Artwork for podcast Transformed Sales
Building a Strong Sales Team with Pete Tonsager
Episode 3718th August 2021 • Transformed Sales • Wesleyne
00:00:00 00:21:17

Share Episode

Shownotes

In this episode of the Science of Selling STEM, I’ll be sitting down with Pete Tonsager, the Director of Worldwide Sales at MGK, a company that develops and delivers innovative insect control products. The youngest of nine, Pete worked several jobs while putting himself through college. His early work involved working in a composite wood research laboratory which served as a springboard to his career as a sales manager in specialty chemicals and composite products. He is customer-focused and a value-obsessed director of sales. 

He has had notable success in devising, defining, and executing short and long-term strategies to amplify revenue, sales, and customer service. He has an excellent history in managing budgets and ensuring efficient usage of the budget with aim of cost minimization. He is adept at assessing customer requirements and exceeding expectations for maximum client satisfaction and success. Companies he’s made a positive impact at including Sumitomo Chemical, Donatelle Medical, Liberty Diversified Industries, and Rehau. You won’t wanna miss this episode as Pete shares his great sales and sales team management wisdom with us. Stay tuned! 

On Today’s Episode of the Science of Selling STEM:

  • Learning how to educate customers instead of selling them and making sure you deliver value (01:49)
  • Why delivering value has nothing to do with the product you’re selling (02:40)
  • How he coaches his sales team so they can keep performing at their best (05:06)
  • Role-playing 101: How to make your role-playing sessions better (06:36)
  • Giving the fresh sales talent the same type of support as the more seasoned salespeople (09:21)
  • Developing a culture of collaboration within a sales team (10:30)
  • The challenges they faced from going virtual since the pandemic began and how they tackled them (12:30)
  • Remarkable achievements in helping salespeople achieve great results (17:15)

Connect with Pete Tonsager:

Connect with Wesleyne Greer:

Rate, Review, Learn, and Share

Thanks for tuning into The Science of Selling STEM! If you enjoyed this episode and want to learn even more about what it takes to transform your sales, don’t forget to tune into our other episodes and share your favorite episodes on social media!

Join The Science of Selling STEM community on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and visit my website for even more content, information, and resources.

Transcripts

Wesleyne Greer:

Hello and welcome to another episode of

Wesleyne Greer:

the Snack size sales Podcast. Today my guest is Pete Ponte

Wesleyne Greer:

Sager. Did I say that right? Pete?

Pete Tonsager:

Yes, you sure did.

Wesleyne Greer:

Awesome. How are you?

Pete Tonsager:

I'm fantastic about you.

Wesleyne Greer:

I'm doing a lovely. Let me tell you guys a

Wesleyne Greer:

little bit about Pete. He is the youngest of nine, he worked

Wesleyne Greer:

several jobs while putting himself through college. His

Wesleyne Greer:

early work involves working in a research laboratory for

Wesleyne Greer:

composite building products serving as a springboard to his

Wesleyne Greer:

career as a sales manager in specialty chemicals, and

Wesleyne Greer:

composite products. He is customer focus, and a value

Wesleyne Greer:

obsessed director of sales. I love it. I love it. I love it.

Wesleyne Greer:

So tell me, how did you start your career? And how did you get

Wesleyne Greer:

to where you are today?

Pete Tonsager:

Yeah, I'm sort of interesting. You know, I never

Pete Tonsager:

wanted to be a salesperson. Like, so many people out there

Pete Tonsager:

sort of thought. That's sort of not where I wanted to go. But in

Pete Tonsager:

college, I was working in a research lab, it was my work

Pete Tonsager:

study job. And it was a composite wood laboratory. And

Pete Tonsager:

so I started interacting with different people who were

Pete Tonsager:

bringing ideas into our lab, and got it got a job running a

Pete Tonsager:

composite slab for a startup business in Minnesota. And we

Pete Tonsager:

were a small startup. And so as the head of the lab, and it was

Pete Tonsager:

a technical product, I started getting brought out in front of

Pete Tonsager:

customers. And it really started with me seeing my myself as

Pete Tonsager:

educating customers not selling them. And that's really the

Pete Tonsager:

approach I've taken since then it's about helping the customer

Pete Tonsager:

and bringing value.

