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Accepted! With Jamie Beaton (Education, Entrepreneur, College, Technology)
Episode 4021st November 2022 • The Action Catalyst • Southwestern Family of Companies
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Jamie Beaton, co-founder and CEO of Crimson Education, the world’s leading US and UK university admissions support company, talks about his new book, “Accepted”, increasing student admissions, helping exceptional students overcome self-doubt, the “Moneyball” approach to college acceptance, the role that parents should play in the process, tackling ageism and skepticism, and geeking out to Warhammer with host Dan Moore. 

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Transcripts

Intro:

Today's guest is Jamie Beaton, co-founder and CEO of Crimson Education, the world's leading US and UK University admissions support company, one of the youngest in the world to be accepted into Stanford's graduate School of Business, Jamie developed Crimson to bring together experts from the best universities around the globe with users four times more likely to gain admission to an Ivy League univers.

Intro:

Jamie shares some of the secrets to this success in his book Accepted Out now.

Intro:

We hope you enjoy.

Dan Moore:

Well, welcome to the Action Catalyst everyone.

Dan Moore:

This is Dan Moore and I'm very, very delighted to have our multi nationally experienced and educated amazing guests, often called Wonder Keen.

Dan Moore:

Mr.

Dan Moore:

Jamie beaten joining us here originally from New Zealand, was stops at Oxford with stops in Cambridge, mass, currently in New York.

Dan Moore:

Jamie, welcome to the Action

Jamie Beaton:

Catalyst.

Jamie Beaton:

I'm super excited to be here.

Jamie Beaton:

Uh, great chat today.

Dan Moore:

Well, we, we know from our, our introduction that our listeners have already heard about you.

Dan Moore:

You have done some amazing things in the area of personal academic excellence, graduating and getting into master's program at the age of 19, and then a PhD as a Rhode scholarship at Oxford.

Dan Moore:

What you've done is remarkable.

Dan Moore:

What's even more remarkable is that you're becoming.

Dan Moore:

Very much a catalyst for a lot of young people to get into the colleges of their choice, the very top elite colleges, four times the average acceptance rate because of the techniques that you perfected and were able to teach to people.

Dan Moore:

Share with us a little bit about why you actually got into this particular business.

Dan Moore:

With your acumen, with your skills, with your background, you could be doing anything.

Dan Moore:

Why did you put your entrepreneurial talents in this direction of helping others do some of

Jamie Beaton:

what you've.

Jamie Beaton:

Great question.

Jamie Beaton:

So growing up in New Zealand, uh, until I was 14, I was focused on potentially getting into a domestic, uh, New Zealand University, for example, doing something like medicine or law locally.

Jamie Beaton:

And I'd never kind of even considered the idea of applying to one of these global universities.

Jamie Beaton:

Going through high school, I had really no idea what entrepreneurship was.

Jamie Beaton:

I didn't know what investing or Wall Street was, quite fortuitously.

Jamie Beaton:

I spoke to this boy who was the valedictorian of my high school.

Jamie Beaton:

He'd gone into Yale and he told me that I should consider applying overseas.

Jamie Beaton:

So I spent the next four years really building my candidacy for these top skills like Harvard.

Jamie Beaton:

It really became the goal for me.

Jamie Beaton:

And then, um, once I applied and got into these schools and I actually got to go to these institutions, it was just totally, uh, mind blowing.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, I was able to quickly meet so many inspiring students, classmates, professors.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, I was able to, you know, uh, build out my own company, Crimson, and begin working as a, as an investment analyst in New York.

Jamie Beaton:

Quickly I realized how transformative these higher ed experiences can be, especially from a, for a kid like me from a far flying part of the world like New Zealand.

Jamie Beaton:

So when I launched Crimson, I really had a lot of passion behind bringing more students access to the kind of guidance they need to get into these really elite institutions that will give them all this opportunity.

Jamie Beaton:

And I remember distinctly in 2015 or so, I was sitting at Tiger, which was a hedge funded here in new.

Jamie Beaton:

And I was, uh, looking my Bloomberg terminal.

Jamie Beaton:

I just finished some counseling with some students and I was really thinking about, you know, post-graduation, do I wanna really go big on Crimson or stay in the investment world?

Jamie Beaton:

And I really thought to myself that, you know, impacting students and helping them find the best path for them, you know, that is so impactful, so rewarding.

Jamie Beaton:

And I, I also could do it all over the world.

