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Becoming a Millionaire at 31 Didn't Come Easy with Tom Brickman
Episode 3687th July 2022 • Real Estate Investing with the REI Mastermind Network • REI Mastermind Network | Real Estate Investing
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Tom Brickman, The Frugal Gay, became a millionaire by age 31 through reselling and real estate investing. Today Jack and Tom talk about Tom's recent twitter thread "Becoming a millionaire at 31 didn't come easy." Where Tom shares the strategies he used to accelerate wealth growth while working at a movie theater on average 55k a year.

Twitter Thread found at https://twitter.com/Thefrugalgay11/status/1542868885149327360

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"You can invest 10,000 hours and become an expert or learn from those who have already made that investment." - Jack

Transcripts

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Welcome to the REI Mastermind Network where host Jack Hoss gathers amazing stories from leaders in real estate investing.

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In each episode, our guests will tell you what they're doing that works what they've tried that failed, and best of all, you'll learn actionable steps to take your real estate investing.

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To the next level now, here's Jack with another value packed episode.

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We have Tom Brickman here with me tonight and this is kind of a treat.

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Because Tom, you're one of my first guests that I've tracked down via Twitter.

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As my followers continue to grow there, sometimes things gets pointed out to me, and Tom Brickman is, you can follow him on Twitter as well and it's at the frugal gay 11 and I'm going to make sure to put that link in the show notes, but Tom has a great website as well, so look over.

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For the frugal gay.com, we'll make sure to have those links in the show notes as well, so swipe over on your podcasting app and find those clickable links, but.

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I really appreciate your time, Tom, as we tackle your thread that you've pinned to your to your Twitter page and it's on, how do you became a millionaire at 31? And it says these strategies are used to accelerate wealth growth while working at a movie theater on average and earning about 55,000.

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Year so this is this, I'm really excited about this.

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This is going to be a great converse.

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Definitely thank you for having me.

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I'm excited to be here.

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So well, Tom, I gotta start things off.

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But you started at a relatively young age when you got into real estate investing.

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You even mentioned it while you were in college at.

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Such a young.

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Age I got I got to ask you.

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Like how did you?

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Traverse and find your way.

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When it comes to real estate investing.

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I my father in second or third grade, bought a rental property.

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We did not have a lot of extra money.

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He was a police officer, but that seed was planted at 2nd and 3rd grade and we'd go pick up rent.

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Were there and I was 21 I was working at the gap. I was making 850 an hour and I didn't want to keep paying rent and that was the driver behind it.

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I was a senior in college, and I bought a multifamily. I bought a $90,000 multifamily. I lived in the ugly upstairs. I rented out the.

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The Nice downstairs, which is exactly what I did not want to do. I wanted to live in the Nice one and rent out the ugly one, but my dads like no. You're going to get more money this way. So, at the time we rented it for 600 bucks.

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My house payment was $738.00, and I didn't know anywhere I could live for $138.00 so that was the mode of definitely early on with real estate.

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Yeah man, I wish more people would take care to take advantage of that, especially at that age.

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I mean, you know one of the things that strikes me and and I warned you that later on I'm going to ask you some rapid-fire questions, but one of them is.

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Like if you could go back in time, what advice would you give your younger self?

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And I bet you 9 times out of 10 its people telling me they wish they.

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Would have started earlier.

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I mean and I don't know how.

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I don't know.

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I'm looking forward to hearing your answer because I don't know if you could go any earlier.

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e. I was too conservative. In:

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, and I found a notebook from:

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In time and do.

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Yeah, well that's really neat.

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So, if you don't mind, I was going to like we'll go through this this thread and just kind of touch on a few things.

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So, your number one was I invested like money was burning a hole.

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In my pocket.

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And that one really struck me because everybody does the opposite.

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They spend the money, and it gets burning a hole.

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In their pocket.

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And my way to invest while spending was, I was flipping products so I would still get the I could go shop and I would go buy purses.

