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Working with Real Estate Investing Firms with Ken Gee
Episode 4066th October 2022 • Real Estate Investing with the REI Mastermind Network • REI Mastermind Network | Real Estate Investing
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Kenneth is the founder and managing partner of KRI Partners and the KRI group of companies. He has more than 24 years of significant real estate, banking, private equity transaction, and principal investing experience. Throughout his career, he has been involved in transactions valued at more than $2.0 billion, much of which has included the acquisition, management, and financing of various multi-family real estate projects.

Before forming KRI Partners, Kenneth was a tax manager with Deloitte & Touche LLP. Some of his major clients included The Riverside Company, Key Equity Capital Partners, Blue Point Capital, Linsalata Capital Partners, The Zaremba Group, Charter One Bank, and Applied Industrial Technologies, Inc.

Before his career at Deloitte & Touche, he spent several years at National City Bank (now part of PNC Bank).

He also owned and operated several certified Cessna Pilot Centers in the Northeast Ohio area.

Kenneth is a licensed Ohio Certified Public Accountant, a member of multiple apartment associations, and Ohio Society of Certified Public Accountants and American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

We chat about:

  • 3 Things A Real Estate Investment Firm Must Have Before You Give Them Your Money
  • Real Estate is Not A Passive Activity. Investing Is!
  • How to Consistently Make Money in Real Estate - Anyone Can Do It Once!
  • How to Vet A Real Estate Investment Firm

Connect with Ken Gee:

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"You can invest 10,000 hours and become an expert or learn from those who have already made that investment." - Jack

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Working-with-Real-Estate-Investing-Firms-with-Ken-Gee.mp3

Transcript

::

Welcome to the REI Mastermind network, where host Jack Haas gathers amazing stories from leaders in real estate investing.

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In each episode, our guests will tell you what they're doing that works, what they've tried, that failed, and best of all, you'll learn actionable steps to take your real estate investing.

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To the next level.

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Now here's Jack with another value packed episode.

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We have Ken Gee with us with.

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They are partners and you can learn and find more information regarding.

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What they do at?

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They are partners.com and I'll make sure to have that link in the show notes, but Ken, I really appreciate.

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Your time here tonight?

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Thanks so much for having me.

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I'm looking forward.

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To it.

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So, you're putting together your next fund.

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It sounds like it's going to be a big one, and if you're not familiar with funds are, I'm going to really send everybody to your website to get educated on that.

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But what we're going to be talking about is what a fund is, how to get involved and but more importantly in making sure that.

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You know those people that you're getting involved in because this is definitely a partner.

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Group that you want to maybe consider, but you want to vet out on both ends both sides of things in the end.

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So really appreciate your time here today, Ken.

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Sure, through again, thrilled to be here.

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I'm looking forward to.

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It we were chatting beforehand and we're going to cover the three things a real estate investor investment firm must have before you give them.

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Any of your.

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So, could we start there and?

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Probably will guide the conversation for the majority of this show.

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Yeah, sure.

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So, it's actually a topic that I'm really passionate about.

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fact prior to the JOBS Act of:

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We couldn't do what we do now, we couldn't raise this money privately, and so I'm thrilled to be part of this industry, I guess you could call it.

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And I think the best way to protect it is to make sure that people do a really good job vetting.

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Investment for before they invest with them.

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So, it is something I'm talking about almost every single day.

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So, the first thing I want people to focus on is making sure that whatever firm you're investing with, their goals are aligned with yours.

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That's super important.

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I think that's important because.

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If you're trying to get a quick hit, you're looking for something that's going to turn over in two months and gonna make a ton of money for you.

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See that's not, that's typically not the type of investment that we do.

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Our investment periods are usually three to five years.

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As we go through the investor meeting that you and I would have, we would have a conversation about how are we aligned is your.

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Goal consistent with what our investment is designed to deliver and that's really important to me because I don't want to set us up for failure later.

