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How to offboard clients who are TOO SUCCESSFUL WITH YOU!
Episode 8019th April 2024 • The Weeniecast - for ADHD entrepreneurs and neurodivergent business owners • Katie McManus ADHD entrepreneur coach
00:00:00 00:34:42

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The perfect offboarding system for ADHD entrepreneurs to set ex-clients up for continued success!

I've seen it time and again: entrepreneurs in the throes of success, grappling with a hidden dilemma... what to do when clients achieve unprecedented success under their guidance.

Hey, I'm Katie McManus, business strategist and money mindset coach, and this is my podcast "The Weeniecast!"

In the latest episode, "How to offboard clients who are TOO SUCCESSFUL WITH YOU! ", I'm sharing some tips on handling this potentially squirmy aspect of business.

The client success 'dance'

There's this move we need to dance between nurturing a client's growth and knowing when to let go of them and wave them on to their next phase.

I'm sharing a couple of personal stories - one involving a client who found personal growth overtaking her business goals, which leads us to question the very definition of success.

And the other one which talks about an interesting business dynamic I have with my podcast producer, who does all the things.

This is counter to how I'd normally work as a service provider, but it works for him and it's ideal for me!

The various client coaching models

I also talk about how to ensure your clients become self-reliant, the importance of knowing when to direct clients to new opportunities, and the delicate craft of soliciting impactful testimonials.

This episode won't just share insights—it’s a blueprint for you to follow as an ADHD entrepreneur who wants a solid offboarding process.

Get ready to take notes! You might find the transcript useful for this which you'll find on the episode page at weeniecast.com/how-to-handle-clients-who-are-too-successful!

Every entrepreneur envisions the moment of triumph when their hard work pays off.

Only sometimes, that success isn’t theirs; it's their clients'.

Timestamped Summary:

- 00:02:12 - The dangers of fostering dependency in our clients.

- 00:05:20 - The necessity for steady marketing.

- 00:08:45 - When coaching becomes personal development.

- 00:12:30 - Maintaining professional boundaries.

- 00:15:45 - Real-life examples of clients who thrived after completing with me.

- 00:19:55 - Why referring a client to another coach is sometimes the right move.

- 00:23:10 - How organized offboarding influences referrals.

- 00:28:25 - How to ask for GOOD testimonials, without awkwardness.

- 00:33:40 - The emotional and logistical elements.

- 00:37:50 - Proactive communication when discussing service cancellations.

Your next steps after listening

Realizing it's time to work with me? Book your free intial strategy call with me - weeniecast.com/strategycall

Get more support in your ADHD entrepreneur life by joining my hyperfocus community! - https://weeniecast.com/hyperfocus

Wanna get this content earlier, and totally unbleeped? Subscribe to the Apple Podcasts premium version of this show - https://weeniecast.com/winners

Want to just buy me a coffee in return for some helpful insight? Thank you! Here's where you can do that - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/katiethecoach

Mentioned in this episode:

My May challenge

Want to participate in my May challenge? Find out more, and sign up for your chance to win 1:1 sessions with me at weeniecast.com/challenge!

Katie's Birthday May Challenge

Katie's May Birthday challenge

Clients can't hire you if they don't know you exist... Which is why it's SO important to post content to Social Media. Consistently. But that's easier said than done... To learn how to post consistently, you have to DO consistently. Which is why I've created the 31 Day Challenge- to hold your feet to the fire so you can create content, post, and finally attract your ideal clients to you, rather than chase them down...

Katie's Birthday May Challenge

Transcripts

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In this episode, I'm going to tell you how

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you can handle when your clients have too much success with you and it's

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time to flee the nest. Hi, I'm Katie McManus, business

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strategist and money mindset coach. And welcome to the Weenie cast.

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Squirrel. One of the coolest things about starting a

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business based solely on work that you're passionate about

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doing and being super conscious about developing

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a niche that attracts people who are not only your

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ideal client, but are just your ideal people.

