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5 - Educate, Don't Sell at Your Event with Destiny Training Systems' Scott DeMoulin
26th April 2022 • High Profit Event Show • Rudy Rodriguez
00:00:00 00:53:33

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Hosted by Rudy Rodriguez, this episode of "The High Profit Event Show" welcomes Mr. Scott DeMoulin from Destiny Training. Boasting over four decades in the event industry, Scott's illustrious journey has seen him collaborate with industry giants like Tony Robbins, Jay Abraham, and Bob Proctor. Among his numerous achievements, co-founding the "Business Mastery" program with Tony Robbins stands out prominently.

Scott is a staunch advocate for the pivotal role of meticulous preparation before any event. He believes that for an event to succeed, whether customized or public, it's paramount to grasp and cater to the attendees' needs and desires. Elaborating on this, he introduces his course, "Engage from Your Stage", where he underscores the notion that everyone has a unique 'stage'. Whether one is a seasoned public speaker or an emerging entrepreneur, the primary objective should be to serve the audience's needs, often eclipsing the allure of sheer numbers or monetary gains.


A significant portion of the episode delved into the pre-event strategies Scott employs. He accentuates the efficacy of conducting preliminary interviews to gauge audience concerns, ensuring the content disseminated is tailor-made to address these issues. During the actual event, fostering trust, rapport, and imparting education take center stage. Scott believes in the power of referrals, asserting that delivering immense value during the event can set the stage for future successes.


Shifting the focus to the delicate art of sales, Scott highlights the essence of trust and value. He critiques commonly employed methods like the "stack close" and showcases its potential pitfalls. Drawing from a recent event as a case study, he illustrated how his approach, rooted in value and trust, culminated in enrollments worth $2 million, far surpassing the anticipated range of $750,000 to $900,000.


The episode wasn't just about numbers and tactics; it underscored the sanctity of integrity. Scott expounded on the power of Cialdini's law of contrast in making compelling offers. He also revisited the timeless Pareto principle, emphasizing that often, the last 20% of meticulous effort can lead to 80% of the results. An engaging anecdote about an attorney testing a refund guarantee showcased Scott's unwavering commitment to audience satisfaction.


Feedback, as Scott and the host concurred, is the cornerstone of any thriving business. They delved into the utility of NPS scores, emphasizing the immediate responses they garner. The duo believes in the transformative power of genuine feedback, urging businesses to embrace it wholeheartedly. Scott reminisced about his 1989 venture when he purchased a training franchise from Tony Robbins. This segment unveiled his professional trajectory, highlighting milestones like receiving the Destiny Leadership Award and playing an instrumental role in Tony Robbins' first business mastery program.


Communication was the episode's final focal point. Scott posited that effective communication constitutes 90% of success in business and entrepreneurship. His training modules at Destiny Training Systems pivot around honing internal communication, sales and relationship communication, and marketing communication. Despite the challenges thrown by the COVID-19 pandemic, Scott transitioned his training to a virtual format without compromising its core essence. He also introduced listeners to his program, "Engage From Your Stage", available on his website, and highlighted an enriching podcast featuring Elliot Roe.


In a contemplative segment, Scott mused about the legacy he aspires to leave behind. Beyond financial gains, he wishes to make a meaningful difference in individuals and businesses. Gratitude was evident as he credited mentors like Tony Robbins, Bob Proctor, and Jay Abraham for sculpting his teachings. The episode concluded with Rudy expressing his appreciation for Scott's profound insights.


Want to connect with Scott?


Website: https://destinytraining.com/


LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scott-demoulin-56bb3b9


YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/destinytraining


Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scottdemoulin/


Twitter: https://twitter.com/scottdemoulin


Don’t forget to subscribe to the High Profit Event Show and thank you for listening. Tune in next time!

✅ Want to book a session with Rudy to discuss how you can to get more high paying clients at your next virtual event? Book a session with him here.

Transcripts

Scott DeMoulin:

Hi and welcome. This is Scott DeMoulin. I'm the founder of Destiny Training Systems in Las Vegas, Nevada and on today's show, one of my outcomes is to help you create more engagement, increase enrollment and profitability with your live events.

