Artwork for podcast The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove
Episode 417 - Be Alert or Be Manipulated
12th February 2024 • The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove • The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove
00:00:00 01:10:28

Share Episode

Shownotes

Topics:

(04:18) Steven Miles Laughs At Violence?

(19:07) Gaza Update

(20:21) UNRWA Aid

(23:36) What Propaganda? ... Exactly

(43:26) Biden Sliden

(50:13) Disconnect

(56:59) Sub Solution - Steal One

(58:26) Coed Vs Same Sex Education

Chapters, images & show notes powered by vizzy.fm.

To financially support the Podcast you can make:

We Livestream every Monday night at 8:00 pm Brisbane time. Follow us on Facebook or YouTube. Watch us live and join the discussion in the chat room.

You can sign up for our newsletter, which links to articles that Trevor has highlighted as potentially interesting and that may be discussed on the podcast. You will get 3 emails per week.

We have a website. www.ironfistvelvetglove.com.au

You can email us. The address is trevor@ironfistvelvetglove.com.au

You can send us a voicemail message at Speakpipe

We have a sister podcast called IFVG Evergreen. It is a collection of evergreen content from the weekly podcast.

Transcripts started in episode 324. You can use this link to search our transcripts. Type "iron fist velvet glove" into the search directory, click on our podcast and then do a word search. It even has a player which will play the relevant section. It is incredibly quick.

Transcripts

Speaker:

Suburban Eastern Australia, an environment that has, over time,

Speaker:

evolved some extraordinarily unique groups of homosapiens.

Speaker:

But today, we observe a small tribe akin to a group of meerkats that

Speaker:

gather together atop a small mound to watch, question, and discuss the

Speaker:

current events of their city, their country, and their world at large.

Speaker:

Let's listen keenly and observe this group fondly known as the

Speaker:

Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove.

Speaker:

Hello and welcome dear listener, just two meerkats for you tonight

Speaker:

on this episode number 417.

Speaker:

We're going to talk about news and politics and sex and religion.

Speaker:

I'm Trevor the Iron Fist, with me UK correspondent.

Speaker:

Now ensconced back in Peter Dutton's electorate, Joe the Tech Guy.

Speaker:

Joe, well how are you Joe?

Speaker:

Evening all, I'm surviving, slowly getting back into the Australian time zone.

Speaker:

There we go, that's Joe.

Speaker:

So, Joe got notes from me extremely late today, so he hasn't had a

Speaker:

chance to read much of it, because I didn't have internet on the weekend

Speaker:

and a whole range of reasons.

Speaker:

Anyway, Joe will work his way through it.

Speaker:

Um, cut him some slack if he doesn't see him across it entirely,

Speaker:

but I'm sure you won't notice.

Speaker:

If you're in the chat room, say hello.

Speaker:

John's there, Watley's there.

Speaker:

Thanks for saying hello on this Monday evening at our new time of 8 o'clock.

Speaker:

And, um, yeah, what are we going to talk about?

Speaker:

Well, we're going to kick off with

Speaker:

Manipulation by the media of the thinking of the public, in a nutshell.

Speaker:

Couple of examples of that, one will be local Premier in Queensland, Stephen

Speaker:

Myles, and a press conference he was at.

Speaker:

And then looking at the situation in Gaza and, um, Israel and just the way

Speaker:

our thinking about that is manipulated by propaganda and how insidious it is.

Speaker:

So not the shocking beat up about um, Barnaby Joyce.

Speaker:

And I wasn't even going to mention Barnaby Joyce, but um,

Speaker:

but seeing you have, Joe, um.

Speaker:

Yeah, he was found sprawled on the street in Canberra, and it's just a

Speaker:

different treatment isn't it, like the right wing side basically abused

Speaker:

the people who took the video of him and said they should have been helping

Speaker:

Barnaby rather than selling the video to the news groups, and didn't want

Speaker:

to condemn him because he's I couldn't really judge what had happened and would

Speaker:

have to talk to Barnaby to see what the truth was, so Well, no, apparently the

Speaker:

truth was he'd taken some medication which reacted badly with alcohol.

Speaker:

Which he'd been warned about, but it wasn't at all his fault.

Speaker:

No.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

Well, we'll leave that, if you like, dear listener.

Speaker:

That's one version of the story, so, um So yeah, that was Barnaby.

Speaker:

But yeah, we're going to talk about, um, media and, and how You've just got

Speaker:

to be alert to what the media's doing, and once you are, you just spot these

Speaker:

things from a mile away, I think, but so few people are alert to these things.

Speaker:

It's very frustrating.

Speaker:

Um, so we'll talk about that, and a little bit about, uh, Tucker interviewing

Speaker:

Putin, um, a little bit about Joe Biden sliding into dementia, and then locally,

Speaker:

the right for employees to disconnect and ignore emails from the boss after work.

Speaker:

And a unique solution to our submarine problem, Joe, I didn't warn you about,

Speaker:

which involves stealing a submarine.

Speaker:

So, stay tuned for that one, dear listener.

Speaker:

Indeed.

Speaker:

So, um, yeah, okay, so Stephen Miles recently appointed as Queensland Premier

Speaker:

because Anastasia Palaszczuk resigned, he got the gig, and, um, so, in my circles,

Speaker:

dear listener, I do have contact with.

Speaker:

The conservative boomer class of Australia.

Speaker:

So, one sort of avenue to that, um, to that pool of thought comes via right

Speaker:

wing Tony, who I Um, correspond with and talk to and unfortunately follow on his

Speaker:

Facebook page, which saves me the trouble of subscribing to Sky News because Tony

Speaker:

virtually reposts whatever they're doing.

Speaker:

And then just um, uh, down at the Gold Coast in the complex that we

Speaker:

stay in frequently, um, group of older people gather together there

Speaker:

in the pool and talk about stuff.

Speaker:

And they're an older boomer generation of the conservative

Speaker:

end, most of them, not all.

Speaker:

But um, anyway, my wife came back from being in the pool with this group

Speaker:

and she said, Have you heard about what the Stephen Miles has done and

Speaker:

laughing at, at um, victims of crime?

Speaker:

And well, everybody in the pool is saying it's disgusting that they were talking

Speaker:

about that lady who was murdered by the African gangs and that um And then Stephen

Speaker:

Myles was laughing about it, and I said, I spend so much time reading things, and

Speaker:

I hadn't come across any of this, but of course I wasn't listening to Sky News.

Speaker:

And I said, sure as eggs, this will be some sort of Sky

Speaker:

News beat up over something.

Speaker:

So a few Googles and whatever.

Speaker:

And, uh, I've got the clip, anyway, of what happened, so I'll play the clip and

Speaker:

then I'll provide the context for it.

Speaker:

So here we go.

Speaker:

The absence of any reference to youth crime in your speech to the Queensland

Speaker:

Media Club would have been noted.

Speaker:

Um, by more than a few, including the people of those communities.

Speaker:

Premier, I'm sure you can see the last two summers have been bookended.

Speaker:

By the murders of young mother, Emma Lovell, and just three

Speaker:

days ago, Grandmother, Violet.

Speaker:

So, for those who can't watch the video, he was initially chuckling at the

Speaker:

beginning of the question, and then as the questioner started listing the names of

Speaker:

those people, his face got more serious.

Speaker:

Joe, have you seen that clip before?

Speaker:

Are you aware of this brouhaha?

Speaker:

No.

Speaker:

Right.

Speaker:

Did that look particularly condemning to you, of Stephen Miles?

Speaker:

Did you look at it and go, what's going on here?

Speaker:

He seemed to be chuckling about the question being a bit random.

Speaker:

It was more, uh, he was shocked by the question just being

Speaker:

out of what he was expecting.

