on Eastern Religions.

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And my end project was about right appropriation of those Eastern religions.

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I also did one last year - or not last year - last semester on using mathematical application to explain the existence of some social justice issues.

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So, mine was focused on fast fashion.

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But other people in those experiences did projects on totally different topics within that kind of sphere.

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So, like, this semester I did coding geospatial data, where we coded a map and I ended up creating a map that showed

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all of the stolen artwork in the world, and why it was stolen, and how much it was valued.

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And then, right now I'm doing To The Stars, where we're focusing on just the galaxy and science.

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And right now, I'm going to be talking about the theories of white holes in the universe and theories surrounding them.

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like, last semester I did, for example, Beating the Odds, which was a math course where we used

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gambling games to calculate the odds of winning the game or your odds of winning and if the game was

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fair.

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We ended up partnering in groups of people with creating a game that had fully fair odds.

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So, it was fair for the house and it is fair for the players.

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And it's really cool to do that.

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And we even got to do the math and show our math on how we make this fair and why it was fair.

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That's really awesome.

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So, I'm just going to, like, pie in the sky here.

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So, you're a kiddo whose interest is in biomedical engineering, for example.

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That's just your passion.

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You want to create devices to help people be healthier or what not.

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And yet you need to walk away from some of these amazing projects that you get to engage in with a real robust understanding of calculus.

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Because when you go into post-secondary, you're going to have to do a fair amount of that.

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help me understand, do you learn the calculus you need in the moment because you're working on a design challenge and a problem, as opposed to

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just going to calculus to learn calculus for the sake of learning calculus?

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Well, you could end up using calculus and experience, it depends on your math level and expertise.

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It's a little bit of both.

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Almost every day, I think we have writing sprints and math sprints where we learn those typical math and

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reading kind of skills that you need to be able to do all these cool things.

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And then, when you're in those experiences, you sometimes will learn extra math that's specific to that topic.

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So, like when I was using the mathematical application to explain a lot of the issues of fast fashion, I learned a lot of math

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topics that were specific to that.

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I guesss, you learned a lot of math topics specific to the gambling one.

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So, it is a little bit of both.

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you also earn credits, like the typical Math, Science, English credits from those experiences.

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So, if you're in the equity - that was the name of mine - if you're in that social justice and math course, you can say, "Okay.

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My project is going to be more heavily math based, so that's what I'm going to count for my math credit." Whereas, another person in that same experience will

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science-based, that's going to count towards my social science credit."

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And then, just to clarify, when she's talking about math sprints and writing sprints, those are separate.

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They're not the whole experiences.

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They're really just like courses that we end up taking.

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And sometimes they're rotating every three weeks, sometimes they're longer.

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There's different levels as well.

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Some people may be in fractions, while some people may in be pre-calc, some will be in calculus, and some people are working on limits and ratios.

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And those are even personable too.

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Like last semester, I took a math sprint that was entirely just deep diving into limits in calculus, which they can get super,

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super intense and in-depth and abstract, really.

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And this semester, my writing sprint is focused on using sensory imagery specifically.

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So, you can also take and kind of personalize the math and writing sprints to what you're really interested in and what your skillset is as well.

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Like, I've done scientific writing where we have read scientific papers, and then wrote about them, and made sure that we really understood what we mean.

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And I've also taken poetry, which is what we're actually doing right now, where we're just writing poems about things around us and just getting really involved

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And all of those go back to the BLOB.

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So, the whole time we're doing this, we're looking at our BLOB and we're going, "Okay.

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What areas of the BLOB do I want to grow in and how are these experiences in these sprints that I'm taking going to help me get there?"

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Thank you.

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It was excellent explanations there.

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And I want to add on to what Saumya is describing about our BLOB, our Bold Learning Objectives, which is also a student record.

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It's our Growth Transcript.

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And one thing she's mentioning, which is so important to us, is that is collaboratively assessed.

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So, we ultimately feel that this should be something that the student owns and says, "This reflects where I am on this journey towards

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mastery on any of these skills." And that it also is something that you're able to use to target growth and to get feedback on.

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And it's not just something that a teacher says you earned a B, that's it, and then move on from.

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so, if it were the area of scientific inquiry or something like mindfulness, the process starts with a mentor saying to Saumya,

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"Okay. This semester, where do you feel you are on these?" Let's have you indicate that first.

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And then, I'm going to follow up and ask you to demonstrate in a portfolio presentation why you feel that you are advancing or proficient

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in that particular skill.

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And if you show me that evidence, that's great.

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And if it feels like not there yet in terms of evidence, then go back and see if you can find that evidence.

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And if not, then let's make that a goal for next time.

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then, we, as coaches, also gather in a space - and we're actually able to do this now in a digital space, we're able to use an app to do some of this - to be

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I saw that. I saw Saumya using advancing mindfulness in this particular experience.