Rudy Rodriguez:

Hi, I'm Rudy Rodriguez, the host of High Profit Event Show and on today's show we have a very, very special guest with us today. Mr. Scott DeMoulin from Destiny Training who has over four years, I mean four decades of experience in the space of hosting and leading effective events. In fact, he's worked with some of the greats like Tony Robbins, Jay Abraham, Bob Proctor and was even the co-founder and the co-creator of Business Mastery along with Tony Robbins. So, Mr. Scott DeMoulin, really excited to have you on the show with us today. Let's go ahead and jump right into the meat and potatoes with our audience. I'm curious, Scott, maybe you can tell us a little bit about your experience in the industry, give us a little background and then we'll jump right into some of these questions.

Scott DeMoulin:

Thanks, Rudy. Great to be here. I can say that the live and virtual event business is a different animal than most people expect. There's a lot of, I call it the devil in the details to learn to really master this. A lot of people do it and they think that, hey, let's just make this happen. In four decades, I've made a lot of mistakes and learned a lot from that. So, I'm happy to share that with your group today.

Rudy Rodriguez:

Awesome. We're really excited to have you here as well. One note I'll make for our listeners here as well is Scott is also a mentor and a coach to myself and our team for well over a year now. We've learned some amazing distinctions from you. So, we're very grateful to have you on the show and firsthand, we know the amount of value that you bring to the show. So, thank you very much. One of the first questions we love to ask our guests is, we believe that the key to a successful event is preparation. What we do ahead of the event. I think you're one of the people I know that has more emphasis on this than anyone when it comes to events. I'd love to hear from you based on your experience. What do you do to prepare for an event?

Scott DeMoulin:

I love that you brought that up, Rudy, because that's the step that most people miss. They focus so much on content or logistics and so forth. The most important thing you can do is to prepare in advance. In fact, we have a whole module that precedes any of the things that we do teaching on how to engage and create better enrollments in your programs. I call it pre-programmed diagnostics. It also means that you identify the needs and wants of your clients, whether it's a customized event for an organization or whether you have a public event where you have 50, 100 or thousands of people coming to your event, as an individual.

Scott DeMoulin:

If you don't know those, you're kind of setting yourself up for failure. You're going to have to work harder for enrollments or conversions towards the end of that event. Pre-preparation is probably a little extra work for most people, including myself, but it's worth it. It pays off tenfold.

Rudy Rodriguez:

Absolutely. We took a course, myself and one of our partners took a course with you on, I think it was called Engage from the Stage. You shared with us how to prepare before delivering a talk. Could you share with the audience maybe some of the specific steps that you do prior to engaging from the stage or leading an event?

Scott DeMoulin:

It's actually called Engage from Your Stage. The reason we say that is because everybody has a stage. Some people, it's more obvious. I train and work with some of the top public speakers, motivational speakers and trainers in the world. There's also leaders and CEOs and entrepreneurs who have a stage: it could be their market, it could be their employees, it could be vendors. So each of us has a stage. The question is, in your communication, how do you create more engagement? How do you create more trust so that the conversion part of it becomes real easy? First and foremost, in Engage from Your Stage, we talk a lot about, we ask the question, do you want to look good or do you want to be good? So many people spend and invest so much time on their landing page, their website, and trying to look good. The question is, are you really creating value? I know you're big on this as well, because our whole focus should be how do we add value and serve the needs and not the numbers? What I mean by that, when you serve the needs, you're serving the needs of the clients. You're not focused on numbers, money, enrollments. That's not really as important. Because if we look at cause and effect, cause is, if you create massive value, people want to work with you. My belief is that from a very early on stage, like close to four decades ago when I got into the industry, if I were to go out and speak, if I were to go out and do a keynote, if I were to go out and do a training, my ultimate goal was not how much money did I make. It was how much value did I provide? And most importantly, could I give so much value that I replace this event that I'm working, speaking, or training on today with two more events of similar value or greater? That was my whole focus.

Scott DeMoulin:

My whole goal was word of mouth. Provide such great value, do such a good job that people refer and happily recommend you to other possible events and speaking events or training events. So be so prepared and do such a great job and have such substance and not just flash that people want to recommend you. It's all about character and reputation. This industry is not as big as you think. If you have great character, that reflects on your reputation. If you have a great reputation, you're going to get referrals and therefore you never have to worry about filling the calendar.