Speaker:

I think, yeah, I think he was more laughing about the

Speaker:

bizarreness of the question.

Speaker:

Correct.

Speaker:

The context is that he was there.

Speaker:

At an event which was to talk about their, um, uh, housing solution that the

Speaker:

Queensland Government has come up with.

Speaker:

And um, so it's, it's a press conference for housing and the

Speaker:

Brisbane Bureau Chief for Sky News, Adam Walters, asked Miles why he had

Speaker:

not addressed the subject earlier.

Speaker:

of, you know, violent crime in his speech, to which Miles said

Speaker:

it was a speech about housing.

Speaker:

So, that all happened before that question.

Speaker:

So, Sky News saying, why didn't you just talk about violence, uh, and why'd

Speaker:

you leave that out of your speech?

Speaker:

And Miles said, it's a speech about housing.

Speaker:

And then, the reporter from Sky News.

Speaker:

continued with asking a question about street violence, youth crime, and it

Speaker:

was because he pushed again on something that Miles had dismissed, that Miles,

Speaker:

you know, smiled and said, oh, come on.

Speaker:

And that is the context that people Need to understand when

Speaker:

they're watching that video.

Speaker:

And of course, the Sky News clip of it doesn't give you that context.

Speaker:

You've got to go and find it.

Speaker:

Joe, it's just frustrating that people would think, even as much as you might

Speaker:

hate the Labor Party and the Premier and whatever, it's, it's just not likely that

Speaker:

That somebody in his position is going to be laughing about somebody's murder.

Speaker:

No, I don't think so.

Speaker:

I think that's You have to think, what is going on here?

Speaker:

What's the context?

Speaker:

There must have been some reason.

Speaker:

What, what is the wider thing going on here?

Speaker:

But so many people, A, didn't ask what that wider context might be.

Speaker:

And then B, Joe, in this, um, sort of Twitter post that I was looking at, which

Speaker:

described This context and the reasons.

Speaker:

You've still got half the people in the comment section

Speaker:

saying, Oh, thank you very much.

Speaker:

It's nice to know the context.

Speaker:

That'll make sense now.

Speaker:

Wish I'd known that.

Speaker:

But then these other half still going, makes no difference at all.

Speaker:

The guy's a scumbag.

Speaker:

Fancy laughing at violence and made no difference to their view whatsoever.

Speaker:

Yeah, I mean, I think it's very much All about tribes, isn't it?

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Um, it really doesn't matter.

Speaker:

It's given us an excuse to be outraged, and our tribe is outraged,

Speaker:

therefore we'll be outraged.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Um, and thinking doesn't come into it.

Speaker:

It's all to do with being a good member of the tribe.

Speaker:

And if you're a good member of the tribe, you're outraged.

Speaker:

Yeah, I just, it's so frustrating and disappointing, like, if something

Speaker:

really weird came out about Peter Dutton or something, laughing at

Speaker:

something like that, you'd just go, hang on a minute, what was the context?

Speaker:

I'd like to think I would anyway.

Speaker:

I mean, the whole Barnaby falling off a planter box.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

It is, is in character.

Speaker:

I don't want to cast suspicions, but apparently he has a reputation

Speaker:

for liking a bevy or two.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

So, so him falling over drunk in Canberra is not a shocking thing, and

Speaker:

therefore doesn't require much scrutiny.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Whereas Barnaby, I don't know, laughing at some Christian thing

Speaker:

would be so out of context.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

But whether it was true or not, you'd be going, hang on, that doesn't sound right.

Speaker:

People have lost the capacity, Joe, to just go.

Speaker:

There's something fishy about this, something not quite right.

Speaker:

I mean, the guys made it to Premier of the State.

Speaker:

You've got to have just a little bit of brains, if only when

Speaker:

it comes to media management.

Speaker:

Like, you've got to know how to kiss a baby and pat a dog.

Speaker:

Preferably don't get them mixed up.

Speaker:

And um, give some people some credit and just think.

Speaker:

But I just think, Joe, that I think the older generation is just way

Speaker:

too trusting of traditional media.

Speaker:

I know there's the tribalism aspect that you said, but I also think there's

Speaker:

just this inherent trust that if If they see it on the news or read it

Speaker:

in a paper, they give it far more trust than younger people would think.

Speaker:

Yeah, I mean, I think it was around the 80s it all changed, wasn't it?

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

So people who grew up with the media before the 80s were

Speaker:

used to a level of diligence.

Speaker:

Um, and the media was big money.

Speaker:

Now the media is scrabbling for pennies.

Speaker:

Um, so they are journalists, they literally churn out whatever they

Speaker:

can, um, and if somebody's gonna write a press release on their behalf,

Speaker:

uh, and they have to do the minimum amount of work, they'll take it.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

And I think, um, Murdoch has, well, it was, um, Fox News

Speaker:

was the original, wasn't it?

Speaker:

It was a Republican Uh, press department, effectively.

Speaker:

But even, you know, the Australian used to be a proper newspaper, and it changed,

Speaker:

and the people who read it, there's a lot of people who still think of it

Speaker:

as the way it used to be, and not the way it is now, which is a caricature

Speaker:

of a right wing rag, who don't get it.

Speaker:

Yeah, it's a right wing broadsheet, isn't it?

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

And you know, I'll say to people, like I could go into that pool tomorrow and

Speaker:

say, um, Where did you get this from?

Speaker:

You know it's from Sky News, you know that they're biased.

Speaker:

Yeah they're biased, but then the ABC and the Guardian are biased.

Speaker:

So they're all, you know, it's just evens out.

Speaker:

I could, I've got to start getting a spiel ready on the bias of the ABC, Joe.

Speaker:

So my question would be, okay, they're biased in the

Speaker:

opposite direction, you believe.

Speaker:

Okay, do you watch them?

Speaker:

Do you, do you take your news from them as well and try and

Speaker:

work out where the truth is?

Speaker:

Because if one side is lying in one direction and the other side is lying

Speaker:

in the other direction, Surely the truth is somewhere in the middle.

Speaker:

Excuse me, Joe, while I write that down.

Speaker:

That's really good.

Speaker:

Are you watching them as well?

Speaker:

Good point.

Speaker:

Are you watching them as well?

Speaker:

Because there's a lot of the ABC that has actually got a right wing bias.

Speaker:

For example, Insiders, compared by David Spears.

Speaker:

X NewsCorp very soft on, on the right wing ringers who come in

Speaker:

there, softball interviews, 'em.

Speaker:

The panelists are invariably from Murdoch Publications.

Speaker:

It's a very right wing show.

Speaker:

Occasionally has, you know, Nikki, Ava there.

Speaker:

But I mean, even Nick Ava, while she's currently viewed as left wing, used

Speaker:

to be, um, a right wing advi advisor for a right wing, um, politician.

Speaker:

I think so.

Speaker:

So there would be that, um, off the top of my head as well.

Speaker:

Um, Patricia Cavallis is, is no lefty.

Speaker:

Um, uh, the former 730er, Lee Sayles was not a lefty.

Speaker:

That didn't make it easy for the left and would softball the, the right.

Speaker:

And, um, another one off the top of my head, um, Lisa

Speaker:

Miller is another one on ABC.

Speaker:

Like, you can name presenters who Are, uh, are easily seen as being

Speaker:

potentially soft on the right wing.

Speaker:

But yeah, that's a good one, Joe.

Speaker:

I'll try, I'll report back as to how that, um, how that goes.

Speaker:

Is to say, why are you watching them as well and trying to work out where the

Speaker:

truth might lie between the two of them.

Speaker:

I mean, my news feed is Apple News and I deliberately haven't liked or

Speaker:

disliked any content, so I get a balance.

