Artwork for podcast The Natural Evolution
Hoping It'll Work with Amy Stein
Episode 178th November 2021 • The Natural Evolution • Michael Roesslein
00:00:00 01:01:19

Share Episode

Shownotes

At first, Amy Stein thought the aches and pains gripping her body were psychosomatic. Working as a medical researcher studying chronic pain management, it seemed plausible that the symptoms her patients were experiencing made her hypervigilant of her own body.

But then the muscles in her back started to fuse, her weight dropped to a dangerous 85 pounds, and her body — screaming in pain — began to shut down.

Western Medicine — including 30 different specialists, from Neurologists to Hematologists, and Rheumatologists plus $320,000 in out-of-pocket medical expenses — offered no solutions.

Sick of being a medical guinea pig, and with a growing cocktail of prescription medications, Amy — who has a Bachelor of Psychology, and an MBA — put her research skills to personal use.

More than 8000 hours of investigation later, Amy discovered the link between trauma and autoimmune disease, the power of plant medicine, addressing imbalances within the body, toxicity, and parasites.

A note from Amy:

"Dr. Kim D'Eramo and other Energy Medicine teachers have been a big influence on my journey. It wasn't until I understood the relationship of mind-body-spirit healing that I began to recover. I am still constantly learning as I love researching and reading. I am working on starting to reach out and helping others to rebalance and thrive with the "power of the plants". I created my own original herbal products that I use in my daily healing and look forward to sharing with others in the future. I want to share my story with others to let them know there is a way back from the HELL of trauma and AI diseases. I decided to start writing a book about my experience. I am also planning on creating a series on different topics that I feel are relevant to know about in order to maneuver the minefields of our toxic world. I have used the plants in many different forms and I am always excited when I discover a new use for a plant-I owe a lot of my healing to Mother Nature and establishing trust in the innate intelligence of my body."

Connect with Kim on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/381761643253110

Dynamic Neural Retraining System (DNRS): https://retrainingthebrain.com/

Dr. Kim D'Eramo: drkimderamo.com

Head over to https://rebelhealthtribe.com/kit to get a free download of our loaded quick start guide to help you along your healing journey.  If you like us, subscribe, review, and share us with your friends, and come join our Rebel Health Tribe group on Facebook.

A Podcast Launch Bestie production

Transcripts

Mike Roesslein:

I'm here with Amy Stein, Amy.

Mike Roesslein:

Thank you.

Amy Stein:

Thank you.

Amy Stein:

I'm happy to be here.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah, it's going to be fun.

Mike Roesslein:

And we had a great chat before we came on and it's a lot of fun and she's now

Mike Roesslein:

watched a bunch of our stuff and she's on the other end of the, of the camera now.

Mike Roesslein:

So let's all try to make her really nervous.

Mike Roesslein:

But, um, what we did is we wanted to do something unique with this

Mike Roesslein:

podcast and I don't know unique.

Mike Roesslein:

I don't honestly listen to tons of podcasts, so I don't know if somebody

Mike Roesslein:

has done it before, but we were looking at who we wanted to have on for this

Mike Roesslein:

first season to talk about healing journeys and the healing process.

Mike Roesslein:

And going through that we came up with the idea we have some pretty

Mike Roesslein:

amazing stories in our community.

Mike Roesslein:

Why don't we read.

Mike Roesslein:

To our people and see what comes up.

Mike Roesslein:

And so we chose four of them and we're going to get to know some

Mike Roesslein:

of our, our HT community members.

Mike Roesslein:

And I think it'll be a lot of fun.

Mike Roesslein:

I think it's, a fun way for, for you guys to be involved.

Mike Roesslein:

And then for our audience to see that, you know, all the other guests so far

Mike Roesslein:

have been doctors or practitioners of some kind, and now they can see like,

Mike Roesslein:

people like them, like people, people who aren't like a doctor, aren't a

Mike Roesslein:

practitioner, aren't a nutritionist.

Mike Roesslein:

And, um, to see that like, you know, see yourself more in the journey and

Mike Roesslein:

to see that, um, there are those who are among us in the community here who

Mike Roesslein:

have been through quite a bit and who have come out the other side of it.

Mike Roesslein:

So, um, I guess my first question would be where you healthy as a kid.

Amy Stein:

Yeah.

Amy Stein:

So that's the thing.

Amy Stein:

Like I don't ever remember being healthy.

Amy Stein:

Like I had bad acne in third grade, I had a dermatologist, like with third

Amy Stein:

grader has a dermatologist third grade.

Amy Stein:

I had bad cystic acne.

Amy Stein:

So I was seeing a dermatologist from third grade on.

Amy Stein:

And the treatment was then you gave him antibiotics, chronically on antibiotics.

Amy Stein:

As a kid had no idea that was destroying my gut.

Amy Stein:

Then they put me on Accutane in high school, which has like all

Amy Stein:

these other crazy side effects.

Amy Stein:

Now they don't even use that.

Amy Stein:

no.

Amy Stein:

Luckily the only thing I have is GI because of it.

Amy Stein:

And my father was

Mike Roesslein:

on a nasty list of side effects.

Amy Stein:

Yes.

Amy Stein:

You have to get blood work every month to make sure it's in effect your

Amy Stein:

liver, but it affected your liver.

Amy Stein:

Anyway, as we all know, everything goes through your liver.

Amy Stein:

So I always had migraines and some gates as a kid, but nobody knew it.

Amy Stein:

Celiac was then.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

And so I grew up in a tine household.

Amy Stein:

My mom made chicken cutlets and like pasta, you know, like three

Amy Stein:

times a week, we always had salad.

Amy Stein:

We always had vegetables, but we always had some sort of

Amy Stein:

pasta or breading or something.

Amy Stein:

I mean always had stomach aches and I felt very unseen because my parents just

Amy Stein:

thought I'd want it to get out of things.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

So I didn't want to go to someone's house or I didn't want to do

Amy Stein:

something because I had the stomach aches and I wasn't comfortable

Amy Stein:

going to somebody else's house.

Amy Stein:

And it followed me through high school.

Amy Stein:

The migraines progressively got worse.

Amy Stein:

I would like black out after lunch in high school.

Amy Stein:

And I would go down to the nurse's office and they would say, you

Amy Stein:

just don't want to sit in math class because you don't like math.

Amy Stein:

And I said, no, I'm like, blacking out.

Amy Stein:

Everything goes fuzzy.

Amy Stein:

Like there's all these, you know, I'm seeing these things that aren't there.

Amy Stein:

It's something's going on.

Amy Stein:

So I would go to my doctor.

Amy Stein:

I would tell her the things they would run, the routine blood work, nothing

Amy Stein:

would come up, nothing would come up.

Amy Stein:

He'd come up.

Amy Stein:

I was just always told you're really sensitive.

Amy Stein:

Just stop being so sensitive, you know, take the medications we give you.

Amy Stein:

Here's the medications for my greens.

Amy Stein:

Take it.

Amy Stein:

And I, I think like crazy nightmares.

Amy Stein:

I had nosebleeds, I had all this stuff.

Amy Stein:

I was depressed.

Amy Stein:

They put me on all these antidepressants.

Amy Stein:

I had all these crazy symptoms from it.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

Acne the whole time to like junior high high school.

Mike Roesslein:

Um, it

Amy Stein:

got better, I guess, after the Accutane, the acne did

Amy Stein:

get better, but the GI symptoms got worse and the migraines got worse.

Amy Stein:

So before I just had like headaches as a kid, but now I was

Amy Stein:

in full on full blown migraine.

Amy Stein:

And then in college, like I, I was that person that I would have to

Amy Stein:

take like a two hour nap before I went out drinking with my.

Amy Stein:

Because I just didn't have the energy to get through it.

Amy Stein:

I was always tired.

Amy Stein:

I wanted to go to bed at like eight 30.

Amy Stein:

I still go to bed at like nine o'clock now for different reasons.

Amy Stein:

But I was always like, I couldn't function.

Amy Stein:

I was falling asleep.

Amy Stein:

I had fatigue.

Amy Stein:

I had all this stuff.

Amy Stein:

I went to my doctor in college.

Amy Stein:

I said, do you think I have a cache motos, his thyroid thing?

Amy Stein:

There's a lot of women in my family who have it.

Amy Stein:

No, no, no, no, no.

Amy Stein:

You don't have an, as we know, it takes, you know, 10 to 15 years,

Amy Stein:

20 years to get accurate diagnosis.

Amy Stein:

But basically how long it took me to get my diagnosis.

Amy Stein:

I've seen some versed it with what I was doing, but it was

Amy Stein:

like a long string of events.

Amy Stein:

I had childhood trauma, as we know, there's a correlation with trauma and

Amy Stein:

auto-immune, I didn't know any of that.

Amy Stein:

You know, I went to school for psychology.

Amy Stein:

I did all this research at the university.

Amy Stein:

None of that was ever mentioned.

Amy Stein:

I wasn't.

Amy Stein:

Doing that field, but like, you know, I was on pub med all the time.

Amy Stein:

I loved it.

Amy Stein:

I was a big book nerd.

Amy Stein:

I always read a lot.

Amy Stein:

I liked the excitement of learning new things.

Amy Stein:

And then I started to work with chronic pain patients a few years

Amy Stein:

after college, after I got my masters and we were doing, we were

Amy Stein:

teaching them alternative modality.

Amy Stein:

So guided meditation, coping skills training.

Amy Stein:

Yes.

Amy Stein:

Which was revolutionary.

Amy Stein:

So

Mike Roesslein:

yes.

Amy Stein:

So it was, but then not back then, I wasn't familiar with any of

Amy Stein:

the people that I know now back then, because I was very in the mindset of,

Amy Stein:

if you had an issue, you went to the doctor, they gave you a pill to fix it.