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a lot of those properties in:

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real estate. I bought one in:

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as, I bought the first one in:

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Just like boring stocks I would invest in inventory that I could resell.

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t that House that I bought in:

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Almost 100-year-old duplex so it needed everything. So, every year when I would get a tax return or a bonus at work it went to new floors, new furnace, new Windows, you know just everything, so it was always going right back into my real estate or into other ways to make money.

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From it

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So, you you've mentioned that earlier that you also resell items.

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You still do that today.

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Very small scale compared to what I used to.

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Do I used?

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To do a ton per year, but yes, I still have a I'm sitting in my eBay shop and mostly sell on eBay.

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Have a very tiny presence on Amazon but it has great years and then it has slow years and I'm not actively purchasing but my inventory is still up and today we ran and.

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We shipped out three items at the post office before this.

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Sure, you know that's a lesson that I wish I would have learned, and or that I should have stuck with because it's funny.

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You bring that up because when I was younger, like when I you know this would have been 20 years ago.

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You know I'm going to date myself a little bit when smartphones wasn't a thing.

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You know it was the handheld devices like palm pilots and.

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And a few other things.

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And at one time I went to the dollar store and there was an end cap full.

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Of these little keyboards.

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That could be attached to the handspring.

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But it was like a palm pilot, and they were a dollar apiece, so I bought them all and I sold them for like 20 bucks apiece on Amazon.

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And that's how I bought.

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My first Xbox, you know, like everything was in the wrong, wrong direction, I should have used that money for more inventory or do something else with.

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But I that's what I wanted at the time, but I should have used that as a lesson.

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Like maybe there's something here you know there was.

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I didn't always reinvest.

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I like during college.

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I bought purses and that paid for my books for that semester.

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They were dollar fifty persons right next to the register I rolled the whole card up to the register.

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Bottom malls and eBay didn't even have buy it.

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Now at the time.

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So, I was selling him two at a time auction style, but I was turning Dollar 50 purses into.

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60 or $70.00 each week and that paid for my books. So that was that was the beginnings.

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Yeah, well indeed you mentioned other you know item number two.

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You talk about college, you paid for college.

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I stayed employed full time through college.

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That's something in itself, because you also mentioned that you had to get a B or better and for the college reimbursement that was associated with your job like that.

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Would have been pretty challenge.

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I only missed it one time.

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It was like the last semester, and I got a C in the class, and it was devastating.

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'cause of the loss of reimbursement for that one?

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And I actually retook the class, and I got an A the second time I did it, so I got reimbursed in the long run.

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But I had to take an extra credit and pay for the one that I didn't get the B or better.

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So yeah, I took advantage of that.

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That was a great opportunity.

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I had worked at Gap since I was 16.

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Even staying full time employed gave you those.

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I think it was three classes a semester that they would reimburse you for at the end of each semester.

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And I didn't know who else was going to pay for school.

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So that was my, you know, I stayed employed full time and I worked a lot of hours.

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But I made it work.

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Well, do you?

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Do you think you know?

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I don't know how, how long?

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Have you been out of college now?

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I graduated in:

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OK.

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Sure, do you think that would be still possible today?

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Uh, I know a lot of big companies in that to attract employees right now or are doing something similar or certain deals with colleges.

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So, I think that it may be structured differently.

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'cause I was the one that as soon as I graduated, I quit, and I went to another company.

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But I think that there's some parameters.

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Now, so you have to, you know if they're going to do that, you have to stay with them for two years after you graduate.

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Or something but.

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I think that there's still opportunities like that out there for sure, yeah?

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Yeah, yeah, so number three was I stopped listening to family members who said I was wasting time buying ugly houses.

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See, there's gotta be a story involved with that.

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Yes, yes.

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I still get it, sometimes I will walk my parents through a property, and I remember they came down for a visit around a birthday and I was just purchasing one and.