Wesleyne Greer:

Oh, helping the customer in bringing value. So

Wesleyne Greer:

when you think about those two things, helping the customer and

Wesleyne Greer:

bringing value, a lot of times I hear salespeople or sales

Wesleyne Greer:

managers saying you can't do both, if because when they think

Wesleyne Greer:

about bringing value, they're always thinking about being so

Wesleyne Greer:

product centric, and like thinking about their products.

Wesleyne Greer:

So tell me, how do you balance those two things, right. And

Pete Tonsager:

that's where so many people I think, go wrong,

Pete Tonsager:

they think about it as product, right. And so I look at the

Pete Tonsager:

individual that I'm talking to, you've got to start there, we

Pete Tonsager:

all bring our personal lives, we all bring our public selves and

Pete Tonsager:

our business selves to work every day. And so it's relating

Pete Tonsager:

to that person. And then you've got to do research ahead of time

Pete Tonsager:

to and understand, if it's a large corporation, the division

Pete Tonsager:

there in the corporate goals, you really need to do your work

Pete Tonsager:

ahead of time. Because what I've learned is, a lot of times the

Pete Tonsager:

value you bring has nothing to do with your product. I always

Pete Tonsager:

tell my team if it's the perfect product with the perfect

Pete Tonsager:

company, the perfect quality, perfect supply chain, we don't

Pete Tonsager:

need salespeople, right, it's going to sell itself. And so

Pete Tonsager:

understanding and I'll use current examples right now,

Pete Tonsager:

global shipping is a mess. And so I now work for a global

Pete Tonsager:

corporation. And so for some of our smaller accounts, I put them

Pete Tonsager:

in touch with our global stuff, the global team that does

Pete Tonsager:

shipping and receiving. And they can help them understand how to

Pete Tonsager:

get a product. That's not a product, it's not me it but it

Pete Tonsager:

brings value to that customer. It's something that someone

Pete Tonsager:

selling the same product at a lower price can't offer. And so

Pete Tonsager:

that's what I always coach my team on understanding that it's

Pete Tonsager:

not always product, it hardly ever is product, it really is.

Pete Tonsager:

How can I help this customer?

Wesleyne Greer:

I love that one thing that I often say is serve,

Wesleyne Greer:

don't sell, right. And sometimes when you're in a situation with

Wesleyne Greer:

a prospect with an existing client, they don't need what

Wesleyne Greer:

you're offering right now. But you have a somebody in your

Wesleyne Greer:

ecosystem, somebody that you know, who can help them, and you

Wesleyne Greer:

help them with their problem today. And that brings you more

Wesleyne Greer:

business tomorrow. So as a individual contributor, I know

Wesleyne Greer:

that it's it's easy to have your marched to the beat of your own

Wesleyne Greer:

job focused on the customer centric and the value. And you

Wesleyne Greer:

mentioned coaching your team? How do you ensure that you're

Wesleyne Greer:

incorporating this into the fabric of your sales team?

Pete Tonsager:

So with my team, we talk about meetings, pretty

Pete Tonsager:

much beforehand, we want to know what our objective is from the

Pete Tonsager:

meeting. And with that we really test each other. We really go

Pete Tonsager:

back and forth, not so much role playing but really understanding

Pete Tonsager:

what are you trying to do and how do you think you're going to

Pete Tonsager:

get there? Because you can't lead the customer there. But you

Pete Tonsager:

need to be knowing what your objective is to understand how

Pete Tonsager:

to get there at the end. And again, it's more about

Pete Tonsager:

uncovering what are the pain points, what are the

Pete Tonsager:

