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Scaling Your Creative Business | MMCB Episode 5 w/Lorraine Kamesha
Episode 55th February 2024 • Minding My Creative Business Podcast • Ron "Ironic" Lee Jr. and ShySpeaks
00:00:00 00:51:21

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Introduction:

Welcome to another insightful episode of the "Minding My Creative Business" podcast! I'm thrilled to share this valuable interview with Lorraine Kamesha, a seasoned entrepreneur and creative professional who has mastered the art of scaling creative businesses. If you're a creative entrepreneur eager to take your venture to new heights, you're in for a treat. In this article, we'll dive deep into Lorraine's wisdom and experiences, exploring the keys to growing and sustaining a flourishing creative enterprise.

Creators Bio:

Lorraine Kamesha is a name synonymous with success in the creative business world. Her journey from aspiring creative to accomplished entrepreneur is an inspiration to many. Through her extensive experience, she has built a thriving creative enterprise and is dedicated to sharing her knowledge with fellow creatives.

Key Takeaways:

* Transitioning to Leadership: Lorraine emphasizes the crucial transition from a hands-on creator to a visionary leader. Learn how to step into this role effectively and guide your business to success.

* Delegation and Systematization: Discover the art of delegation and systemization. Lorraine explains how these processes are essential for streamlining your creative business and allowing it to thrive.

* Empowering Your Team: One of the keys to success is empowering your team to make decisions. Lorraine's insights into nurturing a collaborative and empowered work environment are invaluable.

Step-by-Step Process:

Step 1: Transitioning to Leadership

* Understand the shift from creator to leader.

* Develop a clear vision for your business.

Step 2: Delegation and Systemization

* Identify tasks that can be delegated.

* Implement systems to streamline processes.

Step 3: Empowering Your Team

* Foster open communication and idea sharing.

* Encourage your team to take ownership of their work.

Quotes from Lorraine:

Lorraine Kamesha on delegation: "Delegating tasks effectively is like greasing the wheels of your business. It allows everything to run smoothly."

Lorraine Kamesha on collaboration: "Innovation often arises from the cross-pollination of ideas. Encourage collaboration, and watch your business thrive."

Resources Mentioned:

* mmcbpodcast.com: Visit the podcast's website to join the Creatives Corner community and access additional resources.


Expert Advice:

As someone deeply passionate about creative entrepreneurship, my personal advice is to embrace change and innovation. The creative business landscape is ever-evolving, and being adaptable is key. Listen to your audience, stay true to your vision, and never stop learning. Your journey, much like Lorraine's, can be a remarkable one.


FAQ:

Q1: How can I effectively transition from being a creator to a leader in my creative business? A1: Start by defining your business's vision and values. Then, delegate tasks that don't align with this vision, and focus on guiding your team toward achieving your creative goals.

Q2: What role does collaboration play in scaling a creative business? A2: Collaboration fuels innovation. Encourage your team to share ideas and work together. It can lead to fresh perspectives and solutions that drive growth.

Q3: What should I do if my creative business goes viral unexpectedly? A3: Be prepared to handle increased demand. Ensure your systems, team, and customer support can handle the influx. Use the opportunity to strengthen your brand.

Q4: Where can I find more resources related to scaling my creative business? A4: Visit mmcbpodcast.com to access additional resources and join the Creatives Corner community.

Q5: How can I leave a review for the "Minding My Creative Business" podcast? A5: You can leave a review on your preferred podcast platform, sharing your thoughts and feedback with the community.

Timestamps and Key Points:

  • [00:00:00] Introduction
  • Hosts introduce themselves and guest Lorraine Kamesha, discussing her background in viral marketing and entrepreneurship.
  • [00:01:00 - 00:04:00] Lorraine's Professional Journey
  • Lorraine talks about her transition from business coach to viral marketing strategist, emphasizing the importance of purposeful social media use.
  • [00:05:00 - 00:08:00] Combining Art and Science in Content Creation
  • Discussion on the blend of creative and analytical approaches in content creation, influenced by Lorraine's diverse background in music and science.
  • [00:09:00 - 00:12:00] Starting and Scaling a Writing Business
  • Lorraine shares her experience starting a writing business during pharmacy school, highlighting the challenges and growth strategies, including hiring and delegating tasks.
  • [00:13:00 - 00:17:00] Branding and Automating the Business
  • Insights on the importance of branding, the development of an automated system, and managing global teams.
  • [00:18:00 - 00:22:00] Financial Strategies for Business Growth
  • Lorraine explains her mathematical approach to scaling revenue and the benefits of sharing success with her team.
  • [00:23:00 - 00:27:00] Challenges and Rewards of Going Viral
  • Lorraine recounts her experience going viral on TikTok and its impact on her business.
  • [00:28:00 - 00:31:00] Implementing Effective Communication and Management Systems
  • The importance of communication tools and empowering team members through effective management and Standard Operating Procedures.
  • [00:32:00 - 00:35:00] Transition to Content Creation and Viral Marketing
  • Lorraine discusses her move to content creation, emphasizing the need for systemization and readiness for viral success.
  • [00:36:00 - 00:39:00] Advice for Creatives in Business
  • Tips for creatives on embracing different aspects of their craft and the importance of empowering others in their business model.
  • [00:40:00 - 00:44:00] Outsourcing and Team Development
  • Lorraine highlights the significance of training and developing team members for successful delegation and leadership development.
  • [00:45:00 - 00:50:00] Final Thoughts and Wrap-up
  • The hosts conclude the episode with Lorraine sharing her team size and a discussion on the importance of outsourcing in creative entrepreneurship.


Transcripts

ShySpeaks:

What's up?

ShySpeaks:

What's up?

ShySpeaks:

Welcome to the mind of my creative business podcast.

ShySpeaks:

My name is Shy Speaks

ShySpeaks:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: and I am Ron, Ironically jr.

ShySpeaks:

And today we have a guest with us.

ShySpeaks:

We have Miss Lorraine Kamisha, who is a serial creative manure.

ShySpeaks:

Um, she has several businesses, one being a, uh, writing business for She also

ShySpeaks:

monetizes her content creation on social media, IG, Instagram, things like that.

ShySpeaks:

Um, and she is a business coach.

ShySpeaks:

She is formerly one of my business coaches, actually my first business coach.

ShySpeaks:

So, um, that's how I would introduce you, Miss Lorraine Kamisha.

ShySpeaks:

But I want for you to be able to introduce yourself.

ShySpeaks:

How would you introduce?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Well, thank you, Ron.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I am Lorraine Kamisha and I am actually a viral marketing strategist.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I teach up and coming content creators how to monetize their following so they

Lorraine Kamesha:

can make more money on social media.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I don't believe in just, you know, posting just a post.

Lorraine Kamesha:

We post them for a purpose and that purpose is to pay our bills.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: Yes.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Yes.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I love it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I love it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I love it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So you say a viral strategist, say it again, a viral marketing strategist,

Lorraine Kamesha:

a viral marketing strategist, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So those people who are content creators, right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You're showing them how to, okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

How to monetize this, right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

We're not just doing it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Once again, we know it's called social media, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

We use it socially, but we know that these platforms are not social platforms.

Lorraine Kamesha:

These platforms are marketing platforms, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So you're showing them how to do that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay, cool.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So, so our show, I said, we're like the number one, um, Podcast

Lorraine Kamesha:

for creative entrepreneurs, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So we talk about strategy, structure, and self development.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I see you as a creative for newer, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Based on just me, me knowing you a little bit, um, hearing your story.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, do you see yourself as a creative

Lorraine Kamesha:

for newer though?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Oh, it took a while.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And, you know, before I started with the content creating, I was just, you know,

Lorraine Kamesha:

in my business, like most entrepreneurs are, they're doing all the things.

Lorraine Kamesha:

They're, you know, Sometimes doing the work, like when I started the writing

Lorraine Kamesha:

business, I was actually writing.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So yeah, that is, you know, a creative preneur doing the writing.