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Like, they are the people that if you bumped into them in the real

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world, if you weren't running your business, you would probably become

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friends with them. It is one of the greatest joys

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in the world, because not only are you making money doing

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what you love, you're making money working with people who

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you genuinely enjoy spending time with. And you're not just

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working with them, you're helping them transform some

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element of their life. It is one of the

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greatest gifts that we can give ourselves is to start a

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business where we get to do that day in and day out.

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But it does have its dark side.

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When a client starts to work with you, they're gonna work with you for a

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bit, and there's gonna come a moment where they're done.

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Your work with them will end. And I can tell

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you, as a coach, there's, like, a certain sadness. There's a very specific

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sadness that comes along with completing with a client.

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Mainly for me, it's I get sad that I'm not going to get to talk

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to this person every week. You know, I get really close with my

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clients, and oftentimes we continue the friendship beyond our

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professional engagement. But as a business owner, when a client

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completes with you, there are some other things that go into it. A,

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you no longer have that income coming in, so you then have to start thinking

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about backfilling that client. B, there's also this element of,

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oh, my God. Like, was I good enough? You know, you can start getting imposter

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syndrome because they don't want to work with you anymore. Even if

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they're done working with you, because they reach their goals, it's super

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easy for that voice of doubt to pipe in and be like, oh, you weren't

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good enough. They're done. They don't want to work with you anymore. They probably never

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want to speak to you again. They're probably just being nice because they don't want

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to be rude, because they don't want to, like, leave this uncomfortably. They

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want you to feel good. But like they're going to tell everyone that you suck.

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And see, once you get over that imposter syndrome,

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one of the things you want to prioritize is getting a testimonial from this

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client. So I want to walk you through how you can set up an off

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boarding process that is going to work really well for you and

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really well for your clients and have you ending those relationships. On a really

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solid note, I'm also going to walk you through what my philosophy

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is when I complete with clients. So you can kind of see how I put

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it into practice and how I use this philosophy to really

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help me strategize my whole business.

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So how you off board clients actually starts with

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how you onboard them. One of the things that you want to design

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with them, either verbally or in your agreements,

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is what it looks like to complete. So let me give you a couple

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examples here. So if you're doing contract work where

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they are signing up to work with you for a very specific amount of

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time, you're starting with them in January, you say that you're going to work with

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them for nine months. So that means at the end of September, your

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contract is going to come to a close. And that is where they have the

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option to either finish the work or sign

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up for, for another contract. You want to know that going into it. And

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of course, your client's not going to sign up not knowing that, so it's really,

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really necessary. You can also have it set up in a way where

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clients just sign up with you and they pay you monthly until they're done. This

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is the retainer model. This is the model that I find works really, really

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well. If you are charging less than

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$1,000 a month. Once you start charging more than $1,000

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a month, that whole model of it continues forever until you say you're

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done. Gets a little squirrely. Clients have a kind of a hard time

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sticking with something when you're charging that much. But if you do

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have that retainer model where it's just continue until you're done, you do have to

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explain to them how they ask for cancellation,

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right? Cause remember, it's awkward for you. It's awkward for them. When you're

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working with someone and you're paying them, you're aware that you are making up part

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of their income. And it's one of the hardest

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things to say, hey, I no longer want to pay you for this thing.

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Even if it's coming from a really amazing place, even if it's coming from

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like, you've helped me reach my goals and I'm so happy for you. To make

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this a positive experience for everyone involved, you have to be the person

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who lays all the cards on the table first. And you need to be very

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specific about, here's how you do it, and here's how you notify

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me, and here's the conversation we're going to have, and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah,

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blah, blah. And as you're imagining this, you're going to

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get really squirmy, right? You're going to get really uncomfortable because

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this is going to be an uncomfortable conversation. And that's

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okay. It's okay for you to get squirmy about it. It's

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okay for it to feel unsettling for you. But

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the more you lean into it, the more you're open about it, the more you

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talk about it proactively with your clients, the less awkward

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it will actually be when it happens. I want you to think about talking

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about money. For instance, say you just started dating someone and you're trying to get

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to know them. You think everything's like pretty aligned and you're getting

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serious and you're thinking, okay, I really want to create a life with this person.

