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₿HS001: Genesis episode
Episode 118th September 2023 • Bitcoin Homeschoolers • Scott and Tali Lindberg
00:00:00 00:41:49

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SHOW TOPIC:

Tali and Scott's conversation covers why homeschooling isn't just a choice of curriculum or textbooks. Taking self-custody of education is a commitment to understanding, nurturing, and building relationships that last a lifetime.

IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:

  • Tali and Scott's inspiration for homeschooling
  • Their inspiration for serving the Bitcoin community with lessons learned, recommended resources and interviews of other Bitcoin-homeschoolers (i.e., the reason for this podcast)
  • Learning goes way beyond books
  • Asymmetric upside potential for your kids (let them excel!)
  • Limited downside risk (kids are resilient)
  • You have SO MANY resources within this community
  • Commitment is the first step
  • Help make this more valuable ... What do you want to learn about homeschooling?

RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THE SHOW:

HAPPY TO HELP:

  • Tali's Twitter @OrangeHatterPod
  • Scott's Twitter @ScottLindberg93
  • Scott's nostr npub19jkuyl0wgrj8kccqzh2vnseeql9v98ptrx407ca9qjsrr4x5j9tsnxx0q6
  • Free Market Kids' Twitter @FreeMarketKids
  • Orange Pill App @FreeMarketKids
  • Free Market Kids' games including HODL UP https://www.freemarketkids.com/collections/games

Transcripts

Scott:

Welcome everyone.

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This is the Genesis podcast

of Bitcoin homeschoolers.

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My name is Scott.

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My lovely wife Tali is here

with me and we're very excited

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to kick off this podcast.

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We are here to serve you.

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If you're considering homeschooling,

you're already homeschooling,

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even if you just want to find

some supplemental material for,

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your kids that might be in

public or private school.

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This podcast is going to be for you.

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We'll do a quick introduction

today because it's our first one.

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I'd like to cover the

inspiration for what got us here.

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There's certainly countless people

over the last two decades and four

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kids going through this homeschooling

adventure and it's time for us

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to give back and help others.

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So bitcoiners and homeschoolers in my

mind have a lot of the same core values.

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This is something that's a, it's

a cause bigger than ourselves.

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It's a lot about freedom, human

flourishing, especially for our families.

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So we'll go through that.

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We'll do that today and we'll wrap

up with a couple of recommendations.

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Tali, anything else that you'd

like to add for the intro?

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Tali: Hi everybody, this is Tali

and I'm excited to share lessons

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from our homeschooling journey

over the last two decades.

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It's interesting looking back from

a distance now over what we have

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tried, what we have witnessed, what we

have observed through the many moves

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that we made during our homeschooling

journey, which allowed us to

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look at a lot of different

approaches from different families.

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And we have a pretty wide database of

do's and don'ts to draw from that we would

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love to share with you going forward.

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Scott: Great.

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All right, let's just hit it off.

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I'll start.

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I'm, I consider myself a Midwest guy.

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I spent my formative years in Northeast

Ohio and went to West Point and

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afterwards spent five years in the army.

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And to me, that's important because

that's probably where if I had to

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go back, where the idea of serving a

bigger cause really was crystallized.

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After I got out, went to business

school and Tali and I met at

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Yale school of management.

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And I'm very proud to say I

successfully derailed her and all of her

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aspirations to be an investment banker.

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And she's the one that actually

led us down the homeschooling path.

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So I think, let me just touch on

it from my point of view, but the

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story is more interesting from hers.

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Homeschooling it's a couple of things.

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One, you're pursuing things

that are really good.

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If you're, if your child can accelerate

in one area or another, you can just

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let them take that area and really grow

it also from the Bitcoin standpoint.

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You can teach about money and

other topics that are just

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not taught in public schools.

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The second thing though, is

you can avoid bad things.

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A lot of things in the news about woke

political agendas and a state that

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really wants to control your kids.

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I find that it's really disgusting

that others think that they can take

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over your, your kids development.

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I just, I just find that appalling.

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So, you bring those two together

and you have this asymmetric upside

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because kids are really resilient.

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So if you, if you have any fear, you're

thinking about homeschooling and you

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think, what if, what if I can't do it?

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What if I'm not good enough?

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Let me just tell you in

the absolute worst case.

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You're a child can go back to

a public or private school and

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they, they will be just fine.

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But I'm here to tell you, you can't fail.

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There is so much support available

in this community that it is,

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and there's so many resources.