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It's a hard.

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It's and this is a relationship.

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It really is.

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That's how we view it.

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It's a two-way relationship.

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And in order for a relationship to work, both parties have to get what they want.

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And it's my goal that after you invest with us once and you do really well, we hope that you'll come back.

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So, you want to make sure that your terms are aligned there, your goals are aligned with the sponsors.

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Now the other thing as part of that, do you want to make sure that the term?

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R investor friendly.

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Now, I say that because in in my opinion, this is just my humble opinion.

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If I'm going to ask you to invest your money with us, so we're going to run the deal, I think that I should put you first and all the decisions that I make.

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So, we set up our fund so that you're going to get your preferred return.

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Plus, all your money back, and only then do we get a share of that profit bonus at the end.

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And I think that's super important.

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So, we're talking about goal alignment and we're talking about making sure that the investors are put for.

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So that's the first thing that I want you to think about.

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The second thing is I want you to look at the sponsors track record.

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Obviously the longer the better.

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You don't like to see people learning on someone else's dime, right? That's just not fair. That's not cool, I.

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Don't think people should.

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Do it. In our situation, we've done 18 deals over the last 25 years and our entire track record is there to see.

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We hired a company called verify to verify if you haven't heard of bear vest.

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They verify your track record.

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So, we send them settlement statements and bank tax returns and all kinds of information so that they can determine the yes.

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My track record is in fact what I say it is, so that's important to me.

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That you.

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That whoever you invest with has attracted the longer the better, and then hopefully they're doing similar deal types.

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To what they're asking you to invest within.

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It's in other words of all of my deals that I've ever done, or in self-storage, and now I'm coming to you because I want to do a student housing deal.

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Wait a minute.

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I don't have any student housing experience and you really want that to happen.

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So hopefully it's of the same type all we've ever done, or value add multifamily deals so as you look.

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Our track record, you'll see them over and over again, so I think that's important, a long and good track record.

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And that kind of leads me to the third thing and that is experience.

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So, people don't think of apartment buildings as a business because but that's what they are.

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They have sales, they have employees, they have insurance, they have every single thing that any other business on the planet has.

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What you want?

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To do always people always say of.

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Course you want to invest.

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With somebody that has experience.

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But the reason why is so important.

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If you just look back, we just had a pandemic, right?

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We're now in the middle of inflation.

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You want to make sure that senior management team, the team that you're putting your money with, has enough experience to try to figure out how to navigate whatever is going to come.

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Next, because we don't know what's coming next.

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We think we do, but I never saw the pandemic coming.

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I don't know.

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By you so.

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You want to know that senior management team has experience so that they have some things to draw.

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a lot of real estate cycles,:

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That recessionary period that.

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That financial crisis that.

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We had, so we draw on all of those experiences every single.

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Day when we do what we do.

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With your experience, I have to ask, with your experience and since you brought it up, are you seeing some familiarities with that, the downturn last time to where we're at here today?

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Right.

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Actually, no, I the:

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Having conversations with many people and it to me it seemed obvious that this thing was going to implode it you had people that were getting adjustable-rate mortgages that they really didn't understand.

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They really didn't understand that they were buying in at a teaser rate that were going to Max out every single time that they increase and that was going to push.

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The payment out of their reach.

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I you feel to see that coming in the apartment world, we do a lot in Florida.

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Everything we do right now is in Florida.

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In the southeast, they were selling apartment buildings that were 50 years old.

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Nothing special claimed the Knoll apartment buildings, and they were selling his condo conversions.

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So, when you looked at the property existing as an apartment building, there was no way that apartment building was going to be able to pay the debt, but they were completely speculating on flipping that thing to a condo conversion.

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And then to make it worse, back then you had speculators buying 10 or 20 of these units who were going to then just trade it up really quick and make it quick.

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Profit problem is at some point the credit market froze on them and they had nowhere to go with all of these deals.