Rudy Rodriguez:

That's right. I recently witnessed you at an event just a few months ago and I saw firsthand how much preparation you put into it. As a result, I think a couple referrals came from that event. So I got to witness the effect of that as well. Scott, one of the things I remember you taught us in the course was, even reaching out to the audience ahead of time and speaking with them, interviewing them, getting in touch with their concerns or desires or challenges. We did that and we found it made a remarkable difference. In fact, that's one of the key parts of our sales system that we use is a pre-event call campaign to get to know who our attendees are and make sure that we're tailoring our message to them. So thank you for sharing that piece. Scott, once you get to the event, you've done the preparation piece, people are now showing up at the event, they're registering. Now you're leading three, four, five plus day events. What is it that you focus on during the event to create the maximum engagement value and ultimately enrollments from that event?

Scott DeMoulin:

Great question, Rudy. I have a saying that I coined many, many years ago, that awareness precedes understanding, understanding precedes change. If you're asking your audience members to change, whether it's to do a program or a project or enroll in your programs and projects, whether it's mentoring, coaching, or something that you might be selling from stage. Obviously, as you mentioned, the pre-diagnostic stage is really important. We interview a cross section of people, it's extra work for us, but we do it to understand what's really going on. Oftentimes, whoever hires you for the event, whether it's an event organizer, a meeting planner, a sales manager, a CEO, when they hire you for the event, they're going to tell you what they think they want and or need. And oftentimes it's not always accurate. I remember one time I was sent a first class ticket to go do an event in The British Virgin Islands. I was asked to work with the leadership team and they wanted me to come in and motivate everybody, which is kind of funny because you don't motivate them, they motivate themselves. You just give them the precipice to be able to do that. Ironically, I asked for the names and numbers of those people we were going to be training and working with so I could talk to them in advance. What I discovered was not what the CEO thought was really going on. They thought everything was great. In essence, there was close to a mutiny on the team that I discovered. We ended up doing an intervention and not a motivational talk. So knowing that is really important in advance. Once you get to the event, I think the most important thing you can do is take what you've learned, when you've discovered the needs, the wants, the fears, the doubts, the concerns of your audience.

Scott DeMoulin:

And remember, I said, I don't think you have permission to be on stage until you know those. Once you get there, the foremost outcome is to build trust. People talk about building rapport. Well, rapport is trust, confidence.

Scott DeMoulin:

So if you do that in advance, you already have one up on most people. Obviously that first 40% of your program is to build that trust and rapport. How do you do that? Well, you identify that you know what their problems are. You identify their key distinctions. You also build credibility. Credibility comes from trust and knowledge. So if you have to have knowledge of what their challenges are, and you have to be able to build trust, that's what creates credibility as a speaker or as a leader or a trainer or as an entrepreneur who gets in front of their audience. So part of the thing you can do that, ways you can do that is to educate, not sell. You've been through that and you know the importance of what we call wow statements or information that causes them to say wow, just like a great fireworks display at the finale everybody goes Wow.

Scott DeMoulin:

So build trust, build credibility. Use your knowledge to educate and address their problems and their needs and wants early on, and they'll feel an alignment and an affinity and build trust with you.

Rudy Rodriguez:

Awesome. Thank you for sharing that Scott. I love how you, how you were focused, keep your focus on during the event. I know one of the things you mentioned is that you want to deliver so much value that you're going to get a referral from either the event host or someone in the audience or just the attendees are going to want to come back to the next event. I think that's a key focus point as well.

Rudy Rodriguez:

So Scott here's like the big, I guess the million dollar question I think for most people who are listening to this podcast is, when you, whether you are at the end of day two or day three of your event it comes time to ask for the sale and to present the offer for the coaching, the education, the mastermind type program. Can you kind of give us your insight as to what's your thinking process around how you ask for that sale. I know it's not something that you do on the fly. You have a formula, how you go about it.

Scott DeMoulin:

The formula. It's really interesting. A lot of times when sales managers would bring me into work with their sales teams, or really high level speakers say, Scott, can you help me with my clothes? Can you help us close more enrollments? Can you help me get more conversions? And that's really the wrong focus. Obviously that's the ultimate outcome, but it doesn't start with the sale, it starts way in advance. It starts with the pre-diagnostics, understanding their needs and wants. It's the framing and the building of trust because if you don't have trust in the beginning, you're going to have to work harder when it comes time for the enrollment opportunity. You and I worked a great event, not too long ago, and we won't name any names but there was a great public figure who is well known and well respected, who's doing an event.