Speaker:

And I can literally, by the headline, pick out where it's coming from.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

I can go, that's a Murdoch one.

Speaker:

That's a Murdoch beat up, I can guarantee that.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Just by the headline.

Speaker:

Um, and the same with the Guardian.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Or even worse, some of the others, like Jezebel and, um, uh, Mamma

Speaker:

Mia is the latest mis influenced.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

Right.

Speaker:

Yeah, yeah, you see the headline.

Speaker:

My bastard husband was a bastard, and you go, that's got to be Mamma Mia.

Speaker:

Well, maybe he was.

Speaker:

Maybe he was, but I mean, you can tell it's every headline that

Speaker:

comes up in the news feed from them is about men behaving badly.

Speaker:

Okay, five ways to determine whether your partner is a bad

Speaker:

dad or something like that.

Speaker:

Yeah, it's just, whether they're balanced, what pops up in my

Speaker:

news feed just follows a content.

Speaker:

That's it.

Speaker:

The same as the Murdoch stuff does, the Sky News, the um, uh, Daily Fail.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Um, actually, I don't know if Daily Mail is Murdoch, but

Speaker:

it's definitely right wing.

Speaker:

Um, look, I think it was the Daily Mail that told the backstory, at

Speaker:

least, of this Stephen Miles story that I've just been explaining.

Speaker:

So I think I got the quotes from that, so, um, so, yeah.

Speaker:

Just frustrating that People, A, don't look for the backstory, they

Speaker:

don't suspect, um, they don't see the smoke and think there might be fire

Speaker:

here, and then even when they are told, tribalism kicks in and they go,

Speaker:

well he's just an idiot anyway and he still should be kicked out, argh.

Speaker:

Yeah I mean I think it's very much a, rather than challenging their assertions,

Speaker:

is asking them how they got to that position and what would change their mind.

Speaker:

Is the, is the sneaking attack.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Lots of comments coming through on the chat.

Speaker:

I'm going to try and address the chat at the end.

Speaker:

I was listening to a podcast the other day and they sort of did a

Speaker:

whole show where they just address their chat as a separate item.

Speaker:

And I think what we might try and do is at the end of this, um, we'll

Speaker:

just go back to the comments and try and address them at the end.

Speaker:

So keep making your comments and I think we'll try and run through

Speaker:

them towards the end rather than interrupting the discussion.

Speaker:

Um, with the comments.

Speaker:

Let's try that, see how it goes.

Speaker:

So anyway, that was Stephen Miles and my frustration with the Australian

Speaker:

boomer class on that issue.

Speaker:

And, um, let's just think about Palestine, Gaza, Israel for a moment.

Speaker:

Um, so, more than half a million Palestinians, one in four, are

Speaker:

starving in Gaza, according to the UN.

Speaker:

1.

Speaker:

3 million displaced Palestinians live on the streets.

Speaker:

of the southern city of Rafah, which Israel designated a safe

Speaker:

zone, but has begun to bomb.

Speaker:

Families shiver in the winter rains under flimsy tarps amid pools of raw sewerage.

Speaker:

An estimated 90 percent of cars, as 2.

Speaker:

3 million people have been driven from their homes.

Speaker:

Joe, is there any end, what's the end game here for Israel?

Speaker:

Is this just going to drive these people to starvation?

Speaker:

The end game is a The depopulated Gaza Strip, isn't it?

Speaker:

They're either going to die of starvation or disease at the rate it's going.

Speaker:

Or be refugees in another country.

Speaker:

Yeah, or just be blown to bits by bombs in the meantime.

Speaker:

They're just not letting up.

Speaker:

Um, also, we did that, um, discussion about the, uh, UNRWA.

Speaker:

The U N R W A, which was like the aid organisation.

Speaker:

And There were allegations that a dozen employees in an organisation

Speaker:

that has, I don't know, whether it was 10, 000 employees, it's a big

Speaker:

organisation, an allegation by Israel that a handful were members of Hamas.

Speaker:

And on the basis of the Israeli allegation, the US, Australia and a

Speaker:

bunch of others, decided that they were going to stop funding that organisation.

Speaker:

If any organisation needed money, if there were a group of people needing

Speaker:

aid, it's pretty clear that they did.

Speaker:

You know, my, my view was, I don't care if it's proved that they were Hamas.

Speaker:

I don't care if a thousand of them are Hamas.

Speaker:

If a, if a reasonable proportion of the aid will find its way to Palestinians

Speaker:

in Gaza, then that's good enough for me.

Speaker:

Give them the aid.

Speaker:

I say.

Speaker:

Yeah, I mean the concern is that your aid is going to get diverted

Speaker:

off to fund a terrorist group.

Speaker:

And I don't care if a large proportion is, because I just think the people, the

Speaker:

innocent people there who had nothing to do with anything that went on on

Speaker:

October 7th, um, deserve some help.

Speaker:

But anyway, um, so Caitlin Johnston, um, one of my favourite bloggers,

Speaker:

and she's, we'll be quoting her a lot in this episode, actually, um.

Speaker:

Dear listener, um, much of your subscription money to this podcast

Speaker:

ends up with Caitlin Johnston and the John Manatee blog, as well as, uh,

Speaker:

an economist called Michael Hudson and a couple of things I subscribe to

Speaker:

because I have to, like the Courier Mail and the Guardian and whatever.

Speaker:

But anyway.

Speaker:

Uh, Caitlin does get some of, uh, your money via me, because it,

Speaker:

uh, uh, gets returned back to her.

Speaker:

So, anyway, a few articles from her, and, so she says that Australian Foreign

Speaker:

Minister Penny Wong has acknowledged that Canberra joined, um, a bunch of

Speaker:

other countries in cutting off the funding without having seen proof of

Speaker:

Israel's claims against the organisation.

Speaker:

And as she said, if you're going to say a bad thing happened and we therefore

Speaker:

need to cut off aid to the most aid dependent population on earth, then

Speaker:

you'd better at least be able to prove the bad thing actually happened.

Speaker:

If evidence exists, then show it.

Speaker:

If you insist on starving two million people, you can't do it on vibes alone.

Speaker:

And um, she says, how is this not obvious to everyone?

Speaker:

How is it not immediately obvious the instant it came up?

Speaker:

Yeah, so, I think Penny Bond's been wanting to reverse that decision

Speaker:

and start funding again, I think.

Speaker:

Fair enough.

Speaker:

Not sure of the latest.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

So, um, still Caitlin Johnston, returning back to our original theme.

Speaker:

So, we talked about Miles and the sort of propaganda of Sky News, and now we're just

Speaker:

going to sort of look at the propaganda in relation to Gaza, Palestine, Israel.

Speaker:

So Joe, did you happen to see Tucker Carlson's interview with Vladimir Putin?

Speaker:

Strangely enough, no.

Speaker:

You've had lots of time on your hands.

Speaker:

Yes, I don't tend to follow Tucker Carlson anyway.

Speaker:

Yeah, neither do I.

Speaker:

Mr Putin, I don't know, uh, I would trust a word that comes out of his mouth.

Speaker:

Yes, that's fair enough.

Speaker:

Any other politician?

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

So, even if you thought that he was, even if you were convinced that he was

Speaker:

lying with every second sentence, I still think it's worthwhile watching,

Speaker:

because the guy at least is intelligent and in control of his faculties.

Speaker:

And can run a compelling argument, now it might be littered with bullshit,

Speaker:

but um, there is a brain and an intellect operating there, far and

Speaker:

above what Joe Biden or Donald Trump or Boris Johnson or Rishi Sunak or

Speaker:

Anthony Albanese or others might offer.