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I asked my mom to help me do tile in one of the bathrooms.

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And there was like a bunch of kids playing outside.

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My dads like I would walk away from this one and there were several like I bought a crack house on eBay and he's like he's like you're only 13,000 into this. He's like I'm walking away from this if I'm you and I'm the stubborn.

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One that just sticks with it, and I put a lot of money into that house, way more than what I could have gotten back out of it originally.

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But I made that work, and I will not buy another house on eBay.

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But yeah, they I know that they see the value in it, but they can be very negative because it takes me getting it over the finish line to show them what the house could be.

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Versus what it is when I buy it.

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Yeah, you bought a house a crack house on eBay.

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I did, it was auction COM fulfilled by eBay.

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It was an advertisement.

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I was at work.

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I knew the ZIP code real well.

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I didn't know the street and that was my shortcoming 'cause I lived in the ZIP code so I'm like.

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Oh, I know this this is great.

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I texted my friend that was in town.

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She's like, Yep, I'll drive by it as soon as.

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I'm off work bidding started going and it was done.

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or $:

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And I would never buy again.

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Knowing the streets now and it's funny.

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'cause I'll get DMS on Twitter.

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And people are asking me, and they say that ZIP code and I instantly get fearful, but there's a.

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It's a very diverse zip code and you have a very nice part and a very undeveloped area that is just hard to rent and hard to renovate and and hard to find.

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Tenants, and then.

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That's where I bought my house.

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And I think that was:

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I did that one.

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So what city was that in Toledo?

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OH, oh, OK.

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Are you?

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Do you experience that this is kind of a diversion here now?

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But do you?

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Are there opportunity zones established in those areas now?

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Yes, and that was not one of them at the time.

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I believe it actually is now.

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But yeah, there are around.

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The city, yes.

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Yeah, that probably would.

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Have helped a lot in this.

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Case but yeah.

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For sure.

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So OK, and then you went.

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I took on a part time job and side hustled.

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So, it was this.

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Now let's do the time frame.

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Here was this while.

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You were still.

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In college or now we're after college and a night at full time job part time job and a side hustle.

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Well right now.

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Yeah, all three, so it was after college and between college and.

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I just I and moving to Texas. I accumulated some debt, and I didn't want 17,000 in credit card debt.

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I wanted to buy another house and the banks like we're not going to give you any money if you have this debt.

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So, I took a job at another retail store in Texas, and I'd get off at my full-time job and I'd go over there on Tuesdays and Sundays.

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And Wednesdays were my days off and I would go over there and work and.

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Every check I remember. Like you, I still got a check. I'd go to my bank, and I'd cash it and I drive across the street to city, and I hand them every single penny I made up to get rid of that debt. 'cause and it took me about a year for 17,000 but.

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I just didn't want to carry debt anymore and I knew if I was going to grow this and and really accelerate, so I'm probably I don't know 25 at the.

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Time, I come.

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That's what it.

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Took I mean there's so many different side hustles now that looking back on it, I don't know that I'd want to go and work for 9.

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Dollars again that.

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Had a discount retailer, but that's how I did it back then and it worked and.

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It dug me out.

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So well, that's just you know you gotta forgive me, I just find this is just amazing.

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That you know you.

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Earlier you met, you're the stubborn 1.

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But there's a.

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There's a mindset here that I think we need to take a minute and just identify.

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I mean I; I don't know any 25-year-old that I've ever met.

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To be that stubborn or that focused.

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Is that count?

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Does this come natural to you or what?

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What happened to meet you so focused on that?

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That's what I'm going to do.

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I'm going to just I'm paying this.

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Down no matter.

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What my grandfather and my father are both police officers.

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They're very strict, very, you know, this is how it is.

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Very black and white, and I mean.

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I knew going into college that I was going to have to work full time if I was going to make college work and.

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And I didn't get scholarships.

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I worked through high school, and it was just kind of.