Lorraine Kamesha:

But then as I grew and I learned that I had to start delegating and automating

Lorraine Kamesha:

things that, you know, at the end of the day, my job was to drive sales.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And one of the best ways to drive sales online is through content creation.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So that's kind of just where I fell.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So for the most part, when my business is, I'm the one who's

Lorraine Kamesha:

pretty much the creative director, as far as the content is concerned.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, I am head of sales.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I do employ teams at this point.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, but that's just where my, my, I guess, expertise lie.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I just kind of ended up here and I do enjoy it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I'm glad I'm blessed to have ended up in this position.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I will say.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So, so when we're talking about that whole content creation piece, and you

Lorraine Kamesha:

just mentioned that you enjoy it, I know a lot of people, even, even people

Lorraine Kamesha:

that are creatives that hate that side.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like when I, when it comes to the social media piece, like

Lorraine Kamesha:

I can't, I can't stand it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I do it, but I don't like it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Do you think that's the creative in you that enjoys the content creation

Lorraine Kamesha:

piece?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Actually, I think it's the scientist in me that enjoys the content piece.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, because for me, it's like math and numbers.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So for some reason I can look at content or I can look at what's

Lorraine Kamesha:

trending or what's going viral and I can immediately like take that pattern

Lorraine Kamesha:

out and apply it to something else.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So that for me, it's.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It's, it's, it's a mathematical thing.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It's not as creative, the viral pieces.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Of course I got to do the content and I got to make the video.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I got to bring the vibes and all that stuff.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So that's the creative piece, but the actual, like, how am I going

Lorraine Kamesha:

to propel this content forward is like a scientific thing for me.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Hmm.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: Not okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

That's you just, you just sparked something in me.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So let's talk about that piece because you said, okay, it's not necessarily an art.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And you didn't say that, but this is what I'm surmising, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

But there's a science to this.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So talk about that science piece.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like, okay, you said it's numbers and it's science.

Lorraine Kamesha:

What does that exactly look like?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, you gotta be able to just...

Lorraine Kamesha:

analytics and tell what's trending.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And, and it's so crazy because it's a perfect meld of my personality

Lorraine Kamesha:

because, you know, on one hand, I went to school on a, on a music

Lorraine Kamesha:

scholarship, and then the, on the other hand, I'm a doctor of pharmacy.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So, you know, the chemistry and then the music and then, you know, the

Lorraine Kamesha:

biology and then the scale, you know, so it's always been this duality for me.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So it's the content creation piece.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It's just being able to take a look at those analytics.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Connect what the math says, you know, the deltas, well, you know,

Lorraine Kamesha:

what's the change over time?

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, what, what time factors go into, you know, the

Lorraine Kamesha:

views and, and the followers.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And, you know, if I do this type of content, what is going

Lorraine Kamesha:

to give me the biggest return?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, being able to break that down and, and being able to not do, you

Lorraine Kamesha:

know, based on luck or create based on luck, but create based on, okay,

Lorraine Kamesha:

I know that if I do this, this, and this, I should get this in return.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Wow.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: Wow, wow.

ShySpeaks:

So it's it what you said that you added that on there.

ShySpeaks:

You said she didn't say it is not art.

ShySpeaks:

She just said, she said as a science as well.

ShySpeaks:

And that's why when you go to school, you get a degree of

ShySpeaks:

Bachelor of art and science.

ShySpeaks:

Right.

ShySpeaks:

It's an art and science combined.

ShySpeaks:

And as you just said that, I heard you talk about, wow, art and science, like

ShySpeaks:

that is, and all of that goes together.

ShySpeaks:

And I think that from what I see, artists, or creatives, or whichever

ShySpeaks:

word you want to lean into at this moment, those who have some type of,

ShySpeaks:

ability to tap into that other side is that's where we see the most success.

ShySpeaks:

That's what I'm, that's what I'm listening.

ShySpeaks:

So saying that to say, now, listen, if you're just a pure, you're watching this

ShySpeaks:

and you're just a pure writer, I like, I didn't have another degree option,

ShySpeaks:

but just being able to lean in to that science side is not as much as that art

ShySpeaks:

side could totally make the difference.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Yeah.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And it's something that has always been like the case for me.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like I grew up in that environment.

Lorraine Kamesha:

My dad was an artist.

Lorraine Kamesha:

He painted, he did ceramics and woodwork.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And my mom was the pharmacist.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I'm a second gen pharmacist.

Lorraine Kamesha:

She was, you know, the, the scientist, she was the one who brought it all

Lorraine Kamesha:

together and was like, Hey, let's, you know, market this and let's sell

Lorraine Kamesha:

this and let's, you know, apply, you know, those things to the business.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I think that, you know, all creatives need that side.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I remember talking about this with Ron, you know, a long time ago.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I'm like, look, you know, sometimes the creative just wants to show up as the

Lorraine Kamesha:

creative, but it takes that other side in order to make a business out of that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So it can sustain yourself.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And when I was in, you know, music, what's one of the thing I found out

Lorraine Kamesha:

real fast is that when I had to Do music in order to sustain myself.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I was like, not really my thing, but you know, I've landed in the correct position.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I would say.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: And I can relate to that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Where it's like, for me, music, I love doing it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I'm very passionate about doing it, but I never wanted to.

Lorraine Kamesha:

monetize it to where this was my sole revenue generator, you know?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Cause it was like, it, it just, it, it, for me, it took away something.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So it was like, okay, where can I fit in to where I can utilize my gift for

Lorraine Kamesha:

creating, but also be able to monetize it to where I can, you know, keep this.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Pure per se.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So no, that's, that's interesting.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I don't know if I knew that about you that you, I, I, I know you, you did

Lorraine Kamesha:

the, I know you went to school for pharmacy, but I didn't know that you

Lorraine Kamesha:

initiated going to school for music.

Lorraine Kamesha:

A lot

Lorraine Kamesha:

of people don't know that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I mean, I was a band nerd, like drum major of the band, all that good stuff.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like don't talk about them.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Wow.

ShySpeaks:

That's really, really cool.

ShySpeaks:

Okay.

ShySpeaks:

So All right, so let's go ahead and hop right in.

ShySpeaks:

So now we know that you are an artist.

ShySpeaks:

You're, you are, you say it took you a while to figure out

ShySpeaks:

you're the creative entrepreneur.

ShySpeaks:

You was always a creative entrepreneur from the beginning.

ShySpeaks:

You went to school to be creative and like so.

ShySpeaks:

It's almost like you saw them as two separate things, and it probably

ShySpeaks:

took a while to learn how to blend the two, is what you're saying.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Forever.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I changed my major in college the first time, like, eight times.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like, I couldn't figure out where I belong, because here I

Lorraine Kamesha:

was, you know, good at music.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I was always just...

Lorraine Kamesha:

Naturally good at math and science.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I didn't know what to do.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I'm glad that I'm, like I said, I'm glad that I'm here.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It's, it makes a big difference in your life when you can, you know,

Lorraine Kamesha:

finally put your hands on your purpose.

ShySpeaks:

So speaking of putting your hands on your purpose, again, we're

ShySpeaks:

talking about you're a writer, so you literally put your hands on things.

ShySpeaks:

So can you tell us a little bit more about this company that

ShySpeaks:

you created around writing?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So, um, back when I was in pharmacy school, I was off

Lorraine Kamesha:

for the summer and I was.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Struggling.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like I had been in sales for a very long time, completely like did a

Lorraine Kamesha:

180 and left all that behind, left all the money and the perks and the

Lorraine Kamesha:

commission and everything behind, and decided to go to pharmacy school.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It was off for the summer, broke as a joke, and had to make 140 to

Lorraine Kamesha:

keep my kids, my twin daughters.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Who are like a year and some change at that time in daycare.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And what I was doing is I was doing this for free.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I was writing people's resumes.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I was doing business plans.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I was doing all these things for just, you know, free labor for all my friends and

Lorraine Kamesha:

family, and, you know, people are sending people to me and all that type of stuff.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So one day I decided, you know what, I, I gotta do something.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I decided that I was going to start charging for these resumes.