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So now what's really keeping us?

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things like they did back in:

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So, I can pay whatever I want for an apartment building, but the lender is going to only lend based on the fundamentals.

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And that's what's important, right?

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Because then you don't have this massive a bunch of four, a bunch of foreclosures.

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Their defaults on the mortgages because the lenders held the line they were disappear.

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ng back what happened back in:

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I don't.

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See that happening?

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Now sure, but in the end, it does definitely feel like the market has been changing.

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We could really definitely see the what it happens in.

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At least in my market, the single-family homes were being snapped up so blasted fast.

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You couldn't even hardly make an offer on things now.

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Property is sitting on the market a lot longer and prices are actually starting to drop.

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I'm starting to see pretty regular drops in prices.

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Now one of the things that I like about.

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The business that when we're in multifamily.

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So, I know I think you do a lot of single family.

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So, the pricing mechanism is.

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A little different.

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In our world, I love what we do because I know that if I can increase the cash flow of that, chances are someone going to want to pay more for it, right 'cause, they're going to have more cash flow.

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So, there is a very deliberate relationship between cash flow.

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And pricing, so when we do our value-add business plan, right, so we find a property that's in a good area and it's got good economic growth potential.

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And we know that when we make it nicer, when we run it better, we'll be able to get more rental income because we've made the property nicer than it was.

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We've added value and we know that when that teslow increases.

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It means that we're going to be able to sell it for more than what we paid for it.

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So, I love that predictability about how we do what we do.

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With all that being said, you're talking about buying existing properties, right?

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You don't build anything new.

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We don't.

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ook at Florida. There's about:

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People moving to the state of Florida every day.

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Some of those people are wealthy, but Muslim aren't.

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They're just normal people, right?

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And so, what are they building?

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They can only afford to build the Super high-end stuff that serves the wealthy group of people that are moving there.

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But there's they're not building housing for just ordinary people because they can't afford to.

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The construction costs are too high.

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So, what happens is.

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That we have.

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Of this huge demand that continues to increase and no new supply.

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So, what happens to rent?

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It puts upward pressure on rents and then we come along and say, alright, we're in a, I call it a bull market, right, because there's more people looking for housing than is available.

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Then I put my value-add business plan on it and the returns just explode.

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They do that, but that's.

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How and why, we do what we do in in states like Florida because.

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The growth, so how are you sourcing in these properties?

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Are they on Loopnet or are you building these relationships with the brokers like?

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Yeah, it's a good question.

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Yeah, typically not Loopnet.

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Usually by the time a property makes it to Loopnet, either it's there because a private owner to selling his or her own property or it's gone through the broker world and they're struggling to find a buyer.

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Usually that's what happens, so.

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We generally work the broker network very in a really intense way.

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So, you said that we do funds, right?

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Most people that buy real estate and raise money to do this, they're syndicators.

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So, they go out, find the deal, then they got a short amount of time to go raise the money.

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That's hard.

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That's hard to do in a competitive environment because the sellers all know that you still have to raise the money and everybody that you're competing with.

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It's in that same boat, so a few.

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Years ago.

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Excuse me, it's you.

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Years ago, we flipped that model.

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We said, hey, let's go raise the money first, get the commitments.

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Now we go to the broker community.

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Mr broker, Mr seller.

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We've already got the money raised.

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We are different than all those other people that's competing for this property.

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You don't have to worry about us not closing.

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You don't have to worry about us not raising the equity.

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You don't have to worry about us.

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Re trading you 'cause we've.

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Got far more XP?

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So as a result, we become much stronger buyers in those markets.

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So we sometimes we'll see deals even before they hit the market or we're not afraid to buy a property that's been well marketed by the brokers.

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But so, when you're in a market for a long period of time, you really develop a deep broker network, and they get to know you and they know.

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If they give us a deal, they know it's going to close.

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They just know it's going to close and brokers and sellers love.

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That level of search.

