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Joenrhuz “JR” Tabanda on Everyday People and Everyday Stories
Episode 312nd September 2021 • Podcaster Stories • Danny Brown
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This week I sit down with Joenrhuz "JR" Tabanda, host and audio producer of the Time Capsule Show, a podcast sharing the everyday stories of everyday people.

Each episode asks six thoughtful questions that guests can use to define their life in the 21st century at this moment.

We wanted to give people hope, especially young people that may feel alone.

JR talks about what their goals were with the show, and how that's taken shape, and how the pandemic gave them the opportunity to put these goals to fruition.

We Are All Connected

JR and his podcast team and co-hosts share the belief that everyone has a story, and that's why they appear on the Time Capsule Show.

We just try and put up stories that are timely, powerful, and help us understand the culture of the time we're going through.

One thing they're particularly determined to do with the show is to give the guests a platform, and share their point of view, whether it fits with the hosts or not .

On Taking a Different Path

With a Filipino background, it was expected that both JR and his brother would take a career in the medical profession, or a similarly professional one. But that was a very different path from the one he envisioned.

While he may yet take that career path, for now he's more than satisfied and challenged by the route he's currently on.

Everybody has an opinion, but it's up to you what value you place in that opinion.

Heroes Don't Always Wear Capes

While he'd never describe himself as a tennis player, or even someone that has just a passing interest in the sport from a playing point of view, his all-time hero hails from it.

Rafael Nadal epitomizes everything we should aspire to be, in our personal and professional lives.

People's expectations of you don't mean anything, and if you set your mind to anything you can achieve it.

Connect with JR:

Contact me: danny@podcasterstories.com

My equipment:

Recommended resources:

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Mentioned in this episode:

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Transcripts

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And, you know, in terms of cancelling I think that

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rather firm seeing it from the point of cancel culture,

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I think people should be open to discussion. You should

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be okay to disagree with someone and not everyone in

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your life is always going to grieve with what you

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have to say. And that's an amazing part of this

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time capsule. You know, I got to be honest with

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you as a host, I don't necessarily agree with everything

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that my, the, our guests stay, but, you know, were

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there for a discussion where you were to be open

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to each other. And I think there's power in that

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when you can just listen to some time,

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Hi, and welcome to Podcaster Stories. The show that gets

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to meet the people behind the voices of the show

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is we have listened to this week. I've got

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gr Tabanda, who is a co-host or the time capsule

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show, a show that shared inspiring in stories through six.

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What for questions gr or Jon ruse, whichever you prefer

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welcome to the shore. Thank you for a period. And

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so a quick question or not you're in a New

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York, so let's end this argument once and for all

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New York pizza, Chicago pizza.

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Oh no. Well, first of all, thank you so much

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for having me on your show, Danny. I really appreciate

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it. And in terms of pizza, you know, I'm not

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a big fan of the crust. I'm just going to

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stick with New York. I'm a new Yorker at heart,

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so can't go wrong with that.

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Oh, the thing, because when I came to New York

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because of maybe four years ago or so, and my

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friends all told me, you have to try a New

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York pizza back because the new I'm not like a

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fake cross guy. I'll like that big a, I don't

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know, what have you had? One where its like a

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big Maui cheese crust and it just, it just piles

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up whenever you bite into it. But I have to

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say, or the New York pizza or it was amazing.

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So that's but New York freedom. Happy to hear that

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this was a Mason jar, your, the cohost of the

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time capsule show. So how about you tell us, tell

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us about yourself and your podcast.

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Of course, for so a little bit about me. I'm

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a media professional here in New York city and I'm

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also an actor and a singer. Creativity is, has always

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been a huge part of me. And I'm so happy

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that I was able to practice that creativity in this

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podcast that I started with my brother and two friends

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that have known for quite a while now. So at

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a time capsule show podcasts is a podcast where we

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try to define life in a 21st century through everyday

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people with everyday stories. And w one of our goals

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with the podcasts is to show to everyone in that,

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no matter where you are in life, no matter what

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position you have, no matter what emotions that you're going

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through, we all share similar successes and similar struggles. And

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it's really amazing. We've interviewed college students.

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We've interviewed someone who was a PhD and his, a

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professor we've interviewed someone who was a former secret service

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agent for the white house. So we're just trying to

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show the people that it doesn't matter where you are

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in life. We are all connected in some way shape

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or what.