Jamie Beaton:

So I figured there was a great opportunity to build something that, you know, had real, uh, meaning.

Jamie Beaton:

So, uh, I haven't looked back and I've been really going deeper and deeper into this education space over the last, um, eight years.

Jamie Beaton:

Now in

Dan Moore:

my own experience of advising young people about college choices, so many of them sell themselves short.

Dan Moore:

They say, well, there's no point in even applying.

Dan Moore:

There's no way I would get in.

Dan Moore:

How, how would you address that to a, a bright young person that is considering not applying to one of these top tier universities simply because the lack of self-belief.

Dan Moore:

It's

Jamie Beaton:

a great question.

Jamie Beaton:

Okay, so the first thing is this problem often is, uh, actually catalyzed by, uh, guidance counselors, other folks in the school who, who, you know, might be just in the pattern of recommending, you know, local colleges and universities.

Jamie Beaton:

And, you know, uh, obviously these really, uh, competitive schools like Stanford and New Chicago, they've got very extensive application processes.

Jamie Beaton:

So it's a very big lift for everyone involved to send kids to these.

Jamie Beaton:

And so I think in general, um, there's a tendency to, you know, deviate to more conservative options and, um, take the path.

Jamie Beaton:

It's a bit easier, but that's really a huge loss opportunity.

Jamie Beaton:

So it's really critical that students are applying to the most ambitious schools possible for them.

Jamie Beaton:

And you know, the good thing about this process is that it is a holistic admissions process in which, you know, students are assessed based on the context of their high school.

Jamie Beaton:

So if they go to a high school where a kid hasn't gone to, say Yale in four years or something, or the school only has a couple of AP subjects, you can.

Jamie Beaton:

Or there aren't that many extracurriculars and offer actually.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, and you've got a student who's actually really, uh, thrived with that environment.

Jamie Beaton:

They actually get a lot more support from the admissions office for doing that.

Jamie Beaton:

So you actually do get a bit of a benefit from being one of the quirky few kids in your school that actually applies these bold schools, which is even more reason to do it.

Jamie Beaton:

The last thing that you know we do at Crimson is we, we have taken a bit of a Moneyball like approach to this, um, with our data science background.

Jamie Beaton:

So we've built these college missions algorithms, which tell you based on your SAT score, ACD score, or GPA or extracurriculars, um, financial aid requirements, majors, other kind of preferences.

Jamie Beaton:

What kind of schools are you like could get into with what probabilities.

Jamie Beaton:

And so our students will often be applying to reach match and safety schools based on probability rather than just intuition.

Jamie Beaton:

And that helps to correct some of that bias in which a student might be skewing downwards through a lack of belief to, you know, more conservative options.

Dan Moore:

Right.

Dan Moore:

I like the Moneyball illustration.

Dan Moore:

That's a fantastic way to look at it.

Dan Moore:

Now, what about the role of parents in this process?

Dan Moore:

Because parents are very much into the shepherding and sometimes the guiding and sometimes the coercing part of this whole process.

Dan Moore:

How do you coordinate parental influence with student desire when they may be at odds with one another?

Jamie Beaton:

So the first thing is the period has to play valuable on doing all three of those things.

Jamie Beaton:

You know, I see really talented students who are um, 5, 8, 10, 11.

Jamie Beaton:

And, you know, when you're a particularly young student, even if you've got a lot of passion for academics, um, you still don't really, uh, have the ability to make all these choices for yourself.

Jamie Beaton:

So having a, you know, a parent that can encourage you to challenge yourself, you know, hop into a more challenging math class, or take an extracurricular like debating for the first time and begin to catalyze those different experiences for you.

Jamie Beaton:

It's very, it is very impactful.

Jamie Beaton:

So in my life, I had my mum and she's actually featured in the book a lot, um, accepted.

Jamie Beaton:

And basically she learned a lot of the academic content, uh, that I, I needed to know from my school to the age of 10 or 11.

Jamie Beaton:

We would do studying together on the weekend.

Jamie Beaton:

I remember sitting at Wendy's with her, preparing for certain exams.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, and she was a bit of a cheerleader for me where, you know, when I was really under pressure studying some different tests or assessments, you know, she knew what was going on and I felt I had that strong kind of emotional support from her.

Jamie Beaton:

And as I moved through high school and I got a bit older and I was really, I guess, leading my own charge and setting my own priorities and goals.