Lorraine Kamesha:

When I started advertising myself, uh, which is something that I've

Lorraine Kamesha:

always done in the past, I've worked for advertising companies.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I've worked for radio stations in sales.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I started advertising myself in the business, just kind of

Lorraine Kamesha:

like took off in about a month.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I was making like 1500 a week.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, and then I had to figure out how I was going to sustain

Lorraine Kamesha:

that and go back to school.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So, um, that's where the company was born at first.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It was.

Lorraine Kamesha:

A one woman show, um, because like I said, it was just a hustle.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I was just trying to make a, you know, 200 max to keep my

Lorraine Kamesha:

kids in daycare and pay for gas.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And then when I came with that problem, like, Hmm, how am I going to

Lorraine Kamesha:

go back to school, pharmacy school?

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, full time medical school and also keep this revenue coming in.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So that's when I started hiring people.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And from there, over the years, we've grown.

Lorraine Kamesha:

We, we have probably about 30 something writers over any given period of time,

Lorraine Kamesha:

depending on what the seasons look like.

Lorraine Kamesha:

We have several VAs.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I have an assistant who also has an assistant.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, so it just kind of blew up from there because I learned very early on

Lorraine Kamesha:

that if I wanted to make the type of money that I could sustain myself on as

Lorraine Kamesha:

a single mother, then I had to make sure that I knew how to delegate and what I

Lorraine Kamesha:

couldn't delegate, I could then automate.

ShySpeaks:

Wow.

ShySpeaks:

Wow.

ShySpeaks:

She's talking my language.

ShySpeaks:

Delegate, automate,

Lorraine Kamesha:

scale.

ShySpeaks:

All of these things are sounding really great.

ShySpeaks:

We're going to be talking about that a little bit more about some

ShySpeaks:

of the things that you did to scale.

ShySpeaks:

How do you actually delegate?

ShySpeaks:

How do you automate?

ShySpeaks:

So many people have so many questions about that.

ShySpeaks:

Like, okay, if I'm not writing it, if I want to get anything written

ShySpeaks:

well, I got to write it myself.

ShySpeaks:

That could be your philosophy.

ShySpeaks:

So for all the writers out there, we're going to get into how you get to the

ShySpeaks:

point where you're able to delegate.

ShySpeaks:

Okay.

ShySpeaks:

Run, I want to, I want you to lean in a little bit and inquire about the,

ShySpeaks:

the branding behind like this company.

ShySpeaks:

So the name of the company, like how do you get to the point?

ShySpeaks:

Like, you know, all of that.

ShySpeaks:

And I say run because run loves that he nerds out on that type of stuff.

ShySpeaks:

So

ShySpeaks:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: no, um, that's a great question.

ShySpeaks:

Right.

ShySpeaks:

So You start out providing the service and then you, you,

ShySpeaks:

you realize, okay, oh great.

ShySpeaks:

I'm, I can, I'm generating revenue.

ShySpeaks:

Like I said, you were just trying to get 147 and you got 1500, right?

ShySpeaks:

So now it's like, okay, now I have to pull some other things in

ShySpeaks:

place in order for this to work.

ShySpeaks:

But then at what point and what, what, when did you start to say, okay, wow,

ShySpeaks:

I need to be able to like brand this?

ShySpeaks:

And actually you said you had a set, you had some sales background,

ShySpeaks:

so you knew, you knew sales and marketing and things like that.

ShySpeaks:

But at what point in time, then does that stuff come into play?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Honestly, um, I didn't build my first website for that business

Lorraine Kamesha:

until like maybe three months or so end.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And it was really just because I needed it to do something for me.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And I've talked to Ron about this before.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like, I don't believe in having websites that do absolutely nothing for me.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It it makes.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, but I, that's when I started recognizing, okay, I've got to not only

Lorraine Kamesha:

have that utility with those websites, but I also have to start being recognizable.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I know from being in sales for a very long time that the people

Lorraine Kamesha:

use your services when they can.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, they can find you or they can recognize you.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, if you think about it right now, about how, think about how many

Lorraine Kamesha:

different brands of toothpaste that you can think of, if you, if you think

Lorraine Kamesha:

about that, you could probably come up with like maybe four or five, if

Lorraine Kamesha:

you're really observant, maybe like.

Lorraine Kamesha:

7 or 8 or something like that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

There's like hundreds of brands of toothpaste.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay, I didn't want to be one.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I wanted to be in that four to five.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I didn't want to be in that, you know, hundred that nobody knew about.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So that's when I finally started to connect in.

Lorraine Kamesha:

But honestly, it was such a hustle for me at the beginning.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I mean, you got to imagine I was in school with twins.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Full time pharmacy school.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I mean, one of the top pharmacy schools in the country, Mercer University,

Lorraine Kamesha:

you know, afraid to flunk out.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, you know, running this business so that I could pay the bills, you

Lorraine Kamesha:

know, for myself, keep the kids in daycare, all that good stuff.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I could afford the opportunity to go to school full time.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, so branding and stuff wasn't really at the top of my mind, but it's still

Lorraine Kamesha:

something that I worked on over time.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: Right, right, right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So in regards to, so you said this started off in the summertime, so

Lorraine Kamesha:

you was doing this in the summertime and then you had to go back.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So by, so what was that, what was that strategy that you put in place is

Lorraine Kamesha:

like, okay, I need to keep this going.

Lorraine Kamesha:

But then what are some of those things that, okay, nope, this was the first

Lorraine Kamesha:

thing I did in order for me to keep this going, to keep this revenue coming.

Lorraine Kamesha:

But I wanted to keep, but I went with this, I created this hustle.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I wanted to keep this hustle going.

ShySpeaks:

That's so good, Ron.

ShySpeaks:

What was the first strategy?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay, so I know people ask me this a lot and they're

Lorraine Kamesha:

like, what did you outsource first?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So what'd you think about first?

Lorraine Kamesha:

And what I'll tell them is that it really doesn't matter what you outsource first.

Lorraine Kamesha:

The key is that you are replacing yourself.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So whatever it is that you're doing and it's taken up the most of your

Lorraine Kamesha:

time, then you replace that with something else, whether it be hiring

Lorraine Kamesha:

somebody or automating something.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So for me at that point, because I was writing all these papers myself,

Lorraine Kamesha:

like I was literally, you know, 15, 20 papers a week, and I'm not talking

Lorraine Kamesha:

about 15, 20 pages I'm talking about Projects that could be eight pages

Lorraine Kamesha:

or 10 pages or three or four pages.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I was sitting there on my couch really for the whole

Lorraine Kamesha:

entire summer just typing away.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, so when I knew at that point when I went back to school And I got to study

Lorraine Kamesha:

all this stuff and learn all these drugs and figure out all this chemistry and

Lorraine Kamesha:

all that stuff I wasn't gonna be able to sit on my couch all day and write those

Lorraine Kamesha:

papers So I had to hire writers that was that was the first thing that I had to

Lorraine Kamesha:

do Um, then when I hired so many writers and I started expanding, I had maybe 15

Lorraine Kamesha:

writers that were all over the world and I had an American based, um, customer base.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So that means if you've got writers over across the globe and got

Lorraine Kamesha:

customers over here and you're the only person that's in between

Lorraine Kamesha:

them, then you're working 24 seven.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Cool.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Cool.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Then I had to start outsourcing management of the writers.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I kind of built my own in house agency that way.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I hired somebody.

Lorraine Kamesha:

They take care of, uh, you know, the writers, they do all that communication.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, so that was the sec, the, the second thing that I had to do.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And then when I did that, I realized, Whoa, wait a minute.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I'm still in between all these people.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So that's when I had to start automating.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So in 2017, um, I spent 20, 000 and spent a year of my time to work with developers.