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And you mentioned that there's three cohosts with yourself. You

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can have to find fecal a horse, one of which

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was your brother. So, but how did you can actually

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come up with the idea of the show?

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Yeah, surprisingly, I wasn't part of the original idea of

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Time Capsule. It was between my brother and our other

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co-host Monica. And you know, we're all in our twenties.

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We are living in these, this time of pandemic where

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opportunities are a very scarce and sometimes you have to

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make your own opportunities. And I think that's what they

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did there. That's what we all did eventually. You know,

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being in your twenties, it's easy to feel lost. It's

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easy to feel alone. And sometimes people don't want to

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talk about their struggles, even though we're all feeling the

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same things. So we, they thought that it would be

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best to make this podcast, especially during the hard times

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and to make an old, to make our own opportunity.

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And why not add some value to this planet, add

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some value to this earth and try to impact, and

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hopefully inspire other people out there, especially young people who

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may feel lost and who may feel that they're not

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connected with society.

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And, and you mentioned obviously the shore cram came around

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that the mid, mid pandemic, a guest at the beginning

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of this year, a so are you doing a remote

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recording? Are you managing to get any in-person a cordon

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or how is that

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Working? Yeah, we're actually doing everything through zoom. We're doing

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a lot of a zoom recordings and posting audio and

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video, primarily videos to YouTube. I would love to try

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in-person interviews, but unfortunately we, we're not at the point

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of where we have a studio where we can invite

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people. We've thought about interviewing people on the streets, but

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you know, there's some of the pandemic we're trying to

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be very cautious with that and respect people's space.

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Yeah, no, hopefully with a vaccine is in not coming

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through a note. We were when we can get to

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that position late or, you know what we'll get back

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to be in an in person again, know, as I

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mentioned a premiere at the beginning of the year. So

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what were your goals for it when you first, you

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know, brought the short for life, so to speak and

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how will things evolved maybe since that first episode?

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Yeah. So just from a very basic point of view

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or goals for that, at least to be consistent, right.

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But at least one video a week, what inspiring interview

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rather? And we just started off with that. We started

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off with personal contacts, our own network, and surprisingly with

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like by a third week, someone reached out to us

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and said, Hey, I like your podcast. I want to

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be on your show in it for us. That was

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such a surprise. And we were so grateful that someone

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reached out to us. And shortly after that, we started

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putting to interviews up a week because we just had

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so much on our backlog and we didn't want people

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waiting for months. So our initial goal was to just

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share stories and as what we're doing to this day

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and were, I see us go in the future, I

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just want to make sure that we're always staying true

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to our core and just sharing people's stories and inspiring

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other people.

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And as you mentioned, there was the, the fall of

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you, which I can find real interest in the podcast

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because generally you might have like, see a coup a

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host of, of cohorts, possibly three as the one time,

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a bit having for a as, as, as quite an

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idea of, so is there a, a method that you

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have to decide who does co-host and Judy's for an

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episode, or is it based on a topic or is

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it like Rotarian? How would you work for that?

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Yeah, and it does get challenging at times, you know,

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there was four of us where for a very strong

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personalities for, for people with different thoughts, but the way

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we do it is that we try to delegate the

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work accordingly. Monica is in charge of our social media.

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I do some of the booking, my brother also to

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some of the book, and we all share with some

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of the work Vanessa and my brother. They do primarily

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with a lot of the video editing that we're so

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thankful for and also editing the thumbnails. So we all

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found a way to delegate the process accordingly when it

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comes to hosting, we actually book people. We find interesting

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for people to put it on the podcast and we

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kind of just put it in a group chat and

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say, Hey, who wants to do this podcast? And we

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were very open. We try to communicate with each other.

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Of course, it's not always going to be a smooth

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sailing road.

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Right. But we try to make the best of what

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we have in always be understanding of why, what everyone's

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going through

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And in a group chat, their obviously. So what you

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do, what would be your story in a normal process

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for an episode when it comes to ideation getting a

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gas research, et cetera, how would you, how would that

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work?

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Yeah. So when it comes to finding a guests, versus

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if we're a very open to inviting anyone, because we

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believe that everyone has a story and that's why we

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wanna put them in a time capsule. Everyone has a

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valid story. And when it, this, when we decide who

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we want to put up, we don't necessarily try to

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pick who has a better story, or who do we

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think will get his view is like, that's definitely not

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in early. We just try to do We just try

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and put up stories that we think that are timely.