Jamie Beaton:

You know, that support role she played, that emotional stability was really critical and giving me more endurance to keep, you know, taking more subjects, pushing myself harder, et cetera.

Jamie Beaton:

So I do think, you know, I see thousands of parents all around the world with many different parenting styles, many different cultural backgrounds across both America and the world too.

Jamie Beaton:

And I think in general the, the best approach is, you know, you wanna a child who at least through probably the middle of.

Jamie Beaton:

Has quite a lot of intrinsic motivation for the process, has found some majors or interests they're excited about, but you want an engaged parent or parents who, um, you know, help, you know, the child ride those different emotional waves this process creates for them.

Jamie Beaton:

And I think that's, you know, a really good harmonious state.

Jamie Beaton:

Typically when the parents are pushing too much of the process, it can sort of dilute the child's, uh, internal motivation a little bit.

Jamie Beaton:

But a good balance is critical to.

Dan Moore:

Uh, well said.

Dan Moore:

And I, I love the fact you're including all of these vital influences in this whole process.

Dan Moore:

That's fantastic.

Dan Moore:

You know, it'd be pretty easy to look at your, your career and your young life so far, Jamie, and conclude that everything has been smooth sailing, but I think I know better.

Dan Moore:

I'm sure that you've hit some brick walls once in a while where you would trucking right along and all of a sudden there's an obstacle you were not anticipating.

Dan Moore:

What are some strategies that you have found effective when you run into a sudden setback?

Dan Moore:

That was just

Jamie Beaton:

out of the.

Jamie Beaton:

Some of the most challenging times in my life were actually in my last year of high school where I had, um, really, uh, so growing up, I guess I, I grew up with my, my granddad, my grandmother, my mom and my dad, and, um, you know, very close family unit.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, and my, uh, basically there was a bit of a family, uh, uh, challenge illness with, um, my grandmother that was really dragging on the family was a very, very sad, emotional burden for, for everybody.

Jamie Beaton:

And, you know, that experience was.

Jamie Beaton:

Jarring for my granddad, and he was a big role model to me growing up since I was very young.

Jamie Beaton:

You know, he was almost like a second father figure of sorts to me.

Jamie Beaton:

And so my last year in high school, I was sort of, uh, really grappling with, um, having to, you know, play more of a, uh, serious role in supporting, you know, my, my own granddad, um, emotionally alongside, uh, going through this really intense college process.

Jamie Beaton:

And so without going into all the details, basically, um, I was really being stretched in a lot of different directions and that failed, like at some points, you know, it was just gonna, it was just too much.

Jamie Beaton:

As far as how you kind of get through this, I think there are a couple of really, you know, practical approaches you can take.

Jamie Beaton:

So the first thing is that, you know, when you are getting, you know, knocked down, so to speak, you, you gotta keep those communication channels open to that select group of people in your life that you know, you really trust and, uh, you know, back you.

Jamie Beaton:

That for me was a couple of my best buddies.

Jamie Beaton:

That was my mom and that was my dad as well.

Jamie Beaton:

And I'm not closing off because I think, you know, if you open and share your stress, um, and you, you know, share how you're feeling, that can often really help to alleviate some of that burden.

Jamie Beaton:

A lot of the time, the way these things mount is quite exponential.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, you may have say three different bad things that have happened and they still overwhelm at the moment.

Jamie Beaton:

But if you slow down and just talk through them one by one and realize actually you can, you know, hopefully at least mitigate in two of these things, that can really bring down the pressure quite significant.

Jamie Beaton:

The other thing from a practical high school perspective to make this very concrete is you can actually smooth many of the, you know, challenging milestones of high school over four years rather than just, you know, one year.

Jamie Beaton:

So things like the s a t, things like your college essays, things like extracurriculars, you can actually bring them forward and do them, um, you know, in the early couple years of high school.

Jamie Beaton:

So there's less of this kind of big pressure near the end when everything is due at the same.

Jamie Beaton:

And so techniques like that in many areas of life where you just aren't allowing yourself to get to a point where there's just too many intense things happening at one time is, is a great technique.

Jamie Beaton:

Then finally, of course, you know, uh, fitness and sleep are critical.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, I played a lot of, uh, competitive field hockey and tennis.

Jamie Beaton:

Field hockey, I think is, is more of a girl sport here in America, um, which was a sad game of to the US realized.

Jamie Beaton:

But basically, um, you know, these, these sports, uh, really help me to also get some extra, you know, mental fortitude.