Speaker:

Yeah, I mean, Boris Johnson, I, I think, was one of those, he played

Speaker:

a character of a bumbling fool, but apparently, he was a very intelligent

Speaker:

man, is a very intelligent man.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Um, and the bumbling fool allowed him to get away with

Speaker:

some absolutely shitty things.

Speaker:

True.

Speaker:

If you do an intelligence test, um, IQ test, uh, probably

Speaker:

Boris Johnson would come out.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

I'll do that on that.

Speaker:

I mean, Biden, Trump, yes, absolutely.

Speaker:

I think he's a bumbling fool.

Speaker:

Um, and Biden, I think he's in his dotage.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Uh, I don't know that it really matters in America because

Speaker:

aren't they just puppets anyway?

Speaker:

We'll get onto that.

Speaker:

We'll talk more about that.

Speaker:

But, um, I think it was just interesting that he, he's, yeah, it was probably an

Speaker:

hour and a half or two Sit down discussion between Putin and Tucker Carlson.

Speaker:

It was kind of like a podcast.

Speaker:

It was just long form conversation and at one point really in the very beginning

Speaker:

the first half hour or so Putin's really giving a description of Russian Ukrainian

Speaker:

history as a means of trying to show that this geographical area currently known as

Speaker:

Ukraine has always been You know, Russian, if you like, and, um, actually it was

Speaker:

Turkish, uh, yes, you, maybe you should listen to what he says, Joe, and then

Speaker:

you can put it apart wherever you like.

Speaker:

I'm, I'm, I'm summarising.

Speaker:

He, he may well have mentioned some Turkish involvement there, I can't

Speaker:

remember, but, um, uh, at one point sort of Tucker Carlson is trying to, Sort of

Speaker:

rein him in and say, yeah, but come on, let's, let's move on and talk about,

Speaker:

you know, the war in Ukraine now and, and that, and Putin basically says to

Speaker:

him, you know, Are you doing a show or are we having a real discussion here?

Speaker:

Are we having a real conversation?

Speaker:

You know, I thought we were gonna have a conversation, a real genuine

Speaker:

conversation, not just some show, and then he says, bear with me.

Speaker:

Let me just keep going here.

Speaker:

It's all, you'll understand why I've said it as I get through it.

Speaker:

That sort of, um, response.

Speaker:

You know, without wanting to go Godwin's Law, I'm sure if you sat down with Hitler

Speaker:

for half an hour and had a conversation, he would tell you the history of Jews in

Speaker:

Europe and why they were such a bad people and why they deserved to be wiped out.

Speaker:

Yeah, and at the end of it I'm sure you could have a long form conversation

Speaker:

which would absolutely justify his Yes.

Speaker:

Um, behaviour.

Speaker:

Yes, and at the end of it you might go, that was a pack of lies, but gee, it

Speaker:

was a well constructed pack of lies.

Speaker:

Yeah, that's my point.

Speaker:

That's my point about the Putin interview.

Speaker:

Right.

Speaker:

It might well be a pack of lies, but it was a well constructed,

Speaker:

elucidated pack of lies, is my point.

Speaker:

That's my first point.

Speaker:

Yeah, I'm sure he has to sell it internally.

Speaker:

Yes, and maybe to other countries in the global south and who's Possible.

Speaker:

And China and other states like that.

Speaker:

So, um, so yeah, um, anyway, during the interview, Putin implied

Speaker:

that NATO powers were behind the Nord Stream pipeline bombing.

Speaker:

Shocking.

Speaker:

And Tucker Carlson responded by asking Putin why he didn't

Speaker:

present evidence to the world so as to win a propaganda victory.

Speaker:

And Putin said, Quote, in the war of propaganda, it's very difficult to

Speaker:

defeat the United States because the United States controls all the world's

Speaker:

media and many European media, so, um, he sort of just made the point.

Speaker:

Uh, what's the point?

Speaker:

Um, the United States are the champions when it comes to propaganda.

Speaker:

They control too much.

Speaker:

Um, basically, I, I wouldn't win that propaganda war.

Speaker:

And, um, Clayton Johnson says I was going to say, I don't know

Speaker:

that the United States do, but certainly vested interests do.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

The Western oligarchs do.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Yep.

Speaker:

Uh, yes.

Speaker:

And then, but the state Kind of gets what it wants because it kind of, the

Speaker:

oligarchs I would say, if anything, the US is a tool of the oligarchs,

Speaker:

rather than the other way around.

Speaker:

Yes, and that the state is the result of what the oligarchs want.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

And if that's the case, then the state is probably going to provide The

Speaker:

propaganda that the oligarchs want.

Speaker:

Yeah, but I think it's the oligarchs who, the oligarchs own the press.

Speaker:

Yeah, although let me just get on to that because, um, so, Caitlin Johnson

Speaker:

says, The US empire has by far the most sophisticated and effective propaganda

Speaker:

machine ever to have existed, um, operating with such complexity that

Speaker:

most people don't even know it exists.

Speaker:

And in a fact checking article, Five Lies and One Truth, from Putin's interview

Speaker:

with Tucker Carlson, Politico Europe labels the claim, um, by Putin that

Speaker:

America is the king of propaganda.

Speaker:

And the reason that Politico Europe says that is because Russia

Speaker:

has a state run media, whereas the US media is privately owned.

Speaker:

According to the Politico fact checking article pooh poohing Putin's theory,

Speaker:

they said, quote, The biggest news media companies are privately owned

Speaker:

and operate without direct government control, in contrast to the state

Speaker:

controlled media landscape in Russia.

Speaker:

And this was written by Politico's Sergei Goryazko.

Speaker:

He said, he added, Russian state TV and the primary news agencies there

Speaker:

are the property of the government.

Speaker:

And the Kremlin controls other media or destroys those not willing to collaborate.

Speaker:

So he's saying Russia's a bigger propaganda machine because

Speaker:

it owns the media, whereas in the US, it's privately owned.

Speaker:

At the bottom of the article from Politico, it reads, Sergei Goriosko

Speaker:

is hosted at Politico under EU funded EU for Free Media Residency Program.

Speaker:

And according to Caitlin Johnston, EU for Free Media is a European Union narrative

Speaker:

management operation set up to help integrate Russian journalists in exile

Speaker:

into leading European publications, i.

Speaker:

e.

Speaker:

to provide maximum media amplification to Russian expats who have a to pick

Speaker:

with the current government in Moscow.

Speaker:

It is run with the participation from Radio Free Europe, Radio Liberty,

Speaker:

which are US government funded media operations under the umbrella of the

Speaker:

US Propaganda Services umbrella, USAGM.

Speaker:

So the guy who was saying Putin is wrong because you are, you know,

Speaker:

Western media is privately owned.

Speaker:

Worked for Politico, which is essentially funded by the US government, in a, in

Speaker:

a summary, and creates these sorts of organisations to give the appearance

Speaker:

of independent media commenting when in fact they're owned and operated

Speaker:

essentially by the US government.

Speaker:

Interesting case study, I thought.

Speaker:

Yeah, I mean, Radio Europe is certainly known as a CIA front from the Cold War.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Or Radio Free Europe, I remember.

Speaker:

It was certainly well known.

Speaker:

As being a CIA front.

Speaker:

Um, the big difference is, you know, as shitty as, um, the West

Speaker:

have been to Julian Assange, Um, he still hasn't fallen out of a window.

Speaker:

Well, he doesn't Has he?

Speaker:

No, but he's been locked away in Belmarsh Prison, like, you know, just

Speaker:

like the, uh, the Russian opposition leaders in a Siberian prison.

Speaker:

Julian's in a Belmarsh high security prison.

Speaker:

Belmarsh is slightly better than the Gulag.