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Like for example, for a March was women's history month.

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And we put every week, very strong, powerful stories coming

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from female leaders and female colleagues. And I think that

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we just try to understand the culture that we're going

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through so that people can relate to the content.

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And at the same time, we're also continually interviewing people

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and just hearing more stories. And unfortunately we do have

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a backlog of people might have to wait a month

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or a few weeks for their episode to come out,

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but it's all about the right timing

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And you buy it. Do you know, obviously the, the,

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the, the, the woman's a topic from earlier a and

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you also have the, the black, a black lives matter

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in the black history month topics on your show as

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well. So is it important for you too, to prove

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from it being in your twenties to prove from the,

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the, the cultural and societal issues that are happening at

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the moment and they've been happening for awhile?

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Definitely. That's one thing that we want to do with

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this podcast is to impact people and to, or be

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a reflection of culture in society. I mean, this is

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why we're in a time capsule, right? Literally everything that

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people say, everything that people put into our time capsule

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is what it reflects the century. And I think it

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would be absolutely horrific if we just ignored all the

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social and cultural changes that we're seeing in society. So

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I think it's really important that our podcast or flex

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that, and we reflect relevant and genuine stories that many

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people can understand and relate to

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It. And, and based on a, obviously we're seen a

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lot of pushback on cancel culture where I, I, I

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feel like, Mmm, I don't know, what are your problems

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the same? What I feel like people were finding a

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reason to push back on doing the right thing and

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blame it on, or cancel culture have how's your show,

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or have you had any pushback like that, or negative

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feedback are, or any kind of a, you know, negativity

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because of some of the topics that you knew guests

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are talk to you. And

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So when it comes to the topics that we give

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our guests, even on our booking form, it, we actually

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state to our guests that what we give you a

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platform, right? We gave our guests the MC to speak.

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We don't necessarily agree or disagree, but were there to

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discuss we're there to a story time and to just

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talk and to hopefully influence someone's life. And we haven't

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come across any negative impact or a negative comments yet.

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I'm sure that's something that every podcast, his bounce through

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and into, but, you know, in terms of cancelling, I

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think that rather for him seeing it from a point

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of cancel culture, I think people should be open to

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discussion. You should be okay to disagree with someone and

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not everyone in your life is always going to grieve

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with what you have to say.

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And that's an amazing part of this time capsule. You

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know, I got to be honest with you as a

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host, I don't necessarily agree with everything that my, the,

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our guests stay, but, you know, were there for a

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discussion where you were to be open to each other.

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And I think there's power in that when you can

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just listen to someone else.

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And it, it's definitely something that I've seen, especially on

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social media may have been in the last two years,

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maybe the last for it, to be honest I'm. And

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I think there is a reason for that, that as

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well, but there's very much a divisive attitude. It's either

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your webinar sort of guests, that's a myth, seem to

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you as a lost in this middle ground where we

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can have, or try and have a respectful discourse in

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and see, and land from someone else in a point

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of view. I think it's key, like, to your point,

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that it's, it's awesome that you have people on that

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you may not necessarily agree with it, but you give

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them the space in the voice to share that and,

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and let people make their own minds up, I guess,

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100%. And that's just life. I think that if you

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expect everyone to think like you there's no, but I

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mean, there's no diversity in that. Honestly, if you expect

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everyone to think, like, you have to look like for

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you, and if no one agrees with you, then you

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kind of shunned them out. I don't think that's any,

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right. I think that people have to learn how to

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agree to disagree, and don't let the conversations completely impact

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your relationships with other people. And one

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Of the things I like about your shop, it's a

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very clear for March, you have six questions that you

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have them on your website, and these are the six

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topics that we're all the, the sixth of questions we're

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going in. We speak about Andy, the same six questions

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or asked to each guests. So it's, it's always interesting

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to see different viewpoints and different answers from people in

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different places in their life. So of these questions, or

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maybe your guests, or what's been your favorite so far,

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and why that question still cancer.

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Oh, that's such a good question. You know, I'm not

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used to actually getting the questions because on our podcast,

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where are the ones asking people the questions. But if

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you're going to make me pick just one question from

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those six, you know, it, it's a hard one. And

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I'll tell you to two top questions that come to

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mind. One of them is what are you grateful for?