Jamie Beaton:

Cause I think they really do help you with all alleviating pressure and stuff.

Jamie Beaton:

And then sleep is something that a lot of high school students can start neglecting to the end of high school.

Jamie Beaton:

But you know, getting at least a good seven plus hours is I think, pretty critical for that mental stamina.

Dan Moore:

There's a whole lot of valuable information packed into a very short response that you gave us there, which is great.

Dan Moore:

Now, what do you do on a personal level to keep yourself growing, to keep yourself from getting satisfied or complacent?

Dan Moore:

And some people might say, oh, he's too young to let that happen.

Dan Moore:

But you and I both have known people that get a bit jaded, even in their mid twenties, where they feel as though I've got it all.

Dan Moore:

But you have that, that eagerness, that hunger, that desire to keep.

Jamie Beaton:

I think you really have to set up the environment around you very proactively to create, uh, the opportunity for continual learning.

Jamie Beaton:

So in my case, what I do is I, I'm constantly doing at least one academic program alongside, I work at Ston as I wrapped up my default program at Oxford, where I was studying what drove, uh, student outcomes and student satisfaction in, in online schooling in particular, you know, I'm now doing, um, law school and I find those experiences where I'm, you know, just learning for the sake of it.

Jamie Beaton:

Very valuable.

Jamie Beaton:

I then also, um, you know, you wanna avoid, you know, so to speak, burning out.

Jamie Beaton:

So I always have hobbies.

Jamie Beaton:

So one hobby I play is a game called War Hammer 4k, which is a bit of a nerdy tabletop kind of game, but I really enjoy it.

Jamie Beaton:

And, um, a bit of time for yourself.

Jamie Beaton:

Some of these hobbies, whatever it is for you, can, you know, really recharge yourself.

Jamie Beaton:

And then of course you've gotta make sure work is really stimulating, you know, if you're choosing the right context, hopefully it shouldn't feel like too much like work.

Jamie Beaton:

So when I build in Crimson, you know, I have the thrills.

Jamie Beaton:

Seeing the students we've worked with for years is so engaging.

Jamie Beaton:

And then, you know, there's the business challenges, strategy questions.

Jamie Beaton:

Should we buy this company?

Jamie Beaton:

Should we invest in this business that keeps you really fresh?

Jamie Beaton:

And then I think continually resetting your ambitions and then also having some longer term goals too, family goals.

Jamie Beaton:

So I think it's all about continually looking at that growth mindset, sort of forgetting the past a little bit and what you've been able to do and looking forward and sort of continuing to tilt the plane of ambition, uh, to a higher horizon.

Jamie Beaton:

The last thing is just who you surround yourself with.

Jamie Beaton:

If you surround yourself with people that have a growth mindset that are also challenging themselves and are very ambitious, it's infectious and, you know, you get kinda like a one plus one equals three situation going on.

Jamie Beaton:

So I do think, um, you know, you wanna make sure you've got, you know, the folks in your life as well that do have that mindset too.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, and, and that will, you know, really help you as well with that energy.

Dan Moore:

If you surround yourself with other people with a growth mindset, it is infectious.

Dan Moore:

That is a brilliant quotation.

Dan Moore:

I love it.

Dan Moore:

And I'm quite familiar with War Hammer.

Dan Moore:

When my eldest turned 16, we made a pilgrimage to Nottingham and we played a few games there.

Dan Moore:

So I quite understand.

Dan Moore:

Wow.

Dan Moore:

That

Jamie Beaton:

is the dream.

Jamie Beaton:

So for those of you are familiar, I think, uh, you may be referring to War Hammer World, which is sort of the, uh, the, the biggest war hammer, uh, store, I think in the world or production place.

Jamie Beaton:

So that that's, that, you know what you're talking about.

Jamie Beaton:

That's very exciting.

Dan Moore:

That was tremendously fun.

Dan Moore:

Now, what guidance could you give for, for our listeners that are maybe at the moment really struggling with a sense of direction?

Dan Moore:

They may be mid-career things are are okay, just not brilliant, not great to reinvigorate the sense of excitement.

Dan Moore:

You've got some really powerful ways to just keep yourself reinvigorated.

Dan Moore:

What could you pass on to people that are maybe a generation or two older than you about how to look at your current situation and find a way to get even more excited?

Jamie Beaton:

The first thing is people really underestimate how quickly you can, um, pivot your trajectory or build some new skills that can meaningfully change, you know, uh, the, the, the pace of your career.