Scott DeMoulin:

Build that trust and confidence but in this event, that specific person was saying Scott, we're gonna have a few hundred people in the room. We're going to do a high end ticket back end offer. Right now my goal is to use the stack close. Now the stack close consists of, here's what we're going to give you. We're going to give you, whether it's a mentorship or a mastermind program or a coaching program with us or upsell to some kind of event or program. Then what they do is they were going to get this and that the value of that is $20,000. And we're going to throw in this bonus that's worth $1500, and we're going to give you this and this and this, and they stack it up to make it look like this huge, huge, huge value. It's almost like a huge resource library of content that they've created.

Scott DeMoulin:

To me, that's out of integrity. It's almost insulting the intelligence of your audience because they know darn well that those things aren't being sold for the numbers that you're sharing, and long story short, they feel like you're starting your relationship by manipulating their intelligence. So there's a way to do that. There's a couple of people who are really good at it, but I don't recommend that you do that. So in working this event, Rudy, I know you did a lot of pre-diagnostic as well as I. What we found was, let's work on the syntax. Let's create massive building rapport when they get there, identify their needs and wants, build trust, so they're salivating for what's next, without having to be sold. That's why we call it engage from your stage because people don't learn from just presentation. They learn when they're engaged, and how do you engage? Well you ask questions you don't present. We call it ask, don't tell. When you get them engaged and they're trying to answer those questions for themselves, they're staying enrolled, and there's something else that's really important. Instead of presenting, I love experiential learning.

Scott DeMoulin:

Instead of presenting them and trying to debate and switch or hook them for an offer at the end. If you're constantly building research, excuse me, if you're constantly building trust throughout that time frame, you're exercising their thinking, you're getting them engaged through metaphors, through stories. When they're saying, why is he or she sharing that story with me? What does it mean? What should I do? So, if you can get them engaged, they're more likely to have a better experience and they're learning what they need to learn as opposed to a narrow sliver of what you think they might need to learn. So if you can get them to learn based on what their needs and wants are as opposed to your stock presentation, it is going to get a much better outcome. The other reason the stack close doesn't work as well, either, is that contrast is the goal of that. In fact there's a great module on this in Robert Childeney's book Influence, which talks about contrast and the mistake that people use in the stack close is they say, okay, you're gonna get this this and this and this. It's normally $40,000. We're going to give it to you for $1500 or whatever. For contrast to work they must own that first number. So if you say, it's worth $40,000 but today only you're going to get it for whatever the number is, you don't. You haven't built enough emphasis on the value of the first number.

Scott DeMoulin:

I said, I'm curious. At the very beginning, one of the first things out of my mouth. First of all, is it okay if I pour value into you, instead of sell you? Can we just kind of take the sales part off the table, because most people in the audience are waiting for the other shoe to drop. I know what's going to happen. They're going to give me two days of content and the whole third day is going to be a pitch fest, or they bring up a bunch of different promoters who are pitching their products. What you want to do is build value in the beginning, build trust. So take it right off the table, say, I'm going to elegantly demand, I want you to elegantly demand from me, that we demonstrate value and if you want to continue your education from us and you want to raise your hand, we'd be honored. But can we just focus on the next two days of providing value so whether or not you continue your education with us, you have something to take away. Is that okay? Number one, they obviously are relieved and all of a sudden their guards are down. Next thing we do is say, I am curious, would you invest $25,000 in your education, if you felt that you would get this outcome and that outcome? More engagement, more enrollments, more revenues from your events.

Scott DeMoulin:

Well, let's just take that off the table. So, I'm going to demand that you elegantly demand that we prove that we have our finger on the pulse of your business, we understand the blueprint, we understand the barcode of the success. It's going to elevate your success in your program. So now they're filtering through $25,000. Then when you get to the enrollment say I had a couple goals for being here.

Scott DeMoulin:

Whatever it is- $5000, $10,000, whatever the investment is, and now they're thinking, oh I was filtering it through a $25,000 investment. They're preparing themselves mentally. Is it worth $25,000, and they think you're going to charge them $25,000.

Scott DeMoulin:

That's how they own the contrast. Now, what we did for this event that you and I played at, I think they were looking for and hoping for $750,000 to $900,000 worth of enrollment in the back end.