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And another question is, if you were to leave something

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at a time capsule for people to dig up 100

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years later, what would you put in their, and why

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people always struggle with that time capsule question, because it's

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so hard to pick something that would define the century,

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but now that I'm verbalizing it to you and saying

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it out loud, I think of my favorite question is

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where are you grateful for? And it's because it's so

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amazing to see how positive of that question is, and

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its crazy to see how it always, the little things

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in life that give more meaning to people and what

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people are grateful for.

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The best answer that really touched me was from my

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professor in college, Dr. Anthony Palomba. And he said during

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the interview, he's grateful for people who gave him a

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chance. And that was such powerful statement. I would never

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have thought of that in my life. But when you

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think about it, at some point someone took a risk

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on us, in someone gave us the chance and some

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times we grow from those opportunities. So just to hear

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the answer was really heartwarming and it really put life

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into perspective. For me,

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That's a very strong answer. Or actually, as you mentioned,

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it's, it's all about getting a chance to his, right?

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And it's up to you, what you do with them.

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Obviously the beginning of a chance on a first place

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is definitely, are you gonna, it's a nice to have

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for one or the battle ward. And you'd mentioned also,

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like I said, there are six questions on your, a,

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your short for each gas and one of the questions,

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it was about what people see themselves and X amount

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of years, you know, we were speaking of earlier. Ah,

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and I know you're on background and how did your

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parents, or maybe see you on a very different feature

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for you than the one they're or the past that

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you're currently at the moment. I'm wondering how much have

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that may be lead to the, the, the questions on

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the shore, a subconsciously and or what was that like,

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trying to take your own path when maybe, you know,

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your parents wanted a very different path for

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You? Yeah. I'm so happy you brought that up. Well,

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if it gets a little background about me, our parents

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always pushed me and my brother to become doctors and

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to enter the medical route. And for the longest time

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I was kind of conditioned to tell people I want

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to be a plastic surgeon. I don't want to be

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a dermatologist. I didn't really know what that meant to

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be honest. But when you're young, you're a kid, you

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kind of just say what your parents want you to

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say. And I kind of woke up to it in

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called and say, Hey, I don't know if I want

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to spend the rest of my life doing this. It

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sounds nice to say it as a kid. So people

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think it's impressive, but when you actually grow up, it's

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like, what the heck? I don't really know if I

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want to do that. And to ask that on the

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podcast, I think it's really great for people to reflect

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on who they were five years ago, who they are

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now and what they'll see for yourselves in the future.

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I think that we don't see enough of that reflection

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time. We don't see enough of that. Hey, I'm hot.

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Like how much I've grown, look, how much I've changed.

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And that really helps us grow more as a person

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when you can acknowledge that growth and change. And to

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ask our guests that are guests. Actually, I have some

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difficulty answering the question sometimes because they really have to

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think, and they really have to reflect on their life,

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their choices during mistakes, possibly. And after the data side,

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what their life has looked like, sometimes our guests coming

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on our show and say, Hey, I've never said that

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out loud before. I've never really thought about that. And

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that's what we want to get from our guests.

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And obviously,

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As you mentioned, being on a different path in and

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not knowing what are you quite want to do because

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they know you mentioned that a bit before we came

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on with the show, but we'll come back and forth

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on email. And I know you mentioned even now, you're

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still not really sure you have, or you're not quite

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a phone to the thing you're you wanting to do.

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Although obviously you enjoy it. A lot of things that

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you do it at the moment. So I'm, I'm curious

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or what's your parents think of you, what you are

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doing now then, because obviously you're not on a plastic

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surgery and you may not be a doctor or what,

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what's a feedback from them on all of the cool

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stuff that you'd been doing

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So far, or I'm going to be so honest with

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you doesn't really matter much to them. I mean, sure.

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I'm thankful to have an opportunity, a job during this

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pandemic. And at the end of the day, it matters

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a lot to me, but for them, its kind of

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like, oh your still they're still getting used to it.

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I think getting used to the fact that we're exploring

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different fields and avenues because I come from a Filipino

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background and in that culture, it's huge to go to

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medical school. It's huge to go to law, school of

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engineering. Those are the top three. I'm sure other people

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have Asian descent. You can share that sentiment. And he,

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and I think I'm proud of myself to be honest

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for trying a new field I'm entering media and mentoring

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entertainment, sports news, and it's a whole different play field.