Jamie Beaton:

So I see a lot of folks that are, you know, in the mold or in the funk of a certain kind of job.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, they're not pursuing any kind of studying outside of their, you know, career.

Jamie Beaton:

And so they're really just going to the motions in, in one particular role.

Jamie Beaton:

On the flip side, I've seen, um, you know, for example, take one of our directors, her name's Janine.

Jamie Beaton:

When she was in her fifties, she decided to go to Cambridge and do a, a new degree in social innovation and then pivot her role towards, uh, angel investing, uh, corporate governance, et cetera.

Jamie Beaton:

And she's been on a fantastic career, uh, trajectory over the last, you know, 10 years or so, having made that decision to pick up that Cambridge degree after seeing all these Crimson kids, you know, looking to do these, uh, top university program.

Jamie Beaton:

So I think, um, first thing people underestimate how quickly you can pivot and change to a new trajectory.

Jamie Beaton:

So think about, you know, it could start with a course you class where you learn, you know, some, uh, basic statistics tools or some financial analytics skills you haven't learned before.

Jamie Beaton:

Or it could be a negotiating class, uh, online that helps you, you know, manage conflict in your job more effectively.

Jamie Beaton:

And then secondly, um, you know, uh, often it.

Jamie Beaton:

Only, you know, six months to three years to pivot to a new type of role.

Jamie Beaton:

But you need to ask, so, you know, you need to either speak to your employer, figure out what other parts of the organization could be really interesting to you and how you can get there.

Jamie Beaton:

Or, you know, obviously you could change jobs too.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, but I think you, you need to switch from being sort of like a passive recipient of, you know, working dynamics to being a very active learner.

Jamie Beaton:

There's actually a really good book that I recommend.

Jamie Beaton:

The book is called Power.

Jamie Beaton:

Why Some People Have It and others Don't.

Jamie Beaton:

By Jeffrey Pfeiffer.

Jamie Beaton:

He's a Stanford Business School Profess.

Jamie Beaton:

And he talks about how in many companies the dynamics are set up such that, you know, you really have to think about your own career trajectory.

Jamie Beaton:

You've gotta ask the hard questions, you've gotta ask for progression because it's not always gonna be the case.

Jamie Beaton:

These things, you know, just magically landing your lap.

Jamie Beaton:

So, uh, being very proactive about, you know, pushing your manager or other folks to, uh, engage with you on those career conversations.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, we will keep your, you know, energy replenished and if you set the norm with your manager that you wanna have those career progression conversations, you do have this clear career.

Jamie Beaton:

You know, that will force them to engage with you and that'll become a clear priority for them.

Dan Moore:

These are brilliant ideas.

Dan Moore:

Somehow, despite your obvious brilliance, your many achievements, you have a very appealing humility to you.

Dan Moore:

Oh geez.

Dan Moore:

What obstacles have you encountered because of your age in trying to get backing, trying to get support, trying to get buy in, trying to get people to even believe in you at all?

Dan Moore:

Have, have you encountered any, and what are strategies you could advise for our younger listen,

Jamie Beaton:

So I would say whenever you're building any entrepreneurial venture, by definition you are trying to build something new that's tackling a problem in a new lens.

Jamie Beaton:

And so you've got, you know, incumbents who are gonna naturally wanna push against whatever you're doing.

Jamie Beaton:

You'll have people that are, you know, initially skeptical.

Jamie Beaton:

And so really entrepreneurship is often about pushing through waves and waves and waves of, uh, you know, detractors or folks that aren't necessarily on the same page.

Jamie Beaton:

And then you're converting them hopefully to be big advocates to you as you.

Jamie Beaton:

So in my case, to give very specific examples, when I started Crimson, I was 18.

Jamie Beaton:

I had, uh, you know, just had a great academic, you know, track report at high school, but I had no teaching degree.

Jamie Beaton:

Um, and I was, you know, guiding students on how to apply to these schools.

Jamie Beaton:

And I knew that I had this knowledge and insight for my personal journey to add a lot of value.

Jamie Beaton:

But you could see a lot of traditional guidance council would be very skeptical.

Jamie Beaton:

Or you know, teachers at schools that have been teachers for 20 years, you know, wondering, you know, why is this even necessary, especially in these international countries.

Jamie Beaton:

And so initially it was about really focusing on student outcomes and just in my first cohort of students just getting some amazing college outcomes.

