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How Thyroid Strong is Different from Peloton with Dr Emily Kiberd
Episode 13227th October 2022 • Thyroid Strong • Emily Kiberd
00:00:00 00:11:01

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In today's solo shortie Thyroid Strong Podcast episode, I'm answering a question I received in the DM's. Ultimately she asks, "How is Thyroid Strong different than say a Peloton". This story is all too familiar and comes from Danielle. She shares:

"I just found you and I'm so intrigued. I was diagnosed officially with Hashimotos two years ago, but got hypothyroidism diagnosis 11 years ago and had a massive hyperthyroidism episode 17 years ago after my first. I had pretty significant damage to my thyroid, according to ultrasounds. Longer, the short. I'm 43 and am now struggling with weight. I love weightlifting, which warms my heart, but end up massively exhausted. How is Thyroid Strong different than Peloton."

Key Takeaways

I dive into how lifting with heavier weights, lower reps, and long rest breaks with amazing for cues made just for the Hashi ladies makes a huge difference in our day to day energy.

Connect with Dr Emily Kiberd:

Follow Dr Emily Kiberd and Thyroid Strong on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | TikTok

If you want more information on when the next round of Thyroid Strong workout program goes live, join the waitlist: dremilykiberd.com/tswaitlist

If you’re looking to lose weight with Hashimoto’s: https://www.dremilykiberd.com/weight/

If you’re looking to beat the Hashimoto’s fatigue:

https://www.dremilykiberd.com/fatigue/

If you want to learn more about 3 things NOT TO DO in your workout if you have Hashimoto’s and WHAT TO DO instead:

https://www.dremilykiberd.com/strong

If you want to dive right into Thyroid Strong online workout program: https://www.dremilykiberd.com/thyroid-strong/

Transcripts

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I'm gonna try something new with this shorty episode.

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I'm gonna to answer a question that I get DMed from Instagram, so this

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is from Danielle and I I'm doing this because if one person asks and

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had the bravery to ask and share their story and ask the question.

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Someone else probably has that question too.

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They just didn't have the brave courage to ask.

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So Danielle asked, I just found you and I'm so intrigued.

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I was diagnosed officially with Hashimotos two years ago, but got

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hypothyroidism diagnosis 11 years ago and had a massive hyperthyroidism

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episode 17 years ago after my first.

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Pregnancy is a load on the body.

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Not a lot of women think about that.

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It is a stressor on the body and actually can suppress the thyroid.

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But she had pretty, this is back to Danielle, but have

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pretty significant damage to my thyroid, according to ultrasounds.

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Longer, the short.

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I'm 43 and am now struggling with weight.

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Which by the way, is one of the two biggest struggles women have

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with Hashimotos weight and fatigue.

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And I feel like worst fatigue.

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Oh my God, she said it and brain fog than before.

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And my heart is going out to her cause I have been there a thousand times over.

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I love weightlifting, which warms my heart, but end up massively exhausted.

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Interesting.

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I saw your post about lifting.

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I'm curious, what is different about your course than say,

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Peloton, which I'm gonna address.

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I can't seem to stick with any exercise lately, and I was an

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avid runner up until I developed a Neuroma last year in my foot.

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Okay, So first of all, neuromas are very tricky.

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I've treated a lot of them who they're tricky to treat.

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Even surgery does not have a favorable outcome for most

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neuroma's that I've treated.

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So I feel you.

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Okay, but the question I wanna address specifically from

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Danielle, so we know her history.

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She's had Hashi's diagnosis, hypothyroidism,

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a hyperthyroidism, she's 42.

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She's struggling with weight and fatigue and brain fog, but

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she loves to lift, which I love.

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So her question is, I'm curious, what is different about your course?

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Thy strong than say, Peloton?

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I've tried out Peloton.

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I've tried it out in person.

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When I lived in New York, I used to go wake up super early.

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This was actually pre Hashi diagnosis and go to Robin Arzon's class at

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like 6:00 AM in studio when it is over on 23rd Street and sixth Avenue.

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So Peloton, and I know they have lots of different tools now with

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the Peloton tread, the rower, and they, they do have weights.

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Okay?

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The weights that are used in Peloton, In my opinion are not heavy enough.

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Okay, so I like the women with Hashimotos to pick up a heavier weight

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something by the last couple reps.

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It is challenging if you're gonna put challenging on a scale of zero

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to 10, it's like a seven or eight.

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Another way to perceive challenge in hitting fatigue is, do I

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have maybe two more reps in the.

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Only two and no more.

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If I have five more, if I have eight more, if I have 10 more,

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that weight is too light.

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So I like my Hashi ladies to lift on the heavier side, and I'll

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talk about why I like my Hashi ladies to do lower reps at first.

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Maybe we start with three to five.

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We get our breath, we get our brace, how we engage our core, not

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pulling our belly to our spine.

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And we get stacked.

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We get our ribs right over our pelvis.

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So when we are first learning form, maybe we keep it to three to five reps, then we

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start to increase it to six to eight reps.

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I have not programmed more than eight reps for a Hashi lady in the

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last couple years cuz we want to.

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Feed the muscle tissue but not get so fatigued.

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Right?

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And it's that very fine line that we dance, not get so fatigued that we can't

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get outta bed for three to five days.

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We feel like our workout has taken away from our life instead of enhanced

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it, which is it is supposed to do.

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Lastly Peloton class, you do not take between your sets a rest break of.

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60 seconds, 90 seconds, up to two minutes, sometimes up to three minutes.

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That doesn't happen, right?

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The instructor would be doing a lot of talking and the class would get boring.