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I'm not even thinking about the money. I'm not even

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thinking about regrets at this point. I think I'm just

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happy to be exploring waters that I've never swam in

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before. And to hopefully hopefully learn from this experience, Hey,

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maybe I might become a doctor at some point, but

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it'll be my decision and it won't be anyone else

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with decision. If I do want to become a doctor

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again in one day

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And you, you mentioned obviously in some cultures, it can

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be difficult for T to deviate, I guess, from the

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path that that S traditionally seen for you or, you

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know, whether that's medical or a professional, you know, a

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degree or some degree a professor, or that's a terrible

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sort of professional GRI of some degree, but it, it,

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it can be difficult for DV. So I was wondering,

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was there any difficulty sort of, was it any like

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major argument's you have to overcome when you let your

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parents know that this wasn't what was going to happen

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for me? Unfortunately, not in the model, like you said,

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maybe a doctor leader, but right now, what do you

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have or had you have to overcome or anything like

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that?

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Yeah. And I had to overcome problems and struggles with

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myself because yeah, they have their own opinions. Everyone has

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their own opinions. Everyone has their own expectations for other

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people, but at the end of the day, it's up

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to you, whether you want to decide to let that

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get to you and to find value and appreciation within

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yourself. And I think that's a struggle that I'm still

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trying to understand up to this day as this trying

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to be content with myself and trying to appreciate myself.

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I think that I put too much of my value

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into other people's opinions and other people's thoughts. And it's

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been a real growth for me to start appreciating and

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to start being okay with myself. And Hey, I don't

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need someone else's approval for me to validate myself.

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And you mentioned L it obviously you've had a, a

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few different experiences so far since making that the jump

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away a on your own path, or if your brother,

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you, you mentioned that you've been doing like you or

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you've done a real estate TV production in, and currently

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your work in at Fox a. So how's the experience

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of being a, with all of these different things you've

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been doing?

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Yeah, it's been one hell of a roller coaster. I

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came in to school with a mathematics degree with a

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pre-med intention. And when I was in college, you know,

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I always wanted to be on TV. I knew that

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was something that I always wanted to, to be on

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front of the cameras. I rather, because I as love

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the energy of being in front of a camera. So

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I'm like, Hey, let me try real estate because there's

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a show called million listing in the company. Nest seekers

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is actually on that show. So I got an internship

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at nest seekers and what I was so terrified going

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in for this interview. And I was so terrified seeing

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all these professional people in a really nice office in

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the city of Madison Ave, but I just went blindly

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into it. Most things I did, I just went blind.

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Linda said, what the heck want to just do it?

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And I got that internship. Thank God. And it grew

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to a really great experience.

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You got my license to practice real estate, and I

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was actually able to learn more about the city. I

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didn't really know where anything was in the city. And

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because of that, I learned most of New York is.

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And shortly after that, I started to do background acting

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in the city and the work in some production sites

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I've worked for now on Netflix sets HBO, F X,

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the most thrilling experience that I've had was dancing in

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time square dress as Peter pan for a Korean national

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television. They had me dance to a K-pop dance. I

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don't know much about K-pop. I had to learn to

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dance of it in one hour. Dancing is not my

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forte. I'm mostly when an actor and singer I'm like,

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well, what the heck am I doing? Probably what are

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the most scary and terrifying experiences of my life? But

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I was so proud of myself.

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I got through it. And then, you know, now I'm

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working in media, in New York. Unfortunately we aren't able

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to go back to the office, but I'm loving it

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so far. Everyone's been so friendly, been so patient with

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teaching you the ins and outs immediate, especially since I

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don't have that, that typical background going in to this

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kind of a job. So when I think about I'm

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going to collect it, but I have my experience all

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over the place, but it's what you make of it.

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And it's what you take from each experience that slowly

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builds up and to hopefully something where you meant to

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belong in the future. So

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I'm, I'm guessing at the moment as they a media

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part be in your favor or the opiates of equal

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Or, Hmm, good question. I would say it's different. It

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wouldn't necessarily be greater or less than the other. I

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think that working media is such a fast pace. It's

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always changing. There's so many numbers that goes behind everything.

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I mean, when do you watch a commercial spaces on

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TV? There is so much in negotiation and so much

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of numbers that goes behind that. I'm like, whoa, I

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never knew any of this. And there's a different seasons.

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There's reasons why certain shows go on during certain times

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of the year. And when you understand that to kind

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of puts everything into perspective, it's like, oh, so that's

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why for example, talent shows are put over to some

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or like America's got talent, or that's why news shows

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new episodes and new seasons are towards the end of

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the year.