Lorraine Kamesha:

With no code experience, no nothing, literally a year, um, building my

Lorraine Kamesha:

automated system so that I could remove myself, again replacing

Lorraine Kamesha:

myself, out of the back and forth between writers and clients.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: Wow.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Wow.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Oh,

ShySpeaks:

really, really cool journey.

ShySpeaks:

I want to say this, um, this entire time we've talked about

ShySpeaks:

you being a creative writer.

ShySpeaks:

We talked about you spending hours writing and then how your first strategy was to

ShySpeaks:

outsource something, uh, really just to kind of free up your time cause you needed

ShySpeaks:

to, cause you were trying to go to school.

ShySpeaks:

But for most creatives.

ShySpeaks:

The need is for whatever reason you need it to, whatever it is that

ShySpeaks:

they need their time back for that.

ShySpeaks:

It sounds like you're saying strategy is, I mean, your first strategy is

ShySpeaks:

to outsource something because that's where it creates scale, something

ShySpeaks:

that's time consuming, right?

ShySpeaks:

OK, so we're talking all about this writing.

ShySpeaks:

We're talking about, obviously, we're not talking about how prolific you are

ShySpeaks:

because you're writing all these papers and resumes and all this, all this

ShySpeaks:

writing you're doing to help other people.

ShySpeaks:

What I do want to say is.

ShySpeaks:

We're going to get into a little bit further into like some of the

ShySpeaks:

systems that you put in place, some of the structure that you put in

ShySpeaks:

place to kind of manage all of this.

ShySpeaks:

But I want you to drop the name right quick before we go to pay these bills.

ShySpeaks:

As we say here in the podcast world, drop the name of this business

ShySpeaks:

that you build so people can know exactly what we're talking about.

ShySpeaks:

Sure.

ShySpeaks:

There's

Lorraine Kamesha:

two sites, UniversityWriting911.

Lorraine Kamesha:

com and GradeSeekers.

Lorraine Kamesha:

com.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Those are the two.

ShySpeaks:

Mmm.

ShySpeaks:

Just saying.

ShySpeaks:

Don't go nowhere.

ShySpeaks:

We'll be right back.

Lorraine Kamesha:

What's the irony?

ShySpeaks:

It's because it's us in different color clothing.

ShySpeaks:

I mean, listen, we've been doing a lot of talking, and we want to make

ShySpeaks:

sure that you have an opportunity to make a statement as well.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Because

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: we've seen people make statements

Lorraine Kamesha:

with their athletic apparel.

Lorraine Kamesha:

We've even seen people make statements as entrepreneurs.

Lorraine Kamesha:

But one thing I haven't seen is somebody make a statement

Lorraine Kamesha:

as a creative entrepreneur.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So what we have given you an opportunity to make a statement

Lorraine Kamesha:

as a creative entrepreneur.

ShySpeaks:

Okay.

ShySpeaks:

Okay.

ShySpeaks:

So if they want to make sure that they're rocking that creative preneur

ShySpeaks:

gear, where can they go get that?

ShySpeaks:

You

ShySpeaks:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: can go get that gear from whatstheirony.

ShySpeaks:

com.

ShySpeaks:

Okay, when we say we're playing these videos, a lot of times

ShySpeaks:

people think we got some kind of sponsor.

ShySpeaks:

No, you are the sponsors.

ShySpeaks:

Those of you guys who are creative entrepreneurs who are watching this,

ShySpeaks:

who need some gear that they can rock to actually let people know

ShySpeaks:

that you're a creative entrepreneur.

ShySpeaks:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: Awesome.

ShySpeaks:

Awesome.

ShySpeaks:

So no, like you, in the first half, you've, you've

ShySpeaks:

definitely let us in on a lot.

ShySpeaks:

Right.

ShySpeaks:

Um, and that piece, as far as the, you wanted to replace yourself as

ShySpeaks:

the writer so that you can scale.

ShySpeaks:

Cause like, listen, I can't keep doing this writing somebody else to do that.

ShySpeaks:

Now, a lot of this, I want to know like the mindset kind of behind that, because.

ShySpeaks:

Yeah.

ShySpeaks:

The average person not going to know that they need to do that.

ShySpeaks:

The average person, I don't like, what, how did you come to those?

ShySpeaks:

I know it's like, okay, I'm going back to school, but I want to know mindset

ShySpeaks:

wise, what, what, what was going through your mind in order to come to that?

ShySpeaks:

Like, is there something from the past that you knew or

ShySpeaks:

yeah, where that come from?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So again, it's the math for me.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I've always been somebody that is real focused on the numbers

Lorraine Kamesha:

and it's just natural for me.

Lorraine Kamesha:

But also when you've been in sales for as long as I had been by

Lorraine Kamesha:

that point, um, you know, you're always looking at the run rates.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You're looking at the percentages.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You're looking at your clothes, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

You're looking at all that stuff.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And I guess I just came.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Into my business with that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So, uh, and I've done this before, um, on some of my lives and on some of my, um,

Lorraine Kamesha:

you know, masterminds and stuff like that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

But I talk about the difference between doing everything

Lorraine Kamesha:

yourself and then outsourcing.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So the math works out like this.

Lorraine Kamesha:

If you have a job or, um, let's say something that you can

Lorraine Kamesha:

do for somebody else and you charge a hundred dollars, right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And at capacity, meaning that you cannot do any more.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, for whatever reason, you can only do like 20 of those a week.

Lorraine Kamesha:

If that is the case, then you can only make 2, 000 per week, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

However, if you hire five additional people who can do exactly what you

Lorraine Kamesha:

do and they can each do 20 of those same jobs and you charge, um, 100.

Lorraine Kamesha:

For that job, then you're looking at what 10, 000, I believe it works

Lorraine Kamesha:

out to be a week and you pay them.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Let's say 50 percent of the job.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Then you just took your revenue from 2, 000 to 5, 000 a week and you removed

Lorraine Kamesha:

yourself from having to do all that work.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So, for me, the math has always made sense.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I needed to know that I was going to be able to pay my bills, still go to school.

Lorraine Kamesha:

My kids were going to be taken care of and that I could still live a comfortable

Lorraine Kamesha:

life because 1 thing I don't like to do.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It's struggle.

ShySpeaks:

The math definitely have to, has to math if you don't want to struggle.

ShySpeaks:

She says the math is definitely, it was a math.

ShySpeaks:

And if you're just, I'm being silly, cause that's what they say out here.

ShySpeaks:

The math is not math.

ShySpeaks:

And then listen, the math, the way you just mathed it really makes sense.

ShySpeaks:

I'm still doing 20 papers.

ShySpeaks:

or 20 whatever it is that I'm doing.

ShySpeaks:

I now do, I've like brought in way more people because I have these other

ShySpeaks:

people that are doing it as well.

ShySpeaks:

I increased my income, but I had to share the income with the people

ShySpeaks:

who were helping me do it, but I'm making more without having to do more.

ShySpeaks:

It doesn't

Lorraine Kamesha:

matter.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I mean, one year we went viral on TikTok with my business.

Lorraine Kamesha:

The first video I posted on, uh, TikTok of my business, the writing business, and we

Lorraine Kamesha:

went viral and at one point we made up to $27,000 in a week and I was writing like

Lorraine Kamesha:

a check for 13,000 of that to my team.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Do you think I give a damn if I got, if I'm making 14,000 a week and I

Lorraine Kamesha:

gotta write a check for 13,000 a week,

ShySpeaks:

I don't, you can have the check.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Everybody can eat.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I don't care.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I was sitting, you know, taking care of my babies.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I believe, no, I wasn't pregnant at that time, but you know, I

Lorraine Kamesha:

was chilling with my babies.

Lorraine Kamesha:

We're homeschooling.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I was doing what I

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: do.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Yeah.

Lorraine Kamesha:

No.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And I heard it said that they say that 10 percent of a watermelon.

Lorraine Kamesha:

is greater than a hundred percent of a grade.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And we have to develop that mindset as entrepreneurs.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So where it's like, it's okay to split the pie, especially once

Lorraine Kamesha:

again, if I can get a bigger pie,

Lorraine Kamesha:

right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I'll never be able to make 27, 000 a week on my own.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Back when in 2013, when I started the business, I was doing all the work.