Amy Stein:

And if you didn't get better, it was cause you weren't compliant.

Amy Stein:

So even with my chronic teen patients, I kind of had this chip on my shoulder.

Amy Stein:

Well, you must not be compliant because we're offering you these alternative.

Amy Stein:

Options.

Amy Stein:

You're taking the medications.

Amy Stein:

You're taking a lot of medications, but you're still telling me all these things.

Amy Stein:

So I was, I enjoyed, I was with the geriatric population, which I enjoyed

Amy Stein:

a lot, but I was clueless and I didn't realize it until I got sick.

Amy Stein:

How cool was that?

Amy Stein:

I was, so I started to resemble my patients, I guess, I noticed a strong

Amy Stein:

correlation, probably about two years in.

Amy Stein:

And I remember telling my mom, like, I think there's something wrong.

Amy Stein:

A lot of these things are getting worse.

Amy Stein:

So my doctor referred me to an endocrinologist and he was really cold and

Amy Stein:

was like, there's nothing wrong with you.

Amy Stein:

You just have stress.

Amy Stein:

You just bought a house.

Amy Stein:

You're getting married.

Amy Stein:

These are good stressors.

Amy Stein:

You deal.

Amy Stein:

And I was really upset and I was, I thought, no, I, I

Amy Stein:

think there's something wrong.

Amy Stein:

I think you're missing something.

Amy Stein:

He told me I was pre-diabetic your thyroid was fine.

Amy Stein:

You know, just change, change the way you're eating and you won't.

Amy Stein:

Cause I was blacking out again.

Amy Stein:

So the migraines came back really, really bad.

Amy Stein:

I was blacking out.

Amy Stein:

I was throwing up, I was miserable.

Amy Stein:

I had no energy and everybody keeps telling you it's just stress.

Amy Stein:

It's just stress.

Amy Stein:

Go back to a, see a therapist.

Amy Stein:

You'll be fine.

Amy Stein:

And I knew like, no, no, no, there's something going on.

Amy Stein:

But again, in that system, I was indoctrinated as a child.

Amy Stein:

Like the doctor knows best you just, the doctor tells you the doctor,

Amy Stein:

if you're not doing it right.

Amy Stein:

It's not it's your fault.

Amy Stein:

Cause they know what they're talking about.

Amy Stein:

They went to medical school.

Amy Stein:

And so even though this little voice was like, Hmm, no, this isn't right.

Amy Stein:

I still went along with it.

Amy Stein:

It got to the point after I got married, I got really sick.

Amy Stein:

I, it was January.

Amy Stein:

I was coming back from the clinic to my office and I rolled my ankle outside.

Amy Stein:

I had flats on like, it wasn't wearing high heels.

Amy Stein:

I want to breaking my whole foot.

Amy Stein:

Like the whole metatarsal shattered had no idea.

Amy Stein:

I just thought, oh, it's really painful.

Amy Stein:

But it was edited.

Amy Stein:

My doctor was away and I couldn't get an x-ray.

Amy Stein:

It was like this whole thing.

Amy Stein:

So I pushed it off for a few days and they're like, oh, you know, your

Amy Stein:

metatarsal is completely broken.

Amy Stein:

I was like, oh, how does that happen?

Amy Stein:

They asked me what I did.

Amy Stein:

I said, I was just walking on the sidewalk.

Amy Stein:

I rolled my ankle and it broke.

Amy Stein:

So that was the beginning of the downhill slide.

Amy Stein:

The wheels just fell off.

Amy Stein:

So all this stuff started happening.

Amy Stein:

I was working with rheumatologists.

Amy Stein:

That, that time, that's how I was getting my patients.

Amy Stein:

I was one of the head rheumatologists was a PI on our study and

Amy Stein:

he was referring patients.

Amy Stein:

The other doctors in the facility were referring patients.

Amy Stein:

So I thought I'll just go see them.

Amy Stein:

I work with them every day.

Amy Stein:

I respect them.

Amy Stein:

I'll go see them.

Amy Stein:

So they did my blood.

Amy Stein:

At first, like, it was a little bit of things came up.

Amy Stein:

Like I had a little bit of a positive Ana had some positive C-reactive

Amy Stein:

protein, but other than that, like they really couldn't find anything.

Amy Stein:

And then I telling them like, all this is happening.

Amy Stein:

So they thought, well, we'll put you on some drugs to, you know, balance

Amy Stein:

things out, come back when it's worse.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

They always tell you, come back when it's worse.

Amy Stein:

Like I said, can I make any changes?

Amy Stein:

Can I change my diet?

Amy Stein:

Can I change?

Amy Stein:

I, you know, I read this thing about deodorant.

Amy Stein:

You're pretty on your lymph nodes.

Amy Stein:

There's aluminum.

Amy Stein:

Do you think I should change that?

Amy Stein:

No, no, no.

Amy Stein:

That's you don't need to do any of that.

Amy Stein:

No, just take the medication, come back when it's worse.

Amy Stein:

And it really upset me.

Amy Stein:

And I remember telling my mom and my husband, like I respect these doctors.

Amy Stein:

I work with them all the time and I felt like they didn't listen to me.

Amy Stein:

And I'm just not a regular patient.

Amy Stein:

Like they've known me for years.

Amy Stein:

I worked with them on a daily basis.

Amy Stein:

You know, they know who I am.

Amy Stein:

And they were like, oh, it's fine.

Amy Stein:

Just take the medication.

Amy Stein:

I'll be fine.

Amy Stein:

It didn't get fine.

Amy Stein:

It aggressively got worse.

Amy Stein:

My Ana was like 3000.

Amy Stein:

All of my stuff was off the charts, but they couldn't, they

Amy Stein:

couldn't find a name for it.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

So it was just like, oh, well, you're not, you don't fully fit into this box of RA.

Amy Stein:

You don't fully fit into the lupus box.

Amy Stein:

You don't fully fit into this box.

Amy Stein:

So we're just going to give you more medication and then

Amy Stein:

we'll see how that goes.

Amy Stein:

And I know this doesn't sit well with me, but I didn't know what else to do.

Amy Stein:

I felt really helpless.

Amy Stein:

I felt disempowered.

Amy Stein:

I didn't know what to do.

Amy Stein:

So I live in New York when I'm going into Manhattan.

Amy Stein:

Right?

Amy Stein:

Cause everyone's like, oh, the better doctors are in Manhattan.

Amy Stein:

That was not the case.

Amy Stein:

I did not have that experience.

Amy Stein:

So I went to other rheumatologists, other specialists throughout the whole area.

Amy Stein:

Everyone called me something different.

Amy Stein:

No one could agree on what I had.

Amy Stein:

No one could agree on a course of treatment.

Amy Stein:

No one could offer me any sort of guidance as to what to do.

Amy Stein:

They just felt like I was a difficult patient because even though I

Amy Stein:

cleaned, I was doing what they told me to do, I was getting worse and

Amy Stein:

they didn't know what to do with me.

Amy Stein:

So they just didn't want to deal with me.

Amy Stein:

So then I was like, either I would quit or they would fire me because

Amy Stein:

they didn't know how to handle me.

Amy Stein:

And it was a really, really awful feeling.

Amy Stein:

And I know I'm not alone in that.

Amy Stein:

I know there's a lot of people in our community who have gone through this and

Amy Stein:

it's a really bone-crushing sucky feeling.

Amy Stein:

So I remember I was like, okay, maybe I'll go back to therapy.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

And that will help.

Amy Stein:

And I, even though I knew that it was just going to retraumatize me

Amy Stein:

and it wasn't going to do anything.

Amy Stein:

I didn't know what else to do.

Amy Stein:

And the therapist I saw didn't know what to do with me at that point.

Amy Stein:

I was trying to fight to get onto disability.

Amy Stein:

Totally defeated.

Amy Stein:

I couldn't get out of bed.

Amy Stein:

I had ridiculous pain.

Amy Stein:

I lost massive amounts of weight.

Amy Stein:

I kept breaking my feet.

Amy Stein:

So I would be like in double CAS, the doctors didn't know what to do with me.

Amy Stein:

I changed my diet.

Amy Stein:

I went to the celiac center.

Amy Stein:

I mean, I did everything as a type a person would do to get better.

Amy Stein:

It was this manic, manic, trying to figure out what was wrong with me.

Mike Roesslein:

Have you figured out what was causing your feet to break?

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah, it was the celiac.

Mike Roesslein:

Okay.

Mike Roesslein:

So like malnutrition, basically Villa that was so damaged that you

Mike Roesslein:

weren't absorbing nutrients and

Amy Stein:

minerals and I developed osteopenia because of it.

Amy Stein:

So

Mike Roesslein:

yeah, I'm

Amy Stein:

talking

Mike Roesslein:

faster.

Mike Roesslein:

Oh, it's totally fine.

Mike Roesslein:

I just want to, um, kind of lean into it.

Mike Roesslein:

It's okay.

Mike Roesslein:

If this is not where you want to go, but, um, just let me know as long as

Mike Roesslein:

you're, well, I'm going to talk about the correlation between being negated by

Mike Roesslein:

your parents and like that you're fine.

Mike Roesslein:

You just don't want to go do the thing or that you're fine.

Mike Roesslein:

And this or that, you know, you're, we're invalidated in your experience.

Mike Roesslein:

And then you were invalidated in your experience by the doctors

Mike Roesslein:

that you were going and scrambling.

Mike Roesslein:

And so

Amy Stein:

my husband, my husband didn't believe me either.

Mike Roesslein:

Oh, that's that's three.

Mike Roesslein:

So there's three that all different layers.

Mike Roesslein:

And so, um, I've been doing a lot of trauma work the

Mike Roesslein:

last few years and, um, Dr.

Mike Roesslein:

Gabor Matteo, who I'm studying under this, uh, international trauma expert.