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It looked like this. It was in this context.

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And let's make sure that that's reflected in there." So, it's this, you know, very much collaborative, evolving assessment tool that, ultimately,

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hopefully, the student walks away with, with a strong sense of, not only where they are in these things, but what it looks like to grow in mindfulness.

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I think that's a tremendous skill in any of these areas.

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Yeah. I completely agree.

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And there are so many aspects of this conversation that I love.

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I just can't say that enough.

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I mean, I was so drawn to One Stone's philosophy, and the programs, and the implementations that have come out of

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that just because it just feels so mission aligned to me.

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also, just listening to the two of you talk about your experience, it's absolutely clear to anybody that

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listens that you loved the experience.

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You've gotten so much out of it.

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And I would argue probably so much more than you've found yourselves in it in a more of a traditional learning environment.

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always want to close the program recognizing that folks are going to have a million questions, and I hope that we can redirect them to Mr.

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Ross, and maybe even filter through the two of you, depending on what their questions are.

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I do want to circle back around about one last piece of the conversation, and that is really about this idea around human- centric design.

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Because as I'm listening to the two of you talk about your experience, you are living human-centric design.

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But I don't think that there are lots of folks out there in the world that really understand how that notion of human-centric design translates itself or

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embedded into the world of learning.

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Jesse, I'm going to start with you and then we'll ask the ladies to sort of close this concept.

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But what does that component of what happens within the One Stone ecosystem really mean to you?

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At a very high level, human-centric design is using empathy to solve problems and create opportunities.

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Well, for an individual learner, that's what life is.

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You know, real world experience is going out, encountering something, you know, a person, a story, an opportunity.

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And then, reflecting on that, deciding what's the best path forward for me to be able to grow as a human being.

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That's very broad and a bit abstract.

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I think, of course, when we pull that into an academic space, rather than that just being a project where students can engage in, the

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most important thing we can do with human-centric design and empathy is look inward and say, "Well, if we want learning experiences to be valuable for them

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solve problems and create opportunities, then we need to use empathy." And the way we use empathy in the learning space is to turn to design thinking terms.

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And our end user, in that case, is our students.

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What is your experience?

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What is it that you find thrilling and what is it that you find boring?

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And how do we turn you and help you co-create this experience with us?

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That is what we do with design thinking.

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Yeah. Absolutely. I love that.

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Elani, what about for you?

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To me, let's see.

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Human-centric design for me, is, I guess it's just such a common thing in my life now because of the way we learned it in

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classes. We had design labs - I don't think I ever really touched on that - where we just collaborate with

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students and we end up working towards a solution for a problem within our community.

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And, essentially, that's what I felt like I've been doing a lot in all of my classwork.

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I have just been able to recognize those steps and learn them on my own and even practice that on my own, which is, I think, what we did

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here in the Innovation Challenge.

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I just feel like I'm very comfortable with the idea of human-centric design, and I think I'll be able to say that anywhere.

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Like, if I were an internship outside of One Stone, or when I'm in college creating a project, or pitching an idea for a business competition, I

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just feel like that's something that I'm now really comfortable with and I feel like we just use it in so many aspects.

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Yeah. I love that.

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Saumya, what about for you?

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Yeah. So, as someone who is not originally super comfortable and familiar with the design thinking process, I think before I started

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learning about it and learning with it, I kind of viewed learning as something that was really, really fun.

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And I got to understand all these new perspectives about the world and have all these cool experiences.

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And then, I got the grade and that was it, and it was fun, but that was really the end of it, kind of.

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I think with the design thinking process, it really helps me to both find that joy in gaining knowledge and experiences and understanding.

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And then, also reflect it back to help create these solutions and create these ways to make the world better by

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using that understanding that I got from the people and the world around me to actually do it in a way that works for them as

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well.

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having that fun and joy and understanding and learning, and then using that to make the world a better place.

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Yeah. It's about opting in, right?

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Yeah.

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Yeah. So, on that note, I want to thank all three of you for opting in, as a matter of fact.

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You know, the journey that you've been on, it's truly, truly inspirational.

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And I do hope our listeners will reach out, because I honestly believe that there is so much to learn from the 13

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years of work and effort and thinking, the success, the failures, the ups, the downs that I have no doubt that have come through One

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Stone. But there's no question whatsoever that it is a gift to the kids who had the opportunity to participate in that.

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That's super exciting.

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So, all three of you, thank you so much for joining us today.

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Yeah. Thanks so much for having us.

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Yeah. We appreciate it.

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Thank you for joining us for Learning Unboxed, a conversation about teaching, learning, and the future of work.

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I want to thank my guests and encourage you all to be part of the conversation.

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Meet me on social media, @annaliescorbin.

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And join me next time as we stand up, step back, and lean in to reimagine education.

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