Lorraine Kamesha:

My max was probably about 1, 500.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Maybe about double that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Cause my prices were a little bit different back then, you know,

Lorraine Kamesha:

that whole thing where you don't realize what your worth is and

Lorraine Kamesha:

you're under charge and all that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I had to go through that too.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

But once I got over that, I still wasn't going to be able to make that type

Lorraine Kamesha:

of money that it's just impossible.

ShySpeaks:

Wow.

ShySpeaks:

You know, and honestly, so you were asking about the mindset and the

ShySpeaks:

mindset is really you talked about it being math and I love the simplicity

ShySpeaks:

of that because sometimes when we talk about mindset, we're thinking

ShySpeaks:

like, what do I need to tap into?

ShySpeaks:

And what do I need to listen?

ShySpeaks:

Just do the numbers.

ShySpeaks:

So I love that.

ShySpeaks:

That's really, really cool.

ShySpeaks:

I love it.

ShySpeaks:

I think, um, okay, so, oh, I have so much that I want to inquire

ShySpeaks:

about with you, with this business.

ShySpeaks:

And, um, so the first thing, Ron and I are using this terminology so that

ShySpeaks:

you can scale, but you really weren't trying to scale as in grow the business.

ShySpeaks:

You were really just trying to get your time back so that you

ShySpeaks:

can apply it somewhere else, which is technically scaling.

ShySpeaks:

So.

ShySpeaks:

For some people, just start right there.

ShySpeaks:

Like this, just get your time.

ShySpeaks:

Don't worry about trying to, I'm gonna try to bring in all these.

ShySpeaks:

Just figure out how to get your time back and that will help you scale.

ShySpeaks:

This is keep it simple.

ShySpeaks:

All right.

ShySpeaks:

So now we talk about, you talk about bringing on these other people.

ShySpeaks:

You said five other people back in your case, right?

ShySpeaks:

With the writing company.

ShySpeaks:

If we bring on five other writers, what, okay.

ShySpeaks:

There has to be some type of structure or some type of system or

ShySpeaks:

something that has to be in place.

ShySpeaks:

that allows you to then communicate to these other writers that, hey,

ShySpeaks:

I had, you became a conduit, right?

ShySpeaks:

But what needs to be in place for a person or what do they need to do

ShySpeaks:

before they're able to even delegate something out and outsource stuff?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Yeah.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I mean, the communication piece has to be on point.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So that was probably one of the first things that I set up.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like, what are we going to do to be able to communicate with you?

Lorraine Kamesha:

With each other, especially since the majority of my team was, you know,

Lorraine Kamesha:

based overseas or whatever, like, how are we going to communicate?

Lorraine Kamesha:

And that can bring a huge.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like issue, it could be a huge barrier, especially when you're

Lorraine Kamesha:

working with people overseas.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Number one, how are you gonna do it?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like, what is gonna facilitate that as far as you know?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Is it by phone?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Is it by text?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Is there a platform that you're gonna use, but also cul culturally?

Lorraine Kamesha:

'cause there are cultural differences that you have to deal with when

Lorraine Kamesha:

you're dealing with people who are from different countries.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, be me being a woman and dealing with people, you know, some of.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I ran Iraq, you know, Kenya, uh, India and all the other stuff.

Lorraine Kamesha:

They didn't really take too kindly to me, you know, being the boss

Lorraine Kamesha:

and giving them, you know, ordering them around or whatever at first.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, but you gotta kind of get over that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I would say that that communication was like the first system and

Lorraine Kamesha:

process that I had to put in place.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: If you don't mind us asking, what specific

Lorraine Kamesha:

tool do you use for communication?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Cause we know there's a plethora out there, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, I know me and Shy use Slack and there's some things like that, but what,

Lorraine Kamesha:

what, what tool do you, do you use?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So

Lorraine Kamesha:

I started off with Asana, which was weird.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Sometimes I go and I take, you know, I coach other business owners that

Lorraine Kamesha:

are doing the same thing that I do.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And I'm like, Hey, if you want to do this here, look at it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It's a little convoluted, but work better than what you're doing now.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, so, uh, but if not, I do use Slack.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So we have multiple channels.

Lorraine Kamesha:

We have a channel that's just for, you know, writers.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And we also have a channel that the writers and the.

Lorraine Kamesha:

The customers can communicate with each other.

Lorraine Kamesha:

That's for one business.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And then on the other side, um, the platform that I was talking

Lorraine Kamesha:

about earlier has a built in type of communication piece, right?

ShySpeaks:

He said the other type has to do with the communications.

ShySpeaks:

What's the last

Lorraine Kamesha:

thing you just said?

Lorraine Kamesha:

The platform.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Remember I talked about building that custom platform that I had to build?

Lorraine Kamesha:

It includes a communication piece.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So, um, we use that there.

ShySpeaks:

Okay, gotcha.

ShySpeaks:

Something custom.

ShySpeaks:

Okay, so, uh, when it comes...

ShySpeaks:

See?

ShySpeaks:

Customization.

ShySpeaks:

Alright, so this is...

ShySpeaks:

I like that you said that.

ShySpeaks:

So, number one, there should be a go to system that you can

ShySpeaks:

probably find that works for you.

ShySpeaks:

Maybe it's weird, but then you may have to, like, build out something

ShySpeaks:

custom for whatever it is your creative business is wrapped around.

ShySpeaks:

So I like that, that, uh, that idea.

ShySpeaks:

And it's probably going to be a both and, not an either or.

ShySpeaks:

For some things you can use this, but for some stuff that's specific

ShySpeaks:

to what you have going on, you guys may need something different.

ShySpeaks:

Something specific, so.

ShySpeaks:

Really good advice there.

ShySpeaks:

All right.

ShySpeaks:

So we, okay, go ahead, Ron.

ShySpeaks:

You got something.

ShySpeaks:

Okay.

ShySpeaks:

So, okay.

ShySpeaks:

So we use Slack.

ShySpeaks:

Slack is this way for you and the team to talk.

ShySpeaks:

You create channels specifically so that when we're in this channel, we're

ShySpeaks:

talking about this specific theme.

ShySpeaks:

And then of course, um, as it relates to probably like collaborative

ShySpeaks:

writing or probably something like that, we have another custom piece.

ShySpeaks:

Okay.

ShySpeaks:

All right.

ShySpeaks:

So now when you first want to, when you first decide to outsource something

ShySpeaks:

and you're trying to delegate first, got to get the communication in peace.

ShySpeaks:

All right.

ShySpeaks:

So now how do you then Like, make sure you're, what system are you using to

ShySpeaks:

like, properly manage this team, right?

ShySpeaks:

So now, right, so just because I hired the team, that doesn't mean we're managing the

ShySpeaks:

team well, or how do we keep it going, or, you know, keep that whole machine running.

ShySpeaks:

I know it's communication, but like, is there something that somebody

ShySpeaks:

that, that as a Creative Entrepreneur.

ShySpeaks:

As an entrepreneur, do they need to implement this?

ShySpeaks:

This right here is going to help you keep it

Lorraine Kamesha:

going, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So if you start getting to a place where you have a large team, I encourage you

Lorraine Kamesha:

to hire somebody that you can communicate with that can communicate with the team.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So this is, this is something I learned as a drum major when I was in the band.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I didn't, if I have a 200 piece band, I can't, I'm not going to

Lorraine Kamesha:

individually talk to everybody.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, at the same time, certain things.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

But things that are important.

Lorraine Kamesha:

What I want to do is I want to take the section leaders, which might

Lorraine Kamesha:

what about eight of those, maybe 10 at the most, bring them in and tell

Lorraine Kamesha:

them what, what the plan is, and then let them go and be responsible

Lorraine Kamesha:

for their own individual teams.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: Okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

No, that makes sense.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It

ShySpeaks:

does.

ShySpeaks:

I love it.