Mike Roesslein:

Now he talks about his definition of trauma is not

Mike Roesslein:

the thing that happens to us.

Mike Roesslein:

It's what happens inside the body or what happens after.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

And so it's more about what support and validation and care and

Mike Roesslein:

compassion and protection and all of that that we're able to receive.

Mike Roesslein:

So like the same thing can happen to two kids.

Mike Roesslein:

Yes.

Mike Roesslein:

And there's tons of examples of this, but the same thing can

Mike Roesslein:

happen to like a bus load of kids.

Mike Roesslein:

And if some of them get like care and compassion and validation and support

Mike Roesslein:

and protection and attunement and all of these things that are like for a healthy,

Mike Roesslein:

nervous system response to something, um, That incident will not really affect them.

Mike Roesslein:

Long-term very much.

Mike Roesslein:

And then the ones who don't receive that have a completely different

Mike Roesslein:

experience where it's like, my experience is invalid, meaning I am invalid.

Mike Roesslein:

Like I am it's it's stories, kids make up stories.

Mike Roesslein:

Like you've used the phrase, what's wrong with me a whole bunch of times

Mike Roesslein:

when you were trying to figure out, you know, your health situation and

Mike Roesslein:

kids make up stories, like we make up stories to make sense of the experience

Mike Roesslein:

that we're having and the experience.

Mike Roesslein:

The story that might get created.

Mike Roesslein:

If you're a kid and you always don't feel good and somebody telling you you're fine,

Mike Roesslein:

you just don't want to go to the thing.

Mike Roesslein:

Let's go to the thing.

Mike Roesslein:

Then you'd probably start to not even tell them half the time when you

Mike Roesslein:

didn't feel good, because you feel like it's a burden and then I'm a burden.

Mike Roesslein:

I'm this I'm that something's wrong with me.

Mike Roesslein:

I'm a complainer.

Mike Roesslein:

I'm going to get you a pen.

Mike Roesslein:

So like you learn to eat your you're not physically eat, but like absorb

Mike Roesslein:

and suppress your own experience.

Mike Roesslein:

Like your feelings.

Mike Roesslein:

Yes.

Mike Roesslein:

But like the thing that you're actually like experiencing is

Mike Roesslein:

suppressed then, because you can't share it, you can't express it.

Mike Roesslein:

And then to have that from doctors, from partners, from things like

Mike Roesslein:

that, like that's a lot of time of being really isolated with this,

Mike Roesslein:

because then that feels really alone.

Mike Roesslein:

Like when Mira has gone through her really bad flare.

Mike Roesslein:

People in her life who like don't know how to be there in that

Mike Roesslein:

will just be like, oh yeah, one time I had a really bad fall too.

Mike Roesslein:

And it's like, no, you don't get it.

Mike Roesslein:

Like at all.

Mike Roesslein:

Or like, oh, you can't even have pizza this one time.

Mike Roesslein:

Or like all these little things, like they just don't get or understand.

Mike Roesslein:

And then there's like a boiling, like rage, that comments and like, uh,

Mike Roesslein:

and then, but that can't be expressed either because they don't understand and

Mike Roesslein:

then they'll get defensive if you lash

Amy Stein:

out,

Mike Roesslein:

cut off even more.

Mike Roesslein:

And so you have to be something which isn't a bummer to

Mike Roesslein:

them in order to be around.

Mike Roesslein:

And I just, I think there was probably a lot of that going on.

Mike Roesslein:

And so I just wanted to point that out because that's something I've

Mike Roesslein:

learned about and witnessed being the caretaker for someone who's been

Mike Roesslein:

really sick and then studying a lot of trauma and psychology stuff like that.

Mike Roesslein:

Is just as painful or scary as the fear as the symptoms, it has the

Mike Roesslein:

breaking of the foot as the stomach upsets and all these other things.

Mike Roesslein:

And it's like the silent part of chronic disease that, okay.

Mike Roesslein:

Nobody

Amy Stein:

talks about it.

Amy Stein:

Nobody talks about it.

Amy Stein:

So even when I got to a place with a doctor who believes me,

Amy Stein:

right, which took over 10 years,

Amy Stein:

the doctor I have now, it's great because she actually lets me do my own research.

Amy Stein:

Right?

Amy Stein:

So she respects that I know what's best for me and that I am competent

Amy Stein:

enough to do the research, to look at the data and to figure out what's

Amy Stein:

going to work best for me, that was incredibly hard to find prior.

Amy Stein:

I went to other functional practitioners, other integrative practitioners.

Amy Stein:

When for treatments in Florida to see practitioners down there

Amy Stein:

because New York is so strict with what you can and cannot do.

Amy Stein:

Like you basically can't do anything here.

Amy Stein:

So we went to Florida to get treatment.

Amy Stein:

And even then it was like an uphill battle, right?

Amy Stein:

You're pushing the rock, the Boulder up the hill.

Amy Stein:

No one listens to you.

Amy Stein:

No one sees you.

Amy Stein:

No one believes you of what you're saying, right.

Amy Stein:

It can't be that there, you can't be that alone.

Amy Stein:

You can't be in that much pain.

Amy Stein:

You couldn't have tried everything.

Amy Stein:

There's something you're doing wrong.

Amy Stein:

It's never, it's never the doctor.

Amy Stein:

It's never the protocol because I would do these.

Amy Stein:

So they would have me do these protocols that other patients had done.

Amy Stein:

And I would just get sicker.

Amy Stein:

I'd become septic, I'd become bedridden.

Amy Stein:

I would not be able to eat anything.

Amy Stein:

You know, I'd have to go on a liquid diet and it was my fault.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

I wasn't doing it.

Amy Stein:

And so it was crazy that I finally got to the point where I

Amy Stein:

realized this, this is insanity.

Amy Stein:

Like, this is the definition of insanity.

Amy Stein:

And that I now see how frustrated my patients were.

Amy Stein:

Like, I would listen to them and I would advocate for them, but I never

Amy Stein:

really understood where they were at.

Amy Stein:

And so I got sick myself and then to try to explain it to people that I had been

Amy Stein:

friends with for years, they had no, like you said, they would try to compare.

Amy Stein:

It was like, you know, it was a comparison or like even people in my family.

Amy Stein:

Oh, well I have this.

Amy Stein:

Okay.

Amy Stein:

But you don't get it.

Amy Stein:

Like it's, it's different.

Amy Stein:

It's completely different.

Amy Stein:

And so it was another layer of being unseen.

Amy Stein:

So what happened was it got really dark.

Amy Stein:

Like it got really dark.

Amy Stein:

I didn't want to live, I didn't have a plan.

Amy Stein:

I went up calling a friend of mine a few years ago, I guess it was like

Amy Stein:

three years ago on new year's Eve.

Amy Stein:

And we had worked in college at a crisis hotline.

Amy Stein:

We used to work together.

Amy Stein:

And I said to her, I'm calling you, I don't have a plan, but I

Amy Stein:

don't want to do this anymore.

Amy Stein:

Like, I really just, I can't, I can't do it anymore.

Amy Stein:

I can't live like this.

Amy Stein:

I don't know what to do.

Amy Stein:

I've tried all these things.

Amy Stein:

I've, I've tried, it's just not working.

Amy Stein:

It's not working.

Amy Stein:

And she listened to me and she was, you know, she got me down to a part where

Amy Stein:

I was like, okay, I'm gonna, I'm gonna look into this other protocol because I

Amy Stein:

feel like this is, this is gonna help me.

Amy Stein:

And something's telling me to do it.

Amy Stein:

So I did the DNRs training.

Amy Stein:

And before I, with Annie

Mike Roesslein:

hopper, do the in-person thing or did

Amy Stein:

you not do the in-person because it was so bad.

Amy Stein:

I couldn't travel.

Amy Stein:

I couldn't be in a car longer than a half hour.

Amy Stein:

I couldn't fly.

Amy Stein:

I couldn't.

Amy Stein:

So many

Mike Roesslein:

of the people that utilize that training are in that same boat too.

Mike Roesslein:

I'm sure there's a lot of people who can't go to a three day, four day,

Mike Roesslein:

five day workshop in some other cities.

Mike Roesslein:

I

Amy Stein:

couldn't even leave my house to go to the doctor.

Amy Stein:

You know, there was points where my mom would have to take me or my husband

Amy Stein:

had to take me, so to do that with so, but I knew I could get the DVDs.

Amy Stein:

And I had read her book.

Amy Stein:

I had read so many books by this point.

Amy Stein:

I would bring the books in and say, do you think we should try this?

Amy Stein:

You know, um, Dr.

Amy Stein:

Shoemaker's mold protocol because I live on an island and it's moldy all

Amy Stein:

of the time and our house had mold and I knew we had mold and we try to

Amy Stein:

remediate and it was still in my body.

Amy Stein:

And I mean, I went through the gamut of all this stuff.

Amy Stein:

I, you know, I meet all my friends from scratch.

Amy Stein:

I cut out all the chemicals.

Amy Stein:

I was still getting triggered by going outside of someone's who

Amy Stein:

laundry, or if someone sprayed Windex or someone was smoking a cigarette,

Amy Stein:

five cars ahead of me on the highway.

Amy Stein:

Um, and it was debilitating.

Amy Stein:

I, I couldn't, I couldn't leave.

Amy Stein:

I couldn't, I couldn't do anything.

Amy Stein:

So I thought, okay, this I'm going to have to do this in order to figure out,

Amy Stein:

to get my brain to a place where I can think rationally, because at that point

Amy Stein:

I couldn't even think rationally anymore.

Amy Stein:

And I was like, I don't know, And at that same point, I'd already

Amy Stein:

been listening to all these webinars and all these podcasts, reading all

Amy Stein:

these books, um, for years, right?

Amy Stein:

I had all these notes and all what I should do, and I chat all these things.

Amy Stein:

It didn't work.

