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Flipping Restaurants and Business Growth With Bradley Lum
Episode 3026th October 2023 • Speak In Flow • Melinda Lee
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Get ready for another episode of "Speak In Flow" with your host, the one and only Melinda Lee. Today, we've got a guest who's a business magician, a restaurant-wrangler, and an entrepreneur extraordinaire – Bradley Lum. With over three decades of experience, he's been flipping businesses like a pro and helping them grow. From owning and operating five restaurants and cafes in the San Francisco Bay Area to creating the famous Ono Grindz specialty food company, Bradley Lum is a true game-changer. His mission? To turn the "tough business" of restaurants into a smooth-running cash cow. Now, that's a vision you can sink your teeth into!

Bradley Lum's Bio:

Bradley Lum, the business wizard with 30+ years of experience. The man behind five fabulous restaurants and cafes in the San Francisco Bay Area. The genius who brought you Ono Grindz, the specialty food sensation.

Guest's Social Media Links:

LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bradley-lum-47b74125/

Instagram Profile: https://www.instagram.com/chefbradleylum/

Notable Accomplishments:

  • Bradley's been the personal chef to some heavy hitters, including Elon Musk, Mark Zuckerberg, and Kamala Harris.
  • He's got the insider know-how to help restaurateurs:
  • Scale up or down, whether it's buying or selling.
  • Find that all-important financing.
  • Turn those profits into hard-working assets.

Key Takeaways from the Episode:

Now, let's dish out the real goodies from this episode. Melinda and Bradley Lum dive headfirst into the deep end of business growth and leadership. Get ready for some hearty laughs and golden nuggets of wisdom.

Creating a Vision for the Future:

Bradley shares the secret sauce for crafting a vision that'll make your business dreams come true.

And, more importantly, he tells us how to communicate it like a pro. No smoke signals, please.

Motivating Team Members:

Learn the tricks of the trade to get your team on board and fired up to bring that vision to life. Get ready to build a workplace where high-fives are as common as coffee breaks. Preventing Communication Breakdowns: Melinda and Bradley tackle communication breakdowns – the silent killer of teamwork. They serve up some practical advice on how to keep the lines open and the good vibes flowing.

Overcoming Resistance to Change:

Change, they say, is the only constant. But people aren't always on board. Bradley shares the secret playbook for winning hearts and minds when it's time to shake things up. This episode is a veritable buffet of wisdom for budding and seasoned entrepreneurs alike. Bradley Lum serves up advice that's as mouthwatering as his famous cuisine. Tune in to learn how to navigate the wild and wonderful world of restaurants and businesses. And don't forget to stalk Bradley Lum on LinkedIn and Instagram for a closer look at his journey and expertise.

About Melinda:

Melinda Lee is a Presentation Skills Expert, Speaking Coach and nationally renowned Motivational Speaker. She holds an M.A. in Organizational Psychology, is an Insights Practitioner, and is a Certified Professional in Talent Development as well as Certified in Conflict Resolution. For over a decade, Melinda has researched and studied the state of “flow” and used it as a proven technique to help corporate leaders and business owners amplify their voices, access flow, and present their mission in a more powerful way to achieve results.

She has been the TEDx Berkeley Speaker Coach and worked with hundreds of executives and teams from Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Caltrans, Bay Area Rapid Transit System, and more. Currently, she lives in San Francisco, California, and is breaking the ancestral lineage of silence.

Website: https://speakinflow.com/

Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/speakinflow

Instagram: https://instagram.com/speakinflow

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mpowerall

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Transcripts

Melinda Lee:

My guest today is Bradley Lum. He is a restaurant

Melinda Lee:

consultant, founder of Bradley Lum LLC. He has over 30 years of

Melinda Lee:

flipping businesses turning them from not profitable to

Melinda Lee:

profitable. He has currently eight thriving companies of his

Melinda Lee:

own. He's here to share how he helps a restaurant owners,

Melinda Lee:

increase sales, improve their workflow, as well as improving

Melinda Lee:

effectiveness in their communication. I find it

Melinda Lee:

fascinating the similarities that restaurant owners and their

Melinda Lee:

teams have with corporate leaders and their teams. So

Melinda Lee:

listen carefully on the similarities. Listen for how

Melinda Lee:

communication breakdowns can lead to failing restaurants, as

Melinda Lee:

well as failing teams. I hope you enjoy this episode. Hello,

Melinda Lee:

Bradley. Glad you're here.

Bradley Lum:

Thank you. Thank you for having me.