Jamie Beaton:

So I can really speak to the track record of success.

Jamie Beaton:

You know, they had achieved and those students gave really brand ambassadors and advocates, you know, for us.

Jamie Beaton:

So it was about creating that, that movement of credibility.

Jamie Beaton:

The second thing that I did was to, you know, try and build a lot of external validation for this, um, you know, area of education I was focused on.

Jamie Beaton:

So, um, I did that Masters in education at Stanford.

Jamie Beaton:

I went over to Oxford for the, um, PhD looking at what drives student outcomes and student satisfaction in online.

Jamie Beaton:

And I really formally studied in a very rigorous way, a lot of these different problems we were encountering in, you know, regular at Crimson for our students and opportunities for them.

Jamie Beaton:

So then when I spoke to, for example, you know, heads of universities or um, heads of major schools, you know, I had some credibility to stand on as well, um, from an academic perspective.

Jamie Beaton:

So I think, um, uh, you, you want to get both, uh, you know, soft or informal, uh, credibility through success in whatever you're building.

Jamie Beaton:

And then also look for those, you know, serious external signals of credibility.

Jamie Beaton:

And over time I've also been able to recruit some amazing advisors.

Jamie Beaton:

I'm really grateful for, you know, folks like Larry Summers, who used to be the president of Harvard and folks like Tommy here, or Hoshi, who's the head of the Stanford Online high school.

Jamie Beaton:

And you know, it becomes infectious over time as you keep building your organization and your principles become very clear and your results and impact are very clear.

Jamie Beaton:

You can attract top advisors, which then.

Jamie Beaton:

Amplifies that impact further.

Jamie Beaton:

So there are a couple of the techniques that I've used, um, to, you know, build a lot more momentum behind Crimson from sort of when we started, when I was 18 to now, you know, 26, 8 years.

Dan Moore:

Then.

Dan Moore:

So you were a Harvard undergrad when you started

Jamie Beaton:

Crimson.

Jamie Beaton:

Actually, I started Crimson before I even got on campus.

Jamie Beaton:

So, um, I started Crimson in the middle of 2013, around, uh, around March, 2013.

Jamie Beaton:

And then I, you know, jumped on campus first time in September, 2013.

Jamie Beaton:

So my first recruits to Crimson were the three other kids that had gone into Harvard from New Zealand that year, and a bunch of students from high school that I, that I'd gone through and done competitive debating with or Olympiad with.

Jamie Beaton:

And so I recruited this pool of great academic students from New Zealand.

Jamie Beaton:

That was my first, you know, pool of mentors.

Jamie Beaton:

And then when I landed on campus at Harvard, I, you know, recruited my kind roommates on the platform, you know, freshman year, um, uh, you know, in the dorm rooms, et cetera.

Jamie Beaton:

Getting on onboard business, initial mentors.

Jamie Beaton:

That was kinda how this all began.

Jamie Beaton:

That's great.

Dan Moore:

How big is your current staff?

Jamie Beaton:

It's kind of a, a crazy number, but we're, we're up to about 650 full-time staff around the world.

Jamie Beaton:

And about, um, 2,400, uh, consultants, mentors, tutors, teachers, um, who do a lot of delivery as well.

Jamie Beaton:

And our staff are really dispersed across a bunch of different countries.

Jamie Beaton:

But, uh, America is one of the biggest destinations for our full-time staff as well as, um, the uk, Australia, New Zealand, China, Russia, Korea.

Jamie Beaton:

These are all other major hubs for crumbs

Dan Moore:

around the world.

Dan Moore:

And most of your staff is involved in the mentoring and guiding of, of applicant.

Jamie Beaton:

Yes.

Jamie Beaton:

Uh, we have a dedicated technology engineering, data science team that helps to build the platform that a lot of students learn through.

Jamie Beaton:

So we've got like a video crew.

Jamie Beaton:

We've filmed, you know, more than a thousand videos on these college campuses describing different parts of the application process.

Jamie Beaton:

So we've got a very popular YouTube channel that a lot of students love to watch around the world, learn about these different schools.

Jamie Beaton:

But yeah, a lot, a lot of our, our team are directly working with students.

Jamie Beaton:

They're called strategists, working on their counseling journeys, figuring out, you know, what they can do throughout high school to best develop their profile.

Jamie Beaton:

We've got student success managers, curriculum designers, you know, are really extensive team to make sure we are really putting our students best foot forward.