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All of my siblings.

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It's kind of embedded in us that this is, you know, you're going to have to figure out how to make it work, and you need to not wait for someone else to fix your issues.

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wanted a. This was the early:

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It would, you know, in:

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And I hated that I had to come to Dallas and rent, and I rented for a year.

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And that was the year that I worked there.

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And I wanted to get myself in a position that a bank would look at me as a great borrower, and that's what it took for that year.

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It's just, it's just amazing when somebody has that level of focus, what can be accomplished and you know you said it took me a year, but frankly, that that's actually that.

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That's really quick.

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Definitely 'cause I would say I would do the eBay side hustles.

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I would help.

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Source merchandise, you know, I loved going out to the flea market when I would have a day off and I would see other vendors with great merchandise that were basically giving it away.

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So, I'd buy that, and I take it to a different vendor out there and say, hey, I've got these backpacks and they're only you know this much.

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Money and you could flip products really easy.

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Just by walking through a flea market and buying it from one and selling.

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It to the other.

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Do you do that on the same day as you'd buy it on the flea market, wheel it down to the.

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Other end of the.

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Flea market.

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I would try and do it on opposite weekends, so I'd buy it that Sunday and then go back the next Sunday with it and and try and sell it.

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Sell it to somebody else.

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I wasn't that bad that I was.

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Doing it the same day.

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Well, it had to have been tempting.

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So, another thing you said, I bought a pack of business cards, and you passed it out to everyone who would take it.

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I did. They were little like Vistaprint $15 cards. I printed them with my business name, which is brick by brick not.

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t, uh, I passed out a card in:

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He called me this year and he's like my dad has passed away.

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I don't want to be a landlord.

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Do you want this house?

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And it's a meticulously solid, well-kept little house?

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And I we went back and forth with the price and then he's like, you know, I really want this tenant in here at this price for.

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The next two

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Years I'll give it to you. You know I got it almost $10,000.

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Less than what it should.

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Have been.

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So, in order and I agreed to keep the rent at what it was for two years for.

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n't have passed him a card in:

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OK.

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Yeah, you know one of the things we do is we do direct mail in and I am to this day surprised how often it happens where.

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Get a phone call from a mailing that we sent out years ago and somebody had held onto it.

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It was in their phone book, or somebody passed away and they found it in the drawer or what happened.

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It happens more often than you would think.

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So, the last point here is.

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At key points I did whatever it took to build wealth.

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I took advantage of every opportunity that came my way, and you know one of the things that we, you know everybody points to rich Dad, poor Dad.

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But in the core, it's talking about taking advantage of those opportunities as it as they come up.

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And frankly, putting your mind in that mindset of instead of how?

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How am I going to do it, or can I do it?

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It's how can you do it?

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It?

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It really feels like, and it sounds like that you really put your mind in that in that kind of mindset, like just figure it out as you go.

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There's been so many deals that if I just thought with the one brain version, I could never have gotten and.

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One of my best deals was a house that was unbendable 'cause.

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It had a hole in the roof.

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So, I got creative and got a personal loan.

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One of my other deals.

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I couldn't get any loans written on it.

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I went and got a HELOC on a paid off investment property, so I.

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Just you know.

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I looked at what other others were doing, there's others that are buying this.

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I at the time I wasn't familiar with hard money, didn't want to go through all the steps of getting.

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A hard.

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Money loan so a personal loan could work, and I applied for it, and it was in my account the next day and I'm like damn I'm ready to.

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I want this House I wanted in My Portfolio and now it's one of the best houses in my.

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In My Portfolio value wise, it just keeps appreciating and if I just kind of looked at it with that one set of eyes I it wouldn't be in My Portfolio right now 'cause it couldn't get a traditional loan.

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Right, so you know you talk about creative investing, and you give.

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That's a great example.

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Why do you think people have such a hard time with that creative thought or being able to put that type of?

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The chairs again.