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Like in October, there's so many numbers, a, it goes

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into these things.

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You mentioned at the start of how your show is

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a relatively new, it's a premier in January this year,

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but what are your goals for the future? Are you

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going to continue to do jewel format? So you can

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to obviously when mentioned, you want to get, you just

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love to do the in-person with a studio or what

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else or you go to a plan.

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What do we have in play on our plan is

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to be consistent, first of all, and to just keep

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hosting, inspiring interviews in and meeting great and wonderful people

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and building a fantastic network of inspiring interviews, our goal

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is to just keep doing what we're doing and whether

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we go big or nothing happens. You know, I don't

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think that's the point of anything. And it's really a

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passion project. It's really something that I don't mind doing.

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And it's been so great to talk to people and

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it's really pushed me out of my comfort zone. I

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was always a shy kid. I didn't really know how

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to talk or to speak my mind and being in

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this podcast and starting to host and challenging myself has

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really forced me to come out of my shell.

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And hopefully our show can inspire other people to come

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out of their shells too, and just live life and

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do what you love.

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And that leads me nicely to my next question, actually,

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because obviously the show's about inspiring stories and people find

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an inspiration from either what they're doing and, or the

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people of Maine are, or their own background, ah, and

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who their heroes are. Some curious w with him on

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the inspirational stories you've heard and your own experiences, doing

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your own thing, et cetera, who's your all-time hero

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And why. Right. So, you know, I don't, I don't

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think many people notice about me, but I am a

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huge tennis fan. I watched tennis everyday. I can not

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play tennis. I've took in a few tennis lessons and

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I swung out like a baseball bat and the teacher

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is quite annoyed with me, but I was, I'm always

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inspired by Rafael Nadal. He is a tennis player, but

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he's left to end. It plays a tremendous spin on

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his tennis balls. I don't know if people, most people

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know what that means, but it means the ball. It

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spins a lot when he hits it. And you know

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what, this man doesn't give up. It doesn't give up.

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When the game, when he's losing the game, he doesn't

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give up. He doesn't give up when he's down, even

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if he has zero, if you want zero games and

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he needs to, when six in a row, it a

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win, like he doesn't give up.

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And I think that's such an amazing quality that makes

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a champion. And I take that same quality and most

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tennis players, like a champion tennis player as they don't

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give up. And that's so amazing. That's why I love

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tennis because the game's not over until you give up

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because there's no time limit. And if you just keep

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fighting and you keep trying and you keep finding new

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ways to strategize, I think that anyone always has a

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chance to make the greatest comeback. And that's one thing

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I've learned with my tennis idle, Rafael,

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I'd say, it's interesting. You mentioned tennis. One of my

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heroes, a from us from a sports or an ankle,

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his Andre Agassi. A way to, yeah. It's like, oh

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yeah, I just loved his story because he was this

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magic, a gas with a long cake. It didn't look

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like on a tennis player, which has awesome to start

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with. But then he had this big injury and it

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was out for a long, long time. And it came

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back. I think it was two Wimbledon or maybe in

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the U S masters I'm and everyone had written him

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off their, because of the injury I'm and he was

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up against I D I can recall who was at

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the time that someone of his own and the, the

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male tennis circuit at the time, it might've been a

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land all back on the day of, I'm not sure,

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but he came back and, and he one, and it

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was just amazing. And he got injured, I think, during

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a game, like he's a rest or something, he got

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injured, but it's what you see as to, to this

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point, you kept pushing on it.

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It wouldn't give up. So I it's cool to hear

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like a nutshell, his name mentioned

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Their, oh, for sure. And that's this most tennis players

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that are you looking at? Kim Clijsters is in the

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U S open. She came back after being pregnant and

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she won all of a grand slam. I mean, it

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shows you that peoples' expectations of you. You don't mean

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anything. And if you set your mind to something that

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you can definitely achieve it,

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Let's speaking of tennis, did you hold a little, got

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to follow a tangent here, but M w what's your

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take on? I know there's always been the question of,

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well, you know, a man of far stronger than women

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or men and women can't compete with men, but when

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you look at it to your point, you can close

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those in. You look at the, the Williams sisters. And

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do you think there will be a town? What it's

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it, it's not like mixed doubles, his best classes doubles,

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and anybody can compete against anybody have the wish.

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You know, I've always thought about that, but I think

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we need to sometimes see the realistic aspects of tennis.