bottlenecks, what are the problems that I can help solve

Pete Tonsager:

and that That's how we do it. And then afterwards saying, how

Pete Tonsager:

do you think we did, um, because let's face it, having the best

Pete Tonsager:

laid plan, you can walk into a meeting and get thrown sideways,

Pete Tonsager:

until you're not always going to hit your objective. But if you

Pete Tonsager:

provided a glimpse to that customer, the value you bring,

Pete Tonsager:

it's still a success. I love

Wesleyne Greer:

that. So, so many sales managers and sales

Wesleyne Greer:

teams, they hear roleplay and they're like, Hey, go play. It's

Wesleyne Greer:

the worst ever. But I found that, you know, when you role

Wesleyne Greer:

play, what you're doing is you're allowing the sales people

Wesleyne Greer:

to mess up in a safe space. And so even if they cringe, or they

Wesleyne Greer:

don't like it, this is how they practice. And so when they get

Wesleyne Greer:

out there in the real world, they've already got all the

Wesleyne Greer:

jitters out, they've already perfected their pitch, they're

Wesleyne Greer:

questioning, so it helps them. So how do you one, get your team

Wesleyne Greer:

to enjoy roleplay? And to what are some tips that sales

Wesleyne Greer:

managers could use to make their roleplay sessions better?

Pete Tonsager:

Yeah, I think what I found in past and role

Pete Tonsager:

playing, because honestly, I don't like role playing either.

Pete Tonsager:

It is so uncomfortable. And one of the reasons is, I think a lot

Pete Tonsager:

of times, when trainers come in, they set up profiles and things

Pete Tonsager:

that maybe have nothing to do with the customer. And I always

Pete Tonsager:

bring it back to I start with with the customer. And I say

Pete Tonsager:

what problems are they facing? So if it's procurement, they're

Pete Tonsager:

going to have specific problems, marketing, it'll be different

Pete Tonsager:

set of problems, and then say, how do they create a win for

Pete Tonsager:

themselves in the business? And so that's, that's really what I

Pete Tonsager:

asked to set up a roleplay is, what are we trying to achieve?

Pete Tonsager:

And how can we realistically help them get there? And that's,

Pete Tonsager:

that's where you have to make it personal to me. And so for role

Pete Tonsager:

playing, that's what gets my team comfortable with with going

Pete Tonsager:

through this scenario.

Wesleyne Greer:

I love that it's starting with the end in mind,

Wesleyne Greer:

right? Like, what are the goals that we're trying to achieve?

Wesleyne Greer:

What do we need to what is the outcome of this meeting? Right.

Wesleyne Greer:

And one thing that I like to tell people when I'm working

Wesleyne Greer:

with them coaching them, is whenever you do a ride along

Wesleyne Greer:

with your salespeople, you set the objective before the

Wesleyne Greer:

meeting, you add you are quiet in the meeting, because it's not

Wesleyne Greer:

about you, nobody gets back to you. It's all about salesperson.

Wesleyne Greer:

And then after the meeting, you have to debrief right, you have

Wesleyne Greer:

to say you did this right, you did that? Right. Okay, these are

Wesleyne Greer:

the goals that we set, do you think that we achieved our

Wesleyne Greer:

goals? And again, when you're able to do that in a safe space,

Wesleyne Greer:

I think that's really what helps build the trust within a team.

Wesleyne Greer:

And when they get out there in the field, they perform better?