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And, and honestly, it's, this

is what people have been doing.

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People were schooling their kids

long before government came along.

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So You can't fail.

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To me, this is all about taking

self custody of education.

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It is absolutely worth the hard work.

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The opportunity cost of those lost

wages is nothing compared to the payoff.

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Just like in Bitcoin, it is worth

the energy used to, mine it.

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But now for the more interesting story.

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Tali, I want you to kind of tell them

how we kicked off our homeschooling.

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Tali: Okay, so you don't

want me to talk about...

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why we homeschooled.

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Scott: Yeah, go ahead.

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I mean that to me, that's part of it.

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Tali: Okay.

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So I'm going to go back pretty far.

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Scott and I both have gone through our

schooling through brand name schools.

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And in high school I went to a

science and technology magnet school.

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That was pretty tough to get in

and I was working with students who

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were all just super, super smart.

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From there went to University of Virginia.

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And then from there, of course, he

just mentioned we went to Yale School

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of Management, but the whole time I

had this nagging feeling that Even

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though I had these brand name diplomas

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I did not feel that I was well educated.

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Fast forward to when we had our kids and

it was sort of by accident that I heard

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about homeschooling in the first place.

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We were coming out of church

service one day, our oldest

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was only about two years old.

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And in passing, we were chatting

with a mom and she mentioned that

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she homeschooled her two daughters.

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And I, at the time, I didn't even

know that that was an option.

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I didn't know it was a thing.

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And the only response I could think of to

ask her as a follow up was, were you a

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teacher before you decided you wanted to

homeschool your girls and she said yes

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She was a school teacher and I said aha.

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Well, of course, that's why she

can homeschool because she was

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originally trained as a teacher I

didn't really think too much

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about it a few months later.

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We were at a playdate and our

friend's neighbor came over

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and with her nine year old son.

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And we were chatting and she

said, Oh, my son learned how to

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read when he was nine months old.

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I was floored.

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I didn't think that was possible.

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Like how do you even test a baby

to see if the baby can read a word

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that you show to the baby, right?

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They're not even really talking yet.

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So she showed me this book called how

to teach your baby to read and flip

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through the page where they were showing

the different kinds of flashcards that

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you would Basically flash in front of

your baby's face at regular intervals

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throughout the day to teach your baby to

read And then she said oh and by the way

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We homeschool so that he can accelerate at

the pace that he needs to accelerate and I

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said well Were you also a school teacher?

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She wasn't and I said, I don't even

know where to begin I don't even know

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how to evaluate my options and this

was A long time ago, before podcast,

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before YouTube, and our only resources

were each other or printed books.

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And so she showed me her book

and it was called Mary Pride's

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Big Book on Homeschooling.

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And it was the size of a phone

book for those of you who remember

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those . And I brought it home

and I flipped through from.

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From beginning to end, it was

pre K all the way through high

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school graduation, and I had a

framework that was built for me.

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I didn't realize there were different

curriculums to choose from, so

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I just had a really wonderful

overview of the whole process, and I

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thought, wow, that sounds plausible.

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Like, we can actually do this

because somebody had laid out

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a roadmap, even though it was

in this giant phone book form.

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And I, of course, read her book that

she lent to me called How to teach

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your baby to read and in it the author

described the process and the window,

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actually the window to teach to your

child in that way, in the way that

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he described ended at 36 months old.

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And I was very alarmed because

our oldest was already.

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30 months old.

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And I thought I was running out of time.

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I'm like, Oh my gosh, we

were running out of time.

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Our two and a half year old is

almost not going to be able to

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learn how to read using this method.

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So I woke up Scott and I

said, I can't believe it.

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We're already too late and

we're running out of time.

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But that's how we started

the whole process.

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Scott: Yeah.

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The only thing I could, add

to that is We basically, we,

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we made a commitment together.

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We didn't know exactly what we were

doing, but the first step is to commit and

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then have the courage to follow through.

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And we basically had it as I recall a

discussion that if we could get by with

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one income and give up maybe vacations or

a larger house or something that we were

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committed to make this to make this work.

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So that was a, , you know, the, i

I, I was not worried that Brianna

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could not read at two and a half.

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That was not my concern.

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But this was something Tali was clearly

passionate about trying, and to me,

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the, the big step was to commit.

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I, think we should, jump from there.

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Let's, like, fast forward 20, 22

years and let's connect this with,

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with Bitcoin . The reason that this

podcast is called Bitcoin homeschoolers

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again, is there's a tremendous

amount of overlap between the way

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homeschoolers think and Bitcoiners think.