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Like, I think that the mens vs the women's games

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are vastly different. Like men play with so much more

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spin, stronger, serves hitting over 120 to one 30 miles

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an hour. And women's service, for example, the average around

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what 90, maybe the lower hundreds and they're six and

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there's the exceptions like the Williams sisters. Right. But I

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think it's such a complicated issue too. Look at at

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the moment. But I think that the sport will always

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be it it's T H tennis. We'll always be tennis.

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And a matter of who's playing who I think there's

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always going to be a great way to enjoy it.

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A sport. Cool.

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I'd love to say, I know M I know a

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Williams of trying to think of, of Williams, a venous

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woman was to call on one sec. I can recall

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how that, but yeah, I hear you on that. The

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sales, the, the killer, our guests, when it comes to

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their speed of the south. And fortunately, so your podcast

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to come back on, on top of that. And I

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like,

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What 10 isn't it later on. No worries. I

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Love talking about the time that's what's what is all

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about, so your podcast, or obviously you started in January

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and you've got four, have you on the team. And

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you mentioned that you have your, your role that, you

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know, you know, whose expertise or who was more suited

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to that roll. So no, and all that. Ah, and

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whether it be in a newish podcast, what would your

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advice be for someone looking to start a podcast themselves,

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as part as the team, like for you? What, what

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top of advice would you give them?

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Right. I bought on this question before and I got

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to be honest. Sometimes I think to myself, who the

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heck am I to give advice? I just started a

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podcast. I'm a very young, I don't really know much

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of the things that I'm doing, but if there is

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a statement of guidance I can give to people is

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just to, don't be perfect. Stop wearing what being perfect,

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shut down in that perfectionist mindset and just do it.

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Stop thinking, Hey, am I going to look stupid? If

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I do this or a people think I sound dumb.

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If I say this, or what is the audio? Doesn't

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it sound like this or other podcasts, honestly, who cares?

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Nothing starts perfect. Everything starts a little bit scratching, edgy,

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and you learn from every single mistake that happens. And

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that's the best way that you can improve yourself.

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No, that's a good advice. I like that. So I'm

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in a future podcast in groups, in Facebook, and that's

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one of my pet peeves is when some people say,

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well, you've got to get X makes, and you can

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to make sure that you've got the studio set up,

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but you got to get this audio on your face.

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You really have to get this, their mixed or et

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cetera in your, your thinking. But we'll just start to

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know. I don't have one to $5,000 to blow down

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and all of this up and, and not even know

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what I'm going to enjoy it or not. You know?

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So that's, that's a good advice. I like that.

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Definitely. And people just have to realize that if you

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really want to do a podcast or anything in general,

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you will do it. If you want to film with

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your cellphone and film the speaker out of it and

Speaker:

the mic like do it, it's not, but a sound

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perfect, but it's a great place to start. And you

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will learn as you go and you gotta be patient

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with yourself and you just got to be S you

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got to tell you herself, Hey, I made it a

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little booboo, their, but no worries. I'll make it up

Speaker:

next time.

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And as loud as it goes back to your point

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of, you know, a guy on a chance and analog,

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a

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Trauma. Exactly.

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So a jar I've really enjoyed chatting today, and I've

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loved a tangent there. I had gone in to the

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tennis world when she started on the tennis podcast. And

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we'll have you back on it now, for sure, to

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talk longer for that, for people that want to catch

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up on past episodes or get to know you and

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the team, et cetera, where's the best place for them

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to find

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You. Awesome. So you can find more about us@atimecapsuleshow.com. We

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have new episodes every Monday and Wednesday at 8:00 PM.

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Eastern, you can find us on YouTube at a time

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capsule show on podcasts and Spotify or apple podcasts, and

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most of the podcasts things out there. And you can

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follow up on social media at T C show at

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21 on Instagram or Twitter and Facebook.

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Cool. And I'll be sure to drop all of these

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links in to the show notes. So of you'll listen

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in on your favorite podcast app, or even on the

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website, hop on over to the show notes section and

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make sure to collect through to the relevant links. So

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again, Joe, I really appreciate it. You went on the

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shore today.

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Of course. Thank you so much for having you, Danny.

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I truly had a great experience talking with you, and

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I hope you can talk more in the future.

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You've been listening to podcast the stories. If you enjoyed

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this week's episode, Hoppin over to Podcaster Stories dot com,

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where you can catch all of this episode, it's insane

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