ShySpeaks:

You know, I'm the artist in me is just, I'm loving this musical, you know, because

ShySpeaks:

music is being used as a way to talk about structure, which is normally not the case,

ShySpeaks:

but the way you painted out, you letting people know that we got some organization

ShySpeaks:

going on over here in the music side.

ShySpeaks:

Yeah.

ShySpeaks:

I'm a music artist.

ShySpeaks:

So, so, okay.

ShySpeaks:

So one of the things you talked about earlier, which was, so now I'm asking

ShySpeaks:

you about systems and then it also has to be combined with structure.

ShySpeaks:

Cause you talked about that just a minute ago, which is.

ShySpeaks:

Hey, I was talking to my teammates and they're all in different

ShySpeaks:

time zones and stuff like that.

ShySpeaks:

So now I'm working 24 hours.

ShySpeaks:

So now if I can create one point of contact, then that point of contact

ShySpeaks:

who maybe has a better time scale with the rest of the, with the other people,

ShySpeaks:

then I can communicate with them.

ShySpeaks:

Then they can communicate with others.

ShySpeaks:

I like that because you said it earlier, but it's like, okay,

ShySpeaks:

you have to hire that person.

ShySpeaks:

So then do you need to like, like develop a job title or like, what do you have?

ShySpeaks:

You know what I'm saying?

ShySpeaks:

What do you, what, what do they need to do to like, so they can go

ShySpeaks:

ahead and get that person so they can have that person to talk to that

Lorraine Kamesha:

person, you know?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So the job title, you know, for me, that's always been kind of fluffy, but

Lorraine Kamesha:

I mean, some people get off on that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I don't know.

Lorraine Kamesha:

What do you call that?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Yuck their yum or whatever.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

The main thing you got to do is empower them to make decisions.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So they know exactly what to do in certain situations.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Uh, we still use Asana for that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So we have a list of S you know, SLPs.

Lorraine Kamesha:

If this happens, then we do this.

Lorraine Kamesha:

If that happens, then we do this.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And anything, anytime something new comes up, then we go back.

Lorraine Kamesha:

We, after we solve the issue, we go back, we write up a new SLP.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So now that when something happens and I'm asleep or I'm with the

Lorraine Kamesha:

kids or I'm, you know, across the world, and you can't reach me,

Lorraine Kamesha:

then y'all know exactly what to do.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You should only have to touch me in dire situations or situations

Lorraine Kamesha:

that we haven't discussed yet.

ShySpeaks:

Ladies and gentlemen, we introduced the SOP.

ShySpeaks:

Okay.

ShySpeaks:

The Standard Operating Procedure.

ShySpeaks:

You just, you really giving it to them right here.

ShySpeaks:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: That's what I'm saying.

ShySpeaks:

That's why I'm like, we got to get on the show because she is, you

ShySpeaks:

know, when it comes to delegation, automation and all that, like.

ShySpeaks:

So when I say we introduced the standard operating

ShySpeaks:

procedure, she said the SOP.

ShySpeaks:

So the SOP for some who may not know is the standard operating procedure, which is

ShySpeaks:

a set of instructions that we use within our business to be able to communicate

ShySpeaks:

what happens in any given scenario.

ShySpeaks:

So that's why she's saying, so if that's there, then we don't need to contact me.

ShySpeaks:

The, the person who's the founder or the president or the initial

ShySpeaks:

person who, they won't have to if you actually have it listed out on

ShySpeaks:

this is how we handle this thing.

ShySpeaks:

When this person comes in through payment, this is what

ShySpeaks:

happens from here, here, here.

ShySpeaks:

If you run into this scenario, we do this.

ShySpeaks:

If you run into that scenario, we do this.

ShySpeaks:

And she gave the tip on, not only do you need to have the standard operating

ShySpeaks:

procedure, so everything that you do should be written down, but also go

ShySpeaks:

back in and update the stuff as issues come up, cause like, issues will arise.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Now,

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: how do you know, cause once again, The average

Lorraine Kamesha:

creative, let alone creative for newer, even entrepreneurs, they're not

Lorraine Kamesha:

going to know that they need an SOP.

Lorraine Kamesha:

They don't even know what an SOP is for some people.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So how did you know that?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I need these SOPs in place.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, so at what point in time do you know that you need them?

Lorraine Kamesha:

And then how did you know how to actually create one?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Cause I'm tired.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I'm sorry.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I was burnt the hell out.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, I'm a problem solver and I've said this online before, and I think

Lorraine Kamesha:

I've talked to you about this, Ron.

Lorraine Kamesha:

As a business owner, your job every day is to wake up and solve problems.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You're the type of person who runs away from problems and, and

Lorraine Kamesha:

you know, gets defeated every time they run into an issue.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Then you're going to really struggle as an entrepreneur

Lorraine Kamesha:

because that is literally your job.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So when you remove yourself from doing all the work, you remove

Lorraine Kamesha:

yourself from working in the business.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And put yourself in a position to work in on the business.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And when you have all these teams, your job is to make their job easier so that

Lorraine Kamesha:

they can output as much as possible.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So when I ran into this problem, I said, wait a minute, I'm tired.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I'm burnt out.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I'm not able to hold up my end because I do have a job.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, my job is sales and marketing, content creation.

Lorraine Kamesha:

The creative stuff, the systems, making sure the automations and stuff

Lorraine Kamesha:

are tested and working properly.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I do have a job, and if they are constantly just bombarding me with all

Lorraine Kamesha:

these things, then I can't do my job, and if I can't do my job, they can't do their

Lorraine Kamesha:

job, then the whole system falls, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I knew that I had to document this stuff, write it down, so that,

Lorraine Kamesha:

and make it easily accessible for them, so that we're not You know,

Lorraine Kamesha:

having what they call in science and chemistry, the rate limiting step.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know what I'm saying?

Lorraine Kamesha:

What, what part of the process is going to be the rate limiting step?

Lorraine Kamesha:

The one that's going to slow everything down, you know, before

Lorraine Kamesha:

the output can actually occur.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Wow.

ShySpeaks:

Come on.

ShySpeaks:

Y'all better lean in on this Science at Massey.

ShySpeaks:

Letting you know it'll help you with business.

ShySpeaks:

What is the bottleneck?

ShySpeaks:

Is what we call it in the operations world.

ShySpeaks:

What is, everything is flowing through the conduit.

ShySpeaks:

It's moving and all of a sudden something is slowing down.

ShySpeaks:

Where it's slowing down?

ShySpeaks:

We need to start writing some, writing some SOPs about that because we don't

ShySpeaks:

want this to be a slowdown anymore.

ShySpeaks:

We want to open this back up so that Businesses continue to flow.

ShySpeaks:

I love it.

ShySpeaks:

I want to say this.

ShySpeaks:

You guys are listening to, um, someone who started the university

ShySpeaks:

writing 9 1 1, a university.

ShySpeaks:

Yeah.

ShySpeaks:

So we told you about that, but, and we're asking all these questions

ShySpeaks:

about, Hey, what about this?

ShySpeaks:

Or can you tell us about that?

ShySpeaks:

What system do you use here?

ShySpeaks:

But there is another business that you have that actually helps other

ShySpeaks:

writers, creative writers who want to start their own six figure.

ShySpeaks:

Writing agency, right?

ShySpeaks:

Can you want to, let's talk about that a little bit cause I think

ShySpeaks:

we should drop them a link so that those who are listening, who are

ShySpeaks:

writers are like, this is sounding

Lorraine Kamesha:

good.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Now I know how to ask.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It's not just

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: limited to writers.

Lorraine Kamesha:

No, no,

Lorraine Kamesha:

no.

Lorraine Kamesha:

This process actually I found just by trial and error on my own

Lorraine Kamesha:

applies to a bunch of different bits, service based businesses.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, so I've started, um, a mattress removal service, um, a local services.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I work with a local roofer in the area and we apply this to his business

Lorraine Kamesha:

and I make residual off of that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, I have, uh, cars, a couple of SUVs that I'm renting out.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, this lovely thing behind me is actually a content

Lorraine Kamesha:

house that I've decorated and purchased in the Atlanta area.