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And it was only, I think nine months

ago is January when Matt Odell asked us

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to be on his Citadel dispatch podcast

specifically to talk about homeschooling.

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And just a couple of months prior to

that, Tali and I had never even met

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anybody who was in the Bitcoin space.

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So first of all, hats off to the

people at Bitcoin park, because

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literally, anybody is welcome there.

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And it was just amazing.

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It has made all the difference

in the world for us in terms of.

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Having the courage to take

additional steps down the

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Bitcoin, down the Bitcoin path.

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From there we thought we would go to

homeschooling conferences and we went

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to a couple this year, but we didn't get

a great reception and it was a little

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Well, mind boggling to me, because

there's so much overlap, but again,

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we had two homeschooling conferences,

neither one really, really was like,

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Oh my gosh, where have you been?

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Bitcoiners.

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However, we've had additional

Bitcoiners that loved homeschooling.

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So we talked to Daniel

Prince on Once Bitten.

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I had the opportunity to talk to Shane

Hazel on his personal podcast and it's

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just, it was like Bitcoiners were on fire.

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, the tipping point really happened

just in the last couple of weeks, Elly

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Pembroke and her husband Asher invited

us to participate in a homeschooling

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panel, at tab conf in Atlanta.

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And we just had a, we just loved it.

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We spent an hour talking.

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Shane Hazel was actually there as well.

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It was, it was just really wonderful.

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This is a spark that led to this podcast.

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We had 20 plus years of homeschooling

and now we're, trying to grow our own

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Bitcoin business focus on education.

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And so many people are excited about

the subject of homeschooling that

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I'm like, Tali, we got to do this.

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We just gotta, we just, this isn't

the, this is the next big step for us.

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All right.

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So Tali, what do you, what's

your point of view on this?

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Tali: Well, There were a lot of lessons

that we learned over the last 20 so or so

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years what homeschooling podcast you mean?

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Scott: Well I'm just saying we're

here growing free market kids.

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We're, we're focused on money

education, Bitcoin in particular, and

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it doesn't have to be homeschooling,

but it's about education, the

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intersection of Bitcoin and education.

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And there's a lot to do to, to try

to just get a business up and going.

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So why in the world will

we start a whole podcast?

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And for, for me, it's exciting because

it connects the dots based on these,

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the panel based on, The reception

we have when we talk to people and

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people coming up to us and asking us

questions there's a lot of people who

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are thinking about homeschooling in the

Bitcoin community and this is going

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back to earlier in the conversation.

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This is an opportunity

where we can give back.

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I can't give back in terms of

technical advice on Wallets

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and coding that's not me Right.

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I can't give financial advice.

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I mean, I like to study economics,

but I, I'm, that's not, I'm not, there

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are others who are much further along

in that, but you and I have have over

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two decades of experience in this

area and it just feels like this is

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our way of being able to contribute

to the, to the Bitcoin community.

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Tali: Yeah, I agree with that.

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Because we have had a lot of people

talk to us, even people who don't have

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children yet, and some of them are not

even married yet, but they are so excited

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about the prospect of homeschooling that

that they're asking us Lots of questions.

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And homeschooling sounds like a

very long journey because you're

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looking for, you're like, Oh my gosh,

my child or my unborn child, this

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is, this is an 18 year process.

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And it is, but I don't think that

we need to look so, so long term,

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because a lot of it is literally

just putting one foot in front of

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the other and constantly reevaluating

what's working and what's not working.

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And The honest truth is you think you're

in charge and you gotta figure everything

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out right now, but you really don't.

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Your child plays a very big part in this.

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I call it the 51 49 split.

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, you don't want to be 100 percent

controlling every decision under the

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sun regarding homeschooling because then

your child would feel slightly oppressed

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and maybe a little bit withdrawn,

but you also don't want to give a

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hundred percent control over children.

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So 100 type of setup where the child

does whatever he wants, because there

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is still a part to play for the parents

to set boundaries because we still

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have wisdom, in this world and how

the society functions and everything.

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So the 51 49 split is basically my way

of describing a really healthy I don't

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want to call it power structure, but.

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Contribution, contribution structure.

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Your child is giving you

feedback, you know, like, for

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example, let's just get concrete.

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If you think it's time for your

child to start learning the alphabet

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and you're sitting your kid

down and you're like, this is A.