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If you guys have never talked about money

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ever in the relationship, but that's one of the things that you

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need to know, like what is their approach to money? How much debt are

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they caring? How much savings do they always have? What are their

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financial goals for the future? Because that's really important for you to know when you're

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partnering your life with someone else. If you've never brought that

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conversation up before, and it's never even been referred

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to talking about it, bringing it up when they're high

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stakes is really uncomfortable for everyone.

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So when you start off talking about those things earlier on,

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it makes it easier for those big topics to come up when they matter

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most. It's the same with your clients

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and the whole cancellation process.

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So when your client comes to you and they express their

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desire to complete working with you, your job is

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now explaining how this goes. All right? And of

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course, it's different for every business owner depending on what kind of work you

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do. For the kind of work I do with my clients, one of the things

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that I always like to address is amazing. I'm so proud of you for getting

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to this point where you feel like you do not need support from me anymore.

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Here's what I want to do in our final few sessions is

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I want to make sure that any questions you have about what's going to happen

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in your business in the next six months, we cover. Now,

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I also want to hold you accountable to completing any

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of the projects that we have started, kind of gotten halfway

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through and haven't completed yet. And if I can't

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hold you accountable to finishing them by the time we complete our work

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together, then I want to make sure you're walking away with a

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plan, knowing exactly what you need to do to bring it to

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completion. If you're doing more consulting work

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where you're doing some stuff for your client, then of course you're

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going to have deliverables that you want to make sure you're handing off to

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them. Say you've been doing their social media marketing

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for a year and a half, and they've decided at this

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point that like, maybe they're going to switch to an ads model

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and they don't necessarily need to be creating as much organic

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content, and they just want to kind of reuse what's already been created. At

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that point, what you're going to do is you're going to transfer over

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all of the assets and content that you've done for them and make

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sure it is all nicely organized and ready

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for them to take the reins with. And you want to make sure,

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especially if you're handing over assets, that they understand

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where everything is, that they understand how you have it

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organized, that they understand how they're going to take ownership over

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these computer files. Right. If they're in a shared drive, do they need

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to download those files by a specific date? I can tell you that

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people that I've worked with in my business who've done this well, I refer business

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to, even if I'm not working with them anymore, they are

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my go to. Like, I'm so happy with what they did. Even

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if they no longer fit my business, I want to send more business to them

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because I know how professional they are. I've had one

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really bad experience where I had a

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fractional COo. It was my first fractional COo in my business.

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And when we transferred everything over, she actually didn't transfer

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over. A lot of the training videos that I had for some of my programs

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and where we were storing them for my

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courses wasn't working. Like, the whole system just never

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worked from go. And unfortunately, she lost

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everything. So I had to re record everything. And

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that was super frustrating. It left a terrible taste in my

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mouth, and I think you can bet I'm not referring business

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to her. So this is the importance. Like, you

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handing everything off in a really professional, organized manner

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can make the difference of hundreds of thousands of dollars worth

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of business, depending on how many people this person could refer

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to you, depending on how much you charge

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and so many other factors. So you really do want

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to do this. Well, and the last bit,

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I know it's awkward. I know it feels like you're fishing for

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compliments, and who am I to ask them to say nice things about me?

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But you do need to ask for testimonials. I'm terrible

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at this. I'm so bad at this. I know my podcast

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producer is always on me to ask you guys to, like, go

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onto Apple podcasts or whatever, to review

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this podcast and say, if there's anything that is specific that you like about it.

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And I feel super awkward and cringe about it. Even though I train on

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this, it's always funny when a client

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completes with me, and I've trained them on asking for

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testimonials, and they're like, Katie, aren't you

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forgetting to ask me for something?