Amy Stein:

And I, I wasn't really spiritual at that point.

Amy Stein:

And I didn't really understand the connection with emotions and spirit.

Amy Stein:

And you have to feel the heal.

Amy Stein:

I didn't understand any of that.

Amy Stein:

I heard it, but it wasn't resonating with me.

Amy Stein:

I wasn't at that point that I could absorb it.

Amy Stein:

And it got to the point where one day I was listening to, uh, Stephen Bonaire.

Amy Stein:

So he's an herbalist who wrote a bunch of books about you make your own

Amy Stein:

tinctures and you, you know, too with plant medicine, so utilize the power

Amy Stein:

of the plants to make plant medicine.

Amy Stein:

So plant medicine has been used for 15,000 years.

Amy Stein:

And if Dr.

Amy Stein:

Maya talks about this all the time, And all these different plants have

Amy Stein:

all of these different properties.

Amy Stein:

And I thought this was fascinating.

Amy Stein:

I've always gardened.

Amy Stein:

I've always loved growing things.

Amy Stein:

We grow our own vegetables and I realized all these plants I already had growing.

Amy Stein:

I can harvest for medicine.

Amy Stein:

And I was like, this is crazy.

Amy Stein:

And it reminded me of a book.

Amy Stein:

My grandma had been reading before she passed about plant medicine and, and

Amy Stein:

using it rather than all, you know, as a farmer of alternative medicine.

Amy Stein:

And she had written in the book and inscription, and

Amy Stein:

I was like, you know what?

Amy Stein:

I think this is the route I need to go.

Amy Stein:

And once I started doing that, I guess it was like three or four years ago.

Amy Stein:

Everything changed.

Amy Stein:

Everything shifted.

Amy Stein:

When I turned the power plant medicine.

Amy Stein:

When I started to study homeopathy, I had already been dabbling in essential

Amy Stein:

oils for 10 years before that, but I didn't really understand how.

Amy Stein:

I just knew like, okay, I did this and it, it did this, right.

Amy Stein:

It was like the pill for ill type thing.

Amy Stein:

But I didn't understand the energetics of it.

Amy Stein:

That was all energy medicine.

Amy Stein:

Then I found all these energy medicine practitioners.

Amy Stein:

So Dr.

Amy Stein:

Kim's you drama?

Amy Stein:

She was huge.

Amy Stein:

So a lot of her ideas and her techniques have worked well for me.

Amy Stein:

Um, Donna Eden, I follow, I do her energetic routine every day.

Amy Stein:

I had died tight.

Amy Stein:

She, when I was working and I would refer my clients to it, they thought I was

Amy Stein:

crazy because I was in my twenties and I was the youngest person in the Tyson.

Mike Roesslein:

I've been to Tai Chi classes.

Mike Roesslein:

And I've been the youngest person at one of them I've ever been to.

Amy Stein:

Yes.

Amy Stein:

Yes.

Amy Stein:

So they thought it was hysterical that I was there and I'm like, no,

Amy Stein:

I think there's something to it.

Amy Stein:

You can do it with me.

Amy Stein:

And then the teacher, I had known 10 years ago, she started doing it online.

Amy Stein:

So I started doing that with her again.

Amy Stein:

And once I understand that everything was energy, right.

Amy Stein:

Because 10 years ago, if you would've told me.

Amy Stein:

To use an oil to use, uh, this, you know, this liquid homeopathic

Amy Stein:

remedy, I would have thought you were talking about craziness.

Amy Stein:

Like it wasn't science to me.

Amy Stein:

I needed the science.

Amy Stein:

And then when I realized there was science to it, there was a lot of science

Amy Stein:

for thousands of years in signs on it.

Amy Stein:

I thought, this is, this is where I need to do.

Amy Stein:

This is where I need to go.

Amy Stein:

And once I did that, I also did the micro formulas protocol.

Amy Stein:

That was huge too, because it addresses healing at the foundational level.

Amy Stein:

So I will definitely give a big shout out to them.

Amy Stein:

That

Mike Roesslein:

was so core now.

Amy Stein:

Yes.

Amy Stein:

Well, so of course their practitioner line micro is the regular people line.

Amy Stein:

Yeah.

Amy Stein:

I have Salesforce here.

Amy Stein:

I am on self-worth too.

Amy Stein:

So core has more products in the line than microbe.

Mike Roesslein:

Gotcha.

Amy Stein:

Yes.

Amy Stein:

So I, I introduced my doctor to that and I was like, this is, this is a game changer.

Amy Stein:

This is actually working.

Amy Stein:

Like, I, I felt like I was dying and had no other options.

Amy Stein:

And I started doing this along with the energy medicine.

Amy Stein:

And I feel like there could be hope now.

Amy Stein:

So I started studying more about the plant medicine.

Amy Stein:

I started taking urbalism classes online.

Amy Stein:

I started reading a lot of urbalism books.

Amy Stein:

I started making my own medicine, which was very empowering.

Amy Stein:

It's a lot cheaper too, which is why I did it.

Amy Stein:

And it was incredible.

Amy Stein:

The differences were night and day.

Amy Stein:

And so I fully got behind it.

Amy Stein:

I started studying more about homeopathy.

Amy Stein:

I started making my own bombs because a lot of things on the

Amy Stein:

market were in adjusting my issues.

Amy Stein:

So I was able to meet.

Amy Stein:

My own formulations that were specific for my issues and it was

Amy Stein:

working and I thought this is great.

Amy Stein:

So then I would give them out to people for Christmas.

Amy Stein:

Like, yeah, I think you should use this.

Amy Stein:

It'll be good for you.

Amy Stein:

And people liked it.

Amy Stein:

And then I was like, yeah, yeah.

Amy Stein:

So I'm a back burn right now, but,

Mike Roesslein:

so what was that like when things started to kind of turn

Mike Roesslein:

the corner a little bit, Like what, how did you know you were feeling

Mike Roesslein:

better that if something was working,

Amy Stein:

I just felt it I'm like a spiritual level like

Amy Stein:

once I started actually tapping into that, which was huge.

Amy Stein:

Cause I didn't know to do it before.

Amy Stein:

I really made no wrong decisions, whereas before everything was

Amy Stein:

made decision out of fear.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

Okay.

Amy Stein:

I'm just going to do this because I don't know what else to do.

Amy Stein:

And this is what everyone's telling me to do.

Amy Stein:

And this is what the research says, and this is what this

Amy Stein:

person said on this podcast.

Amy Stein:

So I'm just going to do that and maybe it'll work, right?

Amy Stein:

I'm going to hope it'll work.

Amy Stein:

I'm going to hope it'll work.

Amy Stein:

And it was that desperation, that manic energy, that managed healing,

Amy Stein:

rather than just going relaxing, listening to my body, trusting me, need

Amy Stein:

intelligence of my body, that it can heal.

Amy Stein:

It can rebalance.

Amy Stein:

You just have to give it what it needs.

Amy Stein:

And as you know, we get in the way, cause we think we know

Amy Stein:

better and we try to treat the body like a car that breaks down.

Amy Stein:

And it didn't work when I was going at that, when I was fighting it.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

I thought, oh, but I have to fight this because if I don't fight

Amy Stein:

it, that means I'm giving up.

Amy Stein:

And I couldn't tell it was my life.

Amy Stein:

I couldn't fast.

Amy Stein:

I just kept fighting and fighting and fighting.

Amy Stein:

I have to fight to read this book.

Amy Stein:

I have to fight to listen to all these podcasts.

Amy Stein:

I have to fight to do this protocol and to, to, you know, to beat it, to beat

Amy Stein:

the, the conditions and submission.

Amy Stein:

I mean, at one point I had like 10 different diagnoses

Amy Stein:

that we were working on.

Amy Stein:

So then it always felt like you're chasing the dragon, right?

Amy Stein:

So you get one to kind of calm down and then another dragon pops up and

Amy Stein:

then that one kind of calms down.

Amy Stein:

And then the first dragon resurfaces, and it was a shitty way to live.

Amy Stein:

Like, cause you never knew when the other shoe was going to drop.

Amy Stein:

You never knew what you were going to be dealing with.

Amy Stein:

I mean, I'm still in it.

Amy Stein:

Like I'm definitely not out of it completely.

Amy Stein:

I'm in a lot better place than I ever was, but I still don't know

Amy Stein:

what I'll feel like tomorrow.

Amy Stein:

You know?

Amy Stein:

I mean, I still can sometimes push myself too much and I paid for it.

Amy Stein:

I still contend with the migraines.

Amy Stein:

I still have.

Amy Stein:

But now, rather than pushing through it, I listened to my body when

Amy Stein:

it first gives the message and I'm like, yeah, I need to stop.

Amy Stein:

Yeah.

Amy Stein:

I need to not do that.

Amy Stein:

I need to reprioritize.

Amy Stein:

I need to, you know, and if my husband doesn't have dinner tonight, oh wow.

Amy Stein:

It is what it is.

Amy Stein:

Like if there's something I can eat or if I'm not hungry, that's what it is.

Amy Stein:

Like, rather than feeling the guilt to please everybody, to be a certain person

Amy Stein:

for everybody to make everyone else happy.

Amy Stein:

I was dying because of it, because I had this, you know, I had to be this

Amy Stein:

certain person and to the world and

Mike Roesslein:

people pleasing,

Amy Stein:

probably speaking to everybody, that's listening to this.

Amy Stein:

So it taught me a lot about myself.

Amy Stein:

And initially when I first got sick, I said, I wouldn't

Amy Stein:

wish this on my worst enemy.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

But this is an awful thing.

Amy Stein:

It's horrible.

Amy Stein:

I probably said that for the first five.

Amy Stein:

And then the more I started to get as the energy medicine and

Amy Stein:

plant medicine, it started to shift DNRs, I think again, right.