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Well, if your kid is literally

not able to sit down that long

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yet, That's your feedback.

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And maybe you need to try a different way.

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Maybe you don't, do the formal sort

of sit down, be quiet and listen

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to me teach you kind of thing, but

maybe, , mix it up a little bit and

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do it outside when they're on the

playground and say, Hey, draw me an A.

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Concentrate on the sand.

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Go get a stick and draw it in the sand.

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This is an A.

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and if their attention span allows

them to give you two minutes of focused

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attention then that's what you take and

you don't try to push forward, right?

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So, you're letting the child give

you feedback, everyone initiates

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and the child is giving you

feedback and you constantly adjust.

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I think that is A.

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Really healthy way of

looking at this process.

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The 5149 split,

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Scott: right?

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No, I mean that's and everybody just

just so you know that that's our take

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on it It's it you're gonna have to find

your own mix and I think that's the

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beautiful part about homeschooling is

if you want it to be a hundred or zero

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or zero one hundred or Anywhere on that

spectrum this is this is your choice

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This is it's sort of permissionless if

you're if you're doing this as a parent

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You don't need my permission or the

state's permission or anyone else's.

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This just happens to be our point of view.

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And that balance worked for us, but I

would just like to point out for anybody

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who's in that early stage and they're

trying to think, is this right or not?

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The beautiful part is they get to

decide like no one, no one forced

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us to do what you just said.

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That was.

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That was just what we pursued and so just

want to highlight the flexibility You

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have as a parent to do what you think

is right for your For your kids and it

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can even adjust within the kids right,

maybe one student learns a certain way

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and needs more structure and Another

student is very self motivated and even

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within a family you can vary that So I

just you know, I don't want anybody to

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think that we're saying these things

that we're saying that you have to be

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this way We're just sharing what worked

for us And I wanted to point out that,

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Hey, you can do this anyway you want.

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I, I can't stop you from teaching

your kids the way you want to teach.

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Just like I can't stop anybody

from using or not using Bitcoin.

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I

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Tali: know.

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But I think for some people who are

coming in with no knowledge of how to go

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forward, I maintain my recommendation.

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It should be a 5149 split.

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But before you even think about

homeschooling one of the, the main

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takeaways that I saw, , over the

last 20 years is you got to get

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the power structure right between

you and the your child or children

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because a lot of homeschoolers end

up quitting homeschooling at the

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end of elementary school because

they can't get their children to do

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what they believe they should do.

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Scott: Maybe that I, I think

maybe this, that's too much.

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Well, no, no, no.

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It's actually, what's interesting

about this is I think we.

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This is where we, we need to start

to transition and ask others for

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what they want to hear about.

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If other people are interested and

this is listeners, this is, this

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is where we need your feedback.

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If you're considering homeschooling,

you're already homeschooling, or maybe

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you're just doing the supplemental

thing for your, your kids when

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they come back from public school.

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We need to know , what

it is that you want.

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, let's list this as a subject and

we'll go really deep on setting

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that up as a subject someday.

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Maybe it's not right for today as

an introduction, but I think it's

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certainly a topic that for people

who are listening to you say that.

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They're like, okay, I would, if

that's important, I need to work that

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out with my, my significant other.

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What have you learned?

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I think some people would want to know.

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So just so everybody knows, let me let

me use that as a, as a way to say what

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Tali and I hope to do on this as we're,

as we're learning how to do a podcast

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and adjust this to what you want.

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Some of the things that were

on our mind were , let's share

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things that we've learned.

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Maybe some funny.

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Not so funny stories along the way.

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Let's share some resources.

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Not all of these are going

to be what you expect.

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A lot of homeschooling is not just

the reading, writing, arithmetic type.

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There's a lot of other things to, to

get into so we can share resources and

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of course bring others who the Bitcoin

homeschooling space onto the show.

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So you get some different points of view.

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I think that is actually a good

thing we're all in this together.

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We're all collaborating.

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It's not quite the same as free and open

source software, but we're all working

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on education together and hearing other

people's points of view and how we're

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doing this, I think is pretty valuable.

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So long, long way of saying,

let's put that discussion on as

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one of our subjects to deep dive.

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Tali: Do you want me to respond to that?

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Scott: Yeah, this is a discussion,

of course I want you to respond.

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Tali: Yeah.

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Yeah, definitely.

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Let's, let's dive in subject by subject.

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We, did you mute me?

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Scott: No, I didn't.

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Oh, if you would like

to go deep on it now.