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And I laugh and I'm like, yeah, yeah, I absolutely do want a

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testimonial from you. Thank you so much. I'll send you some questions. Asking

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for testimonials a. It's awkward af. The reason it's

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awkward Af is because you're not a

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sociopath, you're not a narcissist.

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Congratulations. You're safe to be amongst

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other people. But it also means you're gonna get really weird when you're asking for

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testimonials. That's the downside. Asking for testimonials is

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one part of the hurdle here, getting over the fear of it and being

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comfortable with it. But you also have to understand that most testimonials that people give

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are really bad. They're not helpful for other people who are considering hiring

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you, it may sound really nice for someone to write a testimonial saying, oh,

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my God, tim was so kind. I really enjoyed

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every single one of my sessions with him. He was super helpful,

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and I just really appreciated all the support he gave. What

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the does Tim do? You have no idea. Like, who is this

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person? Where did they start from? What did they accomplish while they were

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working with Tim? What's the result that they're getting now

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after they've completed the work? What made Tim stand

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out more than anyone else? That made them choose to work with him? When

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someone's looking at a testimonial of yours, yeah. They're doing it to make sure

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that you do what you say you do. And that you're a good person. But

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more than that, what they're looking for is, is this person who gave the

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testimonial like me, was their life like mine when

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they signed up for this? What are they saying about how it was to work

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with this person, and what's the result that they got?

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So one of the things that I have found super helpful, and I train my

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clients on this, is to send them a very specific

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list of testimonial questions. Some people love this, some people hate

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it. I had one client in my BYOB program who, when I trained him

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on this, he was like, this just sounds like, so

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formulaic and cold, and it's like, cool.

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Then this doesn't have to be your process. But when you do ask for testimonials,

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you want to give people a little bit of direction, because if someone's going to

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write a testimonial for you, they want to write a testimonial that'll actually help you

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get more business. I can't think of a

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single Yelp review that I've written that was positive about a

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restaurant that I wrote because I didn't want them to get more business. The

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reason we give testimonials is because we want to promote this business that

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has had a positive impact on us. So set your

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clients or your former clients up for success so they can do that

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effectively. The other thing about asking for testimonials,

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and this is true across the gambit of any favor

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you are ever going to ask of anyone, ever, in your life,

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how a lot of people treat asking for favors is.

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Is. Here's a hot potato. I'm just gonna throw it at you. Ow. Now it's

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your problem. Now you have to manage the hot potato. You have to make

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sure it doesn't burn your hands. And if you drop it, then that's your

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fault. As someone who moved 16

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times in nine years, because the real estate situation

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in San Francisco Bay area is fucking miserable, I can tell you I moved a

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lot, obviously. And when you move, unless you're

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hiring movers, I mean, there are times in there that I couldn't afford to hire

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movers. Cause I was in my twenties and I was bad with money. So I

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had to ask people to help me move. You know, I had to ask the

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friend who has the truck, and I had to ask the friends who I knew

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were strong and wouldn't hurt their back, and I had to arrange all

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these things. Now imagine if I asked someone to help me

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move, and they said yes, and I was like, great, and

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then never communicated something else to them. Didn't tell them

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where to come to help me with my stuff and where we're going or

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what time or what day. Didn't give them a heads up on, like, the kinds

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of stuff we were moving. Like, if we're moving a grand piano, that's something they

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should know. I don't play the piano, so I don't have one, in case you

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were wondering. But when you're asking someone for a favor,

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it's your responsibility to remind them. It's

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your hot potato. You're the person who has to

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communicate the details. You're the person who has to remind them

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of, hey, just want to touch base. I know I asked you for help with

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this. This is the date. Does that still work for you? Do you need

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reminders? Do you want me to call you at 05:00 in the morning? Cause we're

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gonna be doing this super, super early to wake you up. When you're asking other

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people for a favor, the kindest thing you can do is to

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carry as much of the mental load of remembering to do it

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as possible. So when you're asking people for a

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testimonial and they say, yeah, absolutely, I want to do that, you're going to say,