Amy Stein:

The brain fog wasn't debilitating.

Amy Stein:

And I could kind of have rational thought process and the DNR.

Amy Stein:

Um, I do aspects of it.

Amy Stein:

I, I do more of Dr.

Amy Stein:

Kim's techniques now because it's, to me, it's, it's more manageable.

Amy Stein:

The DNRs is great, but it's, I feel like if I were to refer it to people,

Amy Stein:

the time commitment, especially if you don't feel good is a lot.

Amy Stein:

And I know

Mike Roesslein:

that's the one catch for a lot of people.

Mike Roesslein:

I know it has to be like minimum 30 minutes a day, preferably 61 90.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

Some people do it for 30 and still.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah.

Amy Stein:

So I wasn't that person I had to do the hour and even the hour,

Amy Stein:

I still had to sometimes do more.

Amy Stein:

And.

Amy Stein:

So I checked the, what I, the way I treat myself now, because essentially I'm, I

Amy Stein:

treat myself I'm work under my doctor, but I've been treating myself for the

Amy Stein:

past few years is what resonates with me.

Amy Stein:

So I take aspects of DNRs that resonates with me.

Amy Stein:

I take aspects of your Veda.

Amy Stein:

I take aspects of traditional Chinese medicine.

Amy Stein:

I take aspects of urbalism homeopathy, whatever resonates with me.

Amy Stein:

And I check in with myself like, okay, what do you want me to do?

Amy Stein:

What do you think is going to help body?

Amy Stein:

Like, you know, I still eat really clean.

Amy Stein:

I still make my own food.

Amy Stein:

I don't eat out.

Amy Stein:

You know, I don't have that luxury.

Amy Stein:

There's really nowhere to eat here.

Amy Stein:

We have one restaurant, but it's kind of pricey.

Amy Stein:

So we'd go for special occasions and, you know, I'm able to get

Amy Stein:

somewhat of my life back now.

Amy Stein:

I am still really careful with what I do and I'm still really.

Amy Stein:

Structured compared to most people of how I live my life.

Amy Stein:

You know, we don't use any chemicals in our house.

Amy Stein:

We don't do a lot of things that people do that are normal.

Amy Stein:

Like I haven't drank since I got married 10 years ago, because I just

Amy Stein:

cannot metabolize alcohol, you know?

Amy Stein:

And, and that's a lot of our social experience is that you go out, you drink

Amy Stein:

with your friends, you go out to eat.

Amy Stein:

So I don't do that.

Amy Stein:

So I've lost a lot of people that I thought were friends.

Amy Stein:

That was a hard part of the journey as well is you realize

Amy Stein:

really what's important.

Amy Stein:

Who's actually there for you and who you really are.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

So the person I am now, I like a lot better than the

Amy Stein:

person was before I got sick.

Amy Stein:

And I would now say the last few years I would do it over again because the

Amy Stein:

lessons I learned from it are huge.

Amy Stein:

And now I realize what I'm meant to do with.

Amy Stein:

Rather than what I thought I was supposed to do.

Amy Stein:

So even though my life does not look like what I thought it would be, and

Amy Stein:

I'm not doing what I thought I would be doing, I feel like the work and the

Amy Stein:

knowledge I have now is so much more important for the world we live in.

Amy Stein:

And for all the people that are going through this, that it's,

Amy Stein:

it makes, it makes it worthwhile.

Amy Stein:

So I feel like this whole journey was for a reason, as much as it was.

Amy Stein:

Really shitty.

Mike Roesslein:

And you don't want to hear that when you're in it.

Mike Roesslein:

Like people would always say stuff to us when Mira was really sick or when I was

Mike Roesslein:

really depressed or whenever somebody is really struggling, like, oh, you

Mike Roesslein:

know, you're going to come out of this in some sort of improved way, or you're

Mike Roesslein:

going to learn something from this.

Mike Roesslein:

And I was always just like, shut up.

Mike Roesslein:

I hate you.

Mike Roesslein:

Like, I don't want you all to die.

Mike Roesslein:

Just stop saying those things, because I want this to stop because

Mike Roesslein:

he always just wanted to stop.

Mike Roesslein:

Like he just wanted it to stop or whatever.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

And it's not built that way, unfortunately.

Mike Roesslein:

And yeah, it's been through, you know, our hardest times with all that stuff

Mike Roesslein:

that, you know, the first flare she had.

Mike Roesslein:

We were able to get it under control pretty easily and just had to like tighten

Mike Roesslein:

up her diet and do a couple other things.

Mike Roesslein:

And the second one was more severe and longer.

Mike Roesslein:

And we had to go to like deeper levels of stuff that she needed to do.

Mike Roesslein:

And then this last one was like a year long and really terrifying and really

Mike Roesslein:

horrible, and then went into, you know, energetics and trauma things and stuff

Mike Roesslein:

that like we weren't doing before that.

Mike Roesslein:

And it's always like another level.

Mike Roesslein:

And for me, when I, when I got really depressed, I tried the diets and then

Mike Roesslein:

I was trained in functional medicine.

Mike Roesslein:

I tried the supplements, I tried the things and like I did it didn't work.

Mike Roesslein:

And so I was forced to like, explore different levels of things, which

Mike Roesslein:

is now where I'm moving my whole like work and career and business.

Mike Roesslein:

And all of that is more in that scope because like you can get marginally

Mike Roesslein:

better with like switching a diet or like reducing stress is huge.

Mike Roesslein:

And like there's a difference between like reducing exposure to stress

Mike Roesslein:

and then improving your ability to handle and tolerate stress and

Mike Roesslein:

manage stress two totally different things both need to be done.

Mike Roesslein:

But then, but then there's this other level that you touch on a little bit

Mike Roesslein:

with like your spirituality and your intuition and energetics, and like I'm

Mike Roesslein:

somebody that three years ago, if you said an energy healing to me, I was like

Mike Roesslein:

out the door, like baby, who is nonsense.

Mike Roesslein:

Now I've been in like a really high level of energy training for two years.

Mike Roesslein:

And so my perspective is a little different than it

Mike Roesslein:

was, it was witnessing it.

Mike Roesslein:

That got me on board that got me to want to do the training.

Mike Roesslein:

They got me now I understand it a lot better, but like it was

Mike Roesslein:

witnessing somebody do something that I didn't think was possible.

Mike Roesslein:

Right?

Mike Roesslein:

Like this type of work that I was like, this is hooey, this is nonsense.

Mike Roesslein:

And then watching what happened and then being like, huh,

Mike Roesslein:

that just flipped everything.

Mike Roesslein:

I thought I knew in my head, how do you do that?

Mike Roesslein:

And then now learning how to do that.

Mike Roesslein:

Everything really just truly is energy.

Mike Roesslein:

Like it really is.

Mike Roesslein:

And that was where medicine was before pharmaceuticals.

Mike Roesslein:

And so there was like a split and we followed the money

Mike Roesslein:

and that's where it went.

Mike Roesslein:

And certain people, one that split and that's where we went.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

And that's where we went pharmaceuticals over energy as medicine and, you know,

Mike Roesslein:

things like Qigong and Tai Chi and Chinese medicine and acupuncture and these

Mike Roesslein:

things like they've known it forever and indigenous and native cultures know that.

Mike Roesslein:

And that's how they work too.

Mike Roesslein:

And it's all.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah, it's, there's plenty, plenty of research that I was blown away to

Mike Roesslein:

find on, you know, on, on different aspects of energy and things that in.

Mike Roesslein:

Western culture.

Mike Roesslein:

We tend to turn away from, um, but there's way more science

Mike Roesslein:

to it than I thought there was.

Mike Roesslein:

There's wait a minute.

Mike Roesslein:

You get into quantum physics and neuroscience and all kinds of

Mike Roesslein:

it gets it's pretty undeniable.

Mike Roesslein:

When you look at the bigger picture of it, it just doesn't fit our medical model.

Mike Roesslein:

So it always gets food, food away,

Amy Stein:

but, and you, you know, they think you can't make money off it, right?

Amy Stein:

So plant medicine can grow your own plants.

Amy Stein:

You can make your own medicine.

Amy Stein:

Where's the money in that?

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

We're entirely driven by the medical systems entirely driven by, by that.

Mike Roesslein:

And so is most of our psoas, most of things like most things and

Mike Roesslein:

studies are very expensive to run.

Mike Roesslein:

Like I know cat tubes pretty well, who did recently finished a study with Dr.

Mike Roesslein:

Dale Bredesen reversing dementia and Alzheimer's in people and it costs,

Mike Roesslein:

I think it was a million and a half dollars to do a study with 20 people.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

And now they got funding to triple the size of that.

Mike Roesslein:

They got a $5 million grant to now do 60 people.

Mike Roesslein:

Drug companies do studies with like thousands of people in them, right?

Mike Roesslein:

Because they can spend millions and millions and millions of dollars

Mike Roesslein:

and people will fund this because if they get a certain result, which

Mike Roesslein:

is manageable, uh, then they get more money and then they can sell.

Mike Roesslein:

They just put out a drug for Alzheimer's just last week, that

Mike Roesslein:

$60,000 a year, I think can take it.

Mike Roesslein:

And three people at the FDA quit over it getting approved.

Mike Roesslein:

And they have a pretty low bar at the FDA for like what their morals are at.

Mike Roesslein:

And so for three people over there to quit, because something was

Mike Roesslein:

corrupt is like pretty damn extreme.

Mike Roesslein:

And it's 60 grand a year to use a drug that marginally sort of works.

Mike Roesslein:

If it's a certain population, like, yeah, it's all, it's all money.

Mike Roesslein:

And so.

Amy Stein:

And that's how I took it back is that time became

Amy Stein:

empowered as I did it for myself.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

So I wasn't relying on the medical model anymore because I I don't have

Amy Stein:

any calms out saying I lost hope in it.