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Are there different requirements on your end running a fund versus a syndication then as I'm sure there's some government agencies involved?

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Yeah, just it's not really a lot different. The SEC exemptions available to us are very similar to the one jersey we rely on either A506B or A506 seat we do see. So, if you don't recall the 506 C is.

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For accredited investors and that allows us to, it's called open solicitation.

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We're allowed to talk to anybody.

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We want people that we don't even know about investing.

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In our fund, the SEC just requires that everybody that gets in our fund be accredited and we have to verify that they are.

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Those set of rules apply in both situations.

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It's really no different at.

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All with that being said, I just want to remind everybody, kripartners.com and then Ken has an opportunity for everybody to if you go slash ebook.

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There's a download there for you, I'm sure there's a quick form that.

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They need to fill out too, right?

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There is, yeah. So, I the book's going to cover two things. I've had so many conversations with people that they know there's so much money in real estate. They just know there is. They're.

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Trying to figure.

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Out how it fits in their life, should they?

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They buy a single by a double.

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Should they buy an apartment complex with a couple buddies?

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Should they invest passively?

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So, I helped take them through that process in the first part of the book.

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Now the reality of it is most people should passively invest in real estate because they're busy, they got families, they got all kinds of competing priorities for their lives.

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And they don't have time to do this, so they choose to passively invest.

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So that's typically what most people do.

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So, then the second half of the book, remember I said I was very passionate about this whole vetting real estate firms. That's exactly what the second half of the.

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Covers I go into how does this business really work?

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What makes sponsors and real and fund managers and syndicators, what makes them do what they do?

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You know, I want to educate the investor so that they're asking all the right questions and putting themselves in the best place possible to make sure they have a good match with whatever investment firm they go at.

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So yeah, you're right, it's Curry partners.com/ebook, but that's what I covered. I wrote it because I think it applies to so many.

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People trying to figure this business out.

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Yeah. One of the things that I think is interesting and you mentioned trying to make real estate investing truly passive when you're doing it to the daily day-to-day and you starting out single family homes and you managing rental properties and the like, it the furthest thing it is it actually being passive.

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It is not passive when you're doing that.

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No, Sir.

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But you're right, people do think of that as passive income, and it's really, it's not.

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It's just not.

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Yeah, I'm going to ask you a question later about busting real estate investing myths, but one of the ones that I always make me chuckle is that the concept of mailbox money, it just shows up.

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It's just so easy.

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Yeah, if you invest with the real estate.

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From my cars, then it truly is mailbox 'cause after you make the decision to invest, you really don't.

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Anything except read the emails that we send you from time to time telling you about that property, property and what's going on.

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So yeah.

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One of the things you mentioned that you work strictly with accredited investors who wanted to arm everybody with the concepts of what kind of paperwork and what kind of information would they need to have it lined up and ready for you if they want to be involved.

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With a company such as yours.

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Sure, you so.

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Three things that most likely you'll get from a real estate investment firm.

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The 1st is a private placement memorandum.

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And that's going to talk about their business plan, what they're doing, the property or the fund.

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It will also have a whole section for the lawyers to go crazy and talk about all the risk factors because we want you to understand the risks that you're taking on by investing in a private placement.

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The second document you're going to get is called an operating agreement, so that when you actually become, if you invest in.

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Our fund, you're actually a partner in our fund, so you're signing on the operating agreement page that this document is what governs our relationship.

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It tells you about how distributions are made and who's in charge and all that.

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And then the third thing you're going to get is a subscription agreement.

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Now that's the document that you generally to tell us your name, your address, your date of birth, your tax ID number, you know where you want your money set, all that kind of stuff.

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But then the other part you have to do is you have to tell us how or why you're accredited and it's either I can.

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The tests that most people fall under, it's either an income test or net worth test. So, if it's income, either you make $200,000 a year for the last couple of years and they expect the same for.