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okay, amazing. What I'm going to do is I'm going to send you some questions

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that you can answer. And I know you're really busy, so

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if I don't hear back from you in a couple days with answers, I'm just

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going to send you another follow up email. Because I know what it feels like

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when you offer to do something for someone or you agree to do something for

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someone and then you forget and then you start feeling bad, and I don't want

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you feeling bad. And also, if you decide you do not

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have time for this, or you've decided for whatever reason, you don't want to write

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a testimonial for me, no bad feelings at all, just let me know so I

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don't pester you with it. Without that design, if you're reminding

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them, without you explaining that upfront, you reminding them can feel

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like you're chasing them down and pestering them and annoying them to get

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this thing from them, and it feels really gross. But when

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you design that and you say, hey, listen, I'm gonna do all these things to

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kind of manage the mental load for you because you're doing this

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incredibly kind thing for me, it takes a weight off of their

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backs. It allows for them to keep living their

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lives and also do something really nice for you. Small caveat

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here. If you did not like working with this person,

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don't get a testimonial from them. Don't use a testimonial from them.

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Words carry energy, and when you use the words of

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someone whose energy did not match up with yours for whatever

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reason, guess what kinds of people those words are going to attract

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more of? That's right. You're going to attract more of that kind of

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person. So you want to be super hyper specific about the

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kinds of testimonials you're actually utilizing in your business, and you

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only want to use the ones from the people that you really enjoyed working with.

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I also want to name that the people who give you testimonials and the people

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who give you some of the best testimonials you might be shocked

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about. I had this one client about three years

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ago who started working with me because she wanted to start a coaching

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business. And we worked together for half a

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year, and we had these amazing sessions where we planned what she

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was going to be working on and how she was going to

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really hone in on her niche and start marketing and doing

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sales and all the things. And I trained her on a ton of stuff that

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she would need when she started the business. And every session I'd say, cool. What

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did you accomplish from last session? Nothing. No, I just. I didn't

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get around to it or it just. I don't know. I was resistant to it

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for some reason. And at the end of six

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months, she was like, I want to write a testimonial for you. And she

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hadn't started a business. Like, she hadn't gotten a single client. She didn't market

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anything. And I was like, oh, okay.

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Yeah, absolutely would love to have a

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testimonial from you. And I'm like, oh, my God, what is this person even going

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to say? They're probably going to write a testimonial about how they didn't get any

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results. And she wrote one of the most beautiful testimonials that I've

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ever seen that made me feel so good about my work

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that she had signed up to build a business and

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that when she signed up with me, she thought she wanted all these

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things. And through our work, she didn't necessarily get what she thought she wanted. She

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got what she needed that she didn't realize that she needed from

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our work together. She also named that she'd been in an MBA

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program, I'm sorry, an NBA MBA.

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She'd been in not the National Basketball League or

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National Basketball association. Whatever. I know sports.

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Absolutely. I also know acronyms. This is honestly

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why I can never work for another company, is I can't handle

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acronyms. Is because I can't handle acronyms.

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I can't even pronounce the f word. Also, as I'm

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recording this, I'm really sleep deprived, so just don't mind me right now. I

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apologize. I will be better rested for the next episode, I

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promise. What was I talking about? So she even

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explained that she had been through an MBA program. She

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was trained in business, and she named that she learned more about how

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to start a business and get clients and market yourself and do all the

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things from working with me for six months than she ever did in the whole

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two year program she was in. You will be shocked. The

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kinds of positive impact that you have even when your clients don't

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necessarily get what they signed up for. If you treat your business a little more

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professionally and you don't, you don't pursue friendships with your

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clients, one of the things that you want to design with them also is,

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what am I going to say next? Well, you'll have to keep listening to find

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out. But first, squirrel, squirrel, squirrel, squirrel, squirrel.

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If you treat your business a little more professionally and you don't, you don't

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pursue friendships with your clients, one of the things that you want to design

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with them also is like, a six month check in,

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just to check in to see how they're doing for you as a business person.