Amy Stein:

And I not really think it's going to get back.

Amy Stein:

Emergency medicine is completely different.

Amy Stein:

You know, I cut off my arm, I'll go to the hospital for sure.

Amy Stein:

But anything else was chronic pain or chronic conditions.

Amy Stein:

It, it completely failed and it completely failed me.

Amy Stein:

And it completely found a bunch of people.

Amy Stein:

I mean, even recently, like my pre-diabetes turn into

Amy Stein:

type two diabetes, right.

Amy Stein:

Even though I, I eat a really good diet, I don't eat processed food.

Amy Stein:

I eat quality meat and protein and organic vegetables.

Amy Stein:

And I cheated it with homeopathics.

Amy Stein:

My doctor was bored.

Amy Stein:

She wanted me to go to metaphor and I'm like, absolutely not.

Amy Stein:

I'm going to treat this my way.

Amy Stein:

And if it doesn't work in six months, we'll readdress.

Amy Stein:

But between homeopathic and some other changes, you know, I don't believe

Amy Stein:

there's one magic pill for everybody.

Amy Stein:

Even with alternative treatment.

Amy Stein:

There is no, there's no quick fix.

Amy Stein:

I hate to tell people there's no quick fix.

Amy Stein:

I used to tell my patients when I worked at them, there's no magic pill.

Amy Stein:

Not every diet works for every person.

Amy Stein:

I mean, I've been on a lot of different diets.

Amy Stein:

I do what works best for me.

Amy Stein:

And that's what I think is the most important part is people have to

Amy Stein:

realize that they have to reconnect with themselves on a higher level.

Amy Stein:

Yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

You mentioned listening to like knowing when you're overstepped

Mike Roesslein:

or when you've, you're too extended or you're too tired or things like

Mike Roesslein:

that, your body will have science.

Mike Roesslein:

Like you'll get messages.

Mike Roesslein:

You'll feel a certain way.

Mike Roesslein:

You might feel a little bit and our tendency and what we're

Mike Roesslein:

taught to do is push through that.

Mike Roesslein:

And if you don't, something's wrong with you and if you complain about

Mike Roesslein:

it or you tell somebody I can't do something, then you're letting

Mike Roesslein:

them down or you're weak, or this.

Mike Roesslein:

And I have witnessed with Mira and my own stuff.

Mike Roesslein:

My my struggles have been more like mental, emotional, spiritual, not

Mike Roesslein:

physical I've somehow miraculously not really had any health issues

Mike Roesslein:

considering I did everything I could to destroy my body for about 15 years.

Mike Roesslein:

It's very resilient.

Mike Roesslein:

So I'm grateful there, but with her, the signals will get louder when you don't

Mike Roesslein:

listen to them until they will haul to it.

Mike Roesslein:

And that's where Gabor's book.

Mike Roesslein:

I mentioned before we came on, uh, when the body says, no, that's the

Mike Roesslein:

whole premise of the book is like, when you get to a certain point,

Mike Roesslein:

it's just going to say no for you.

Mike Roesslein:

And that can show up as an auto-immune conditions.

Mike Roesslein:

It can show up as cancer.

Mike Roesslein:

It can show up as chronic fatigue syndrome.

Mike Roesslein:

It can show up as a lot of different things.

Mike Roesslein:

Debilitating depression will shut you down really quickly.

Mike Roesslein:

Like, and so connecting to the.

Mike Roesslein:

That knowing the knowing and the subtle sensations it gets it's I don't need

Mike Roesslein:

the pain to be at a tend to notice it.

Mike Roesslein:

I'll notice it when it's starting to creep in to be a one.

Mike Roesslein:

And then it's like, okay, weird.

Mike Roesslein:

That doesn't feel good.

Mike Roesslein:

I need to rest the rest of the way and take care of

Mike Roesslein:

myself and do what feels good.

Mike Roesslein:

Like, um, mirror started doing this thing when she comes home from work.

Mike Roesslein:

It's just like toning, like, uh, like sound like, no, just with her, with her

Mike Roesslein:

own, like, just like a sound like that.

Mike Roesslein:

And she, no one taught her to do that.

Mike Roesslein:

No one told her to do that.

Mike Roesslein:

It just, when she would come home from a shift in the ER, she would lay down and

Mike Roesslein:

put her hand on her chest and do that.

Mike Roesslein:

And I'd say, what are you doing?

Mike Roesslein:

You say I'm vibrating.

Mike Roesslein:

And I don't know, it feels good for my body and like, starting to learn,

Mike Roesslein:

like, it feels good for my body and trusting that and not needing to be

Mike Roesslein:

told, like, by someone that you need to do this, like that, wasn't something.

Mike Roesslein:

Like I've learned if I want her to try something or do something.

Mike Roesslein:

The last thing I should do is like, tell her to do it.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

Maybe like leave a book about it on the table, but don't, um, don't say

Mike Roesslein:

you need to do this, or you should do this because after you've been

Mike Roesslein:

through the ringer with the medical institutions and people invalidating

Mike Roesslein:

you and telling you what to do and all these things, like that's not helpful.

Amy Stein:

And people offer you suggestions, have you tried this?

Amy Stein:

Right?

Amy Stein:

Like you haven't tried everything and then some,

Mike Roesslein:

yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

And they're usually like 19 steps ago for you.

Mike Roesslein:

Like, they're like something you tried like seven years ago is their cutting edge

Mike Roesslein:

thing that they just read an article about

Amy Stein:

or something.

Amy Stein:

Yeah.

Amy Stein:

Yeah.

Amy Stein:

But it was just like in the paper.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

But we knew about it 15 years ago.

Amy Stein:

Yeah.

Amy Stein:

So that, yeah, that that's been hard for me too, is just trying to

Amy Stein:

figure out how to talk to people in a way that does not shame them.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

And cause more internal trauma for them.

Amy Stein:

And in a way that can make.

Amy Stein:

Accessible for everybody because unfortunately I fear that it's already an

Amy Stein:

epidemic now auto-immune so even if you're not aware that you have something going

Amy Stein:

on, your body's already feeling it, right.

Amy Stein:

5g, the EMS, the poor diet, the toxins, heavy metals, all that,

Amy Stein:

your body's already feeling it or hurting, trying to cope.

Amy Stein:

And it's not.

Amy Stein:

So these people may be failing after we've already fallen down the hole.

Amy Stein:

So that's something I try to think about.

Amy Stein:

Well, how would I explain this to somebody who has no idea that their

Amy Stein:

body's already experiencing this?

Amy Stein:

You know, how would I make it so that they understand that these small changes.

Amy Stein:

We'll make big differences and yeah, it may not completely reverse everything,

Amy Stein:

but, you know, do you want a cast or,

Mike Roesslein:

oh, it's just a million small changes.

Mike Roesslein:

It's changing the way that you relate to yourself and your body

Mike Roesslein:

and like the whole situation.

Mike Roesslein:

And so many times to chronic diseases, the body becomes the enemy and here's that,

Mike Roesslein:

and it knows that that's not what we need.

Mike Roesslein:

Like it's always doing its best at a hundred percent of the time, like all

Mike Roesslein:

the time and the messages you're getting in the symptoms you're getting are

Mike Roesslein:

like the light turning on in your car.

Mike Roesslein:

And if we just turn the light off in the car all the time,

Mike Roesslein:

the car will explode, right?

Mike Roesslein:

So like you need the signals, you need the warnings, you need

Mike Roesslein:

the symptoms and it's not fair.

Mike Roesslein:

And it's not, I think the most frustrating thing, at least for

Mike Roesslein:

her is when, like there's other people that do tons of stuff that.

Mike Roesslein:

Well, like that way worse than any, like she's always eaten pretty clean.

Mike Roesslein:

She never really drank a lot.

Mike Roesslein:

She never part, like our backgrounds are very, very different.

Mike Roesslein:

I'm the one that did all the things over her.

Mike Roesslein:

Perfect for me.

Mike Roesslein:

And she's not, and she's the one that's been really sick and I'm not,

Mike Roesslein:

and there's like a resentment there, not towards me, but towards life.

Mike Roesslein:

Like, why does this happen to me?

Mike Roesslein:

Why is this me?

Mike Roesslein:

These people are all out drinking and doing all these things.

Mike Roesslein:

Like if she went out for like two nights in a row and party

Mike Roesslein:

until two in the morning and like whole, like, I don't even know.

Mike Roesslein:

I don't even know what would happen.

Mike Roesslein:

Like it would be catastrophic yet.

Mike Roesslein:

That's like most people's lives.

Mike Roesslein:

And like, there's this like attachment to wanting to be normal.

Mike Roesslein:

And our normal sucks.

Mike Roesslein:

Like our normal is just not good and healthy and it's

Mike Roesslein:

not something to attain to.

Mike Roesslein:

The, one of my favorite quotes is like, I don't remember exactly how it

Mike Roesslein:

goes, but it is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a sick society.

Mike Roesslein:

Exactly.

Mike Roesslein:

And so like, it's.

Mike Roesslein:

The things that I thought I was missing out on when I shifted my

Mike Roesslein:

whole life about like social things and going out and all those things,

Mike Roesslein:

and that lasted for a little while.

Mike Roesslein:

Like there was this foam on for awhile, and then I was like, man, you couldn't pay

Mike Roesslein:

me to go somewhere at 10 o'clock at night.

Mike Roesslein:

Now I'm like, are you kidding?

Mike Roesslein:

Like, if somebody was like, Hey, I'll meet you there at 10.

Mike Roesslein:

I'd be like in the morning.

Mike Roesslein:

Or like, what?

Mike Roesslein:

Like, there is no place I'm going at 10 o'clock at night.

Mike Roesslein:

Like that's just not going to happen because I'll feel like hell the next day.

Mike Roesslein:

And like, that's not worth it to me anymore.