Melinda Lee:

Yeah, I'm so glad it's good to see you. Again. I'm

Melinda Lee:

excited to dive into this topic, because I think it's so

Melinda Lee:

fascinating. So you are a restaurant consultant right now.

Melinda Lee:

And you're helping restaurant owners revamp and become

Melinda Lee:

profitable and, and so these restaurant owners have teams, so

Melinda Lee:

they're working with their teams ranging from three to maybe even

Melinda Lee:

100 people. And I find it interesting, because corporate

Melinda Lee:

and corporate, we have teams as well. And so what do you think

Melinda Lee:

are just really quickly are some similarities, that might be a

Melinda Lee:

restaurant team to a corporate team,

Bradley Lum:

um, a lot, some of the similarities is would be the

Bradley Lum:

kind of the brigade, you always have the owner, and the owner

Bradley Lum:

has a vision, the vision needs to be kind of relayed down to

Bradley Lum:

upper management all the way down the line. And if everybody

Bradley Lum:

has that, that vision in mind, that's that goal. It's a lot

Bradley Lum:

easier to execute.

Melinda Lee:

Yeah. And I think the key word is if right, if

Melinda Lee:

everybody. And you didn't mention to me, I thought was

Melinda Lee:

fascinating now that you consulted these different

Melinda Lee:

restaurants, that 80% of restaurants fail, due to lack of

Melinda Lee:

communication? Is it right? More about that? Yeah.

Bradley Lum:

Right. I'm really a lot of restaurants and I'm sure

Bradley Lum:

you've been to a lot of mom and pop restaurants just have

Bradley Lum:

somebody who opened a restaurant or bar restaurant, and they

Bradley Lum:

really didn't have any restaurant or business

Bradley Lum:

experience. And it's kind of, they're just they're buying a

Bradley Lum:

product, turning it into something and selling it and

Bradley Lum:

taking the money and doing whatever with it. But there's

Bradley Lum:

really no structure. And, you know, being able to help

Bradley Lum:

restaurants, structure their their business. So there's a

Bradley Lum:

line of communication, a line of, you know, there's leadership

Bradley Lum:

and a vision. Everybody has this map of where they where they

Bradley Lum:

want to go, and how to get there. So. So in that sense,

Bradley Lum:

it's very similar to corporate America, because I think that

Bradley Lum:

that's the goal, right, is to instil that vision.

Melinda Lee:

Yeah, because a lot of the managers they're just

Melinda Lee:

like these mom and pops, they have a product and they're

Melinda Lee:

really good at making the product, they want to sell it.

Melinda Lee:

But as a manager as well, you they get promoted, usually,

Melinda Lee:

because they're really good at that one specific craft or

Melinda Lee:

expertise. And then they get promoted. And then now suddenly,

Melinda Lee:

you have to, you'd have to shine you have to start leading other

Melinda Lee:

people to bring this vision together, and they don't really

Melinda Lee:

get training, or they're not really doing it very well in

Melinda Lee:

terms of identifying what is the true vision because now you have

Melinda Lee:

to think broader, and vision. And so tell me about visioning.

Melinda Lee:

What is the challenge that people that leaders have with

Melinda Lee:

visioning? Because I think it's broader, and it's, it's

Melinda Lee:

ambiguous? Is that the case you're finding?

Bradley Lum:

Yeah, and, you know, trying to get even get the

Bradley Lum:

vision out of the owner can be really tough sometimes, because

Bradley Lum:

the bottom line is, you know, we want to make money. Okay, but,

Bradley Lum:

you know, maybe defining like, How much money do you want to

Bradley Lum:

make? It would be a good, good start, right. Some people might

Bradley Lum:

want to expand, but it might be too early to even think about

Bradley Lum:

that. And also the exit strategy, you know, that's

Bradley Lum:

another part of the vision that they they need to have because,

Bradley Lum:

you know, a lot of restaurant owners just get into the

Bradley Lum:

restaurant business and then you know, 20 years down the line

Bradley Lum:

there, what do we do with it, you know, just try to pass it

Bradley Lum:

off to our kids, but our kids are, you know, they grew up in

Bradley Lum:

the restaurant and they don't want to, they don't want to take

Bradley Lum:

on this, you know, business that kind of took their or

Bradley Lum:

relationships with their parents away because they were always

Bradley Lum:

there or or whatever the case may be, but most kids don't.