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This year, or if you're married, it could be $300,000 with you and your spouse, so that would make you a credit.

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And you'd have to.

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Eventually you have to.

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Verify that with us.

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Sometimes we use third parties.

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You could send me tax returns.

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You could send me a letter from your CPA, your attorney, that says I know this guy.

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He is.

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I've seen his tax returns, I know he's accredited, and I just have to have that piece of paper in my file so that when we get audited by the SEC, they can see that we did.

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We were supposed to do to verify that the 2nd test is a net worth test, sometimes a little harder to prove.

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But if you have to have $1,000,000 net worth not including your home.

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So, for those.

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Of you who don't really understand net worth, all you do is you take all of your assets and value them.

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Write them.

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All down.

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Tally them up and figure out what they're worth.

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Then you take out take your liabilities.

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How much debt do you have?

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And the difference between your assets and your liabilities is what your net worth is, and that has to be $1,000,000 and you just can't include.

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Your home in that.

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So, if you meet one of those income or net worth definition tests, then you're accredited and you're able to invest in the fund.

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No, thanks for that clarification.

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I think that that just helps quite a bit for those that might be interested in going back to the property and sourcing the property.

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Are there certain types of property that you look for and what type of value are you adding to improve the equity there?

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Sure. So, types of properties, they're generally in the business, we call it BC class assets, basically the best way to think of what we buy.

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It's decent properties in good neighborhoods.

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That's the bottom line.

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Might have to be very comfortable to bring my wife and daughter and son and walking around the neighborhood I that's very important to me.

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Now what type of value do we bring?

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So, we are going to do usually what we start out with is the exterior improvements.

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So, we'll go, and I act like I'm DRI, I'm act like I'm a perspective renter and I start with my first experience when I drive to that property signage, the front they call it curb appeal, but it that's really what it is and I.

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Follow myself as I go to the leasing office.

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How do I feel?

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What do I see?

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Then I go to the amenities.

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Package and I want to build the best amenity package I can because people love amenity packages.

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So, if I can give you, uh, a clubhouse with a pool table, fitness center, outdoor grill, outdoor TV, lovely, nice Wicker furniture to hang out.

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And excuse me.

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If you think about all that, you can.

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Really paint a.

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Good picture as to what, uh, perspective?

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Renter would feel like living at your property, so you want them to feel that they can see themselves in this really nice amenity package.

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Moms working out, dads watching the football game, the kids are.

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In the pool.

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Then it's time for lunch.

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There's a grill right there.

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He cooks.

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Here's he cooks and cooks lunch so the parents flipped, and one goes to the fitness.

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Center the other.

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One goes in the pool or whatever.

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You can see a whole Family Day there, and I think that's really cool.

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Then we follow the path that person would take to their apartment, and we want to make sure that it's nice, and then we go inside the apartment and just.

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Make sure that it's upgraded in modern.

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Typically, we'll vinyl plank flooring to the faux wood floor.

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I think we'll do either black or stainless-steel appliances, 2-inch blinds, we'll do a nice paint package, updated fixtures and things like that.

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So basically, we're just basically giving that property sort of a facelift, right, modernizing it.

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We tend to stick 70s and.

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I prefer 80s and 90s and newer, but we'll go to the 70s, nineteen 70s as well.

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Typically, there's a good opportunity as long as the floor plan isn't become obsolete, but there's usually a pretty good opportunity.

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There to make that property feel it look and feel a lot newer than it really is. So those are the opportunities that we look for. And then when we do that, we're typically able to rate we had to get paid for spending all that money 'cause it's not cheap to do all this. So, we're looking probably at 300 plus in terms of rent increases over time.

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To pay us back for all of.

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That so that's the criteria that we.

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One of the things that you mentioned before we hit record that unlike syndication with the fund you might be owning multiple properties within that fund.

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So, what size of properties are you looking for and how many properties or how many units in total are you planning for this current raise?