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Feeling together.

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There's risk the risk attached to it. You know that personal loan was, I think it was like $900 a month. I had to pay on it and that you know if this goes terrible.

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If you know, depending on how the renovations go, I'm on the hook for that $900, so there's a risk a level of risk that comes with it and people get stuck.

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On that and people are afraid of the unknowns and buying that house that was a hoarder house.

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I've bought a crack house.

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I've bought a hoarder house.

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I've bought an abandoned retail space.

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There's lots of unknowns, and that's one thing that scares people.

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You know, earlier today went through a couple houses here and and as we're looking at him.

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There's a lot of opportunities, and I'm in Dallas right now, but there's a lot of you know.

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I was with two other investors and they're like I don't know if this.

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Is you know how it is the roof going to fail soon and those are the things that I don't know.

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I've just gone head forward and dive right in.

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And I mean I bought condos.

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In the:

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We'll figure it out.

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We'll make it work and.

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We'll get it fixed.

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So, you know a lot of people that come on the show also talk about the importance of mentorship and getting some training.

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But at the age that you started this out, it seems like you did.

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You kind of just figured it out as you went.

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Unless I'm missing something there, did you have any kind of mentorship, or do you think it's overrated or?

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I don't think it's overrated and I do think that I'd still be at my nine to five job if I didn't pull some mentors from Twitter.

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ow, I tried to quit my job in:

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g with him up till January of:

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Up I didn't have mentors.

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Early on, but I had friends that could resurface bathtubs. I had friends that did HV AC. I had friends that did tile, so having that in my pocket helped me because I could make a $13,000 condo look like 1,000,000 bucks. Get all the clearance tile at Lowe's and and really turn out a place nice.

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By resurfacing by adding in fancy tile by putting some Bluetooth speaker bulbs up in the ceiling, and that was kind of what I that was my strength I had HV AC I had tile I had resurfacing and that's what my houses had then was resurfaced.

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Was tiled nicely and.

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And had a.

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Good working HV AC which in Texas that's the number one thing that people want is that air conditioning, cranking.

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Right, so well, now that you've made that progress and you finally quit your none to five job.

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What advice do you have for people who are thinking about making that type of leap?

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What should they do to prepare for that final decision?

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I think we're in a great spot whereby the end of the year, I think there's going to be a lot of opportunities and house hack is the way that I built wealth.

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If I didn't do this House hacking, which I didn't even call it house hacking when I was doing it, I rented out one, lived in the other and when I was in Dallas, I had a two bedroom, 2 bath condo and I rented out the other.

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I wouldn't be where I am right now, so I think looking exploring other options and this is where.

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Some people get stuck is.

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They want to be at the best spot at the beginning.

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But I look at OK if I go to this C Class, I can trade it up to a B class and then I can get to that best spot.

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Along the way it's just.

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Going to take me a couple years to get there, but.

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I can certainly get.

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There, yeah, you know one of the things that I.

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This was a you know I like to share this because it.

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It helped me.

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Anyway, when because sometimes people get so focused on their dream goals, you know we all in a.

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Lot of the stuff.

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I would have said was a bunch of hokum about 10 years ago.

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If you bought dream boards and and journaling and all that junk, I would have, I would have said.

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It's a bunch of hooey.

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But one thing I did do was.

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I started to I took.

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Account of all of the expenses.

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That I have and then every time.

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I got a rental property.

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I was able to subtract.

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Like that that cash flow from what I those expenditures.

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So, when that hit zero, I know that.

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OK, I got my expenses covered.

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You know it was just a way for me to, and I had that pinned to my bathroom mirror so I'm constant.

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I was constantly reminded of it.

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When I got to door 5, that's when I'm like Oh my gosh, I can actually make money doing this and it took me.

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I had a dud in:

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I was I lost $22,000. I lost money on it every year.

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I owned it but when I got to door #5.

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I've, I'm like.