Bradley Lum:

Unless a business is thriving, right? I'm sure that the kids

Bradley Lum:

have whatever I don't know, star but you know, just name any any

Bradley Lum:

restaurant that's, you know, totally thriving became

Bradley Lum:

something I'm sure they'd want to take it over but if it's just

Bradley Lum:

a small one restaurant operation yeah most kid Yeah,

Melinda Lee:

that's me. That's me. Yeah. No, my father. Yeah, I

Melinda Lee:

was like, No, I'm not. I'm sure you wanted you to. Yes, yes.

Melinda Lee:

Yes. So it was important to have that vision both like going

Melinda Lee:

forward and also exiting? What are some of the questions? Or

Melinda Lee:

how do you help the, the restaurant owners to define the

Melinda Lee:

vision? Can you share a little bit more you talked about? What

Melinda Lee:

is the profit? Or, you know, how much money do you want to make?

Melinda Lee:

Yeah, yeah,

Bradley Lum:

you're just really trying to figure out, you know,

Bradley Lum:

what, what do they want? And a lot of times, you know, like I

Bradley Lum:

said, they're going to, a lot of people are just gonna say money

Bradley Lum:

at first, but really, that's not really the goal. So I mean, if

Bradley Lum:

you've, if you really think about it, it's not really the

Bradley Lum:

money, it's really the feeling that the money will give you.

Bradley Lum:

Right? Or, or, you know, because having things is just, you know,

Bradley Lum:

it's just a thing, but it will make you feel a certain way,

Bradley Lum:

when you have it right. So. So yeah, getting the goal out of

Bradley Lum:

out of them is, is is pretty, pretty difficult some time

Bradley Lum:

unless they really know. So anyhow, you know, it could be a

Bradley Lum:

smaller vision where, you know, I want my restaurant to be

Bradley Lum:

operated this way, or you know, what I mean, or a little more

Bradley Lum:

casual, or I wanted to kind of be like a Chipotle where they

Bradley Lum:

all line up and kind of order down the line. Right? So it

Bradley Lum:

could be something as simple as that.

Melinda Lee:

Right? But I love that, that idea of the feeling.

Melinda Lee:

Because if nobody knows where we're going, then everything

Melinda Lee:

seems more ambiguous. But if you paint a picture, even if it's a

Melinda Lee:

small up level of something, whether it's a Chipotle, or

Melinda Lee:

whether it's a beautiful formal gathering, but it's like the

Melinda Lee:

feeling that, hey, we're all working towards something.

Melinda Lee:

Right? Right. It's like, everybody's like, okay, we're

Melinda Lee:

working toward a feeling of inspiring and making something

Melinda Lee:

happen, that wasn't there.

Bradley Lum:

Right, right. And getting, I mean, it could be

Bradley Lum:

something really vague, you know, it's just like getting in

Bradley Lum:

the car and driving somewhere. It's like, I know, I want to get

Bradley Lum:

to New York, right. And so there's a lot of ways to get to

Bradley Lum:

New York. But after you figure out where you want to go, then

Bradley Lum:

you can kind of like put the little steps in the play. Right

Bradley Lum:

on what you think

Melinda Lee:

are the challenges with communicating things like

Melinda Lee:

this.

Bradley Lum:

Just that you know, not not worrying, knowing where

Bradley Lum:

you want to go. And then also, there could be other smaller

Bradley Lum:

vision. So after you get that that end goal, you know, it

Bradley Lum:

could be upper management to their goals, you know, I want to

Bradley Lum:

get out of here at 930. You know, and so, knowing that you

Bradley Lum:

want to get out there 930 These things, maybe this thing takes

Bradley Lum:

15 minutes, this thing takes 30 minutes, so then you can kind of

Bradley Lum:

structure it and put everything into play.

Melinda Lee:

Right, right, right. And then know if

Melinda Lee:

something is off track. Least we see you know, has some

Melinda Lee:

documentation or some data of what happened or if we veered

Melinda Lee:

off track,

Bradley Lum:

things that happened. Exactly.