Scott DeMoulin:

Long story short, at the end of the three days we didn't do the test, the stack close. We did a very simple, if you really want to do this, apply to qualify, we will interview you, and that's what you and your team did- very well by the way. Long story short, instead of hitting a target of $750,000 to $900,000, I think the enrollments were right around $2 million. That's the impact you can have. We didn't do the stack close. We didn't insult their intelligence. We built trust, we created integrity, and we created a really strong foundation for moving forward. It was a simple task of asking for the yes. So I know that was a long winded answer but the truth is, don't focus on the close. Focus on building value, focus on creating trust, focus on educating, focus on solving their problems or needs or wants, and that positions you as an expert and a mentor and a coach that they want to work with, and naturally saying, I want to go to the next level. The next level is the natural progression and is no longer a hurdle or a close that you have to do to get people to enroll. So I hope that helped answer your question in a long, long answer.

Rudy Rodriguez:

That was pure freaking gold, I'm going to go back and listen to this recording and take notes. Maintaining integrity in the conversation and doing the law of contrast properly from Cialdini, having them own the number. Then they really feel like they're getting a great deal or feeling that relief when it's like wow I would have paid $25,000 but the fact that this is $10,000 or $15,000. Well, what a great deal. So, wow, this is great and I'm going to encourage anybody who's listened to this to go back and probably take notes on that last question. That was gold. Thank you, sir.

Scott DeMoulin:

I also say the devil's in the details Rudy and people feel like, hey, I want to go do an event, I want to go to a seminar, and they do 80% of the things that are right or well, and it still fails. The reason why, it's that last 20% of the details. That's the difference between pray those principles, 20% accounts for 80% of your results. That's really that last 20% and by the way, it took me years if not decades to discover. It's kind of like an ongoing learning process, each event you do, you're going to learn something else you could have done better. Whether it was the pre-diagnostics, whether it was the questions, whether it was the way you set up the logistics of the room, the way you greet them at the check in counter.

Rudy Rodriguez:

Most definitely devil's in the details and we don't know what we don't know when we're first jumping in. And even it sounds like you, for decades, and you're still learning a thing or two.

Scott DeMoulin:

Every day it's kind of like golf or poker, sporting events. If you're not learning each time you're going out you're getting worse. One of my dear friends and mentors Bob Proctor who unfortunately just passed away. But he kept. It was really important. I don't know how to say this. I lost my train of thought on that but I just say, if you're not learning you're dying is what he said, if you're not growing you're dying. And if you don't learn something from each event you're making a mistake, you want to. In fact, one of the things we do and I know you do as well with your team is if you're not doing a debrief of your events, you're making it harder to prepare for your next event, because it's so easy to go back and look at your notes, look at your journal, and capture the things that either didn't go well that could be improved. I don't like good or bad or right or wrong. I think here's what went well, here's what could be improved. So get together with your team and listen intently for their feedback or your audience feedback. You mentioned the surveys, we do a survey because I want to kill the monster, it is tiny if somebody has an upset or confusion or there was a misunderstanding. I want to identify that on day one, not when they leave the room. So each day we audit or interview or survey actually our attendees, we say on a scale of scale of zero to 10 how much value did you get. If they're not an eight, nine or 10, like let's say there are five or six I immediately seek them out and say, what could we do to improve or what did you find you enjoy, what didn't you. What didn't land with you and go spend some time with them because I want to get them back on track so they can enjoy day two.

Scott DeMoulin:

Do I have time for a quick story?

Scott DeMoulin:

$1,500 I think it was. What we said was, we want you to go through the event. Play full out, we asked you to play full out. We want you to go through the entire event. If at the end of the event you don't think it was worth two or three times the value of your investment in the program but also your travel and expenses for being here paying for a hotel etc. We will refund your entire investment and give you $1,000 to offset your expenses, because we didn't deliver on our promise. Now I made that for two reasons. One was, I made sure I prepared so that I didn't have to refund money and obviously it eased their concerns about making an investment in an intro program like that, knowing that we were committed to it.

Scott DeMoulin:

You want to have the awareness of what's going on in your audience. You want to know if they're in that deer in headlights glaze or if they're not participating, or if their arms are crossed and legs are crossed and they're checked out. So this guy was definitely checked out all day one. Now normally I would go to that person at the end of the day, by the way I checked his form, and it was like a six on a scale of zero to 10. I'm thinking this isn't right because every single other person, 90% of them were 10s and a few nines. He was a six. So I was normally going to, I normally seek them out and say hey listen, it sounds like to me this program isn't right for you. We invite you to leave if you want. We'll refund your money now so you don't have to waste your two days if this isn't a fit for you. But I didn't. I said you know what I'm going to let this one play out. Day two, Rudy, it was really interesting because day two he was like this at the start of the day, and then all of a sudden I noticed he goes, and he writes something down. Every now and then he would make a note. He started to open up out of his shell on day three, he was engaged in playing full out. Now here's what happened at the end of the event. There's a whole long line of people who come up and you know they want to get their hug or they want to thank us for providing value, and I can see him in the line. Every time somebody came in and stood in the line behind him he would go to the back of the line. Eventually by the time he was the last person he came up to me and he said, Scott, I just want to tell you, this was a great event.