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A, this helps you kind of check in to make sure that they're doing well

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and that you can speak authentically about their success.

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B, if you get to that .6 months from now and they've decided that

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they want to, like, start working with you again, that's that natural

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conversation for you to have where you're discussing picking the work back up.

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What I run into with my clients is, you know, I become friends

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with them, so I have to design with them. Hey, now that

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we're not working together anymore, still call me,

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still stay in touch. Just because we're not in a

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professional agreement anymore doesn't mean we

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have to stop talking. And I'm so glad I do this because I've made some

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of the most incredible friends in my life through working with

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them. So that is your offboarding process. Those are all the things that you have

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to consider when clients complete with you.

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Now, I want to share with you a little bit about what my philosophy is

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about my clients and how long they work with me. And them coming to

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completion at some point, and I wanted to name that. There are

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some business models out there that are reliant, right?

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So my relationship with my podcast producer,

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Neil, I'm not going to do any of the things he does for me.

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If he and I, for some reason stopped working together, there just

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wouldn't be a podcast. I'm not learning how to edit,

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okay? I'm not figuring out how to upload things to

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places and have other stuff go

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on. I don't even know the things. I don't wanna know the

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things. What I like about our professional

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relationship is I get to show up sometimes with an idea. I get

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to talk into a mike for anywhere from an hour to 2

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hours, and he turns it into an episode and does all the things

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and I don't really have to worry about it. And all I have to do

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is have incredible conversations with people who book sales

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calls with me because they want to learn about working with me, because they listen

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to my podcast. That is what I love. So that's a reliant

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relationship. That is, you know, Neil in this case, is

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not building independence in me because I don't

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want it. I'm sure if I did, he would find a way,

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we would design a package for him to train me on all that. But no,

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thank you. I'm good. My philosophy with my clients is very

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different. I'm not working with clients so that they're always going to

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be dependent on me to grow and run their businesses. My

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ultimate goal is that a client works with me from

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wherever they're starting from and throughout our work, however long

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we work together, be it six months, a year, three

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years, my goal is to see them, to reaching their

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goal, whatever that is. And absolutely,

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I have clients who've worked with me for years and years and years,

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and who are committed to just continue working with me forever until they

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hit that goal. And I love them. I will always have

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space in my business for those people. And also I have

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clients who work with me. They might join BYOB beginner

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for a year and get their first, like, five high

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paying clients and really understand, like, the simple ways that they can market

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and sell their services and realize, cool, this is good

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enough. I don't need anything else. I have clients who will go through the

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BYOB advance program. Program, and we'll get all the infrastructure

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built in their business, from their websites, their email marketing,

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to creating lead magnets, and understanding how they can do webinars

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and so on and so forth. And once we have all that set up.

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They're good. They don't need to continue working with me,

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and that's my goal. My goal is to

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create a self sufficient business owner

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who knows that they can do it on their own in some instances. I'm

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also not the right coach to continue with them. I had a client

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a few years ago who just this incredible coach.

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We worked together for nine months. She did this beautiful job of building her

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business and establishing multiple different revenue streams for the

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work that she did. But when we came to the end of our nine months,

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you know, one of the things that she was struggling with was she was the

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mom of two small children and her husband had a very time

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intensive job. So she was really struggling with how to manage her

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time, how to balance the demands of her new business that was

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doing really well and the demands of her

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two beautiful toddlers. And I'm not a mom. I don't have

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toddlers. I spend time around kids very rarely, if my

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friends have kids, those are the kids I'm spending time with, but I'm not

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taking care of them. I'm not managing their lives. I'm not dealing with them when

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they're, they're sick. I'm not liaising with their preschool. I have no idea

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about that stuff. So, for this client, you know, she'd gotten to this really beautiful

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point in her business, and what she needed next was

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a coach who could help her work on balancing

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motherhood and business ownership, and that wasn't

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me. And so it was a natural conclusion for

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her to move on to someone who really fit her needs for that time. When

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you approach your business with this kind of philosophy, it becomes a lot less

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scary when people compete with you. It becomes a lot less

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imposter syndrome inducing because you've made it about them getting

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to the point where they need to be. I've bumped into several

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business coaches out there in the world who,

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when you start, like, being in their world, they start trying to

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set that expectation that once you hire them, you're always going to work with them.