Melinda Lee:

So a lot of these restaurant owners don't even

Melinda Lee:

have the vision. That's actually the first huge, huge block. And

Melinda Lee:

then once they do, there could be some potential challenges

Melinda Lee:

with communicating it. But at least we're more aware. Can you

Melinda Lee:

give any tips of what then once they have it, what are some key

Melinda Lee:

tips on executing or painting that vision getting everybody in

Melinda Lee:

alignment,

Bradley Lum:

right? Documentation. Documenting and

Bradley Lum:

recording your progress. Just knowing where you're at at all

Bradley Lum:

times, is very important. That way you can make adjustments,

Bradley Lum:

right? Just like if you're on a, an aeroplane, you know, it could

Bradley Lum:

be just off like two degrees and you know, you're trying to go to

Bradley Lum:

Hawaii but all of a sudden you end up in the north pole or

Bradley Lum:

whatever it is right. But knowing where you are, you can

Bradley Lum:

kind of oh, I'm a little off course I just need to keep

Bradley Lum:

adjusting. Right Um, so documenting your progress is

Bradley Lum:

very important. And a lot of restaurant owners don't even

Bradley Lum:

don't even do that they, you know, they just remember stuff,

Bradley Lum:

you know, it could be even, it's something as simple as you know

Bradley Lum:

what time that I pulled that out of the oven. Right? If

Bradley Lum:

something's cooling down, and this is very important for the,

Bradley Lum:

for the health department to, because they want to see, I

Bradley Lum:

mean, if you do have a violation, they, you know, a

Bradley Lum:

good way is to have documentation of of things. So

Bradley Lum:

then that way they they know that you're on top of, you know,

Bradley Lum:

your food safety. So, yeah, it could be something, something as

Bradley Lum:

simple as that just, you know, documenting what time you pulled

Bradley Lum:

something out of the oven, what time you clean the bathroom, you

Bradley Lum:

know, if you go to a restaurant, a bathroom in the restaurant,

Bradley Lum:

right? They always, most times they'll have a schedule, and

Bradley Lum:

they'll have somebody whose initial what time they kind of

Bradley Lum:

just documentation is is key.

Melinda Lee:

Yeah, right. And then I mean, because that's

Melinda Lee:

because like you said, a lot of times are so challenge was

Melinda Lee:

trying to just make money. And so all this documentation

Melinda Lee:

doesn't seem very important. Right? And, and then looking

Melinda Lee:

back, you're like, What just happened in that year? We don't

Melinda Lee:

even know, where did things fail? We don't know. And so

Melinda Lee:

having at least a documentation, even if you did not get the

Melinda Lee:

outcome that you wanted, but at least you can have some

Melinda Lee:

information about where where maybe things have failed, or

Melinda Lee:

where maybe maybe things can have better process improvement.

Melinda Lee:

Right? Having someone come like you, like a consultant come on

Melinda Lee:

board to be a part of the team. Do you find people resisting to

Melinda Lee:

the changes? And what are some of the things that? Yeah, yeah,

Bradley Lum:

I do. You know, and as a consultant, I can only tell

Bradley Lum:

you what would be, you know, the best, your best practices are,

Bradley Lum:

you know, the best use of, of whatever it is. And many times,

Bradley Lum:

you know, people don't like change, you know, people, they

Bradley Lum:

Yeah, they just don't like change. And it's just hard to

Bradley Lum:

get somebody to, to change, how they think, how they, how they

Bradley Lum:

operate. So yeah, that's, that's, that's pretty

Bradley Lum:

challenging. And a lot of times, I have to just kind of wait

Bradley Lum:

until it fails. Before they were like, oh, okay, yeah, we would

Bradley Lum:

have done It

Melinda Lee:

That's true. That's so yeah.

Bradley Lum:

So just being able to, and then, you know, I to

Bradley Lum:

kind of remedy that I just go back and talk story about

Bradley Lum:

whatever, my past clients or even my experiences, or you

Bradley Lum:

know, what happened to me and, you know, trying to try to go

Bradley Lum:

that route. And most times that helps. But yeah, a lot of times

Bradley Lum:

they they, they don't change until something happens. Like

Bradley Lum:

you're, you know, just kind of like people's diet, right? If

Bradley Lum:

they don't stop eating sugar until they get diabetes in.

Melinda Lee:

Right. Right. Right. Yeah, something needs to

Melinda Lee:

happen. And then they say, Okay, I want to try to change

Melinda Lee:

something, and, but you also share some experiences, I mean,

Melinda Lee:

this at least your due diligence, as a, as a

Melinda Lee:

consultant, or as a manager, to share your personal experiences,

Melinda Lee:

and what could happen if things don't change, right? Here are

Melinda Lee:

some, yeah, personal experiences, and we're just

Melinda Lee:

wandering and just really being authentic and genuine in terms

Melinda Lee:

of these experiences. And then at the end of the day, yeah,

Melinda Lee:

they're going to decide on their own whether they want to change

Melinda Lee:

or not, and hurt themselves too bad or to cost too much. To the

Melinda Lee:

business or to the right.