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Holy crap, I am actually making some money doing this and.

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This is growing and this is getting easier and and then I have systems in place.

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So yeah, I think having a long-term vision and a vision board is important, so you know you know that's one of the questions I ask when I do coaching is what's your goal with this?

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What do you want to do with this?

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Do you just want to own a property?

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Do you want to build wealth with it?

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Do you want to?

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Turn this into a hands on or a passive income like what is it that you want to do and and it's crazy?

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Some of the answers I get from people when I ask.

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Them that question.

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'cause you know you gotta go into it knowing where you.

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Want to go with it?

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Sure, so you know you mentioned earlier you stopped listening to your friends and family.

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They're saying, you know, you're crazy, but.

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Have you had any friends and family now go well?

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Kind of acknowledge.

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That you were right all along.

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Always no.

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I mean, they it it's it comes up.

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A lot, yes.

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Uhm, and I all of my siblings are homeowners.

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They understand the value in it.

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They understand it's a way to build wealth.

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They like me bye fixers.

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Usually they don't buy turnkey properties, but they definitely see that there's you know this is a way to continue to grow wealth and.

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Stability and yes, it takes upkeep, but they understand.

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Well, since you've been doing this for a while now, you probably have at least one story of lets.

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Let's tackle it.

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The biggest mistake you made in your business.

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And what did you learn?

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not the crack house, it's the:

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I was cocky.

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I went to a bank with No Down Payment and they're.

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Like we'll give you the keys to this house.

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And I had no business, and I had no plan, and I had no emergency fund 'cause I had spent it all.

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In the other house.

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. It closed on my birthday in:

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Trying to rebound.

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I know I'd actually make a profit if.

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I still hold it today.

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But I had no business buying that because I had no emergency fund and I had.

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No plan, you know.

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And and it probably was a big relief off your mind.

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Like how much how speak to like the mental cycles that might have saved you.

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Just getting rid of that.

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I struck; I didn't have a team in Cleveland.

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OH, this is a different market and that's why I've stuck.

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In my Dallas and my Toledo, OH because I have people that I can lean on and there was so much that went to it from having to do evictions.

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Couldn't find it.

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Couldn't collect rent, couldn't get people to go do work at the house.

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It was just one thing after another after another.

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And yes.

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Mentally, when I got to write that check that final check, I knew that it was done.

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It was like a weight off my shoulders.

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Yeah, I can imagine so well, you know I, I really appreciate your time here Tom.

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Like I said, your thread really caught my eye and and and you were recommended to me by a couple of acquaintances.

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This again, I'm going to remind everybody. Head over to the frugal gay.com. I'll make sure to have that link in the show notes, but I kind of warned you at the top of the before we hit record that it was coming. Are you ready for some rapid fire?

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Let's go for it.

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So, let's start things off as I warned you, you can't say the rich dad poor dad book, but what other book would you recommend if somebody is looking to?

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Get into real estate investing.

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So, it's not really real estate, but I the four-hour workweek, Tim Ferriss.

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I liked it.

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I've listened to it over and over.

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I bought it on audible and it's one of those that stuck.

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It's me.

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And and motivated me and just kind of kept me going.

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Yep, I have a the revised.

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I've read the original.

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I got the revised edition over my shoulder.

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I had to get the updated version when that came out great.

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That's a great book.

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So, what is the one piece of business the worst piece of business advice you've ever received?

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t's probably attached to that:

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It just I didn't do any kind of inspection.

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I didn't, I just.

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Wrote a deal.

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Because it was in the right spot, and I should have never bought that.

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And then there's a couple that I, you know, have taken over to my family set of eyes and they're like I wouldn't buy that.

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And then you go back, and you regret not buying it and listening to him and you see, you know, hey, this is a $800,000 property now.

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he way and buying that one in:

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Keep it from start to finish.

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What's the worst piece of business advice you've ever received?