Mike Roesslein:

So yeah, just people can respect those decisions.

Mike Roesslein:

And if you know somebody in your life that's dealing with chronic

Mike Roesslein:

disease, like just be mindful of this.

Mike Roesslein:

This is the world they live in.

Mike Roesslein:

Like this that's the,

Amy Stein:

is there every day, you know, the ability, the fatigue, like,

Amy Stein:

you know, you see all this thing about the COVID long haulers, right?

Amy Stein:

These people are suffering people in the autoimmune community have been

Amy Stein:

suffering like that for so long.

Amy Stein:

And there's no money towards the research for fatigue.

Amy Stein:

Finally, Dr.

Amy Stein:

Tim bomb, he's a big fatigue doctor.

Amy Stein:

I'm sure.

Amy Stein:

You know, He finally got research money for, for fatigue research.

Amy Stein:

It took him like 40 years to get substantial money from

Amy Stein:

the athletes to do research on fatigue only because of, because

Mike Roesslein:

there's not going to be a pill there.

Mike Roesslein:

Right.

Mike Roesslein:

The reason they got the money is probably because they think there's going to

Mike Roesslein:

maybe be some sort of crossover between what he was doing and then some sort of

Mike Roesslein:

treatment for either COVID or something else or something that they'll be

Mike Roesslein:

able to turn into a drug or like some something, cause chronic fatigue syndrome

Mike Roesslein:

is not going to be treated with a drug.

Mike Roesslein:

So that's why it doesn't get attention

Amy Stein:

and treated with a drug.

Amy Stein:

Cause they give it to people with fibromyalgia.

Amy Stein:

They give you.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah, but the thing, I mean, LDN is more effective than that,

Mike Roesslein:

but there's like, um, chronic fatigue is just a very loud shutting down of the.

Mike Roesslein:

And it's

Amy Stein:

and it's throughout a lot of conditions, right?

Amy Stein:

I think there's this misnomer.

Amy Stein:

And it's also been vilified as a psychological issue when the data shows

Amy Stein:

that it is a very physical issues.

Amy Stein:

That's another issue in this community is that you're told you're crazy a lot.

Amy Stein:

And I, and I was from that background and to be told, like, just go, just go

Amy Stein:

to back to therapy, just take a pill.

Amy Stein:

Wow.

Amy Stein:

This is how we treat people

Mike Roesslein:

like millions of people.

Mike Roesslein:

Like most, most people, that's how we, that's how we treat them chronically ill

Mike Roesslein:

for anything that's a medical system.

Mike Roesslein:

Doesn't have an answer for.

Mike Roesslein:

So it's yeah, it's maddening.

Mike Roesslein:

And it, the funny thing about it's in your head goes full circle.

Mike Roesslein:

They say it's in your head and then you're like, screw you.

Mike Roesslein:

My symptoms are physical.

Mike Roesslein:

And then what we realize when we go further down, it is it's, it's

Mike Roesslein:

not in our head, but it's in our, like being, and it's the, yeah, but

Mike Roesslein:

it's the mind, it's the emotions.

Mike Roesslein:

It's the trauma.

Mike Roesslein:

It's the things which technically there is a psychological component there,

Mike Roesslein:

but the, the in your head part that they mean is not the, in your head.

Mike Roesslein:

Part of the reality is the thing it's like 20 levels to

Amy Stein:

shallow, but that's because we only do the physical

Amy Stein:

and the mental components.

Amy Stein:

There is no spiritual and emotion component in our society.

Amy Stein:

And that was what was lacking in my care as well.

Amy Stein:

And I, it took me having to get that skill set for myself.

Amy Stein:

There was nobody there doing it for me.

Amy Stein:

And I think that that's, that's the huge disconnect is that they don't look at it

Amy Stein:

as a whole, even in the functional arena.

Amy Stein:

A lot of those doctors don't have the time or the skillset, or they

Amy Stein:

don't have someone in their office.

Amy Stein:

Who's trained in that.

Amy Stein:

To teach people energy healing work.

Amy Stein:

They could do themselves.

Amy Stein:

You know, like I taught myself the body codes.

Amy Stein:

Um, you know, I, I just had a

Mike Roesslein:

meeting with Brad Nelson yesterday.

Mike Roesslein:

Oh yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

How funny their stuff on the new platform.

Mike Roesslein:

Oh,

Amy Stein:

that's great.

Amy Stein:

And you know, like the other things you were saying about the

Amy Stein:

HMI, you know, so I do energy.

Amy Stein:

I was doing it before actually actually started our podcast to try to get myself

Amy Stein:

back into my body and to be connected so that I could be fully on for this.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

And give, give the best version of what I want to give.

Amy Stein:

And so that I could speak from the heart and, and be able to resonate with the

Amy Stein:

community so that they know that I get it.

Amy Stein:

I'm living it still.

Amy Stein:

I'm not out of it.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

It doesn't really ever end changes and you have to change with it because it's just

Amy Stein:

another layer that you're appealing back.

Amy Stein:

There's something else you have to learn.

Amy Stein:

In the past, I'd get really angry.

Amy Stein:

Like what now?

Amy Stein:

Like, what am I doing with now?

Amy Stein:

Why is this, what am I not learning?

Amy Stein:

What is happening here now?

Amy Stein:

I, I I've learned do the work I've done.

Amy Stein:

That's not helpful.

Amy Stein:

Right?

Amy Stein:

Just as a form of self hate, like I'm just getting mad at myself again.

Amy Stein:

So I've been doing the whole opponent prayer for a few years.

Amy Stein:

That helped as well.

Amy Stein:

That, I'm sorry, please forgive me.

Amy Stein:

Thank you.

Amy Stein:

I love you.

Amy Stein:

And I substitute people in my life who were, you know, hurt me and

Amy Stein:

rather than say, I love you to them.

Amy Stein:

I say, I forgive you because it may be hard to say, I love you

Amy Stein:

to these people that hurt us.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

Or even to ourselves.

Amy Stein:

So I forgive you.

Amy Stein:

And that was, that was huge part of my healing as well.

Amy Stein:

But it it's a whole moving machine.

Amy Stein:

It's not just one component.

Amy Stein:

So it's not just the diet.

Amy Stein:

It's not just the supplements.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah, I wish we had an easier, simpler, faster, more, more,

Mike Roesslein:

easy answer for you, but it really is.

Mike Roesslein:

It's simple in that it's like once you see the whole picture, it's like,

Mike Roesslein:

of course all those things matter.

Mike Roesslein:

Like it, can't not matter like energetically, like, you know, how

Mike Roesslein:

you feel different when you go in a room of certain types of people or

Mike Roesslein:

you're in this place or you're in the forest for me, like it shifts

Mike Roesslein:

the entire way that my body feels.

Mike Roesslein:

And like, that's just as real of a thing as having a headache or having whatever.

Mike Roesslein:

And we just need to see it as that and be able to learn to hear that

Mike Roesslein:

and feel that and acknowledge that and make decisions based on that too.

Mike Roesslein:

Like, oh, I'm not feeling this, uh, thing, this isn't for me.

Mike Roesslein:

And like to trust that, but when you're told that your opinion is,

Mike Roesslein:

or your experiences and valid for like years and years and years to

Mike Roesslein:

like regain that trust of your own experience is super empowering.

Mike Roesslein:

Like it's, it's a total shift.

Mike Roesslein:

This is true.

Mike Roesslein:

What's happening to me is real.

Mike Roesslein:

It's true.

Mike Roesslein:

It's happening.

Mike Roesslein:

This is true.

Mike Roesslein:

I know what it's like.

Mike Roesslein:

I know it.

Mike Roesslein:

And other people see it now and it's real.

Mike Roesslein:

And, but learning that, that doesn't matter.

Mike Roesslein:

Like the other people can't validate it for

Amy Stein:

you.

Amy Stein:

Exactly.

Amy Stein:

And their opinions are none of your business right before with Dr.

Amy Stein:

Kim.

Amy Stein:

What's been huge as she says, to live through your heart.

Amy Stein:

Right?

Amy Stein:

So from your heart, rather than your brain, Dr.

Amy Stein:

Kim, dear Damo, he's in Colorado.

Amy Stein:

So she says,

Mike Roesslein:

you told me I

Amy Stein:

needed to talk to her.

Amy Stein:

She's amazing.

Amy Stein:

She's, she's amazing I always get dabbling into it before I was introduced to her.

Amy Stein:

And I just, I found her on a podcast or something.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

It was just the universe, bring her to me.

Amy Stein:

And then once I started listening to what she had to say, and so how real she

Amy Stein:

was, she overcame her own health as well.

Amy Stein:

Um, It was like it connected, right?

Amy Stein:

It just felt ranked.

Amy Stein:

So that's what I, my most important tip is to the people in this group

Amy Stein:

is to go with what feels good for you, because what feels good

Amy Stein:

for me may not feel good for you.

Amy Stein:

What feels good for Michael May not feel good for you, but to go with

Amy Stein:

what feels good for you to reconnect with that innate intelligence of your

Amy Stein:

body, the innate intelligence, that's always been there, even if you're not

Amy Stein:

spiritual and you can't connect to the higher power or the universe or

Amy Stein:

archangels, or, you know, whatever you do.

Amy Stein:

Like I pull an Oracle card.

Amy Stein:

That's how I connect and ask how I should, you know, what I should do with things.

Amy Stein:

Um, there's so many different ways that you can connect, you know, sound healing.

Amy Stein:

There's so many different modalities where you can find a spiritual

Amy Stein:

connection without having to go.

Amy Stein:

Somebody makes you uncomfortable.

Amy Stein:

It's a practice too, right?

Amy Stein:

It comes, you build up on it with what you're comfortable with and,

Amy Stein:

and more will be introduced to you.

Amy Stein:

Because it's all connected.