Bradley Lum:

Yeah, yeah, sometimes. Yeah. I mean, you

Bradley Lum:

don't want to get to the point where, you know, your reputation

Bradley Lum:

is so bad that you ended up having to change your name or,

Bradley Lum:

or, that's kind of the worst case scenario. Right? It was,

Bradley Lum:

you know, the worst case scenario with kind of getting it

Bradley Lum:

taken away from you. If it got to that point, but there's a lot

Bradley Lum:

of things that could happen but but yeah, you know, I tried to

Bradley Lum:

just prevent that you know, by by helping them and giving them

Bradley Lum:

advice and doing what they needed to do.

Melinda Lee:

I mean, I really admire what you do I get cuz I

Melinda Lee:

think back to the restaurants now. And it's not just a Russia,

Melinda Lee:

it's a community, especially with AI and the pandemic and a

Melinda Lee:

lot of these restaurants have shut down and it's just so sad

Melinda Lee:

and he's night when I see restaurants that are a small mom

Melinda Lee:

and pop and they're empty. There's always breaks my heart.

Melinda Lee:

I'll just like So glad you're doing this. Um, I mean, what

Melinda Lee:

lights you up when you do these things?

Bradley Lum:

Really, when when they succeed, you know, their

Bradley Lum:

success stories? You know, they're just them winning, you

Bradley Lum:

know?

Melinda Lee:

Yeah, can you give an example of one of your

Melinda Lee:

clients?

Bradley Lum:

Sure, there's a client in South San Francisco

Bradley Lum:

that, you know, when I first started with them, they were

Bradley Lum:

losing anywhere from 20 to $40,000 a month. And, and today,

Bradley Lum:

they're, they're on track to probably do a little under the

Bradley Lum:

last check was probably about maybe like, four months ago, but

Bradley Lum:

they were on track to do about 1.5. Yeah, so it's,

Melinda Lee:

and we did things that you did, like some high

Melinda Lee:

level things that you did to help them.

Bradley Lum:

Number one was getting them to communicate

Bradley Lum:

better. You know, because of the way that the restaurant was set

Bradley Lum:

up, they'd have to go back and forth a lot. So you know,

Bradley Lum:

something as simple as just getting headsets, right, you

Bradley Lum:

know, so they can communicate back and forth. There, and then

Bradley Lum:

the arrangement of the, well, the first thing I did was, was

Bradley Lum:

really to rearrange their kitchen, because they, they were

Bradley Lum:

doing pizza in there, and they have this, this dough prep

Bradley Lum:

machine that kind of presses it and pre in part cooks the dough,

Bradley Lum:

and then from there, you would take it, and then kind of put

Bradley Lum:

all your toppings on, it's kind of how what are those, like blue

Bradley Lum:

line pizza, you know, those, those fast, quick serve pizza

Bradley Lum:

places are, is that kind of that same machine that they use, when

Bradley Lum:

it was they used it at this place, but the thing was, is

Bradley Lum:

like on one side of the room was was that and on the other side

Bradley Lum:

of the room was the oven. So number one is like, you know,

Bradley Lum:

you got to walk, you know, 100 steps over to get the dough to

Bradley Lum:

the oven, it just didn't make sense. So just rearranging the

Bradley Lum:

kitchen, so it flowed better. And then getting the the kitchen

Bradley Lum:

to kind of communicate with each other. So they all kind of know

Bradley Lum:

where they're at. Like, if you'd be just a ticket, that could be

Bradley Lum:

like 10, nine, it was on the ticket. And you know, you have

Bradley Lum:

four different stations. So you have to kind of you have to

Bradley Lum:

communicate to all these stations to get the food out at

Bradley Lum:

the same time. Nobody likes to, you know, if your party of six,

Bradley Lum:

and you're sitting there, and then one guy gets his food, and

Bradley Lum:

everybody else is sitting there waiting, you know, it's kind of,

Bradley Lum:

it's not a good thing, food gets cold, you know, and last thing

Bradley Lum:

you want to do is have the food gets sent back. So getting that

Bradley Lum:

line of communication going, getting them to talk to each

Bradley Lum:

other. You know, knowing where each other is that is going to

Bradley Lum:

help you execute and get that ticket out on time. So, you

Bradley Lum:

know, putting printers where they needed to be putting

Bradley Lum:

expediters where they needed to be having a lead Cook, to

Bradley Lum:

communicate to the expediter you know, things like that. It's all

Bradley Lum:

Yeah, it's just a lot of the communication just needed to be

Bradley Lum:

done, because nobody was talking to each other. And yeah, yeah.