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Forgoing the inspection to save $400. I mean I had that come out of a realtor's mouth one time and I don't it.

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It depends on the property and the price point.

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But I'm not buying it without just getting it inspected, and I mean there's been so many duds.

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And oh my gosh, I can't believe that this was done like this.

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And this was covered up.

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And my first property I bought that duplex.

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I didn't do an inspection.

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It was very clean, very nice and sure enough a few weeks after we closed.

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I mean I had water in the basement and obviously they had just painted the basement walls right before listing and it looked pretty, but it was definitely an issue for years that was covered up and I didn't do an inspection and.

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I was the one that got to.

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Deal with it, yeah.

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And I I'm gonna repeat that and.

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It actually causes.

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We've gotten kind of a bit of a workflow when we get an inspection as well because we get an inspection for not only just to just check on some things, but.

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But we might get an expansion so and it actually creates our tasks list when we tackle the project, because then we know what the inspector is probably going to be looking at when we sell it.

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So, it's just a way to knock some things off.

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And have a like an extra set of eyes.

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Hey, I just made my task look. I got an inspection, but I've got #20 under contract and I just got it back last night and that was exactly what I did with.

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It was these are my top 10 things that I need to do on this one.

::

Yeah, it sounds like you have multiple projects going at any given time.

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Is there any kind of software that you use to help manage all this?

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I mean, I use a very outdated version of Quick Quicken rental manager back when they used to do it, it's an outdated QuickBooks, but and I I've used Stessa to track stuff.

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But no, I don't have a.

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A super exciting spreadsheet or any of that for I'm not fancy.

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You know that that hey, whatever works right?

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I had I had a person who on the show this was a.

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While ago, but he.

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He did wholesaling and I said oh, I asked him a similar question. What do you do use for your CRM, and he picked up one of those xylophones 31-day envelope folders.

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And then it's like here it is.

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He just.

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He just he writes everything on paper and when he has to follow up with somebody two days later, he puts it two days in advance and whatever is on that date he pulls it out and that's what he has to do that day.

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It it's talking about keeping it simple man it.

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I couldn't deny that that would makes a lot of sense and it.

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It worked for.

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Him definitely.

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So, if you could give your younger self like what is the one thing you wish you would have?

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Known before you started.

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ad I applied for this loan in:

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Then I let that scare me.

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Up to taking on debt and building.

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You know My Portfolio up a lot more aggressive with a lot more doors early on, and that experience costs me a lot because I look back at the things that I passed on 'cause I didn't have the right debt, or I didn't have the right money and that is something you know I look back ten years ago, and I'd be.

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In a hole.

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If I wasn't so afraid by that:

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So, I had a lot of paid off properties.

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But I wish I could go back and and redo it and not be afraid of.

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Some of these creative ways of doing financing early on.

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Yeah, you know.

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That that's some great advice.

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Nice well Tom.

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Is there a question or concept that you wish we would have covered here tonight?

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I think I think we covered the all the good stuff.

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I mean there's so many ways to get into it and you just have to go in with a plan.

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And that's one thing when I'm talking with people and they're doing coaching and they want to use their whole emergency fund as.

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A down payment.

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I can't stress to you.

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Please don't do that.

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'cause I did it and I failed terribly, and I don't want you to do that.

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As well, so I think you covered everything else though.

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OK, well again one last time.

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Find Tom on Twitter at the frugal gay 11. I'll make sure to have that link in the show notes, but more importantly, check out his website at the frugal gay.com

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Tom, thank you so much for being on and and this is genuine.

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If you have an open invite, I hope you'll take me up on that and come.

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Back sometime.

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Definitely thank you for having me.

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If you learned at least one actionable step to incorporate into your real estate investing.

::

If so, please consider returning some of that value by leaving a positive review, subscribing to our YouTube channel, or joining our growing network on Facebook and Twitter.

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You can find links to all of our social media accounts in the show notes.

::

See you next.