Scott DeMoulin:

He said, quite honestly I'm an attorney. I came here to see. For one reason, I didn't really come here to learn. I came here to see if you would actually honor your guarantee. In fact, here's what happened, Rudy, when he first got there I shook his hand. I said his name and I said, so I'm curious how much money do I owe you? I said, well I recognize the fact that you weren't really fully engaged especially the first day or two. Obviously that's on me, we didn't deliver so I want to know, do I owe you a refund? And he goes you'd give me a refund? I said, yeah, of course. He goes, I'm an attorney. I came here to see if you would.

Scott DeMoulin:

I said, we have a home study program that's valued at $1,000 and because you were a little closed down day one or day two you might have missed some stuff. I don't want you to miss out So I'm going to gift you that $1,000 program. It's got CDs, it's got the manual, everything. I'm just going to gift it to you so that you can make up for what you missed out on. The guy was practically in tears; he couldn't believe that I would do that for him. So that's what I mean by your commitment to your audience. That's what I mean by holding yourself accountable and holding them accountable to get what they really invested in and paid for. So thanks for listening to that story because that's the kind of outcome I believe you need to have. That's in, by the way, there was only 60 people in the audience and I think we did over a quarter of a million dollars in back end coaching sales for that event. So, it was still a very very successful event in bucket.

Rudy Rodriguez:

Well thank you for sharing Scott. That story was awesome and I love starting with the end in mind. Pick leaving the audience as raving fans, nines and 10s across the board, or giving them a full refund.

Scott DeMoulin:

A friend, a relative or someone else that you know, to our services or to buy our product. And if it's zero to six, that's a detractor score, seven and eight is they're satisfied, but that's still not doing you and them any service satisfaction, means they'll do a little bit with it but they won't go out and shout from the rooftops.

Scott DeMoulin:

And you're right, start with the outcome in mind. How do we get more nines and 10s, preferably 10s? I'm proud to say that our average customer survey score at the end of each day is 9.91. That's like all 10s with one or two nines, so my goal. By the way, I'm not hurt if someone says it was a six because it's really about them it's not about me, but I work hard to learn from that and improve so we can get them to a level eight or nine or 10.

Rudy Rodriguez:

It's a great point, Scott, that you highlighted one of the things that we focus on as well. When we do our individual sessions or one on one, back of the room is making sure that they're getting that NPS score sent to them, that link via Surveymonkey, so we get that immediate feedback can pull into a dashboard and we get notifications if anybody is a an eight or seven or eight or six or below and we can do something about it right away.

Scott DeMoulin:

It's one of the things I love about you and your team and I think I should encourage other people to not shy away from feedback. Most people don't offer surveys because they're afraid someone's going to give them some feedback that they don't like. That's how you learn. I mean it's like when I go into a restaurant. If I get bad service or bad food or whatever, I'll ask to see the manager. I'll pull them aside and say hey listen. I know you can't improve if you don't understand or learn what's going on so here was our experience we're not upset about it, we don't want a refund, we don't want a discount or credit or anything. We just want to share our feedback to you as a manager, so you can improve your training or the quality of your service, the quality of your food, so that you can grow your business and be more successful. Most people are afraid to do that and that's the difference between looking good or being good. You don't have to invest in flashy marketing or a great website or anything else, if you deliver a great product, you've got to be able to back it up and be good. In today's day and age, there's all these influencers and people have a great Facebook following or Instagram following. The question is, do they really provide value? And you want to fall into that second category: you want to be good, and then work on looking good because if you're not being good, looking good doesn't matter.

Rudy Rodriguez:

That's right. I like that. You mentioned earlier in the interview that one of the feathers in your cap was helping Tony and create the first business mastery program. I'm just curious if you can briefly kind of let us know a little bit about how that came about, and the work you did for Tony and Chet.

Scott DeMoulin:

It was an interesting journey. I think back in 1989, Rudy as you know, I bought a training franchise from Tony Robbins, and I did so because of the stuff that he was sharing, the communication skills, the engagement, the framing.