Lorraine Kamesha:

We've applied it to some of the services and things in there as well.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So the process is something that you can take out and you can literally

Lorraine Kamesha:

use for service based businesses.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, but I do have, um, a guide that I wrote that talks specifically

Lorraine Kamesha:

towards writers, um, and it's called write6figures, or I'm sorry, write6figs.

Lorraine Kamesha:

com.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, so you can check that out and it'll give you literally a guide of

Lorraine Kamesha:

everything that I did in my writing business to scale it from, you

Lorraine Kamesha:

know, nothing to what it is today.

ShySpeaks:

Wow.

ShySpeaks:

Right.

ShySpeaks:

Sixfigs.

ShySpeaks:

com.

ShySpeaks:

Okay.

ShySpeaks:

I'm telling you, we'll drop a link for you in the description so

ShySpeaks:

that you can know how to get here.

ShySpeaks:

Ron, you got something else cause you know, I'm gonna keep going.

ShySpeaks:

I don't, I don't, you

Lorraine Kamesha:

know,

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: listen.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I mean, no, it's, it's, it's, she, she said so much.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I definitely, it's a lot of things that have been just kind of firing

Lorraine Kamesha:

off, um, in my head in regards to, um, you know, what it is she does and

Lorraine Kamesha:

how she approaches it and whatnot.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, but one thing I want to just kind of, leaning a little

Lorraine Kamesha:

bit for our audience, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So for you, you were like, okay, I'm doing all the writing.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I had to see, okay, because I'm spending the most of my time there and

Lorraine Kamesha:

I need to free up my time so I can do other things, but for that creative

Lorraine Kamesha:

to where the writing piece or whether it's writing or whatever their creative

Lorraine Kamesha:

piece is that they enjoy doing that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

They, they want to keep doing that, but they know these other things are needed.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Speak to them a little bit, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Cause they don't look at it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like, listen, I wanted to get the writing off my plate so that I can scale it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

But for this person, like I don't want to take the writing off or I don't want

Lorraine Kamesha:

to take this other creative aspect off.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I want to keep doing that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So how do you, what would your advice be to them?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So let me tell you a secret.

Lorraine Kamesha:

The writing never left my plate.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It's still on there.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It's just on there in different ways.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So I'm writing ads.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And I'm writing Facebook statuses and I'm writing TikTok videos and scripts.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And now I'm studying AI prompt engineering and I'm, and I'm working with that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, so the creative piece really never disappears.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It just moves to different.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, places.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, so I'm very much still writing.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I, I, I write so much in a day.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I mean, I've got files and files of content that I just sit there and I write.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Now I've gotten to the place where I've had to systemize

Lorraine Kamesha:

the, the content creation too.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, that's something I definitely want to talk about because when I

Lorraine Kamesha:

transitioned from, you know, whole business owner, entrepreneur, you

Lorraine Kamesha:

know, Hear me roar, all that stuff.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And then I started creating video and for some reason I thought

Lorraine Kamesha:

that it was going to be different.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, I was, you know, I was in a place where, you know, I could

Lorraine Kamesha:

work minimal hours, be around for my family, you know, do all the things

Lorraine Kamesha:

and then got into content creation.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And it took me probably about three, four months to realize, wait a minute, girl,

Lorraine Kamesha:

you already did this to yourself once.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, calm down and do what you know you ought to be doing because

Lorraine Kamesha:

that video content creation, you know, podcasting, TikToks, Reels, Facebook,

Lorraine Kamesha:

all those things will wear you out.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I mean, and I, and I went through it, like physically went through, um, so.

Lorraine Kamesha:

That's something that you have to be aware of as well.

ShySpeaks:

Okay.

ShySpeaks:

I like it.

ShySpeaks:

I like it.

ShySpeaks:

I love it.

ShySpeaks:

I love how you said that basically you didn't quit writing.

ShySpeaks:

You started writing something else.

ShySpeaks:

And so for creative, if they're not a writer, it may

ShySpeaks:

not be that you stop cooking.

ShySpeaks:

You're just going to start cooking in a different way.

ShySpeaks:

You know?

ShySpeaks:

Maybe you didn't stop producing, you started producing in a different way.

ShySpeaks:

When I say music production or something like that, maybe you

ShySpeaks:

didn't stop producing the show, you started producing from another.

ShySpeaks:

So it, it just basically sounds like they have to embrace the reality.

ShySpeaks:

It's not that they're going to stop doing it.

ShySpeaks:

So they're like, Oh, bring somebody in so stop doing this.

ShySpeaks:

No, you're not going to stop doing anything you love.

ShySpeaks:

You're just going to have to do it in a different capacity.

Lorraine Kamesha:

All right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So you gotta, you gotta learn how to kind of.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Open your eyes and see stuff where it is.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Like Martha Stewart.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I mean, she's, when she had her cooking show, she was still technically cooking,

Lorraine Kamesha:

but was she prepping out everything?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Was she going to the grocery store?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Was she, you know, having to pull all her ingredients?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Was, you know, all that stuff was prepared for her, but she was still cooking, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So this is, it's the same thing, you know, you're still going to be creative.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And at this point, she's probably just looking over things and improving.

Lorraine Kamesha:

She's using the knowledge that she learned from all that creativity from years and

Lorraine Kamesha:

years of practicing that in a different capacity, but it's still creativity.

ShySpeaks:

Martha Stewart is a creative entrepreneur.

ShySpeaks:

Okay.

ShySpeaks:

But no, that is so true.

ShySpeaks:

There were aspects of that.

ShySpeaks:

I like going to the store.

ShySpeaks:

I like cooking the food.

ShySpeaks:

I like doing, okay, you like all, you really like cooking, but you don't have

ShySpeaks:

to go to the store or you like, you know, there's some part of it that someone

ShySpeaks:

else can do without you having fear that the ball is going to be dropped.

ShySpeaks:

I want you to speak to that real quick, because I see that outsourcing is very

ShySpeaks:

important to you to develop, whether it's a writing agency or any agency model,

ShySpeaks:

you have to begin to embrace outsourcing.

ShySpeaks:

Number one, realizing you're not going to have to let go

ShySpeaks:

of the thing you like to do.

ShySpeaks:

You're going to get to still do it.

ShySpeaks:

But what about people who struggle with like the whole idea of man, the ball is

ShySpeaks:

going to get dropped or I'm going to.

ShySpeaks:

Lose like clock before this thing is going.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

What would you say to that?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So one thing you had to get comfortable with when you stop doing all the work

Lorraine Kamesha:

yourself is now you take off that doing hat and you move into a trainer position.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And I think that's what most people drop the ball at, is that they believe

Lorraine Kamesha:

that people should come perfect.

Lorraine Kamesha:

People should come to, you know, into your space, knowing all the things,

Lorraine Kamesha:

knowing your systems and processes, knowing how you like things done.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And that's just not the case.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So you have to learn how to communicate, train people, develop people.

Lorraine Kamesha:

You really start to pour your knowledge into other people.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Okay, that's the first thing.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And then the second part, how arrogant do you have to be to believe that you are

Lorraine Kamesha:

the only one that can do a job the way that you do it or as good as you do it?

Lorraine Kamesha:

That is one of the most arrogant things the most, and one of the

Lorraine Kamesha:

biggest limiting beliefs that I've seen literally crack people down.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I've seen people not allow people to help them or do things for them

Lorraine Kamesha:

because in their mind, oh, nobody's gonna be able to do it like me.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I don't care if you do it like me or not.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Is the result gonna be the the same or better?

Lorraine Kamesha:

If so, move forward.

Lorraine Kamesha:

That, that sounds good to me.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

ShySpeaks:

So go ahead, Ron.

ShySpeaks:

No, no.

ShySpeaks:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: Go ahead.

ShySpeaks:

Go ahead.