Bradley Lum:

So there was that. And then, you know, she was the owner of this,

Bradley Lum:

this restaurant, she was very meticulous about her accounting,

Bradley Lum:

I mean, she would do everything on Excel. So she knew exactly,

Bradley Lum:

all her numbers, right. So, you know, just taking that mentality

Bradley Lum:

and applying it to the other parts of the restaurant. You

Bradley Lum:

know, I just I just kind of, because that's the way that she

Bradley Lum:

communicating was through through data and things like

Bradley Lum:

that. So just getting data and documentation of other parts of

Bradley Lum:

the restaurant, you know,

Melinda Lee:

be more meticulous about the communication. So

Melinda Lee:

she's meticulous about the finances. And I think sometimes

Melinda Lee:

when we think about soft skills, we don't measure we don't track

Melinda Lee:

right. And so being just as you can be just as meticulous with

Melinda Lee:

in terms of the process with communication, and having some

Melinda Lee:

data around that, like how long does it take to communicate from

Melinda Lee:

like you said, you close the gap and communicating from the front

Melinda Lee:

end to the back end or between in the in the kitchen as well.

Melinda Lee:

Right? Awesome,

Bradley Lum:

right? And all that is all that it's it's money

Bradley Lum:

right? So if it takes you 20 minutes to fire to get this this

Bradley Lum:

food out. If you could get it down to eight, you know, you'll

Bradley Lum:

be able to turn tables faster, you'll be able to have more

Bradley Lum:

people come in and your girl sales would just be higher.

Bradley Lum:

Yeah. In theory

Melinda Lee:

Thank you, Bradley. Well, congratulations on that

Melinda Lee:

success and helping these restaurants. And I hope that

Melinda Lee:

more people go out and enjoy your local restaurant and and do

Melinda Lee:

you have any one last like tip or key tips for leaders for

Melinda Lee:

restaurant owners when it comes to their businesses? And

Bradley Lum:

yeah, leaders should really, you know, I'd

Bradley Lum:

say, Listen, you know, you were born with two ears and one

Bradley Lum:

mouth, so kind of use them to proportion. Listen to what your

Bradley Lum:

your team is telling you, obviously, listen to listen to

Bradley Lum:

their upper leaders as well. And yeah, I would say, you know, you

Bradley Lum:

listen, a lot of people don't, don't listen. There's, there's

Bradley Lum:

these three words that are very dangerous in a lot of business,

Bradley Lum:

for entrepreneurs and people in the in the in the businesses is

Bradley Lum:

I already know, right? There's always something to learn, I

Bradley Lum:

think in every situation and just listening and being patient

Bradley Lum:

and, you know, you'd be able to solve a lot of problems.

Melinda Lee:

Yeah, yeah. If someone is has the courage to

Melinda Lee:

say something to you, then at least open up both ears to try

Melinda Lee:

to listen. Absolutely. I love that. It's so true. So true.

Melinda Lee:

Thank you so much, Bradley, that was so helpful. So empowering. I

Melinda Lee:

think there's a lot of similarities between restaurant

Melinda Lee:

owners, with their teams and also corporate teams, and how to

Melinda Lee:

communicate more effectively together. And once you do that,

Melinda Lee:

you can accomplish so much more, right? Having that vision, and

Melinda Lee:

then knowing who's going to be part of that vision and what

Melinda Lee:

role they play in implementing that vision and having the

Melinda Lee:

communication to make that happen. When breakdowns happen,

Melinda Lee:

who's going to support each other and who's going to help

Melinda Lee:

each other out and just having that all dialled in, like you

Melinda Lee:

said, can can help these restaurants? Hopefully not have

Melinda Lee:

such a high fail rate? Yeah, yeah. And so any restaurant

Melinda Lee:

owners or people that know restaurant owners that are out

Melinda Lee:

there that are struggling? How can they find you?

Bradley Lum:

Um, the best way would probably be to email me

Bradley Lum:

or, or just call me. My email is pretty simple. Just

Bradley Lum:

Bradleylum@gmail.com. And that's probably the easiest way to get

Bradley Lum:

to me. Yeah,

Melinda Lee:

Bradleylum@gmail.com. Yep. Hope you all enjoyed. Thank

Melinda Lee:

you, Bradley, and really appreciate your time today.

Bradley Lum:

Absolutely. Thank you for having me. It wasn't

Bradley Lum:

fun.

Melinda Lee:

Thank you.

Bradley Lum:

All right.

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