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No,

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Tali: we don't have to go ahead.

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No, no, we don't have to go deep.

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I, I, I was just basically

following my train of thought.

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Just if, if you're coming in brand

new, you don't know what's available.

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You don't know what it involves.

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And how huge the scope is, if you're

looking very long term, just know that

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it is more of a constant reevaluation,

pivot, pivot, pivot, pivot kind

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of process versus a straight line.

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It's not K to 12 in a straight

line, everything preset,

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everything predetermined.

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Everything prearranged.

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That's not the way it's going to happen.

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It has, it's not the way

it happens for most people.

361

:

And going back to Scott's point

about how , you can plan things

362

:

out, but it may not work the same

way with one child versus another.

363

:

And we also know families who have

one child in public, one child in

364

:

Private, , one child homeschooled and then

another one literally doing it online.

365

:

So Depending on the child's personality

depending on your needs depending on

366

:

the nuances of their learning styles

There's not one right answer for every

367

:

single child and certainly not one

right answer for every single family

368

:

Scott: Right.

369

:

So, so one of the things that I wanted

to, to get out today is I'm looking at

370

:

this from almost a game theory standpoint.

371

:

This is something that's bigger than us.

372

:

We're playing an infinite game and

educating our children is, is certainly

373

:

a cause bigger than just ourselves.

374

:

This is something that's going to outlast.

375

:

It's going to last generations.

376

:

It is a huge responsibility

and a huge impact.

377

:

And it's just something that's, it's

very personal, but it's also Something

378

:

I just want others to, to kind of

think of it as a, from that game theory

379

:

standpoint of this is an infinite game.

380

:

This isn't like when those

things you win or lose, you were

381

:

successful or not successful.

382

:

Did you do a good job or not do a

good job with, with the education

383

:

of your, of your children?

384

:

This is something that literally

is going to go on forever.

385

:

We're still, even as a, even

though our kids are adults.

386

:

We're still learning and

we're still parenting and it's

387

:

just going to continue on.

388

:

And then that's when they have

kids, it'll continue way past us.

389

:

Tali: Okay.

390

:

So see, you're all altruistic

and thinking big picture.

391

:

And for me, I did it for very selfish

reasons and I'm sharing lessons with

392

:

you for very selfish reasons because for

our next generation to succeed, I think.

393

:

Personally, that the most important

thing children need to realize is that

394

:

their parents care and that they count.

395

:

And if you decide to homeschool,

and you're devoting time and

396

:

attention on your child, even if,

, hypothetically, that academically,

397

:

you don't achieve some super high

level, let's say, if that's your goal.

398

:

But.

399

:

The day to day interactions that you

have with your children were healthy.

400

:

And they fully recognize that

you are devoted to them and

401

:

you want what's best for them.

402

:

I think that covers a lot of possible

mistakes that you might make in

403

:

the process because Scott and I

for sure made a ton of mistakes.

404

:

I always feel bad for my firstborn,

especially because she bore the

405

:

brunt of me not knowing what the

heck I was doing and just trying.

406

:

stuff out on her.

407

:

So I have apologized to her numerous times

before being my test subject, but the

408

:

entire time she knew that we, we cared and

we were, whatever mistakes we were making,

409

:

we thought we were doing what was right.

410

:

I just want to say that because.

411

:

This is not a, this is not like a like

a, like a test, , there's no, there's

412

:

no grade that you need to meet, whatever

the school system has trained you up

413

:

to think, everything is evaluated

with the letters a, b, c, d, but.

414

:

In my mind, a successful homeschooling

experience means that your, your children

415

:

grew up knowing you cared means that

they grew up with you being involved in

416

:

their lives and they were prepared for

adulthood and that can look different

417

:

for everybody, for every family.

418

:

Scott: Yeah.

419

:

I mean, just to testify, if you look

at our kids, they're, , young adults

420

:

basically, and they have conversations

with us and their friends look at

421

:

them and say you, you tell your

mom, what you tell your dad, what?

422

:

And that, that connection you're

talking about will last forever, right?

423

:

Who's going to spend the most time

with your, who's spending the most.

424

:

The thing is on my mind is you're

saying that is who is your child

425

:

spending the most awake hours with?

426

:

And when you're, when you're

schooling, you're there, they're

427

:

learning in the car, they're learning

in the kitchen, they're learning.

428

:

They're learning all the time and

you're talking to them all the time.

429

:

And I think the, not just whatever the

academic thing is that you, that you

430

:

gained from that, but man, you gain

this, this much deeper relationship.