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So I like for my Hashi ladies, heavier weights, lower reps.

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There's form, form, form cuing.

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We talk about foot dialing, how to engage the glutes.

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How to breathe, where to breathe, where to step your feet, how to turn them out,

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how to foot dial so you can engage and build tension in your lower legs to pick

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up a weight, whether it's a deadlift or you're pressing your weight overhead.

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It's a full body move.

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So even if you're gonna press a weight overhead, and they have a

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lot of women reach out and be like, Oh, but my upper body's so weak.

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Girl.

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A press is not an upper body move.

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Is is a full body move.

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You step your feet, you squeeze your heels, you screw your feet into

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the floor without moving your feet.

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You get your quads engaged, you squeeze your butt like you're cracking a walnut.

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You breathe down in wide and brace and all that tension that was

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built from the feet all the way up.

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Then using your exhale of a big, strong, ch.

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Gets the weight up.

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So it is not an upper body.

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Oh, I have weak arms move.

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It is a full body move.

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The other thing is that thyroid strong is programmed very strategic.

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It is the essential seven moves, right?

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So there's not bicep curls, there's not tricep kickbacks.

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It is all.

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The essential seven moves with variations, but a hinge, a squat, a push, a pull,

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a lunge, a carry, and an anti rotate.

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So we want to replicate those moves that we do in life so

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that we can get better at life.

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Sometimes I feel like with Peloton, We're doing Peloton to get better at Peloton,

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to get that gamification, to get your name on the board to move up on the board.

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I get it.

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It's a great way to create community.

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But I don't wanna get better at Peloton.

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I wanna get better at life.

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I wanna get stronger so that I can pick up my kids.

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If they run up to me and they jump on them, I can literally sit my hips

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back hinge and hike 'em up like a kettlebell into my arms and hug 'em.

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That's how I pick up my three year old is literally hiking her back into

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a back swing and up into my arms.

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I love the gamification and the community Peloton has created, but when you do

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it with an autoimmune condition and you see other people getting results

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and changing their body composition and hitting the top of the leaderboard,

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and you're trying to do the same, and you're pushing yourself harder and you're

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gaining weight, And you're getting more exhausted, it's because those people

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don't have an autoimmune condition.

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So I believe you have to work out different for your body.

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My queuing and thyroid strong.

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You'll see if you ever go online and look at the reviews.

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For thyroid strong, the queuing is like impeccable.

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As a chiropractor who has treated and trained.

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Not only just normal patients and athletes and the autoimmune population

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since 2007, if one queue worked for everyone, everyone would say that queue.

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But as life is one cue does not work for everyone.

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So you have to say it different ways to get that person to get into that move.

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So we give those cues, we give them in different ways so that different

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things work for different people.

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I'll give you an example, Foot dialing.

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So if you step your.

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Outer hip width, right?

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So step your feet outer hip width, turn your toes out.

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If there was a clock to like 11 and one o'clock, now you're going to

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spread the floor picture like you're screwing your feet into the floor

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like you're squeezing your heels together, but don't move your feet.

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What do you feel?

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You feel your quads engaged the fronts of your legs.

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You feel your butt squeeze.

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That cue of squeeze your heels, but don't move your feet does not work.

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For someone with high arches, they're like, Ah, it's not working.

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I don't get it.

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I don't know what's going on.

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So you have to cue someone in my experience with high arches differently.

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So you tell that person with high arches.

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Okay.

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Instead of squeezing your heels, think you're taking your pinky toes

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and you're tearing a towel, like you're spreading your pinky toes out

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to the sides, like you're standing on a paper towel and you're trying

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to tear that paper towel in half.

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But don't move your feet that cue.

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Spread your pinky toes works for the high arch person.

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So that's an example of queuing and both of those are given, We

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talk about that in thy strong.

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So Danielle, who loves heavy weight lifting but feels fatigued and is gaining

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weight and has worse brain fog after.

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That's the difference between thyroid Strong That's the difference

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between thyroid strong and other kettlebell apps and courses as well.

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I love kettlebells cuz they are super forgiving when you are first learning.

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If you do a heavy carry, AKA farmers walk with dumbbells, they're going

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to bang all over your legs and give you bruises on your thighs.

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Kettlebells will glide smoothly along your thighs.

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Kettlebells are super forgiving within your first learning form.

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If you learn a deadlift with a barbell, your form has to be so on point.

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Of how you bring the bar up and shave your legs and then drive through with

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your hips and squeeze your butt, and then lowering the bar down and not

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sending your butt back too soon so that you don't throw out your back.

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Everything has to be super tight.

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Kettlebells, more forgiving when you're first learning form.

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You don't have to be that dialed in.

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Yes, we queue amazing.

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So that you don't injure yourself, we tell you exactly where to line the

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handles up, where to step the feet, where the bells should be under you in

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a row compared to a deadlift, compared to a squat, and that queuing is so

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pivotal in feeding your muscle tissue.

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All of this exercise and strength training is to feed your muscle

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tissue to put more meat on the bones to help with the turnover of your

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inactive to active thyroid hormones, to secrete mykines, to help regulate

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your hormones and your immune system.

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That's why we feed our muscle.

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That's why we eat protein minimum or 30 grams per day, because when we do that and

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we feed our muscle tissue, we have more.

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We have joints that feel better.

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We age more gracefully, and if we fall down the road and we break a hip,

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which actually happens in reverse, most people, they actually break their hip

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at their femoral neck and then fall.

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We have a better outcome of not dying within that first year post that.

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So just aging more gracefully.

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Better longevity.

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So Danielle, that is how thyroid strong is different than say a Peloton.

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