Speaker:

It's one of the worst prisons he could possibly be in.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

It's a really hardcore, terrible prison to be.

Speaker:

Um.

Speaker:

Totally inappropriate for somebody who's committed the sort of, even if

Speaker:

true, the crimes that are alleged.

Speaker:

Yeah, I mean, look, um, one doesn't justify the other, but I think

Speaker:

there's, uh, there's a different scale.

Speaker:

of, uh, dealing with the opposition.

Speaker:

You know, at least, at least say the Russian opposition

Speaker:

leader was arrested in Russia.

Speaker:

Well, yes.

Speaker:

For supposed crimes against Russia, and put in a Siberian jail.

Speaker:

Julian Assange, an Australian citizen, is not even in America, and he's

Speaker:

arrested for breaching an American crime.

Speaker:

And he's not even in America!

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Like, doesn't Anyway.

Speaker:

That's another rabbit hole.

Speaker:

We might refer to that later as well.

Speaker:

So, um, so as Caitlin Johnson says, there's an old joke that says, uh,

Speaker:

A Soviet and an American are on an aeroplane seated next to each other.

Speaker:

And, um, the American asks, Why are you flying to the US?

Speaker:

And the Soviet guy replies, To study American propaganda.

Speaker:

The American replies, What American propaganda?

Speaker:

The Soviet says, Exactly.

Speaker:

It's true.

Speaker:

It's really true.

Speaker:

People don't see it.

Speaker:

So, as she says, let's talk about that sort of private ownership of

Speaker:

media, as opposed to government.

Speaker:

She says anyone who's wealthy enough to control a mass media platform

Speaker:

is going to have a vested interest in preserving the status quo upon

Speaker:

which their wealth is premised.

Speaker:

And they will co operate with establishment power structures

Speaker:

in various ways towards that end.

Speaker:

That make sense?

Speaker:

The fact that these mass media outlets look independent, but function as

Speaker:

propaganda organs for the US Empire, allows its propaganda to fly into

Speaker:

people's minds without triggering any gag reflex of scepticism.

Speaker:

Which, uh, which would happen if people knew the outlets

Speaker:

were feeding them propaganda.

Speaker:

So propaganda only really has persuasive power.

Speaker:

If you don't know, it's happening to you.

Speaker:

Ah, the invisibility of U.

Speaker:

S.

Speaker:

propaganda is further aided by the subtle methods by which it is administered,

Speaker:

which we've seen exemplified beautifully in the coverage of Israel's ongoing U.

Speaker:

S.

Speaker:

backed atrocity in Gaza.

Speaker:

So, this is now we're going to talk about, dear listener, the way articles

Speaker:

and headlines are worded, um, uh, subtly.

Speaker:

The Intercept reports that a review of a thousand articles from the New York

Speaker:

Times, the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times about Israel's war on Gaza.

Speaker:

found that the outlets consistently used word choices which served

Speaker:

Israeli information interests.

Speaker:

Highly emotive terms for the killing of civilians like Slaughter,

Speaker:

Massacre and Horrific were reserved almost exclusively for Israelis

Speaker:

who were killed by Palestinians, rather than the other way around.

Speaker:

Um, and in the report, the term slaughter was used by editors and

Speaker:

reporters to describe the killing of Israelis versus Palestinians, 60 to 1.

Speaker:

And massacre was used to describe the killing of Israelis versus Palestinians.

Speaker:

125 to 2, and horrific was used to describe the killing of Israelis

Speaker:

versus Palestinians 36 to 4.

Speaker:

I find that useful, Joe, because, you know, I could say, as I did before, Oh,

Speaker:

well, you know, Lisa Miller, David Spears, Lee Sayles, whatever, you know, I consider

Speaker:

them fairly right wing ABC journalists.

Speaker:

And it's hard to quantify that feeling, other than just saying I'm a critical

Speaker:

watcher and this is the view I've come to.

Speaker:

But to be able to actually look at words like slaughter, massacre, um,

Speaker:

horrific, and see such an imbalance of when those words are used, in a

Speaker:

situation where we've got such a horrific massacre occurring in Gaza, and every

Speaker:

reason to use those words, I find it really compelling argument, um, so.

Speaker:

That was a useful report, and that's the sort of thing that, you know, okay, The

Speaker:

Intercept's a very left wing magazine, but, uh, or outlet, but I think when

Speaker:

they say they've counted those words and that's what they get, I think we

Speaker:

can trust that that would be correct.

Speaker:

So, as Caitlin Johnston says, this is the sort of manipulation that a

Speaker:

casual news consumer wouldn't notice.

Speaker:

Unless you're on alert for bias, um, Do you hear about that girl, Joe, in

Speaker:

Gaza who was, um, trapped in a car, her family were killed, she was the

Speaker:

only one alive, somehow gets on the phone, I think, I think she's six years

Speaker:

old, and she sort of rung saying, you know, help me, um, I'm really scared

Speaker:

and I need help, and ambulance was sent and it was blown up as well.

Speaker:

Um, cute little girl, terrible.

Speaker:

Terrible thing to imagine happening to somebody.

Speaker:

So, in the reporting of that, um, is another illustration

Speaker:

of how things are worded.

Speaker:

So, in the um, CNN, New York Times, BBC, reporting on that story used

Speaker:

headlines such as, Five year old Palestinian girl found dead after being

Speaker:

trapped in car under Israeli fire.

Speaker:

Also, missing six year old and rescue team found dead in Gaza, aid group says.

Speaker:

And Hind Rajab, six, found dead in Gaza days after phone calls for help.

Speaker:

That was the Western media.

Speaker:

In contrast, Al Jazeera reported, body of six year old killed in deliberate

Speaker:

Israeli fire found after 12 days.

Speaker:

And the Middle East Eye, um, used the words, Hind Rajab, Palestinian

Speaker:

girl found dead after being trapped under Israeli fire for days.

Speaker:

So, it's this sort of softballing description versus the more

Speaker:

explicit blaming of Israelis.

Speaker:

And it's easy to spot the difference.

Speaker:

When you have them side by side like that, but if you're just reading

Speaker:

one outlet, you don't pick that up.

Speaker:

Um, another example she mentions is, last month the BBC published

Speaker:

an article titled, Record number of civilians hurt by explosives in 2023.

Speaker:

As though they were mishandling fireworks, or something.

Speaker:

Instead of being actively killed by Israeli bombs.

Speaker:

So, the headline was, Record number of civilians hurt by explosives in 2023,

Speaker:

um, uh, contrast this with the BBC's headlines when reporting on Ukrainians

Speaker:

killed by Russians, and the headline would be, Ukraine more, Russian airstrikes

Speaker:

claim five lives in Kiev and Mikhailov.

Speaker:

Uh, or Ukraine War, baby killed in Russian strike on Kharkiv Hotel.

Speaker:

So, in Ukraine, people die from bombs because Russia launched

Speaker:

Russian airstrikes and killed them.

Speaker:

Whereas in Gaza, people get hurt by explosions because they got too close

Speaker:

to some type of explosive material.

Speaker:

Yep.

Speaker:

It's their own fault.

Speaker:

Yeah, really interesting examples.

Speaker:

So, the concluding comments in this great article.

Speaker:

These little manipulations fly under the radar if you're

Speaker:

not on the lookout for them.

Speaker:

Such as the brilliance of the US Empire's invisible propaganda machine.

Speaker:

That's why it's very difficult to win a propaganda war against the United States.

Speaker:

That's why Westerners have been so successfully manipulated into

Speaker:

accepting a status quo of endless war.

Speaker:

Echo Side, Injustice and Exploitation, and that's why the world looks

Speaker:

the way it looks right now.