Scott DeMoulin:

As a result, I got the Destiny Leadership Award that Tony gave out each year to the top franchise. After about four or five years I took what I learned, invaluable information, I couldn't have gotten that education anywhere else. I couldn't have gone to school for six years and got the education I got there but I took what I learned from Tony and the team, and being a trainer for Tony as well for his live events, Date with Destiny. I went through 26 Date with Destiny’s, and I say this often, it's not because I'm a slow learner but because I really wanted to master the material. So I did that for, I did the franchise for four or five years, went back out into my own, started my boutique consulting business, working with business owners, working with salespeople, working with speakers and trainers who wanted to become more and work with his creative team on co-creating the agenda. I hired and retained 19 key speakers who were high business speakers. Started a business team. People like Jay Abraham, Stephen Covey, Vision Locke Yanni from MindValley, brought in a lot of great speakers to create this five day program that we sold. Here's the deal, I only had eight weeks to put this together, and I was totally in charge.

Scott DeMoulin:

On a phone call where we talked about what the program is going to be. Long story short, their goal was to 250 people at a high enrollment fee. We had to cut off, true story, really we had to cut off enrollments at 459, because the fire marshal said that's it, if you're going classroom style, that's as many people as you can fit in the room. So, it was six weeks. I burned a lot of energy putting it together. I told Tony when I saw him, I literally lost 22 pounds in six weeks, because I was working so hard to put the event together I didn't have time to eat. So, a great event turned out very successful and as a result of that, that was kind of the springboard. I was very well compensated for that. That was the springboard for Tony to go into business mastery because I've been working in business consulting for the last 15 years, and Tony and Chet wanted to leverage that and say, okay, how can we build a business program as well because they were shifting.

Scott DeMoulin:

There's ways you can get some of the results that Tony has but you don't have to. To do that, I'm not saying that you wouldn't, don't try to be a clone of Tony. So many people say, yeah, I was a partner. I worked with Tony Robbins, and anybody who's been to a seminar or they were a field sales rep for Tony who sold the thing. After that they asked me to stay on as a CEO of their high end business growth consulting division. To consult for business owners who wanted to grow their sales, the front end, their marketing, their messaging, their framing and their overall success so I did that for about a year and realized that wasn't for me I went back into what I'm doing now and that's my destiny training consulting business.

Rudy Rodriguez:

Awesome Scott. Thank you for that extra gift of story there and I actually didn't know all that about you guys. I enjoyed hearing that story, and know listeners will as well. And speaking of, you're now training with destiny training systems. Can you maybe just share a little bit about that, and maybe how listeners can reach you if they're interested in learning more.

Scott DeMoulin:

Thank you. I'd be happy to. My belief is sales, business entrepreneurship is 90% communication. Most people think it's about the product, it's about the people, what it is, to some extent, but if you don't have effective communication. First and foremost, with yourself. What is your mindset, what's that internal dialogue? You gotta have that mastered number one. Number two, with your relationships, personal and professional relationships. Next with your team or your organization. Next with your marketplace and in the world as a whole, your community, your tribe. If you're not communicating effectively, if you're not framing, if you're not engaging, then it's going to be difficult for you to grow your business have success, have profitability, create enrollments or engagement, so we focus on this training, we focus a great deal on your personal internal communications, your sales and relationship communications and then your marketing communications. My belief is if you master your message, you can make a big difference in your people. So, you want to elevate your ability to influence. You want to elevate your ability to impact, which results in income. So we work with business owners in a consulting relationship. We usually have two or three clients at a time. Rudy, you've been through that experience. We've worked with your team. We help train their salespeople. We will work on your framing, your marketing, your messaging and so forth. So we have a couple clients at a time.

Scott DeMoulin:

Experience where you learn how to connect from the platform, whether it's to create a training for your team or whether it's to be a keynote speaker. I've got clients who make $150,000 a keynote, and they still hire me to work with them on their framing, on their sales, on their whole messaging or communication. So we work in an emergency. Now it's changed, it’s morphed by accident. When COVID came about, we couldn’t do live events. So we changed to a virtual program where it was meeting on a regular basis over a period of weeks or months and chunking down and doing a module at a time. Now we've gone to a place where it's three, excuse me, 60 day advance virtual program and then it's a three day live where you get a chance to put that to use with live feedback and coaching and interaction from not only myself but the other participants who are there. So Engage From Your Stage. In fact, you can go to find out about us, go to engagefromyourstage.com, and there's a landing page there, and a gift I'll give to your listeners as well Rudy if you go. If they go through the landing page they'll see all what it's about, some of our clients, and testimonials of some of the top speakers in the world have endorsed us. But at the very bottom of that landing page, one of our mutual friends, Elliot Roe. I did a really great podcast with Elliot. It was an hour long podcast.