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Sure. Yeah, it depends on the properties of property size. We like somebody somewhere between 75 and 250 units.

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I know that's a very wide swing, but here's what's important.

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When you get really big, you start to compete with institutional buyers who have a completely different capital stack than we do, and it's just very hard to compete with them.

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Because their return requirements are very different when you go really small.

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It's very hard for us to put on site managers because we want to have a manager in the leasing office.

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We want to have a full-time maintenance person.

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So, it's hard to do that below 75 units. So that kind of that's why we stick in that range, and we expect this next fund to be somewhere 15 to 20 million is as we like.

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That it's a comfortable fund size for us.

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We can usually get 3 deals in the fund.

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And that gives our investors good diversification.

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For example, the last fund we have a deal in Tallahassee, we have a deal in Daytona, and we have a deal in Bradenton, which is just South of Tampa, north of Sarasota.

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So, you can see those are very different markets and so our investors are going to enjoy some great diversification.

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The other benefit they get a couple of others but.

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If you think about, remember I talked about that private placement memorandum and the operating agreement, all this stuff.

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The lawyers charge a lot of money to put those together, as you can well imagine.

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So, in our world I get to spread those costs over 3 deals 'cause.

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I only have to do one set of documents when you make a commitment to the fund.

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I don't have to do 3 set to documents.

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So, I save a ton.

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Of money in that little savings accrue right to.

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The investors, yeah, this is really interesting how you had it all set up.

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And then when you take over a property, are they typically?

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Formerly mom and pop places.

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Or is this like?

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Sometimes, yeah, it's sometimes it.

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It depends.

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Sometimes they're private owners, sometimes they're larger, almost institutional, the company has grown up and they no longer want to mess around with.

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100 units 'cause.

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Everything else in their portfolios, 3 or 400 units. And so, we're happy to take those size properties 'cause.

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Usually love that scenario because a company that's growing and looking ahead rather than behind, they stop paying attention to those hundred 150-unit properties.

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I know that sounds silly because those are quite large properties, but to them size is always a relative thing.

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To them it's small and that's why they sell it.

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So, we love to have that situation because we usually.

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Have great opportunities to make that property better.

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Thanks for that, because I was trying to make sense of the I run into a mom-and-pop type outfits all the time and then they don't raise rents.

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Equivalent to the market, and then they don't typically want to spend the money into doing those updates and stuff.

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And so, I was trying to wrap my brain around if you're buying it from fund or another company, what happens there to make the value add?

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Available to you.

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Yeah, so there's a lot of reasons.

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So, first of all, we don't dislike buying from Mom and pops at all.

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Excuse me for all the reasons.

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That you described.

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There are other.

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Reasons that we that somebody else might.

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Not might sell.

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So, say somebody did a syndication and they came up with a value-add plan and they are once you do a syndication.

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You're done raising the capital.

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Right.

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You spent your budget, you're done.

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You can't do anything else to the property because you don't have the money to do that and to call your partners and ask them to contribute more.

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That never goes well, right?

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It just doesn't happen.

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So, a lot of syndicators will implement their business plan, and once they're done, they're done.

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That doesn't mean they've taken it as far as it could go.

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That just means that they're done, and they've made some money for their investors.

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So, there are so many different reasons that properties have upside potential.

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Right now, the biggest challenge for people is just.

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Understanding what they should be charging for rent.

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So that is a big challenge right now.

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It just is.

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And a lot of people are way behind, especially the mom and pops that you described, because they make friends with the residents, and I don't blame them.

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These are great people that probably live there and it's really hard for them to bring themselves to.

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Raise rats one more time kripartners.com slash.

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Ebook and take advantage of that offer by from Ken, but again, this was a great conversation.

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I'm hoping you have a few more minutes and I'm going to throw you.

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Some rapid-fire questions at you.

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Child good I do.

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So, what is 1 real estate ING myth you'd like to bust your toe?

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Right.