Speaker:

So, yeah, there we go, media manipulation.

Speaker:

It's a sad toy, story.

Speaker:

Um, we mentioned previously, just earlier.

Speaker:

About Joe Biden and, uh, how he's sort of apparently slipping into the dotage.

Speaker:

Is that the word you used?

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

So, he has been investigated in relation to mishandling some classified documents.

Speaker:

And the good news is that they've decided that criminal charges

Speaker:

are not warranted in this matter.

Speaker:

So that's the good news for Joe Biden fans.

Speaker:

The bad news, for Joe Biden fans, is the reason given, and basically, that

Speaker:

he's such a forgetful old man, and that's the way that he would come across

Speaker:

in a trial, that, um, um, uh, it'll likely convince some jurors that he

Speaker:

made an innocent mistake, rather than acted willfully, um, so, essentially,

Speaker:

the reasons given for not proceeding were, uh, his mental, you Memory is

Speaker:

so poor, no one could be convinced that he really knew what he was doing.

Speaker:

Not the best way of getting off something, if you're the President of

Speaker:

the United States, but, uh, there you go.

Speaker:

Um, yeah.

Speaker:

Yeah, I mean, um, I remember Neil deGrasse Tyson being interviewed and, yeah, what

Speaker:

would you do if you were President?

Speaker:

Or what would you do, who would you make President?

Speaker:

I can't remember.

Speaker:

Something along those lines.

Speaker:

And he said the problem isn't who's President, the problem is

Speaker:

who's voting for the President.

Speaker:

Hmm.

Speaker:

Uh, until, until you can change the infrastructure behind it, uh, who

Speaker:

is president really doesn't matter.

Speaker:

Right, well, who, who's running the empire in the, in the system?

Speaker:

Is that what you mean, rather than who's voting?

Speaker:

Because until, the voters don't get to change that either.

Speaker:

No, but I mean, even, even the voters, um, I think are disengaged.

Speaker:

Hmm.

Speaker:

They don't care.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

So just going on with this article, she says, uh, the U.

Speaker:

S.

Speaker:

empire has been marching along in exactly the same way it was before Biden took

Speaker:

office, completely unhindered by the fact that the person who's supposedly

Speaker:

calling the shots is in a state of degenerative neurological free fall.

Speaker:

Literally anyone could hold that office and it would make no meaningful difference

Speaker:

in the way the US Empire is run.

Speaker:

The globe spanning power structure that is centralised around the United States is

Speaker:

run not by the official elected government of that nation, but by unelected

Speaker:

empire managers who filter in and out of each administration and maintain a

Speaker:

steady presence in government agencies and government adjacent institutions.

Speaker:

These empire managers form alliances with corporate powers and

Speaker:

working relationships with them.

Speaker:

The many nations, assets and partners who function as members

Speaker:

of the undeclared US empire.

Speaker:

Which means there's really not any way for Americans to vote

Speaker:

their way out of this mess.

Speaker:

Voting in Western democracies is done to give us the illusion of control.

Speaker:

I like this bit here coming up, uh, Voting in Western democracies is done

Speaker:

to give us the illusion of control.

Speaker:

Like letting a toddler play with a toy steering wheel.

Speaker:

Well, you drive so they can feel like they're participating.

Speaker:

Well, I, um, the fact that Trump was in power for four years and didn't

Speaker:

completely fuck the American economy.

Speaker:

Hmm.

Speaker:

Um, people talked about childminding him.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

That, that they basically didn't carry out his orders because they

Speaker:

knew he'd forget them in half an hour.

Speaker:

And we spoke in previous episodes recently about, I think, Victoria

Speaker:

Newland, who was the one involved with the, uh, the coup in the Ukraine.

Speaker:

Oh yeah.

Speaker:

Basically, it didn't matter whether it was a Republican or

Speaker:

Democrat, um, administration.

Speaker:

She got a job, with all of them, except when Trump was in power.

Speaker:

That was the only time that she wasn't in some high powered job.

Speaker:

So, um, that was one of the dangers and one of the reasons why.

Speaker:

Um, a lot of these people don't like Trump was because for the first time in

Speaker:

their careers, they would be on the outer.

Speaker:

So, yeah, there we go.

Speaker:

Unlike Kennedy, who completely fucked up the CIA's plan with the Bay of Pigs.

Speaker:

Um, so Kennedy?

Speaker:

Yeah, so, uh, yeah, they had a, they had a whole plan about the

Speaker:

US re invading or invading Cuba to bring back a right wing government.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

And, and Kennedy basically pulled funding for it.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

He said no.

Speaker:

And that's, that's the whole basis of the CIA killed Kennedy.

Speaker:

Okay, so this was after the Bay of Pigs, this was another, another shot at it.

Speaker:

No, this was the Bay of, Bay of Pigs, basically, um, Kennedy

Speaker:

pulled all the support out.

Speaker:

Right.

Speaker:

And said, we can't have American assets, it has to be Cubans only.

Speaker:

Gave a whole bunch of, you can't do this, you can't do that, laid down the

Speaker:

law, and apparently that was because, that's why it was such a, a screw up.

Speaker:

Ah, see I'd heard a different story.

Speaker:

I'd heard he was really pissed with them, that he'd allowed him, that

Speaker:

he'd allowed them to talk him into it.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

That was the version I heard.

Speaker:

Certainly there was a big fallout with the CIA over Bay of Pigs.

Speaker:

Yeah, the version I heard was he was so pissed with them for getting it so wrong.

Speaker:

It was like, what sort of fucking advice is this from these guys?

Speaker:

That was a disaster.

Speaker:

So, yeah.

Speaker:

The other one I read, the other thing about him was, you know, when

Speaker:

they were deciding what to do when, because Russia was sending the nuclear

Speaker:

weapons over, and the Americans were deciding on their response.

Speaker:

And Robert Kennedy, I think, said to Joe Kennedy, we're having all

Speaker:

these meetings, but there's a danger here that everybody is agreeing with

Speaker:

you because you're the president.

Speaker:

And they don't feel in this group situation that they can

Speaker:

give a contrary point of view.

Speaker:

And so they allowed the others to have meetings without Kennedy present.

Speaker:

So people felt freer to give an honest opinion about what they should

Speaker:

do and not allow the group think to All the sort of, the fear of going

Speaker:

against the President stopped them from saying what they wanted to say.

Speaker:

I believe that's what happened in the lead up to that.

Speaker:

Right, um, The right to disconnect, Joe, seems like lots of people

Speaker:

have a problem where their bosses expect them to be available for,

Speaker:

uh, being contacted after hours.

Speaker:

Either by phone calls or emails.

Speaker:

And the Centre for Future Work found that 71 percent of surveyed employees

Speaker:

worked outside their scheduled hours, largely to meet employer expectations.

Speaker:

Most of this time, most of this overtime was unpaid.

Speaker:

That could be just working late in the office, I guess, as

Speaker:

well as phone calls and emails.

Speaker:

Ever have a problem, Joe, with some boss expecting you to answer emails at

Speaker:

seven o'clock at night and saying, why didn't you get back to me about that?

Speaker:

Um, no, I mean, I've been in jobs where I've had on call and I've been in jobs

Speaker:

where, um, there was a, an expectation that out of hours work was done.

Speaker:

Um, and yes, it was unpaid, but it was time in lieu.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

So it was paid then, in that sense.

Speaker:

If you worked an hour at night, then it was considered.

Speaker:

Yeah, I mean, yes, um, I've always been in a, a skilled industry and therefore not,

Speaker:

not as subject to the vagaries of a boss.

Speaker:

But I certainly had, um, colleagues who were, um, told that they were not

Speaker:

allowed to take leave for two weeks out of the month because that was month

Speaker:

end and that they weren't allowed any leave at year end, financial year end.