431

:

So yeah, maybe, maybe our, our daughter

will have to forgive you for whatever

432

:

you tested out on her, whatever

madness you got into on the other hand.

433

:

You can talk to her every day and even

though she's at college and that's a

434

:

pretty amazing relationship that if you're

looking long term and you're thinking

435

:

about homeschooling the question I would

ask is what what kind of relationship

436

:

do you want to have when your kids are

adults and who's gonna spend the most time

437

:

influencing their their way of thinking

think about the opportunity you have right

438

:

now To commit to being able to be the

one that they spend the most time with.

439

:

And I'm just thinking about all the

conversations we've had with the

440

:

kids and they, their peers are not

having those same conversations.

441

:

With whatever life things are dealing

with, with with their parents, or maybe

442

:

they are, but I think it's the exception.

443

:

Tali: Yeah, that's what we have heard.

444

:

When they graduated homeschooling and

they went out to programs where they were

445

:

the exception, as in all of their peers

were either public school or private

446

:

schools and they just, , share stories

about their personal life and families.

447

:

They were all shocked that our kids talk

to us every day and tell us everything

448

:

and they tell each other everything,

, our girls would tell them the boys

449

:

stuff and ask each other opinions.

450

:

And apparently, we just took

that for granted that that's

451

:

just the way families work.

452

:

But apparently for a lot of children

out there, they feel so alone that

453

:

they don't talk to their siblings

and they don't talk to their parents.

454

:

I mean, I feel like that's the best

reward for homeschooling out of

455

:

every other thing that we talk about.

456

:

That's the most precious part of this.

457

:

Scott: Yeah.

458

:

Pretty, pretty amazing,

pretty amazing gift there.

459

:

So any, anything else

that you, well, I was

460

:

Tali: going to say this, I was

thinking about something when you

461

:

were talking about who, who do

your kids spend the most time with.

462

:

And I think.

463

:

All parents who spend time and

attention and give their kids

464

:

attention, realize something very,

very quickly, which is the incredible

465

:

power they have to shape how the child

looks at the world and themselves.

466

:

That was something that was so surprising

to me when the kids were younger.

467

:

I didn't realize the amount

of power we had over that.

468

:

And Of course, with that power

comes great responsibility.

469

:

So you better make sure that yourself

is, you yourself are standing in

470

:

a very healthy place looking out,

. This is a, this is a definitely

471

:

a learn as you go kind of thing.

472

:

And again, I want to go back to

the notion that this is not a you

473

:

have to figure everything out right

now in order to do a right thing.

474

:

You're going to have to adjust yourself.

475

:

All the time, in addition to adjusting

your approach with your kids.

476

:

It's a lot of evaluation, like

introspective evaluation discussions,

477

:

probably with your spouse experimenting

and it's a back and forth process.

478

:

Scott: Yeah.

479

:

I'm just thinking of several stories.

480

:

I'm wondering, maybe this is Bitcoin

homeschooling, anything that we can

481

:

connect with a Bitcoin story related to

that and how we talk to the kids about.

482

:

About that, even though they're done

with, they're done with high school,

483

:

.

Tali: In terms of going back and forth to like learning

484

:

Scott: as we go?

485

:

Well there, there are frameworks.

486

:

Yeah, sorry to talk over you said,

you, you, you mentioned we have the

487

:

opportunity when you're homeschooling to

help shape how they view the, the world.

488

:

And I think our kids have been pretty

good about becoming critical thinkers.

489

:

And even challenging us.

490

:

And I'm thinking about what's happened

over the last three years as we've gone

491

:

deeper and deeper into, into Bitcoin.

492

:

And even though the formal

years of schooling are over,

493

:

like you and I haven't stopped.

494

:

We're still, we're still in that

teaching mode and the dynamics are a

495

:

little bit different, but I think it's

been interesting to listen to the kids

496

:

frameworks as they ask us questions or

give us their points of view on what,

497

:

You and I are doing as we're learning

about Bitcoin and we're excited about it.

498

:

We're trying to teach them and I'm

just trying to connect the dots

499

:

between what you said about being

able to influence their framework.

500

:

And then money in

particular and, and Bitcoin.

501

:

Okay,

502

:

Tali: so I just thought of something.

503

:

So if you've ever seen a competition

of Tai Chi hand, what's it called?

504

:

Hand combat, Tai Chi hand combat.