Pete Tonsager:

Correct? Yeah, it's just immensely helpful. And

Pete Tonsager:

I also try to remind my team that, you know, I've coached

Pete Tonsager:

older folks that have been selling for a long time. And in

Pete Tonsager:

the current industry, I'm in it's long term accounts that

Pete Tonsager:

you've been selling to for 40 years. And so what's relevant 40

Pete Tonsager:

years ago, is still relevant today, as far as some of the

Pete Tonsager:

knowledge, but I always remind them, I said, Any relationship

Pete Tonsager:

you've ever had, whether you're married, whether you're not even

Pete Tonsager:

your relationship with with your parents, right? Think about when

Pete Tonsager:

you first started that relationship, and what was

Pete Tonsager:

important to you in them then? And what's important now, you

Pete Tonsager:

know, new couples starting out, it's finding a place to live

Pete Tonsager:

together. What do we agree upon all of that. And once you've

Pete Tonsager:

been married 20 years, it's different. So you can't assume

Pete Tonsager:

that what you knew about an account 20 years ago, or two

Pete Tonsager:

years ago is true today. So tell me about those.

Wesleyne Greer:

Those salespeople that you have that

Wesleyne Greer:

are probably towards the end of their career, and they've been

Wesleyne Greer:

doing the same thing for 1020 30 years. For you as a sales

Wesleyne Greer:

manager? How do you ensure that you're giving the brand new

Wesleyne Greer:

people on the team, the same type of support as those more

Wesleyne Greer:

seasoned salespeople?

Pete Tonsager:

Yeah, and what I tried to do there is praise and

Pete Tonsager:

understand those those workers that have been in the in the

Pete Tonsager:

position a long time, they're doing a great job, they're the

Pete Tonsager:

best coach, they're the best example for the newer members of

Pete Tonsager:

the team. So get them to work together to understand each

Pete Tonsager:

other, and, and even to share accounts. I've done that some

Pete Tonsager:

salespeople really hate it, I'll admit, because they're very

Pete Tonsager:

competitive, and they want to win on their own. But if you

Pete Tonsager:

make them understand that winning together, that's truly

Pete Tonsager:

what a team is about. And what I also tried to do is, I tried to

Pete Tonsager:

stay away from my account that my this my that, I always remind

Pete Tonsager:

them, we're stewards, they're the company's accounts. And so

Pete Tonsager:

if I can get them to buy into that and believe in that, that's

Pete Tonsager:

also a big asset to training.

Wesleyne Greer:

So I touched on something that is so, so big

Wesleyne Greer:

with sales teams, it's really like we're not competing against

Wesleyne Greer:

each other. We're competing against external forces. So

Wesleyne Greer:

really having within your sales team them working on accounts

Wesleyne Greer:

together and sharing knowledge and I won here, you can do this,

Wesleyne Greer:

you can do that. And give us some tips tell us how you were

Wesleyne Greer:

able to develop that culture within your team.

Pete Tonsager:

So with the team, I it's really a celebrating

Pete Tonsager:

individual victories. And also acknowledging the challenges and

Pete Tonsager:

sharing those as a as a group, again, that that safe space that

Pete Tonsager:

you talk about, owning up to everyone has a bad day, right.

Pete Tonsager:

And the other thing I've done is I get to Team comfortable with

Pete Tonsager:

the fact that we're not all the right cup of tea for each other.

Pete Tonsager:

And so you are going to have a country feel there's nothing

Pete Tonsager:

there, we've got everything we can get. And so getting people

Pete Tonsager:

comfortable with swapping out accounts, to bring it and I'm

Pete Tonsager:

sort of the intermediary to make sure you're not dumping your

Pete Tonsager:

worst accounts on someone, but really getting people to

Pete Tonsager:

understand and it's, it's been miraculous, because accounts

Pete Tonsager:

also respect that, that you respect them enough to say, All

Pete Tonsager:

right, you know, it didn't work out with this salesperson. This

Pete Tonsager:

is another person, right? And this is why I selected them for

Pete Tonsager:

you, this is what I expect to get out of it. Because I want

Pete Tonsager:

the accounts to understand too, that they also play a role in

Pete Tonsager:

this. If they're going to be Prickly, with every single

Pete Tonsager:

account manager that gets in front of them. That's that's not

Pete Tonsager:

an account that we want to spend a lot of time with. It's not

Pete Tonsager:

rewarding for anyone. So I sort of also expect respect from the

Pete Tonsager:

accounts for what we're trying to do if we're truly bringing

Pete Tonsager:

them value, they would understand that.