Speaker:

And we're expected to work long hours and we're told not to put in overtime

Speaker:

claims for the hours that they worked.

Speaker:

Um, so I think it's very much down to, um, your employer's belief

Speaker:

on how easy you are to replace.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Is there a power imbalance or not?

Speaker:

Absolutely.

Speaker:

Mm.

Speaker:

And that's why I gave up on the union a long time ago, um, not so much

Speaker:

because I don't believe in unions but because, um, I wasn't really in

Speaker:

a position to be assisted by them but I have told everybody in a, um, more

Speaker:

easily replaced job to join a union.

Speaker:

I've always, you know, payroll, people like that who are deemed

Speaker:

replaceable by, uh, management.

Speaker:

I've always said join a union and get the best representation you can.

Speaker:

And um, my daughter's peers, again, I've pushed towards, um,

Speaker:

fair work and, um, the unions.

Speaker:

Okay, did she take your advice?

Speaker:

Uh, so, uh, Join a union?

Speaker:

Yes, and my daughter isn't a member of a union, but Oh,

Speaker:

she's not a member of a union?

Speaker:

So she hasn't taken your advice?

Speaker:

Well, um, she's not yet employed.

Speaker:

Oh, okay, right.

Speaker:

But her friends, yeah, yeah, my friends, uh, one of her friends

Speaker:

is an apprentice electrician.

Speaker:

Right.

Speaker:

And, uh, I was saying, you know, if, if you feel you're being underpaid,

Speaker:

you're not getting your, um, Shea used to work for, I forget who it was.

Speaker:

But I pointed them towards that group, passed all the details on,

Speaker:

and said, if you've got concerns about not being paid fairly, then

Speaker:

these are the people to talk to.

Speaker:

Hmm.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Um, so, Labor Government, supposedly happening today, don't know if it

Speaker:

happened, introducing legislation, basically, uh, to empower people

Speaker:

to be able to disconnect from work.

Speaker:

Of course,

Speaker:

if your employer is expecting you to answer emails and phone calls after

Speaker:

work and you say I don't have to and start waving the legislation in their

Speaker:

face, uh, will you find yourself shunted off to the side down the track?

Speaker:

Um, how powerful are you?

Speaker:

And can you be blocked?

Speaker:

Um, yeah, as a casual, if you turn down shifts, then you don't get offered shifts.

Speaker:

Find yourself missing from the Time table, next time.

Speaker:

Yeah, so anyway, Labor attempting to do that and also casual workers who have

Speaker:

regular work arrangements being able to say, well I've been casual this long,

Speaker:

you've had me working for example, every Thursday and Friday from 10 till 3, you

Speaker:

now have to offer me a permanent position.

Speaker:

Rather than just casual, so, that's good.

Speaker:

See, um, how that pans out.

Speaker:

I think the most interesting part of that is Peter Dutton came out and said

Speaker:

he's going to repeal the laws about, um, out of hours communications.

Speaker:

How are these guys going to win an election?

Speaker:

So does that mean we can ring Peter Dutton out of his work hours?

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

If Ring him on his home line and say, hey, I want to talk to you

Speaker:

about this problem I'm having?

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

So yeah, this sort of right to disconnect, Dutton has said

Speaker:

they're going to repeal that.

Speaker:

And, um, he said that this law is damaging to relations between employers

Speaker:

and employees and it hurts productivity.

Speaker:

I, I, I agree with him.

Speaker:

I think since he's my MP, he should be available to me on call 24 hours a day

Speaker:

to deal with any problems that I have.

Speaker:

Yeah, try that.

Speaker:

And I, I want his personal phone number, as his employer.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

I just think, how are these people expecting to win young voters, um?

Speaker:

Next week, well you sent me that article, we'll talk about it next week, yeah,

Speaker:

about the UK and young voters deserting the Conservative Party in the UK.

Speaker:

Dramatically.

Speaker:

And scarily not over here.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Not to the same extent, yeah.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Um, so, next week, Joe, for that article, because it was quite lengthy

Speaker:

and there were a lot of charts.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Um, but, um, but, if Dutton keeps making statements like this, He will

Speaker:

be heading in the same direction as the UK Conservatives in terms of his

Speaker:

relationship with young people, I think.

Speaker:

One can only hope.

Speaker:

Joe, we've spoken a lot about our problems with submarines over the years.

Speaker:

What a debacle the whole thing is.

Speaker:

There is, it seems, a debacle of the same type, frigates, and

Speaker:

I'll get my head around that.

Speaker:

Um, but I saw this thing that, um, I'll just read it, I think it was a tweet.

Speaker:

The Japanese make some peculiar television shows and movies, with however

Speaker:

commendable attention to strategy and detail, and there's a series out called

Speaker:

The Silent Service, in which a Japanese crew steals a US Navy nuclear submarine

Speaker:

during their familiarisation exercise.

Speaker:

Recommended viewing for our Royal Australian Navy Submariners.

Speaker:

During the early stages of their training exercises, might shave a few decades

Speaker:

off our acquisition of those submarines.

Speaker:

It's about the only way we're gonna get a nuclear sub out of the Yanks,

Speaker:

is to follow this model and steal one during a familiarization exercise.

Speaker:

Yeah, I mean, call me a cynic, but I don't think it was ever

Speaker:

about getting subs out of the U.

Speaker:

S.

Speaker:

Yeah, we mentioned the other day, last week, about single sex education.

Speaker:

Because there was that, um, Newington College becoming co ed, and some

Speaker:

of the parents, Joe, were crying, I guess, some of the old boys.

Speaker:

Yes, yeah, because he was going to have a grandchild and now he can't have a

Speaker:

grandchild Yeah, he wasn't gonna send his grandchild to that school now.

Speaker:

Yeah, not gonna have that There's an article here, which says that Just looking

Speaker:

at the debate of whether single sex schools perform better than co educational

Speaker:

schools and this is a tricky one.

Speaker:

So if you've got E.

Speaker:

g.

Speaker:

a girl, um, who might have an interest in maths and physics, there's been

Speaker:

an argument that girls perform better in all girl schools than they

Speaker:

do in co ed schools, for example, particularly for those subjects.

Speaker:

But, as the article explains, it's really hard to sort through the data because

Speaker:

so much of educational Uh, success relates to socio economic factors.

Speaker:

And the people who end up in single sex private schools are

Speaker:

at a higher socioeconomic level.

Speaker:

So it's really difficult to look at the data and compare girls of a

Speaker:

semi socioeconomic status in single sex schools with girls, for example,

Speaker:

of a similar socioeconomic status in co ed schools, because there's

Speaker:

just not enough single sex schools.

Speaker:

With that lower socio economic background.

Speaker:

The other question is, are exam results the sole measure of success?

Speaker:

Or do you want a well rounded person?

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Because if you have someone who's got great exam scores, but is

Speaker:

totally inappropriate dealing with members of the opposite sex, Hmm.

Speaker:

Are they employable?

Speaker:

Indeed.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Because I was hinting at that, uh, last week when I was saying how some of the

Speaker:

kids who ended up in university and, uh, operated under a disadvantage for

Speaker:

a few years till I figured things out.

Speaker:

I was one of them.

Speaker:

Um, but anyway.

Speaker:

For example, in Australia, 14 out of the 20 top performing schools in the

Speaker:

latest HSC round were single sex.

Speaker:

That was 8 all girls and 6 all boys.

Speaker:

And, um, uh, as we're top, uh, as we're 12 of the top performing schools

Speaker:

in the VCE, that must be Victoria.

Speaker:

So, um, but, um, here's the interesting part, Joe, is in Ireland.