505

:

And they, if you've ever seen, not seen

them, , look it up on YouTube, but it'd

506

:

be two opponents with your arms up and

they're basically just pushing each other

507

:

They're their stances firm and they're

pushing each other back and forth and

508

:

you're feeling out each other's strengths

and weaknesses and Point of attack

509

:

and , like retreat points things like

that And so the reason I think of that

510

:

is as the kids grow up, when they were

little you can just almost one way tell

511

:

them what to do and then as they mature

and You necessarily should have retreat

512

:

moments and advanced moments and retreat

in advance because you got to you got to

513

:

balance their willingness and ability to

critically think and make their decisions

514

:

and you kind of give them feedback that

kind of thing and as Get they get even

515

:

older than that like our kids early

adulthood You you can't use the same

516

:

approach that you used when they were five

Or even 10 or even 12, they're, you know,

517

:

18, 20, 21, and then we have a 16 year

old, but we have to change our approach.

518

:

So if we go to them and go, Hey, these

are the books on Bitcoin you must read.

519

:

And I'm your parent, you need to

listen to me, and go listen to these

520

:

podcasts episodes, then that direct

approach in that one sided approach,

521

:

We'll produce the opposite results.

522

:

So we have to be more tactful

now, more diplomatic, and we have

523

:

to watch for the right timing.

524

:

We have to be flexible about how we

bring information to their attention.

525

:

So that's sort of that the Tai Chi

approach that I, I kind of see in my head.

526

:

We have

527

:

Scott: to be, well, I mean,

it makes us have to be better.

528

:

Right.

529

:

If you, if you are able to just

force your way, you, you don't have

530

:

to be good if you're, you know, you

have a monopoly over the discussion.

531

:

You, you don't have to be good.

532

:

It forces us to, to go deeper on

the subjects, to, to have better

533

:

logic, to be able to hold our own

in a, in a conversation about why

534

:

they should, they should look at it.

535

:

So,

536

:

Tali: yeah.

537

:

But also be patient enough

to wait for the right timing.

538

:

Scott: Agreed.

539

:

I agree.

540

:

Yeah.

541

:

That's all I have to say.

542

:

Really?

543

:

Okay.

544

:

For now.

545

:

I'm recording.

546

:

I'm going to replay that part right there.

547

:

All right.

548

:

So one of the things that I wanted

to just get out today is this.

549

:

It's something that's already out there,

but one of the things that I think would

550

:

help listeners in terms of understanding.

551

:

My thought process that led up to this

podcast , and that is that after we went

552

:

to the homeschooling conventions and not

being able to, convince people that have,

553

:

they, they, they're, they literally, I

literally thought these are people who are

554

:

big corners and just don't know it yet.

555

:

So.

556

:

So instead of just going through

all the points again, I, I, I do

557

:

have pinned on my Twitter an article

titled that homeschoolers are

558

:

Bitcoiners who don't know it yet.

559

:

If you're new to hearing some of the stuff

that Tali and I are talking about now,

560

:

these are some of the topics, not all of

them, but some of these topics have come

561

:

up on panels and other podcasts, but So

if you are new to homeschooling or just

562

:

new to hearing some of our points of

view on it, I would really recommend that

563

:

you could check out the, that article.

564

:

We'll also put the links in the

show notes for that we're, we're

565

:

just starting this obviously.

566

:

So right now this is an audio version.

567

:

We're going to have video later,

but we will certainly have show

568

:

notes starting from the beginning.

569

:

All right, Tal, how about you?

570

:

Anything?

571

:

I tell you one thing, if I could, that

I thought for today would be, would

572

:

be interesting for people because it's

come up, I literally think it's come up

573

:

in every panel and podcast so far, and

that is recommended resources to start.

574

:

Tali: Okay, so on free market kids

towards the bottom of the page, there is

575

:

a link that says I want to homeschool.

576

:

And if you go there, it gives you

some outline of curriculums out there.

577

:

but also the state by state legal

requirements for homeschooling.

578

:

But I just want to say that you don't

have to worry about any of those things

579

:

until your child is five or six at least.

580

:

Well, in terms of the legal requirement,

definitely not before the age of six.

581

:

And honestly, in terms

of curriculum, I don't.

582

:

I don't necessarily think you

need to worry about that either

583

:

until they're five or six.

584

:

In the beginning, really all you have to

focus on is having fun with your kids,

585

:

observing your kids to start gathering

information about their specific learning

586

:

style, making sure that your relationship

is healthy , you need to have enough

587

:

authority with your child that if you

tell your child to do something he doesn't

588

:

like, he will do it because you said so.