ShySpeaks:

I was going to say, um, that that part was very important when we

ShySpeaks:

talk about delegating and outsourcing to realize that when I outsource, I

ShySpeaks:

am not just outsourcing a task because then I'm going to create somebody

ShySpeaks:

who can just hopefully follow my way.

ShySpeaks:

But when I, when I delegate the.

ShySpeaks:

Like the full like responsibility you're like, yeah, you do delegate the authority

ShySpeaks:

and there you give them the authority to be empowered means that you kind of

ShySpeaks:

have to not train them to do it your way.

ShySpeaks:

You have to train them to be empowered, which is another word that you say, like

ShySpeaks:

you are going to have to, yes, they're going to be able to do it, but you have

ShySpeaks:

to do some form of training as well.

ShySpeaks:

Because it's one thing to give people to make other task makers, and it's

ShySpeaks:

other people, you're making other people leaders, and they can lead

ShySpeaks:

that thing without you having to lead it, you know, the entire time because

ShySpeaks:

they have the authority to lead it.

ShySpeaks:

Why do they have the authority to lead it?

ShySpeaks:

They already have the know how, how, which is why you hired them, and then you

ShySpeaks:

train them, not to make them a follower and do it your way, but you train them

ShySpeaks:

to be empowered, to execute in their authority, and they can lead that thing.

ShySpeaks:

You don't need to, that's arrogance to think that you're the only leader.

ShySpeaks:

There's so many leaders

Lorraine Kamesha:

out here.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And I think that's where a lot of organizations crumble.

Lorraine Kamesha:

They fall because they're not training people to work with them.

Lorraine Kamesha:

They're training people to work for them.

Lorraine Kamesha:

They want to set up this, you know, hierarchy of, you know, I'm, I'm the boss.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I'm gonna tell you what to do.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And at the end of the day, it doesn't really leave any space for people

Lorraine Kamesha:

to develop those leadership skills.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I want decision makers.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I want people who can logically think about, well, if this happens, then.

Lorraine Kamesha:

We gotta do this, or what do you think about this?

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know that that's when you're become, I, I think a true entrepreneur,

Lorraine Kamesha:

when you have people that can come to you with ideas, not just, okay, what

Lorraine Kamesha:

are we gonna, what are we gonna do?

Lorraine Kamesha:

You know, , what I'm saying, they're coming to you.

Lorraine Kamesha:

It goes from, Hey, Lorraine, we've got this problem.

Lorraine Kamesha:

What, what next to.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Hey, Lorraine, we've got this problem.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I think we should blah, blah, blah, blah.

Lorraine Kamesha:

What do you think?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And, and I encourage that because when they first come to me with problems,

Lorraine Kamesha:

well, what do you think that we should do?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

What, what in your experience, have you, have you seen this before?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Have you ran across this before?

Lorraine Kamesha:

What would you do if you were in this position?

Lorraine Kamesha:

So that now we're having a collaborative effort and not just,

Lorraine Kamesha:

you know, feeling like somebody's telling them what to do all the time.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: Yeah.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Yeah, listen, I want us to keep going, but you know, it is, we

Lorraine Kamesha:

are at the point of the show where we're going to wrap it up, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

But this has been a phenomenal interview and you've given so many gems and

Lorraine Kamesha:

jewels and I'm hoping that you guys are listening to what was shared.

Lorraine Kamesha:

If you, if you need to go back, go back and listen, make sure you take

Lorraine Kamesha:

a note because she was definitely dropping some, some gems and jewels

Lorraine Kamesha:

on how, how, how you can effectively run and grow and sustain and all

Lorraine Kamesha:

these things, your creative business.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So yes, no, thank you for your time.

Lorraine Kamesha:

We're going to have to have you come back because I do want you to talk about that.

Lorraine Kamesha:

That content piece, right?

Lorraine Kamesha:

I think that's the

ShySpeaks:

thing.

ShySpeaks:

I'm going Just give me one something from, you said you wanted to talk.

ShySpeaks:

Give me one something.

ShySpeaks:

Just a nugget.

ShySpeaks:

Just to tease me for the cartoon.

Lorraine Kamesha:

If you're worried about going viral, you better be ready.

Lorraine Kamesha:

That's all I gotta say.

Lorraine Kamesha:

If you're not ready to go viral, you better chill out and sit down somewhere

Lorraine Kamesha:

because going viral can just tear your whole, thing down if you're not,

Lorraine Kamesha:

that, that would be the one thing that I've dropped for now, but I would

Lorraine Kamesha:

love to come back and talk about, you know, viral marketing and how you can

Lorraine Kamesha:

monetize that um, and, and really, you know, blow your business up.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Wow.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I, I, I need to hear about it myself.

ShySpeaks:

I got to hear about this.

ShySpeaks:

One other thing I like to give a hardcore data.

ShySpeaks:

When we have someone come on here on this show, it's cause they.

ShySpeaks:

Have achieved six, seven, and even eight figure type of success.

ShySpeaks:

And they know what they're talking about because they've done it.

ShySpeaks:

And we're trying to follow and implementing their, their steps.

ShySpeaks:

Those of us who are emerging creative entrepreneurs, a lot about

ShySpeaks:

outsource, outsourcing, hardcore data.

ShySpeaks:

About how many people would you say that you have, uh, hired to

ShySpeaks:

be able to outsource tasks to?

ShySpeaks:

Just a number.

ShySpeaks:

Hmm, let's

Lorraine Kamesha:

see.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And this is correct because you asked me earlier, like, how

Lorraine Kamesha:

many businesses do you have?

Lorraine Kamesha:

I'm like, oh, I don't know.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, so I have, um, three assistants.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, one writing manager.

Lorraine Kamesha:

I have five, um, writers who work specifically on larger projects, and I

Lorraine Kamesha:

have, um, about 15 writers that I have working, um, on the smaller projects.

Lorraine Kamesha:

So that sounds like what about 20 for that?

Lorraine Kamesha:

Um, the content creation side, I have, uh, a video editor.

Lorraine Kamesha:

And I believe that's it.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Most of my stuff on content creation right now is mostly, um, automations.

Lorraine Kamesha:

There's a lot of different tools that you can use for that.

ShySpeaks:

Wow.

ShySpeaks:

Yeah.

ShySpeaks:

This is about 30 people that we just, you know, so this is not something

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that she's just saying in theory.

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This is a reality and things are getting done.

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So don't worry about it.

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it can get done with or without your hand being all the way on it.

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Speaking of being hands on and writing, y'all clap it up for Miss Lorraine.

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Oh my gosh, you gave it to us.

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Uh, while I'm saying thank you.

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Clap it up for you.

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I'm saying thank you for being on, but run.

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I want you to thank anybody else that needs to be thanked as well.

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Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: Um, once again, I think the listeners, I think each

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and every listener that is listening to our, our, our podcast that are, that

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are following us, please like subscribe Follow, share if you are gaining any

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value from this podcast, but that's, and I will be remiss not to thank you all.

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Cause once again, you all are the reason why we are here.

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So thank you.

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Thank you.

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Thank you.

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And also please, please head over to the website.

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Uh, mmcbpodcast.

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com and there you'll be able to join our creatives corner community,

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which is both a group as well as a newsletter to kind of keep you

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going in between podcast episodes.

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So we want to stay in touch with you as well.

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And wherever you are listening to this podcast, drop us a review.

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We want to hear from you as well.

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So thank you so much for tuning in before we get out.

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I like to do something with.

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All of the listeners.

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I want you to repeat this mantra with me so that we can actually

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be further empowered in our creative entrepreneur journey.

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Y'all ready?

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Let's get it.

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Let's go.

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Say this out loud.

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All it takes, all it takes

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Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: is intention, is intention, consistency,

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consistency, and laser focus to run our creative

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Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: business.

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And laser focus to mind my creative face.

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Okay.

Lorraine Kamesha:

All right.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Ron "iRonic" Lee Jr.: And on that note, we will see you all later.

Lorraine Kamesha:

Peace.

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