Wesleyne Greer:

I love that. I love that, you know, because

Wesleyne Greer:

sometimes I find that sales managers, or salespeople,

Wesleyne Greer:

they're like, oh, yeah, that person doesn't like me. So we're

Wesleyne Greer:

just not going to do business with them. But you take a

Wesleyne Greer:

different stance that maybe that sales person doesn't veg with

Wesleyne Greer:

their personality. So let me try somebody else. And if I try

Wesleyne Greer:

three or four people, then yeah, it's the customer. It's got my

Wesleyne Greer:

salespeople, right. So at some point, it's not making excuses,

Wesleyne Greer:

it's really aligning the outside influence with the inside

Wesleyne Greer:

influence. So within this last year, we've been in, I call them

Wesleyne Greer:

a new normal. So we've transitioned to mainly virtual,

Wesleyne Greer:

we've done a lot of things differently, what were some of

Wesleyne Greer:

the challenges that you guys experienced? And how did you

Wesleyne Greer:

overcome them.

Pete Tonsager:

So the challenges, as you can imagine,

Pete Tonsager:

we're not an inside sales team. We're an outside sales team

Pete Tonsager:

here. And it's international. And so to overcome some of the

Pete Tonsager:

cultural differences, other things, it just makes more sense

Pete Tonsager:

to be face to face as much as possible. And not being able to

Pete Tonsager:

do that was very challenging. We adapted very quickly to having

Pete Tonsager:

teams meetings or Zoom meetings, that wasn't an issue. But the

Pete Tonsager:

body language, the rest of it was really a challenge. And so

Pete Tonsager:

for the team, a big thing we did is, for large meetings, I'm

Pete Tonsager:

okay, if someone's not talking, not really primary to the

Pete Tonsager:

meeting, camera can be off, not a big deal. But if you're

Pete Tonsager:

speaking, and especially if your salesperson your camera needs to

Pete Tonsager:

be on, you need to be interacting in that way, because

Pete Tonsager:

that is the best thing we can do. And so that was one thing

Pete Tonsager:

that we did. And like you said, we really, we had to almost

Pete Tonsager:

become therapists, because when people were working from home, I

Pete Tonsager:

found that there were more of their personal lives that

Pete Tonsager:

interfered with work than when they're in their office. And so

Pete Tonsager:

just understanding sometimes that you're that you can see a

Pete Tonsager:

little kid that's coming up and tugging on dad or mom shirt, and

Pete Tonsager:

wanting some attention saying, hey, you know, do you need a 10

Pete Tonsager:

minute break? Or should we reschedule, people really

Pete Tonsager:

respected that and understood that. So it was being aware of

Pete Tonsager:

these different cues that we obviously in a business setting

Pete Tonsager:

when you're in a conference room, you don't have to be aware

Pete Tonsager:

of? So that was that was our challenges, and I think we

Pete Tonsager:

tackled them very well.

Wesleyne Greer:

I love that because you know, one thing that

Wesleyne Greer:

I say is, would you get in the room with a customer with your

Wesleyne Greer:

sales manager, your colleagues with a bag on your head? Why are

Wesleyne Greer:

we in a Zoom meeting, and I'm just looking at a black box and

Wesleyne Greer:

I poke fun I can I can talk to your black box today. I get it,

Wesleyne Greer:

you know, you just don't want to be on camera. But it's weird,

Wesleyne Greer:

talking just a name. And I think that, you know, humanizing,

Wesleyne Greer:

because sales people are people too, right? Like, I really like

Wesleyne Greer:

to say that because a lot of times, salespeople get this

Wesleyne Greer:

stigma of being sleazy or self centered, like all of these

Wesleyne Greer:

things, but at the end of the day, they're human, right? And

Wesleyne Greer:

so yes, they have families, they have animals, they have kids,

Wesleyne Greer:

they have spouses, they have things that are happening. And

Wesleyne Greer:

really within this past year, there were so many things that

Wesleyne Greer:

were out of our control. So I'm curious, do you see what do you

Wesleyne Greer:

see I guess for the next 12 months or so for for the

Wesleyne Greer:

business. Are the reps going to be back in the field are you

Wesleyne Greer:

going to do in person conferences virtual All

Wesleyne Greer:

conferences, what are you going to be doing to incorporate the

Wesleyne Greer:

old and the neat.