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Once you hire them, you're going to be with them for decades, and

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often not always. These coaches will play on

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the insecurities of their clients to sow fear that they can't

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do it on their own. And let me tell you, if you're starting a business

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and if you're looking for support to start and grow this

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business, stay away from people like that, because what they will

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create is reliance in you. They will so doubt that you

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cannot do this on your own. They will give you just enough to help you

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with that next little problem that you have or that next little goal.

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But they won't set you up to be able to tackle the whole thing on

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your own, or at least to understand who you need

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to hire to help you tackle the big goal. Cause hopefully, if you have really

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big, massive dreams, you're not doing it all your own. Hopefully you're

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hiring someone to do your social media. Hopefully you're hiring someone to do ads

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and to do some pr and to get you booked on stages and to

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liaise with your literary agent for the third book that you're gonna be

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publishing this year. But as a business owner, you

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ultimately can do that on your own when you have the confidence

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and the know how. When I work with clients, my number one

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goal is to build that confidence and to establish that know

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how. The

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clients who it really makes sense for them to see stay working with me

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for an extended period of time are the ones who are

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starting from absolute scratch. They know that they maybe

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want to do coaching or they want to do consulting, but

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they need to first figure out, like, what their niche is going to be, what

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their offer is going to be, how much they're going to charge, how do they

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market it, how do they sell it. But, like, that's just the

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beginning of their journey. Like, they. Yes, they want to,

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you know, have some clients and they want to make a lot of money, but

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the clients who tend to stay with me the longest are the ones that have

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the biggest dreams. They're the ones who look out in the world and

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know that if they stick with this, if they're

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deliberate and they have the correct strategy, they're going to be the kind

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of person who is Oprah's life coach. They're going to be the

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kind of person who gets paid crap ton of money to

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be a keynote speaker at major events and conferences.

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They know that if they have the

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right action plan, that they can launch themselves

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into the stratosphere and become famous, not

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just for the sake of being famous, but for the sake of

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bringing their wisdom and their gifts to the world. Because

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they know in their bones that they

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have this deeper gift to give to the world and they feel a

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duty to deliver it. And those are the clients

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that I will always make space for in my one on one practice.

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Because I can't tell you the pride at seeing

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someone grow from making $0 a year in their business

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to hitting their 1st $100,000 a year, to

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hitting their first hundred thousand dollars

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month, to getting booked on stages, to

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writing their book, to doing all these things that they

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only ever dreamed of. But because they were brave

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enough to put their money where their mouth was and brave

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enough to actually get to work and stop being a weenie about it,

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they actually make it true for themselves. Those

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are my people.

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If you really struggle with that fear when a client completes because

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you're worried about backfilling them, then one of the things that you really need to

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start working on in your business is consistent marketing.

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Without consistent marketing, you're just constantly going to have

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a artist boom and bust cycle happening. And if you want to learn more

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about what that is, then I want to point you to episode 74, where I

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talk all about what that is, the impact it has on your business and

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how you can avoid it. But essentially, you want to become

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so consistent in your marketing that even when you're at full capacity

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with clients that you have inquiries coming in. Right. And

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the only way to do that is to be ironclad

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in your consistency. Squirrel. Squirrel. If you're ready to stop being

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a weenie and actually run a business that makes money, then go ahead and

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book a generate income strategy call with me by going

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to weeniecast.com

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strategycall. On this call, we will talk about your goals,

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your dreams, and your frustrations in getting there.

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And if it's a fit for both of us, then we can talk about different

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ways to work together.

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Boom. I got excited about the word smorgasbord.

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Squirrel, squirrel, squirrel, squirrel.

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