Speaker:

Where is it in this?

Speaker:

I haven't highlighted it in this thing.

Speaker:

But apparently in Ireland, there's a lot of single sex schools and, um, which

Speaker:

are government run and do not have a, sort of, a selective enrolment bias.

Speaker:

Government funded?

Speaker:

Yes, government funded.

Speaker:

So don't have a A socio economic slant that's different so

Speaker:

much with the co ed schools.

Speaker:

And there's a link to a study which was done and it was by the British Educational

Speaker:

Research Journal that basically said they couldn't find Um, significant differences

Speaker:

in results when looking at the performance of kids in the different schools.

Speaker:

So it was more or less saying, when you've accounted for socioeconomic factors and

Speaker:

other issues, then there was no evidence that single sex schools led to greater

Speaker:

academic achievement as determined by objective scoring systems, Joe.

Speaker:

Hadn't heard that before, but that was, that was, um, that was interesting.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

So, um, so that's a rundown of the topics and let me, Joe, try and find,

Speaker:

I want to look at this chat now.

Speaker:

So, dear listener, uh, let me find, how do I get to the chat?

Speaker:

I want to scroll through, yeah, captions, chat.

Speaker:

There it is.

Speaker:

Sorry.

Speaker:

Thank you.

Speaker:

Um, so yeah, that's it dear listener in terms of.

Speaker:

The, uh, topics.

Speaker:

I thought we'd just quickly run through the chat and see what people had to say.

Speaker:

Watley and John saying hello.

Speaker:

Same with Joel, thank you.

Speaker:

Um, so John says that the Chaser podcast did a good wind up of Barnaby today.

Speaker:

Um, and John also says not to worry about Sky News and its propaganda because it

Speaker:

only has three people and a dog watching.

Speaker:

Yeah, the problem is, Joe, goddamn ABC takes its cues from From the Murdoch.

Speaker:

What's the news window, isn't it?

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

So yeah, nobody watches the bloody thing, but it does seem to set the agenda for

Speaker:

these people, including the A, B, C.

Speaker:

Um, uh, John says, my children have been discussing how casually racist

Speaker:

their grandmother has been lately.

Speaker:

I just pointed out the generation gap to them.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

Yeah, I mean, I had a chat with dad about, um, he made some

Speaker:

comments that were possibly.

Speaker:

Not great about gay people and he said you have to remember that when I

Speaker:

was growing up being gay was illegal.

Speaker:

Yes You know Society has changed and sometimes it's very difficult to get

Speaker:

rid of your entrenched biases Um, Joel says ABC is very right wing.

Speaker:

It's their entertainment that is left leaning.

Speaker:

That would be true.

Speaker:

So someone like, um, Sean McAuliffe, um, he would say He was curing,

Speaker:

um, Scott Morrison and his group.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

The government of the day, yes.

Speaker:

He took, no doubt, great delight in that.

Speaker:

So, uh, yeah, that would be true.

Speaker:

It's their entertainment that is left leaning.

Speaker:

Good point, Joel.

Speaker:

Um, uh, Watley says, Seems legit.

Speaker:

Batboy will one day be president of the USA.

Speaker:

Who's Batboy?

Speaker:

This is about the Weekly Word News.

Speaker:

This is Don's comment.

Speaker:

It was the Men in Black.

Speaker:

Ah, OK.

Speaker:

So it was the newspaper in Men in Black.

Speaker:

You read to find out the truth because it was the one that was

Speaker:

telling you all about aliens abducting Elvis, or whatever it was.

Speaker:

Oh, okay.

Speaker:

Right, okay.

Speaker:

Um, John says Putin gives a history lesson from his point of view,

Speaker:

doesn't sound very convincing.

Speaker:

Whatley tells him to be objective.

Speaker:

Um, and, uh, Whatley says torture is better than murder, then, Joe.

Speaker:

I don't know what that means.

Speaker:

So that was talking about Julian Assange and the Russian journalists.

Speaker:

Right.

Speaker:

And the answer is, neither are great, but one person being tortured

Speaker:

is probably better than a hundred people being pushed out of windows.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

I think that neither side are great.

Speaker:

It's just a level of shittiness.

Speaker:

How many people were in Guantanamo, again?

Speaker:

Yeah, probably a hundred, but they weren't journalists, were they?

Speaker:

We're talking, okay, we're just talking people killed.

Speaker:

Okay, the American way isn't to push people out of windows, it's

Speaker:

just to bomb them, if they're brown and they're in a desert, you know.

Speaker:

Yes.

Speaker:

Yep.

Speaker:

Uh, and John says, please see who the report was done by, a

Speaker:

Republican endorsed official.

Speaker:

That was to do with Biden being senile.

Speaker:

Well this was the um, well I think this was the people looking at the

Speaker:

indictment, I think these were the lawyers looking at the indictment, John.

Speaker:

Yeah, apparently he's a Republican.

Speaker:

Right, okay.

Speaker:

Don't know.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

And that was the chat.

Speaker:

We'll try and do that every week, so if you do make a comment, you will be heard.

Speaker:

And, uh, there we go.

Speaker:

Scott was with us.

Speaker:

comment about our country was founded on the criminal element, justifying

Speaker:

we should steal the submarine.

Speaker:

But I'm thinking that maybe that's a good argument back to the, this nation

Speaker:

was founded on Christian values, was this nation was founded on criminals.

Speaker:

So does that justify us all being criminals now?

Speaker:

Are you reading that in the main chat on the, on the right?

Speaker:

Where did you read that?

Speaker:

Yes, scroll all the way down.

Speaker:

I still keep going and The last one I've got is by John saying,

Speaker:

please see who the report was done by, a Republican endorsed official.

Speaker:

There's another, there's another three under that.

Speaker:

Why haven't I, why can't I see them?

Speaker:

They're up on the screen, on the chat.

Speaker:

Maybe because they're on the screen that they don't appear in that right chat.

Speaker:

They do.

Speaker:

Okay, mine's not scrolling, but anyway.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

Uh Uhhhh Don't forget, our country was founded on the criminal element,

Speaker:

so it's their patriotic duty to flog anything that isn't bolted to the floor.

Speaker:

Good one, Don.

Speaker:

Uh Monster Dutton or Voldemort, um, Chris says, why isn't there an option

Speaker:

other than Biden in the next election?

Speaker:

And, uh Because democracy is failing, Chris.

Speaker:

And um, uh, yeah, okay.

Speaker:

Those didn't appear in my right inside.

Speaker:

Anyway.

Speaker:

All right, dear listener, that is a wrap on this podcast, episode 417.

Speaker:

Scott wasn't with us.

Speaker:

He had other commitments.

Speaker:

He should be back next week.

Speaker:

And uh, yeah, I'll be back next week.

Speaker:

Joe will be my last podcast, hopefully wearing glasses.

Speaker:

So you're going to be blind the week after, are you?

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

So, in the, after next week's podcast, I'm getting new intraocular lenses.

Speaker:

Well, synthetic ones put in.

Speaker:

Because I had cataracts appearing and they said, well, need to fix

Speaker:

that up and while we're at it Would you like some new lenses?

Speaker:

And you won't need glasses.

Speaker:

And I thought, wow, I've worn glasses since I was 16.

Speaker:

So that will be an interesting, life changing event for me.

Speaker:

So, yeah.

Speaker:

So next week, glasses, but then in the days following that, um, Don says he's

Speaker:

getting bionic eyes, Steve Austin style.

Speaker:

John and Chris say goodnight.

Speaker:

Goodnight to everybody.

Speaker:

We'll talk to you next week.

Speaker:

Bye for now.

Speaker:

And it's a good night from here, mate.