Pete Tonsager:

So for us, it's been pretty interesting. We deal

Pete Tonsager:

with very small companies, but also a very, very large

Pete Tonsager:

corporations. And we've been trying to be polite and

Pete Tonsager:

cognizant of where they're at. Some are coming back into the

Pete Tonsager:

office on a part time basis, but not allowing for, you know, face

Pete Tonsager:

to face meetings. Others are, and so we're getting in front of

Pete Tonsager:

those that are ready to accept us. And honestly, with others,

Pete Tonsager:

what we found is they want to meet as well. And so if their

Pete Tonsager:

company is not allowing people into the building to meet, we're

Pete Tonsager:

actually flying out and meeting in an outdoor coffee shop, if

Pete Tonsager:

that's acceptable, just having them check. But again, it's it's

Pete Tonsager:

part of that value equation, again, you have to value where

Pete Tonsager:

they're at what they're comfortable with, while still

Pete Tonsager:

maintaining a great relationship. And so we're

Pete Tonsager:

really doing a mixed bag of still doing some online, some

Pete Tonsager:

face to face some getting into a corporate boardroom and talking

Pete Tonsager:

to folks, whatever is acceptable to them, and they're comfortable

Pete Tonsager:

with.

Wesleyne Greer:

I love that back in the olden days, as my kids

Wesleyne Greer:

call it when I was first in sales, I can remember one of the

Wesleyne Greer:

things that I would do when I got a new lead or prospect, I

Wesleyne Greer:

would ask them, How do you like to communicate phone in person,

Wesleyne Greer:

email, subconsciously like email, and like I sold things

Wesleyne Greer:

100% through email, this is way before the days of Skype or zoom

Wesleyne Greer:

or selling that way. But like I corresponded 100% through email,

Wesleyne Greer:

they sent a purchase order, we never spoke on the phone,

Wesleyne Greer:

sometimes they would want to see face to face, like they would

Wesleyne Greer:

not do business with you, unless they're like, no, come meet me.

Wesleyne Greer:

And then you're like, Okay, well, can I send you the quote

Wesleyne Greer:

or put nope, nope, coming in, right, and you do what the

Wesleyne Greer:

customer wants. And I think that that goes back to being customer

Wesleyne Greer:

centric, which is what you said, it's like, focus on what the

Wesleyne Greer:

customer wants, I can't go on site. But I do think that we

Wesleyne Greer:

need a connection and you want to see me let's go to a coffee

Wesleyne Greer:

shop, I'll take you to lunch, right. And I think that is

Wesleyne Greer:

really what helps to build these strong sales teams. Right? So I

Wesleyne Greer:

would love for you to tell me Give me a success story. Tell me

Wesleyne Greer:

about a salesperson that you have that was an underdog. That

Wesleyne Greer:

was the comeback kid that was like a written off and you were

Wesleyne Greer:

able to redeem them, or a team or a project, something that

Wesleyne Greer:

you're really especially proud of,

Pete Tonsager:

you know, I've got quite a few folks that I

Pete Tonsager:

just feel personality wise, professionally, they were at one

Pete Tonsager:

point and just getting them to a new point has been remarkable.