589

:

That's probably the biggest reason

some homeschoolers end up quitting

590

:

and sending their kids back to school

is because they can't get their kids

591

:

to do what they want them to do.

592

:

So the power play, again, I hate

using the word power, but that's.

593

:

I, the best word I can think of

to describe it, you need, when the

594

:

kids are little, especially, and you

have so much influence over how your

595

:

relationship is or becomes, that's

really the most important thing to

596

:

get right before you start thinking

about teaching them numbers and ABCs.

597

:

Scott: All right.

598

:

Is there anything else that you would

like to get out on our first podcast?

599

:

Tali: That's, that's basically the

most important thing for anybody

600

:

who's thinking about homeschooling

is don't ask those questions yet.

601

:

Scott: Okay.

602

:

All right.

603

:

Well,

604

:

I want to express our gratitude

for everybody who's putting the

605

:

hard work or committing to put

the hard work in the future.

606

:

That level of commitment to self

custody of your education, your

607

:

kid's education is just tremendous.

608

:

And again, in the show notes, we will

have links to anything that we've talked

609

:

about.

610

:

Tali: Can I add something?

611

:

It's just something just

popped into my head.

612

:

I'm just going to reword what I said

before, which is the art of parenting is

613

:

what needs to be focused on first, which

is why in this podcast, I'm going to

614

:

stress a lot about sharing parenting tips

because I, I feel that their natural

615

:

instinct and desire is to be great.

616

:

And they're going to look for ways to

learn because that's a very natural

617

:

human desire is to grow themselves.

618

:

And in order to grow, they must learn.

619

:

So I don't feel that we necessarily have

to push very hard for kids to do well.

620

:

But the parenting balance has to be right.

621

:

Scott: Yeah, I don't want

to scare anyone either.

622

:

These are all important things.

623

:

If I were not homeschooling yet and

I just listened to, to man, I got

624

:

to figure it out the art parenting,

and I gotta figure out this, and

625

:

I gotta figure out like that.

626

:

I think we run the risk of overwhelming

people and the most important thing, I

627

:

mean, it's okay for us to disagree folks,

by the way, like Tali and I are both

628

:

committed to the same cause, but we have,

we do have different points of view and I

629

:

actually think that's a, that's a feature,

not a bug in our , in our parenting.

630

:

The takeaway is worth it in the long run.

631

:

This is worth it for your kids.

632

:

This is just, it is worth it for society.

633

:

It is just worth it.

634

:

And yes, there's going to

be a lot of things you don't

635

:

know, but it's, it's worth it.

636

:

And if you commit to it and you

have the courage to follow through,

637

:

you will gain those capabilities,

whatever those capabilities may

638

:

be that you don't have today.

639

:

That's what leads to confidence

when you look back and say I

640

:

did that, or the kids did that.

641

:

I, I just want to leave people with, it

is worth it and just take the first step.

642

:

, just start and, everything that

we're talking about, these are

643

:

all things you can get into.

644

:

You don't have to do any of them.

645

:

You don't have to do all of them.

646

:

You can do whatever you

want, but just start.

647

:

Just take that first step and commit

and then the rest will follow.

648

:

I want to somehow work that into this.

649

:

Reassure people that no matter

how deep we go on any subject,

650

:

don't be intimidated by it.

651

:

It's, something you're going to have

your own things that you're wanting.

652

:

You're going to want to go deep on anyway.

653

:

So anyway,

654

:

Tali: I agree with that.

655

:

I agree with that.

656

:

Sorry if I sound too intense but

this is a literally put one foot in

657

:

front of the other baby step process

658

:

.

Scott: Right.

659

:

Everybody heard it.

660

:

Tali and I agree on, this.

661

:

This is, this is good.

662

:

All right.

663

:

Best way that we can serve you

though, is if you let us know

664

:

what you're, looking for.

665

:

So we don't care if it's email,

DM, Nostra, orange pill app,

666

:

telegram, whatever your method is.

667

:

We want to be available.

668

:

Let us know your questions.

669

:

Let us know people you'd

like us to interview.

670

:

Let us know what kind

of resources you want.

671

:

We're looking forward to continuing

our journey and giving back.

672

:

And honestly, we're still

learning along the way.

673

:

Tali, what do you think?

674

:

Anything else here?

675

:

Tali: Nope.

676

:

I'm good.

Links