Dan Moore:

That's brilliant.

Dan Moore:

And do you have some, uh, some full-time people working with you in the finance arena or operations, things

Jamie Beaton:

like.

Jamie Beaton:

At this point, um, we've got a pretty heavy hitting, um, I guess headquarter functions, finance, operations, human resources, sales and marketing, digital marketing country teams, led by local country managers to speak to local language and are responsible for running their particular neck of woods.

Jamie Beaton:

So if you go to Crimson in Russia, if you're ever making the trip, The whole office speaks Russian, for example, and has a lot of local cultural context.

Jamie Beaton:

They can advise families accordingly.

Jamie Beaton:

And then we've got a great, you know, board and, you know, fantastic investor base behind us, which has been great because, you know, we started this time, we were very young, we're still pretty young.

Jamie Beaton:

And, um, getting that advice from those who've done these kind of things before us.

Jamie Beaton:

Has been critical to being able to serve more students in a short period of time.

Jamie Beaton:

Good.

Dan Moore:

Well, one of the other compliments I'd like to pay you is your willingness to bring other people into your team, because many brilliant entrepreneurs have a really difficult time letting go, sharing authority, sharing responsibility, sharing opportunity.

Dan Moore:

Clearly you don't have that hangup, and that's part of why you're grown as much as you've grown and the impact you're having is so significant.

Dan Moore:

Thank you.

Jamie Beaton:

I, I appreciate that.

Jamie Beaton:

I think, um, this comes from, uh, the same philosophy applied to actually schooling.

Jamie Beaton:

So for the students on the call and.

Jamie Beaton:

A lot of students will go through high school and it's your averse to asking questions.

Jamie Beaton:

If you're, if you're that student who's a bit stuck in class, you don't quite understand a concept in English or in math, and you just leave that class, you don't ask a question, you just think I'll figure it out later.

Jamie Beaton:

Versus the student who proactively says, Hey, actually I want to get the answer to this question.

Jamie Beaton:

I wanna ask for advice and I'm okay appearing that, you know, I don't know what I'm doing here.

Jamie Beaton:

That different mindset is critical.

Jamie Beaton:

Cause if you compound just asking that one question a day over the course of four years of high school, the amount of extra information you soak.

Jamie Beaton:

Is is far higher.

Jamie Beaton:

And so I found, for example, even at college, a lot of opportunities, they're not advertised on a website.

Jamie Beaton:

Like, uh, I had to go to, you know, email, cold email, different professors or, um, different, you know, advisors to get opportunities like my thesis advisor and stuff.

Jamie Beaton:

And so I think that willingness to practically ask for advice and um, you know, bring in experts around you is, is a critical.

Jamie Beaton:

And furthermore, um, people are usually really happy to help.

Jamie Beaton:

You know, people love to share wisdom and expertise, and so it's, it's very rare that you ask someone to help who's, you know, older than you, with a bit more wisdom than you, and they say no, um, you know, hardly ever happens.

Jamie Beaton:

So it's more of that mental barrier within the student or the entrepreneur that they need to overcome.

Jamie Beaton:

And then once they've sort of gotten over that, you know, internal qum, um, you know, it's, it's a very powerful, uh,

Dan Moore:

It is because people do like to share, particularly when they're asked by somebody that's got the heart and the sincerity that you've got.

Dan Moore:

So, Jamie, time with you flies my friend.

Dan Moore:

This has just been a wonderful conversation.

Dan Moore:

I've thoroughly enjoyed getting to know you.

Dan Moore:

Uh, how can people locate your book and what's the best way to access more information about Crimson?

Jamie Beaton:

So people can jump onto, uh, Amazon.

Jamie Beaton:

Uh, it's under accepted and if you wanna hear more about Crimson and how we work with students across the us, um, just go on to crimson education.org or type Crimson education on Google and you'll find us

Dan Moore:

really quickly.

Dan Moore:

Perfect.

Dan Moore:

Well, I appreciate you very much.

Dan Moore:

Keep up the great work and listeners always believe, don't let age be a limitation.

Dan Moore:

Let everything be an inspiration.

Dan Moore:

Thanks so much, Jamie, for joining us today in the Action Catalyst.

Jamie Beaton:

Thanks, Dan.

Jamie Beaton:

Amazing.

Jamie Beaton:

Thank you very much.

Jamie Beaton:

It was super fun.