Pete Tonsager:

And I had a person who was a new immigrant to the United States,

Pete Tonsager:

and really felt uncomfortable with their language skills felt

Pete Tonsager:

uncomfortable with the way they interacted, it just culturally

Pete Tonsager:

was a different environment for them. And so I work with that

Pete Tonsager:

person, and help them to understand that bringing their

Pete Tonsager:

culture out. And sort of bringing it with them, instead

Pete Tonsager:

of being ashamed of it or trying to minimize it was actually to

Pete Tonsager:

their advantage. Because it made the conversation more

Pete Tonsager:

interesting. It made it more of a learning experience for both

Pete Tonsager:

sides. And this person just had had a heart like you wouldn't

Pete Tonsager:

believe. And I remember after two years ago, I was at a trade

Pete Tonsager:

show. And this was a female, she wasn't in the trade show booth.

Pete Tonsager:

And one of her customers came in and said is Lisa here and I, I

Pete Tonsager:

have a dry sense of humor. So I made some sarcastic remark about

Pete Tonsager:

oh, you know, she, you know, Lisa, she showed up and now

Pete Tonsager:

she's gone. And this customer got defensive on Lisa's behalf

Pete Tonsager:

and defended her and it was then I realized, this is who she is.

Pete Tonsager:

And to this customer. She wasn't a salesperson, she was a member

Pete Tonsager:

of their team. And it just made me so proud of the steps that

Pete Tonsager:

she had taken to really overcome, you know, what she

Pete Tonsager:

felt was something that set her back. And she was able to turn

Pete Tonsager:

it around and really use it to her advantage to be more human

Pete Tonsager:

as a sales, like you said as a salesperson, right?

Wesleyne Greer:

Oh my goodness, I absolutely love that story. A

Wesleyne Greer:

lot of times in these this technical field that we're in we

Wesleyne Greer:

have a lot of people who English isn't their first language. And

Wesleyne Greer:

a lot of times they shy away from getting into sales because

Wesleyne Greer:

they're like, I have to talk to people. And I don't feel like I

Wesleyne Greer:

can communicate clearly but for you as a sales manager to say

Wesleyne Greer:

hey, it's okay. You know, your differences are accepted and

Wesleyne Greer:

respected and I'm going to work with you and lean on the things

Wesleyne Greer:

that you're good at that relationship building that

Wesleyne Greer:

developing that rapport and really when you have a customer

Wesleyne Greer:

who's defending your boss, maybe like that is like the Holy

Wesleyne Greer:

Grail. So kudos to Lisa I hope she listens to this wherever she

Wesleyne Greer:

is in life and really knows and understands how great of a

Wesleyne Greer:

salesperson she is to have her Boston Finding her, I mean her

Wesleyne Greer:

customer defending awesome. So Pete, we have had an amazing

Wesleyne Greer:

conversation and I know there gonna be be people out there who

Wesleyne Greer:

want to get in contact with you what is the one best way for

Wesleyne Greer:

them to reach out?

Pete Tonsager:

Probably through LinkedIn. Um, I know it's a

Pete Tonsager:

tough last name. But on LinkedIn, it's Pete last name is

Pete Tonsager:

Tom Tiger. Isn't Thomas o n is an anti s ag er, just ping me on

Pete Tonsager:

LinkedIn. I'll sure be sure to get back to you. I love meeting

Pete Tonsager:

and connecting with people on LinkedIn.

Wesleyne Greer:

Awesome, thank you so much for talking to us

Wesleyne Greer:

about building value and having a customer centric sales

Wesleyne Greer:

organization and really how you take your sales leadership, your

Wesleyne Greer:

sales management to a whole different level by really

Wesleyne Greer:

coaching your team to their strengths and their weaknesses.

Wesleyne Greer:

Thank you so much, Pete.

Pete Tonsager:

Thank you for a great podcast. I love listening

Pete Tonsager:

to it. It's been fantastic.

Wesleyne Greer:

Awesome. Thank you guys so much for listening

Wesleyne Greer:

to another episode of the snack sized sales podcast. Be sure to

Wesleyne Greer:

check us out rate and review this episode and in everything

Wesleyne Greer:

you do. Remember to transform your sales