Scott DeMoulin:

So much to some of the questions you asked, but at the bottom there's a podcast with Elliot. Listen to that podcast. There's nothing to buy if you just go there and listen to that podcast. It's a very valuable education on how to more effectively communicate and engage from your stage. So if they go there they'll get access to that podcast as well.

Rudy Rodriguez:

Awesome. Thanks for sharing. I will add that to my list as well.

Scott DeMoulin:

Another episode to listen to earlier on, Elliot's a great mutual friend and great resource as well.

Rudy Rodriguez:

I 100% agree. I've done many sessions with Elliot and it's definitely shifted my mindset and my life and the results have been able to produce as well. So highly recommend listening to that to our listeners. And Scott, briefly here is kind of our final question wrap up here, love to ask you, what legacy do you want to leave? What do you want to be remembered for?

Scott DeMoulin:

That's an amazing question because I love it. It comes back to why people fail in business and sales and relationships. It's the difference between thinking short term and long term. If you think about the short term you, what sale am I going to make today? What are my numbers going to be like this quarter? You've got to look at those things. My belief is there's more value and looking long term. How do people look at me as my character? What's my reputation in the industry going to be? What's the legacy that I'm going to leave? And the intent of your question is very powerful because if people think about how do I want to be remembered as opposed to how much money am I going to make, it changes how you contribute to your audience and the people who are coming to you for wisdom or advice. My legacy changed recently Rudy. I was doing a lot of live events and I realized that, yeah, you can get great content in live events. The question is, does it really make a lasting difference? Consulting taught me something that I get a chance to impact companies for six to 24 months working with them on a weekly basis. That you're doing already. So if you can continually improve little incremental adjustments over time, you're going to get lasting change.

Scott DeMoulin:

But the reason for creating that was my commitment to honor my mentors, Tony Robbins, Bob Proctor, Jay Abraham and others. A lot of people contributed to the message that I now train and coach on. My commitment was this, I don't want to work with someone just because they can afford our fees or write us a check. I'm only looking to work with companies, entrepreneurs, and speakers who want to make a difference. The question is, do you want to make money or do you want to make meaning? If you want to make meaning, if you want to make a difference, those are the people I want to appeal to. And the reason why was this- is that, yeah, I could go work for five companies at a time and elevate those five companies, but I felt like I would rather work with 100 entrepreneurs who may not have the resources, the education or the wisdom or the experience to be successful, but they would long term impact a greater number of people. If I only worked with those people like you, who have high integrity, who want to make a difference, who want to master their message, who really want to give back.

Scott DeMoulin:

So right now my legacy is to honor Bob Proctor, to take the message, and 30% of what I teach is tied directly back to Bob Proctor. 40 or 50% is directly tied back to the years and the education I got with Tony Robbins, Jay Abraham and others. The fun part is when you put all those together, I now have a different recipe or a different menu to choose from, based on each and one of those mentors, taking the best of those people, just like in think and grow rich. When I read that it was to go out and become partners with the best people in the world, and then offer a combination of that. So thanks for your question. My legacy now is 100% to contribute to people who are making a difference and have high integrity.

Rudy Rodriguez:

Thank you for sharing that Scott, and thank you for working with us. It's grateful to be part of your legacy. We definitely intend to make you proud. So, thank you, appreciate you brother and just for our listeners here, to wrap up, encourage you if you enjoyed this episode be sure to share it with others leave a positive review and definitely go to Scott's website, engagefromyourstage.com and take advantage of that extra podcast that he has with Elliot Roe on there and if you think you're fit to work with Scott definitely reach out to him. Highly recommend it. Thank you Scott for being a guest on our show today, and really grateful for the time we've had together. Thank you.

Scott DeMoulin:

My pleasure Rudy and I appreciate the opportunity to contribute to others and hopefully there was a nugget or two that you took from this and please put it to use. Love to make a big difference. The world needs it right now.

Rudy Rodriguez:

Absolutely. The world does need it right now.

Scott DeMoulin:

Thank you. If we're not growing together we're growing apart. So hopefully we'll have a chance in the future to grow together.

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