Amy Stein:

So what you'll need, you need to know what we brought to you.

Amy Stein:

I'm a firm believer in that because

Mike Roesslein:

yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

You just gotta be open to listening and hearing it and not trusting.

Mike Roesslein:

You're like hit on it.

Mike Roesslein:

Like, yeah, this is good.

Mike Roesslein:

Or this isn't good.

Mike Roesslein:

And

Amy Stein:

my thing is, if he's here at three times, like if someone says to me

Amy Stein:

to me three times, like, oh yeah, okay.

Amy Stein:

I'm going to read that.

Amy Stein:

Dr.

Mike Roesslein:

Kim that's about the 10th time somebody brought it up somewhere.

Mike Roesslein:

So I should probably, uh,

Amy Stein:

kind of the book is a quick read and it's really,

Amy Stein:

it's the mind body, soul kit.

Amy Stein:

It's really.

Mike Roesslein:

I, I think I have it bookmarked I'm on her website at Dr.

Mike Roesslein:

Kim Deramo.

Mike Roesslein:

Okay.

Mike Roesslein:

Mind, body toolkit.

Mike Roesslein:

Yep.

Mike Roesslein:

I will make a note to, I

Amy Stein:

think that a lot of free resources that people, and she does

Amy Stein:

a three, uh, like webinar every week on her site and on Facebook.

Amy Stein:

I don't know.

Amy Stein:

I recommend her a lot.

Amy Stein:

Like I started the Facebook group to teach people about the power of the plants and

Amy Stein:

I, I post her videos cause I feel like,

Mike Roesslein:

cool.

Mike Roesslein:

Can we link your Facebook group under the podcast?

Mike Roesslein:

All right.

Mike Roesslein:

I'll get the link from you.

Mike Roesslein:

So if you're watching, I'll put her website on here too, because why not?

Mike Roesslein:

So we'll, we'll get Dr.

Mike Roesslein:

Kim's website down below.

Mike Roesslein:

We'll get your Facebook group.

Mike Roesslein:

And then anything else you want to share with us that we've mentioned

Mike Roesslein:

that you think would be worth?

Mike Roesslein:

We can send DNRs website.

Amy Stein:

Yeah.

Amy Stein:

Micro formulas, I think would be helpful too, because it's a foundational protocol.

Amy Stein:

And that was the one that I feel has helped a lot of people because

Amy Stein:

I did so many protocols before that.

Amy Stein:

And it was.

Amy Stein:

So what's great about that protocol is they have videos every week, right?

Amy Stein:

And so the doctors come on or, you know, affiliates that work with

Amy Stein:

them, come on and they educate, it's an educational platform.

Amy Stein:

You can create an account it's free and it's not just Willy nilly.

Amy Stein:

You take these things.

Amy Stein:

But again, I listened to my body with it.

Amy Stein:

I did not take it at school recommendation.

Amy Stein:

I took it at half and I've still never gotten up to, I mean, some

Amy Stein:

people are dosing really high.

Amy Stein:

That's not for me.

Amy Stein:

And I know that.

Amy Stein:

And some people learn the hard way in the past.

Amy Stein:

I've learned the hard way, but that's the only protocol I did

Amy Stein:

that I did not get sick around.

Amy Stein:

So.

Amy Stein:

I would definitely recommend that.

Mike Roesslein:

Good to know.

Mike Roesslein:

We're looking at bringing in some of their bar products into our shop.

Mike Roesslein:

Um, it's just, it's tough.

Mike Roesslein:

Cause it's like, there's so core protocols or like a zillion products that they

Mike Roesslein:

recommend you do all these things.

Mike Roesslein:

And so we're trying to figure out which ones we could,

Amy Stein:

well the drainage products, like the limp and the two Duca, anybody

Amy Stein:

can take those cause they adjust drainage.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

And a lot of people in this group have an issue with drainage.

Amy Stein:

So either they're not pooping every day or they have so much crap in their

Amy Stein:

body and their potty can't get it out.

Amy Stein:

Right.

Amy Stein:

So the first phase is drainage.

Amy Stein:

So the lymphoma to Duca would be the, would be I think the best

Amy Stein:

products to start with because they address drainage and they'll

Amy Stein:

start opening things up for people.

Amy Stein:

Those are the ones I take consistently.

Amy Stein:

I don't take all of the products consistently anymore

Amy Stein:

because I energetically, I don't feel that I need them.

Amy Stein:

I would did it for three years.

Amy Stein:

So, you know, that's another thing is just.

Amy Stein:

You have to trust yourself, right?

Amy Stein:

Like that, you know, better than anybody else, you know, better than I know you,

Amy Stein:

you know, better than the doctor knows you, you know, what's best for you.

Amy Stein:

So just remember that you have that knowledge, you just have to tap

Amy Stein:

back into it because we've been taught that we don't know better.

Amy Stein:

The doctors know better.

Amy Stein:

Everyone else knows better, but you, right.

Amy Stein:

Your mom knows better.

Amy Stein:

Your husband knows that.

Amy Stein:

Especially

Mike Roesslein:

for people who've been sick since they were young

Mike Roesslein:

and got disregarded invalidated.

Mike Roesslein:

And all of that, it's been years of that our mind will believe

Amy Stein:

exactly.

Amy Stein:

So, you know, better, you know, best.

Amy Stein:

Remember that connects to that again.

Mike Roesslein:

We're about at time, this was great.

Mike Roesslein:

I think that you gave people a really solid glimpse into like

Mike Roesslein:

what, what it really is like to go through the ringer with.

Mike Roesslein:

Mystery chronic disease and frustration around doctors and not being validated

Mike Roesslein:

and not understanding what's going on and trying a million different things and

Mike Roesslein:

healing as like a, I could just feel your frustration when you talked about like

Mike Roesslein:

how regimented you were and how structured everything was and how it wasn't working.

Mike Roesslein:

And you were trying all these things.

Mike Roesslein:

And it was like, uh, I know what that's like, and it's like

Mike Roesslein:

a full-time 24 hour a day job.

Mike Roesslein:

That's exhausting.

Mike Roesslein:

And, um, and it's like panic inducing and it it's, it's, it's,

Mike Roesslein:

I'm never going to get better.

Mike Roesslein:

This is always going to be like this because you lose the ability to see

Mike Roesslein:

outside of the immediate bubble of hell that you're in and it's confusing

Mike Roesslein:

and you don't trust anything.

Mike Roesslein:

So like, I think that the lessons you learned in that journey are really

Mike Roesslein:

beneficial for everybody to hear.

Mike Roesslein:

And I think that that's what we're really looking for is to bring that to people,

Mike Roesslein:

to hear that, you know, That coming back to being able to read and listen to the

Mike Roesslein:

singles and the signs and trust that, and that there's deeper levels to this.

Mike Roesslein:

Like I know that we've taught in this platform mostly around, um,

Mike Roesslein:

diet and lifestyle and supplements and like nutrition things.

Mike Roesslein:

And that there's a whole nother level to this that, um, you know, I'm building

Mike Roesslein:

with, uh, with another platform to bring over there to kind of connect the two.

Mike Roesslein:

But, um, Most people stop there.

Mike Roesslein:

And a lot of people that's going to limit your ability to heal.

Mike Roesslein:

So the energetic, the trauma, the spiritual, the emotional side of

Mike Roesslein:

things is what moves the needle for a lot of people when they're stuck.

Mike Roesslein:

And it also shifts how you experience the struggle to begin with, which then

Mike Roesslein:

reduces the stress signals on the body.

Mike Roesslein:

Like it's a, it starts a chain reaction that only good things will come from.

Mike Roesslein:

So I would recommend diving.

Mike Roesslein:

No, it's not an, it causes you to face a lot of things to that

Amy Stein:

is fine.

Amy Stein:

Yeah.

Amy Stein:

You have to face your demons.

Amy Stein:

But in doing that, you learn so much more about yourself and

Amy Stein:

it makes it so much more work.

Mike Roesslein:

Well, thank you so much, Amy.

Mike Roesslein:

I was really, you know, I appreciate the openness and vulnerability

Mike Roesslein:

that you shared everything with.

Mike Roesslein:

I'm sure that over time, some of this stuff has become easier to talk about,

Mike Roesslein:

but I know that, um, for a while, it's, it's really challenging to

Mike Roesslein:

even talk about some of these things.

Mike Roesslein:

Cause it's super triggering to bring up like where you were and people not

Mike Roesslein:

hearing you and not listening to you.

Mike Roesslein:

And when I brought that up, I could like feel the charge.

Mike Roesslein:

Like you're just like, yeah.

Mike Roesslein:

And then they told me I was crazy.

Mike Roesslein:

And like, and, and there's so much anger there and there's parts of

Mike Roesslein:

us when we go through that type of stuff that needs to be validated.

Mike Roesslein:

Like they need to hear that like your experience was true

Mike Roesslein:

and that really happened.

Mike Roesslein:

And I'm sorry that that happened and that people should have treated you like that.

Mike Roesslein:

And if you've never heard that, that can be a really powerful thing for

Mike Roesslein:

people just to get that validation.

Mike Roesslein:

So I just want to.

Mike Roesslein:

Commend you on sharing so openly.

Mike Roesslein:

And so many people benefit just from hearing that they're not alone, like

Mike Roesslein:

going through this stuff that it's not just them, that they're not the

Mike Roesslein:

only ones and that, um, you know, we'll link your Facebook group down

Mike Roesslein:

below so people can come find you over

Amy Stein:

there.

Amy Stein:

Yeah.

Amy Stein:

I would love that.

Mike Roesslein:

Cool.

Mike Roesslein:

Thank you so much.

Mike Roesslein:

Thank you.

Mike Roesslein:

Yeah, it was a lot of fun.

Mike Roesslein:

It was great to meet you and to chat with you.