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We, I think we talked about the passive nature.

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That's one.

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It is not passive unless you unless you invest with somebody else.

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The second I'm going to go with two, if you don't mind.

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The second myth I'd like to buy.

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Is that real estate is easy.

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So many people don't really understand that it's a business no different than any other.

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And you really gotta dive into the nitty gritty and get into the details, because that's what makes you successful.

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So those two myths would be the ones.

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I'd like to.

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What book would you recommend or what are you reading right now?

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Yeah, I get that question a lot.

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So, I'm constantly reading.

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I love Stephen Covey.

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7 habits of highly effective people.

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I love grant Cardone's 10X rule. I think that's the name of it. Something like that. So those are two good books that I read a lot. I read them over and over actually, because they're so impactful.

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What's the best piece of business advice you've ever received?

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Ooh, that's a.

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The best the best piece of business advice I ever received was, and this is a nuanced he saying.

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But you gotta figure out how to get out of your own way.

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And by that I'll say this another way.

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And I might have stolen this from somebody if I did.

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I just don't remember who it was.

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So not trying to steal their Thunder, but I always say that people are where they are.

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Because they choose to be there, right?

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So, their brain puts them in a certain spot, in a certain place.

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At a certain level of success, a certain whatever.

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And because of that's where they stay.

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And so, the best business advice I ever got was the person who convinced me.

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10 You got to get out of your own way.

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You've got to start thinking differently because you can be far more than you are.

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The only reason you aren't there is because you haven't chosen to go do.

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That yet? There you go.

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Yeah, well that's awesome.

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What is the biggest real estate investing mistake you've ever made, and what did you?

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Learn from it.

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Yeah, believe it or not there, I probably have been doing this a long time, so I'm sure I've made a lot of mistakes, but probably one of the biggest ones that sticks out and it's kind of counter intuitive when people buy properties with a value-add business plan, right?

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You have this in your mind.

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Oh my God about make this place amazing.

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And so, they buy it and day one they're going full speed and they try to do their renovation.

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ome things about the property:

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But I now I was.

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I had to go into my old pocket to fix that, because I didn't.

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I wasn't careful.

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operty, sit on your hands for:

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I screwed it.

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Drive you crazy to do it.

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But if you do it, it is actually the smartest thing that you can do because.

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You'll always readjust your.

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Budget, and you'll be in a good position to make reallocations of your budget dollars your CAP ex dollars if you learn something about that property you didn't know before.

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So that would probably be it now.

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It wasn't catastrophic for me, 'cause.

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I could I just use my own money to fix, to pay for whatever it was?

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But if it's a big enough mistake, it could really be a challenge.

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No, no, that's great advice.

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So, if you could go back into time and give yourself one piece of advice, what would it be?

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Oh, I already told you.

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Get out of your own way can.

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Get out of your own way.

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It really is.

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As I grow older now, I'm in my upper 50s and I feel if I would have done that a lot earlier, I'd be in.

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A very different Ken.

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This was a great conversation.

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Before I let you go, is there a question or concept you wished we would have covered here tonight?

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ur investors have had fifteen:

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Terms and without this ability to do what we do; they wouldn't have access to that kind of deals we talked about.

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That is so important to me.

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So now there's probably not.

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I could go on and on for an hour and then talk about things, but I think that is probably the most important thing and we did a good job of covering it.

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No, I appreciate the value you brought here tonight.

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Again, it is key.

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Ripartners.com/ebook take advantage of that, but I can't. I hope you'll come back again sometime. I have a feeling we could dive deeper on a number of other topics.

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We could. I would.

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Like that very much.

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Thank you.

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Have you learned at least one actionable step to incorporate into your real estate?

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Testing if so, please consider returning some of that value by leaving a positive review, subscribing to our YouTube channel, or joining our growing network on Facebook and Twitter.

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You can find links to all of our social media accounts in the show, notes. See you next time.